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Indiana University Bloomington

Courses

 

Fall 2016

HPSC-X 111 Ethical Issues in Biological and Medical Sciences (3)
Evan Arnet
Class # 4268
Regular Academic Session
MW 11:15a-12:30p AC C112

Investigation of ethical issues that arise in the biological and medical sciences, the impact of these issues on the behavior of scientists during the conduct of scientific research, and on the role of science in discussions about ethics and public policy. The course will focus on specific cases and debates arising from and within biology and medicine, and in related fields such as ecology or clinical psychology. The course will provide an introduction to critical reasoning in ethics and an overview of major ethical theories. No prior background is required.

HPSC-X102 Revolutions in Science: Plato to NATO (3)
D Bertoloni Meli
Class # 11352
IUB GenEd S&H credit
IUB GenEd World Culture credit
COLL (CASE) S&H Breadth of Inquiry credit
Regular Academic Session
MWF 1:25p-2:15p GY126

An introduction to the formative steps in the scientific tradition. The course will survey in a chronological sequence aspects of the Aristotelian world view, the Copernican revolution, the mechanical philosophy, the chemical and Darwinian revolution, and the rise of twentieth century science. Where did modern science come from? Is it a stockpile of technique and knowledge that has accumulated slowly and steadily over the centuries? This course presents a more complex and dynamic picture, in which the history of science also takes unexpected twists, turns and conceptual leaps, in response to changing social, political and religious interests, and to shifting scientific assumptions, methods, and forms of organization. The course introduces the most important formative steps in the scientific tradition, each of which overturned earlier ways of investigating and understanding nature. These include Aristotelian physics, Ptolomaic astronomy and Galenic medicine in the ancient and Medieval world; the scientific revolutions of the 15th- through the 18th centuries that ushered in Copernican astronomy, Newtonian physics, and new ideas about physiology and medicine; the chemical and Darwinian revolutions; and the rise of modern physics and other 20th-century innovations and problems.

Discussion Sections:
Class #28227 F 1:25p-2:15p SY 103 Discussion Leader: Archie Field
Class #4269 F 2:30p-3:20p SY 103 Discussion Leader: Archie Field


HPSC-X138 Science & Religion(3)
Ali Mirza
Class #28224
Regular Academic Session
TR 09:30a-10:45p WH008

This course explores aspects of the complex relationship between science and religion We will focus on four main themes: (1) Creation, (2) Evolution, (3) Cognitive Science of Religion, and (4) Demarcation. 
In the first part of the course, we will look at the cosmology of different traditions, including but not limited to the Greeks, Christianity, Buddhism, Islam, and the Navajo—with an eye out for how these stories relate to scientific culture. For example, we will contrast how the early church fathers, such as St. Augustine, interpreted the creation account found in Genesis with the initial presentation of the “Big Bang” theory by Georges Lemaître. In the “Evolution” section, we will explore scientific debates in evolutionary theory from the 19th century to the present and how a diverse group of religious thinkers have responded to these debates. This will put us in position to locate and compare the sources of contention and agreement regarding the central issues of human descent and the origin and diversification of species. 
                In the third part, “Cognitive Science of Religion,” we will critically evaluate those theories which attempt to discover the cognitive and evolutionary basis for religious belief and experience via a series of readings and “visual” experiments. We will discuss the implications these approaches have for our understanding of religious and scientific knowledge. Lastly, we will ask how science and religion are to be demarcated from each other. Specifically, what separates science and religion from one another and what similarities can we locate? And, depending on the answer to this question, we will explore what this means for broader social and political attitudes towards, science, religion, and the interaction between them.

HPSC-X200 Scientific Reasoning (3)
TOPIC: The Problem of Cancer
Amit Hagar
Class #9266
Regular Academic Session
MW 09:05a-09:55a GY126

Patterns of scientific reasoning related to the problem of cancer presented in a simple form useful to both non-scientists and prospective scientists for understanding and evaluating scientific information of all sorts. Illustrations for these patterns as they are applied to the problem of cancer are drawn from a wide variety of historical and contemporary sources, including popular magazines and newspapers. There will be a final group project and 5 short papers, but no final exam.

Discussion sections:
Class #28228 F 9:05a-9:55a SY 103 Discussion Leader: Joshua Aponte Serrano
Class #28229 F 10:10a-11:00a SY 103 Discussion Leader: Joshua Aponte Serrano

HPSC-X207 Occult in Western Civil (3)
W Newman
Class #28217
Regular Academic Session
TR 9:30a-10:45a GY143

TBA

HPSC-X323 Topics in Science: Social and Historical (3)
TOPIC: Gold, God, and Secrets: Alchemy in Civilization
W Newman
Class #28219
Regular Academic Session
TR 1:25p-2:15p WY115

TBA

HPSC-X340 Scientific Methods: How Science Really Works (3)
Jutta Schickore
Class #15553
Regular Academic Session
MW 4:00p-5:15p HU111

As all researchers know, the activity of science is governed by methods: methods of doing experiments, methods for analyzing data, methods for testing hypotheses, methods for writing scientific papers, and so on. But it is by no means easy to give clear descriptions of these methods. In science classes, students learn how to perform research, but general methodological questions are rarely addressed. This course introduces students to philosophical and historical debates about scientific methods. Students will acquire general conceptual tools that help them to express what they are doing when they are doing science and to discuss and evaluate research practices. We will talk about models and visualization, "big data", collaboration and collective authorship, trust and expertise, biases, negative results, and much more.

HPSC-X406 Survey of History of Science up to 1750 (3)
D Bertoloni Meli
Class #28222
Regular Academic Session
T 2:00p-4:30p BH664

TBA

HPSC-X420 Advanced Seminar in History and Philosophy of Science (3)
C Allen
Class #36550: Philosophical Issues in Animal Minds
2nd 8 weeks Session
TR 08:00a-10:30a BH 006

Do rats remember specific events? Do monkeys understand the meanings of their calls?  Do pigeons have concepts? Do fish feel pain? Do mice show empathy? These are some of questions that are being hotly debated in the field animal cognition — a highly interdisciplinary subject to which psychologists, behavioral biologists, anthropologists, and philosophers have all made contributions. Practitioners from these different fields bring varying presuppositions about the relative power of observation vs experiment, laboratory, vs field work, verbal vs non-verbal protocols, evolutionary vs. computational frameworks, and neurological vs. intentionality-based approaches. The goal of this course is to examine current research in animal cognition along these dimensions with a view to understanding the relationship of animal cognition to cognitive science in general. Using Kristin Andrews book "The Animal Mind: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Animal Cognition” (Routledge 2014) as our guide, we will read a mixture of scientific reports and philosophy articles arguing the case for and against Darwin’s thesis of strong continuity between the mental powers of humans and other animals.

HPSC-X452 Modern Philosophy of Science (3)
Jordi Cat
Class #13876
Regular Academic Session
MW 4p-5:15p BH664

This course will trace the historical development of the philosophy of science from approximately early 17th century to the mid-twentieth century, beginning with a quick survey of the philosophies of Galileo, Bacon, Descartes, Newton and Leibniz, then turning to the philosophy of Newtonian science developed by Immanuel Kant, its developments and reactions, and ending with French conventionalism, logical positivism, Popper and Quine. In the twentieth century philosophy of science begins to take shape as a specialized discipline within philosophy more generally. Its problems are motivated and framed by the interplay of earlier philosophical questions and more recent revolutionary developments in nineteenth century science: the discovery of non-Euclidean geometries, the wave theory of light and electrodynamics, thermodynamics and the conservation of energy, and molecular-atomic theory. Canons of scientific methodology were introduced in the 19th century in Britain by Herschel, Whewell and Mill. Work in philosophy of science was undertaken next by professional scientists attempting to come to terms with these new developments-in particular, by Herman Von Helmholtz, Ernst Mach, Pierre Duhem and Henri Poincare. Around the turn of the century, philosophy of science is stimulated once again by revolutionary developments: Einstein relativity theory, on the one hand, and new work in logic and the foundations of mathematics by Gottlob Frege, Bertrand Russell, and David Hilbert, on the other. Philosophical developments took place as well, such as neo-Kantianism and phenomenology. Philosophy of science was now pursued by professional philosophers, although most trained in the sciences, in particular Karl Popper and the members of the so-called Vienna Circle of logical positivists such as Moritz Schlick, Otto Neurath and Rudolph Carnap. Neurath and Ernst Cassirer try to engage the social sciences as well. The work of all these philosophers sets the stage for most of post-war twentieth century philosophy of science. Alongside the relevant philosophical and scientific problems and ideas, this course will expose the students to examples of different approaches to the history of philosophy.

HPSC-X501 Professional Development Seminar (0.5)
W Newman & E Lloyd
Class #13101
Regular Academic Session
T 11a-12a BH664

HPSC-X506 Survey of History of Science up to 1750 (3)
D Bertoloni Meli
Class #28223
Regular Academic Session
T 2:00p-4:30p BH664

TBA

HPSC-X552 Modern Philosophy of Science (3)
Jordi Cat
Class # 13884
Regular Academic Session
MW 4p-5:15p BH664

This course will trace the historical development of the philosophy of science from approximately early 17th century to the mid-twentieth century, beginning with a quick survey of the philosophies of Galileo, Bacon, Descartes, Newton and Leibniz, then turning to the philosophy of Newtonian science developed by Immanuel Kant, its developments and reactions, and ending with French conventionalism, logical positivism, Popper and Quine. In the twentieth century philosophy of science begins to take shape as a specialized discipline within philosophy more generally. Its problems are motivated and framed by the interplay of earlier philosophical questions and more recent revolutionary developments in nineteenth century science: the discovery of non-Euclidean geometries, the wave theory of light and electrodynamics, thermodynamics and the conservation of energy, and molecular-atomic theory. Canons of scientific methodology were introduced in the 19th century in Britain by Herschel, Whewell and Mill. Work in philosophy of science was undertaken next by professional scientists attempting to come to terms with these new developments-in particular, by Herman Von Helmholtz, Ernst Mach, Pierre Duhem and Henri Poincare. Around the turn of the century, philosophy of science is stimulated once again by revolutionary developments: Einstein relativity theory, on the one hand, and new work in logic and the foundations of mathematics by Gottlob Frege, Bertrand Russell, and David Hilbert, on the other. Philosophical developments took place as well, such as neo-Kantianism and phenomenology. Philosophy of science was now pursued by professional philosophers, although most trained in the sciences, in particular Karl Popper and the members of the so-called Vienna Circle of logical positivists such as Moritz Schlick, Otto Neurath and Rudolph Carnap. Neurath and Ernst Cassirer try to engage the social sciences as well. The work of all these philosophers sets the stage for most of post-war twentieth century philosophy of science. Alongside the relevant philosophical and scientific problems and ideas, this course will expose the students to examples of different approaches to the history of philosophy.

HPSC-X632 History of Medical and Life Sciences (3)
TOPIC: History of Biology
S Gliboff
Class #28220
Regular Academic Session
M 9:30a-12:00a LH 023

The term "biology" was first used at the turn of the nineteenth century to distinguish a new ?scientific? or ?philosophical? approach to the study of life, distinct from natural history, natural theology, and medicine. But what did it mean to be scientific?either then or for the ensuing two hundred years? Biology has continually transformed itself, in keeping with changing ideals of how to do science. This seminar is a survey of key figures and pivotal moments in the history of modern biology that have re-defined its scientific character, by either opening new lines of inquiry and explanation, developing new kinds of instruments, practices, and institutions, or changing the social role of the biological scientist. There are no formal prerequisites, but knowledge of modern biology or modern European or American history will be helpful.

HPSC-X 706 Sp Topics in History and Philosophy of Science
TOPIC: Science and Values
Jutta Schickore
Class #10511
Regular Academic Session
T 2:30p-5:00p BH664

In this course we will examine the debates about the view that science is (or ought to be) value-free. The course combines historical and systematic perspectives on the topic. In the first part of the course, we will study 19th-century ideas about “pure science” and scientific freedom and place them in intellectual and social contexts. One part of the course will focus on Max Weber’s ideal of “value-free science” and its impact on early 20th-century philosophy and sociology of science.
In the last portion of the course, we will move on to current issues. The view that science is not value-free has become widely acknowledged. But many questions are still open, including: What roles exactly do (or should) values play in science? Can we maintain a distinction between epistemic-cognitive values and social-political values? Are only the former kinds of values properly scientific? In what way do historical changes in science affect scientific values? We will trace how the debates about these issues have unfolded since the days of Rudner, Kuhn and Laudan, and we will examine current approaches and contributions to the discussion.

COLL-C 104 Critical Approaches (S & H)  (3)
TOPIC: Evolution and Creationism
E Lloyd
Class # 10260
Regular Academic Session
MW 10:10a-11:00a
Discussion sections:
Class # 10261 F 10:10a-11:00a AD A152
Class # 12811 F 10:10a-11:00a BH244
Class # 10262 F 11:15a-12:05a AD A152
Class # 12464 F 11:15a-12:05a BH244

TBA.

HUBI-B 200 The Intricate Human (4)
S Gliboff
Class # 9880
Regular Academic Session
TR 11:15a-12:30p MO107
Discussion sections:
Class # 9881 F 09:30a-10:45a MO107
Class # 9882 F 11:00a-12:15p MO107
Class # 9883 F 12:45p-02:00p MO107
Class # 9884 F 02:15p-03:30p MO107

TBA