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Indiana University Bloomington

Courses

 

Spring 2015

HPSC-X 100 Human Perspectives on Science (3)
TOPIC : Bioethics: Applied Topics in the Biological Sciences and Medicine
Kimberly Brumble
Class #18292
Eight Week - Second 3/9 - 5/8
MW 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM SY 002

This course constitutes an examination of ethical, conceptual, and legal problems arising in and about health care and biological science. Ethical frameworks will be applied to topics like euthanasia, stem cell research, withdrawal of treatment, the physician-patient relationship, research on human subjects, medical consent, and public health. The emphasis will be on practical applications of ethical and legal theory. The course will emphasize philosophical reasoning and historical context in approaching these social and scientific topics.

HPSC-X 102 Revolutions in Science: Plato to NATO (3)
Aaron Martinez
Class #25491
Regular Academic Session 3/9 - 5/8
Tu Th 4:00 PM – 6:00 PM SY 103

Domenico Bertoloni Meli
Class #18293
Regular Academic Session 1/12 – 5/8
MWF 12:20 PM – 1:10 PM PY 100

Discussion Sections:
31147 Regular Academic Session 1/12 – 5/8 F 1:25 PM - 2:15 PM SY 103
31146 Regular Academic Session 1/12 – 5/8 F 12:20 PM - 1:10 PM SY 103

An introduction to the formative steps in the scientific tradition. The course will survey in a chronological sequence aspects of the Aristotelian world view, the Copernican revolution, the mechanical philosophy, the chemical and Darwinian revolution, and the rise of twentieth century science.

Where did modern science come from? Is it a stockpile of technique and knowledge that has accumulated slowly and steadily over the centuries? This course presents a more complex and dynamic picture, in which the history of science also takes unexpected twists, turns and conceptual leaps, in response to changing social, political and religious interests, and to shifting scientific assumptions, methods, and forms of organization. The course introduces the most important formative steps in the scientific tradition, each of which overturned earlier ways of investigating and understanding nature. These include Aristotelian physics, Ptolmaic astronomy and Galenic medicine in the ancient and Medieval world; the scientific revolutions of the 15th- through the 18th centuries that ushered in Copernican astronomy, Newtonian physics, and new ideas about physiology and medicine; the chemical and Darwinian revolutions; and the rise of modern physics and other 20th-century innovations and problems. IUB GenEd S&H creditIUB GenEd World Culture creditCOLL (CASE) S&H Breadth of Inquiry credit

HPSC-X 123 Perspectives on Science: Social and Historical (3)
TOPIC: Science and Medicine at the Asylum
Kate Grauvogel
Class #30561
Regular Academic Session 1/12 – 5/8
MWF 12:20 PM – 1:10 PM WH 121

Case studies from the history of science to examine the intellectual, cultural, and social impact of science from a variety of historical perspectives. Case studies are presented at an introductory level.

INDIVIDUAL SECTIONS WILL VARY IN CONTENT AND MAJOR THEMES, BUT ALL WILL EMPLOY CASE STUDIES FROM THE HISTORY OF SCIENCE TO EXAMINE THE INTELLECTUAL, CULTURAL, AND SOCIAL IMPACT OF SCIENCE FOR A VARIETY OF HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES. VARIOUS CASE STUDIES ARE PRESENTED AT AN INTRODUCTORY LEVEL.

HPSC-X 126 Perspectives on Science: Natural and Mathematical (3)
TOPIC: The History and Philosophy of Extraterrestrial Life
Sarah Reynolds
Class #30569
Regular Academic Session 1/12 – 5/8
MWF 10:10 AM – 11:00 AM SY 001

Case studies illustrating, from a variety of perspectives, the logic and methods of the natural and mathematical sciences. Examples illustrating these methods are presented at an introductory level.

INDIVIDUAL SECTIONS WILL VARY IN CONTENT AND MAJOR THEMES, BUT ALL WILL EMPLOY CASE STUDIES TO ILLUSTRATE, FROM A VARIETY OF PERSPECTIVES, THE LOGIC AND METHODS OF THE NATURAL AND MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES. EXAMPLES ILLUSTRATING THESE METHODS ARE PRESENTED AT AN INTRODUCTORY LEVEL.

HPSC-X 200 Scientific Reasoning (3)
Samuel Ketcham
Class #18294
Regular Academic Session 1/12 - 5/8
MWF 1:25 PM - 2:15 PM SY 002

Nicholas Zautra
Class #25492
Eight Week - Second 3/9 - 5/8
TuTh 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM SY 200

Patterns of scientific reasoning presented in a simple form useful to both non-scientists and prospective scientists for understanding and evaluating scientific information of all sorts. Illustrations in the natural, biological, behavioral, and bio-medical sciences are drawn from a wide variety of historical and contemporary sources, including popular magazines and newspapers.

PATTERNS OF SCIENTIFIC REASONING PRESENTED IN A SIMPLE FORM USEFUL TO BOTH NONSCIENTISTS AND PROSPECTIVE SCIENTISTS FOR UNDERSTANDING AND EVALUATING SCIENTIFIC INFORMATION OF ALL SORTS. ILLUSTRATIONS IN THE NATURAL, BIOLOGICAL, BEHAVIORAL, AND BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES ARE DRAWN FROM A WIDE VARIETY OF HISTORICAL AND CONTEMPORARY SOURCES, INCLUDING POPULAR MAGAZINES AND NEWSPAPERS.

HPSC-X 229 HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF MODERN PHYSICS (3)
Amit Hagar
Class #30577
Regular Academic Session 1/12 - 5/8
TuTh 9:30 AM - 10:45 AM WY 115

Introduction to foundational concepts in statistical mechanics, quantum mechanics, special relativity and general relativity. Discussion of philosophical issues concerning the nature of the material world and the process of scientific inquiry. Emphasis on developing writing skills and the ability to present complex ideas clearly and critically.

HPSC-X 300 Undergraduate Readings in History and Philosophy of Science (1 - 5)
Sander Gliboff
Class #18295
Regular Academic Session 1/12 - 5/8

Individualized readings for students in history and philosophy of science.

INDIVIDUALIZED READINGS FOR STUDENTS MINORING IN HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE. MAY BE USED WITH CONSENT OF INSTRUCTOR AS AN ALTERNATIVE TO OTHER UNDERGRADUATE COURSES.

HPSC-X 305 HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF MEDICINE (3)
Elisabeth Lloyd
Class #30585
Regular Academic Session 1/12 - 5/8
TuTh 9:30 AM - 10:45 AM SY 103

The history of public health and medicine from ancient to modern times. Addresses a selection of historical, philosophical and ethical problems including medical understandings of the body; ideas about the nature and causes of disease, from "airs" and "humors" to germs to genetic predispositions; assessment of risks and liabilities.

HPSC-X 320 Topics in Science: Humanistic (3)
Jordi Cat
Class #32032
Regular Academic Session 1/12 - 5/8
TuTh 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM BH 344

SPECIALIZED TOPICS AND THEMES IN THE HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE. DEPARTMENTAL FLYERS, AVAILABLE AT REGISTRATION TIME, WILL DISCUSS EACH SECTION IN DETAIL.

HPSC-X 390 Space, Time, and Relativity (3)
Amit Hagar
Class #30592
Regular Academic Session 1/12 - 5/8
Tu 1:00 PM - 3:30 PM GB 107

TOPICS IN THE PHILOSOPHY OF SPACE, TIME, AND SPACETIME. THEORY OF MOTION AND ZENO'S PARADOXES; ST. AUGUSTINE ON TIME; TIME AND BECOMING; RELATIONAL VERSUS ABSOLUTE THEORIES OF SPACE AND TIME; MACH'S PRINCIPLE; INTRODUCTION TO EINSTEIN'S THEORY OF RELATIVITY AND SPACE-TIME

HPSC-X 407 Survey of History of Science since 1750 (3)
James Capshew
Class #18296
Regular Academic Session 1/12 - 5/8
W 1:00 PM - 3:30 PM GB 107

Growth of quantitative methods in physical science and experimental methods in natural history. Gradual separation of science from philosophy and theology.
(Source: Course Catalog)
GROWTH OF QUANTITATIVE METHODS IN PHYSICAL SCIENCE AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS IN PHYSICAL SCIENCE AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS IN NATURAL HISTORY. GRADUAL SEPARATION OF SCIENCE FROM PHILOSOPHY AND THEOLOGY.

HPSC-X 452 Modern Philosophy of Science (3)
Jordi Cat
Class #21500
Regular Academic Session 1/12 - 5/8
TuTh 5:00 PM - 6:15 PM GB 107

The aim of this course is to understand the origin and character of twentieth century philosophy of science by examining the historical development of the subject - in interaction with parallel developments within the sciences themselves from 1800 to the early twentieth century. The main figures to be studied include Hermann von Helmholtz, Ernst Mach, Henri Poincare, Moritz Schlick, and Rudolf Carnap.
(Source: Course Catalog)
EXAMINES THE ORIGIN AND CHARACTER OF TWENTIETH-CENTURY PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE BY INVESTIGATING THE HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT-IN INTERACTION WITH PARALLEL DEVELOPMENTS WITHIN THE SCIENCES THEMSELVES-FROM 1800 TO THE EARLY TWENTIETH CENTURY. HERMANN VON HELMHOLTZ, ERNST MACH, HENRI POINCARE, MORITZ SCHLICK, AND RUDOLF CARNAP.

HPSC-X 507 SURV OF HIST OF SCI SINCE 1750 (3)
James Capshew
Class #18297
Regular Academic Session 1/12 - 5/8
W 1:00 PM - 3:30 PM GB 107

Growth of physical, biological and social sciences during 19th and 20th century. Attention will be paid not only to the scientific contents but to the institutional and social context.

HPSC-X 521 RESEARCH TOPICS IN THE HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE (1 - 3)
TOPIC: Anatomy in the Renaissance
Domenico Bertoloni Meli
Class #30600
Regular Academic Session 1/12 - 5/8
TuTh 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM HU 217

This class covers the transformations of anatomy occurring in the renaissance and seventeenth century, from approximately the time of Leonardo da Vinci and his pioneering scientific and artistic investigations, to the birth of microscopic anatomy. We will discuss the relations between art and science, the discovery of the circulation of the blood, the role of physiological experiments, and the rise of a mechanistic understanding of the body.
The class will include a trip to the Lilly Library to see the books and original artwork we covered.
No previous knowledge of anatomy or physiology is required to take this class.
This class meets with HON-H305. Graduate students will be required to write a final essay on material related to the course.

HPSC-X 552 MODERN PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE (3)
Jordi Cat
Class #21501
Regular Academic Session 1/12 - 5/8
TuTh 5:00 PM - 6:15 PM GB 107

The aim of this course is to understand the origin and character of twentieth century philosophy of science. Examination of the historical development of the philosophy of science - in interaction with parallel developments within the sciences themselves - from 1800 to the early twentieth century.

HPSC-X 600 ADVANCED READINGS COURSE (1 - 4)
Sander Gliboff
Class #8914
Six Week - First 5/13 - 6/20

Readings.

HPSC-X 693 PHILOSOPHY OF BIOLOGY (3)
Elisabeth Lloyd
Class #30608
Regular Academic Session 1/12 - 5/8
W 10:00 AM - 12:30 PM GB 107

Survey of the important concepts in biology from antiquity to the present. Emphasis on changes in evolution theory and concepts of development and inheritance. A familiarity with biology is helpful but not necessary.

HPSC-X 700 A M THESIS (1 - 6)
Sander Gliboff
Class #8917
Eight Week - Second 6/9 - 8/1

Research.

HPSC-X 705 SP TPCS IN THE HIST OF SCIENCE (1 - 5)
TOPIC: Darwin
Sander Gliboff
Class #27943
Regular Academic Session 1/12 - 5/8
M 1:30 PM - 4:00 PM GB 107

This advanced graduate seminar analyzes the life and times of Charles Darwin and the changing interpretations of his work, in science, politics, and philosophy, from the Victorian period to the present, and in international comparison. In addition to sampling the vast secondary literature, we will analyze Darwin’s principal works, such as The Origin of Species and The Descent of Man, and we will make use of the extensive archival material that is now available online or in published form, from the Darwin archives and elsewhere. A term paper on Darwin or later issues in Darwinism will be required, which is to be based on original research on primary sources.

Required Books
You will need The Origin and The Descent, but they are available online, if you don’t want to buy them. Also good to have are Ruse, Darwininan Revolution; and Desmond & Moore, Darwin or Janet Browne’s 2-volume Darwin biography.

HPSC-X 790 SPACE TIME & RELATIVITY THEORY (3)
Amit Hagar
Class #30615
Regular Academic Session 1/12 - 5/8
Tu 1:00 PM - 3:30 PM GB 107

Topics in the philosophy of space, time, and space-time. Theory of motion and Zeno's paradoxes; St. Augustine on time; time and becoming; relational versus absolute theories of space and time; Mach's principle; introduction to Einstein's theory of relativity and space-time.

HPSC-X 800 PH D THESIS (1 - 12)
Class #8919 Eight Week - Second 6/9 - 8/1
Class #8918 Six Week - First 5/13 - 6/20
Sander Gliboff

Research.

HPSC-G 901 ADVANCED RESEARCH (6)
Class #9008
Sander Gliboff
Regular Academic Session 8/25 - 12/19

Available to graduate students who have completed all course requirements for their doctorates, have passed doctoral qualifying examinations, and have the requisite number of degree credit hours, this course provides the advanced research student with a forum for sharing ideas and problems under the supervision of a senior researcher.

Fall 2014

HPSC-X 100 Human Perspectives on Science
Kimberly Brumble
TuTh 4:00PM - 5:15PM
Sycamore Hall (SY) 002

This course constitutes an examination of ethical, conceptual, and legal problems arising in and about health care and biological science. Ethical frameworks will be applied to topics like euthanasia, stem cell research, withdrawal of treatment, the physician-patient relationship, research on human and animal subjects, medical consent, and public health. The emphasis will be on practical applications of ethical and legal theory. The course will emphasize philosophical reasoning and historical context in approaching these social and scientific topics.

HPSC-X 200 Scientific Reasoning (Second 8 week )
Staff
TuTh 5:45PM - 7:45PM
Wylie Hall (WY) 015

Patterns of scientific reasoning presented in a simple form useful to both nonscientists and prospective scientists for understanding and evaluating scientific information of all sorts. Illustrations in the natural, biological, behavioral, and biomedical sciences are drawn from a wide variety of historical and contemporary sources, including popular magazines and newspapers.

HPSC-X 220 Issues in Science: Humanistic
James Capshew
MoWe 3:00PM - 4:15PM
Goodbody Hall (GB) 107

Trees are not only an essential part of our natural environment, they also contribute in many ways to our cultural heritage. This course provides an introduction to the study of trees, concentrating on understanding their role in ecosystems of the Earth as well as focusing on their venerable and diverse relationships with humanity. Trees supply basic necessities for shelter, fuel, building materials, food, and medicines. At the same time, they provide metaphors, symbols, and other cultural constructions that nurture connections to the environment. In the current Anthropocene epoch, the fate of human populations is inextricably bound to the health and sustainability of the world¿s forested areas. Learning goals include deeper understanding of the natural and cultural history of trees (including IU¿s woodland campus), practical orientations to ecological ethics, and passionate appreciation for the many roles trees play in daily life.

HPSC-X 300 Undergraduate Readings in HPSC
Sander Gliboff
ARR
ARR

Individualized readings for students minoring in history and philosophy of science. May be used with consent of instructor as an alternative to other undergraduate courses.

HPSC-X 327 The Computer: A Biography
Amit Hagar
TuTh 1:00PM - 2:15PM
Sycamore Hall (SY) 103

The purpose of this course is to expose the students to the history and the philosophy behind the development of the digital computer. Focusing on the major land marks in the history of computing machines (Babbage¿s difference engine, Turing¿s machine, the ENIAC,The IBM decades, the personal computer, the software industry, the internet, cybernetics, and quantum and DNA computing) we shall gain insight on the intricate relations between computer science, mathematics, physics, and modern society. This is a self contained class, with no prerequisites. Assessment will be based on weekly short writing assignments, group presentations in class, a mid term exam, a final group project and a final term paper.

HPSC-X 391 Phil Issues in Quantum Theory
Amit Hagar
We 10:00AM - 12:30PM
Goodbody Hall (GB) 107

Demons in Physics

Many theories and models from physics are probabilistic. This observation raises several philosophical questions: What are probabilities in physics? Do they reflect objective chances which exist independently of the human mind? Or do they only express subjective credences and thus capture our own uncertainty about the world? Finally, which metaphysical lessons, if at all, can one draw from the largely probabilistic character of physics?

In this 4 credits research seminar we shall investigate these question through the lenses of two famous demons, namely Laplace¿s and Maxwell¿s, which have shaped the development of our best theories of matter, spacetime, and information.  Our discussion will be based on an open access volume of collected papers on the subject, augmented with additional articles and book chapters. Particular emphasis is laid upon statistical physics and quantum mechanics, whose basic mathematical structure will be explained in class. Assessment will be based on class participation, weekly writing assignments, and a final term paper.

HPSC-X 406 Surv of Hist of Sci up to 1750
Domenico Bertoloni Meli
Tu 1:00PM - 3:30PM
Goodbody Hall (GB) 107

This is an introductory course designed for all students with an interest in the history of the sciences and their cultural contexts. We will cover select topics from Greek to early modern science, emphasizing both primary sources and contemporary historiographical debates. The course will pay particular attention to a number of figures, including Vesalius, Galileo, Descartes, and Newton. We will include aspects of natural philosophy, astronomy, the medical disciplines, and the development of experiment. Students from a broad variety of backgrounds will be welcome and their varied expertise in the science, humanities, or languages will be valued highly. This is an introductory course designed for all students with an interest in the history of the sciences and their cultural contexts. We will cover select topics from Greek to early modern science, emphasizing both primary sources and contemporary historiographical debates. The course will pay particular attention to a number of figures, including Vesalius, Galileo, Descartes, and Newton. We will include aspects of natural philosophy, astronomy, the medical disciplines, and the development of experiment. Students from a broad variety of backgrounds will be welcome and their varied expertise in the science, humanities, or languages will be valued highly.

HPSC-X 424 Neuropsychological Pathography
James Capshew
TuTh 1:00PM - 2:15PM
Ballantine Hall (BH) 137

What does it feel like to experience depression, autism, or bipolar disorder? Traumatic brain injury or stroke? Obsessive-compulsive disorder, Alzheimer¿s, or locked-in syndrome?

This seminar explores personal narratives of mental trauma and psychological distress, and seeks to understand neurological damage and emotional affliction from the perspective of the sufferer as well as the scientist. We will read and discuss various sources, both literary and scientific, in our investigation of ideas of the self and personal identity, the social construction of illness, and the role of narrative in scientific understanding.

The major learning goal is to deepen understanding of neuropsychology through exposure and analysis of personal narratives, and to assess their contributions to clinical science, rehabilitative services, and prevalent notions of human resilience.

Among the books discussed are: Howard Dully, My Lobotomy; Siri Hustvedt, The Shaking Woman or a History of My Nerves; Kay Redfield Jamison, An Unquiet Mind: A Memoir of Moods and Madness; Dawn Prince-Hughes, Songs of the Gorilla Nation: My Journey Through Autism; Oliver Sacks, A Leg to Stand On; and William Styron, Darkness Visible: A Memoir of Madness.

3 credit hours of A&H. PSY P324: Abnormal Psychology is recommended as a prerequisite. Questions? Please contact the instructor.

HPSC-X 451 Scientific Understanding
Elisabeth Lloyd
Th 11:00AM - 1:30PM
Goodbody Hall (GB) 107

We will review some of the most influential texts and figures of Anglo-American philosophy of science in the 20th-21st Century, aiming to give both undergraduate and graduate students a strong background in the key positions and issues that serve as the background of the field today. Students will read, study, discuss, and write about popular as well as controversial figures such as Karl Popper, Thomas S. Kuhn, Carl Hempel, Larry Lauden, N.R. Hanson, Imre Lakatos, Helen Longino, Bas van Fraassen, Ernst Nagel, Carol Cleland, Ian Hacking, and others. The syllabus for the course is oriented around topics for each week, and while the reading list is not long, the students are expected to read each selection three times before seminar meets. Class requirements involve weekly writings, seminar presentations, and a term paper on a choice of assigned topics (this last requirement for the graduate students only). The emphasis in this seminar is on sympathetic, fair interpretations of author¿s writings, respectful and deep discussion of the philosophical issues, and the development of responsible criticism. We usually also have lots of fun in this seminar.

HPSC-G 901 Advanced Research
Sander Gliboff
ARR
ARR

Available to graduate students who have completed all course requirements for their doctorates, have passed doctoral qualifying examinations, and have the requisite number of degree credit hours, this course provides the advanced research student with a forum for sharing ideas and problems under the supervision of a senior researcher.

HPSC-X 501 Professional Development Seminar
Sander Gliboff
Mo 2:00PM - 3:00PM
Goodbody Hall (GB) 107

Designed for beginning graduate students, but repeatable for credit, this course addresses some of the practical aspects of professional life in History and Philosophy of Science and related fields. Topics include research tools, grant proposals, presentation  skills, research ethics, job applications, teaching, and challenges facing underrepresented groups in the academy.

HPSC-X 506 Survey of History of Science up to 1750
Domenico Bertoloni Meli
Tu 1:00PM - 3:30PM
Goodbody Hall (GB) 107

This is an introductory course designed for all students with an interest in the history of the sciences and their cultural contexts. We will cover select topics from Greek to early modern science, emphasizing both primary sources and contemporary historiographical debates. The course will pay particular attention to a number of figures, including Vesalius, Galileo, Descartes, and Newton. We will include aspects of natural philosophy, astronomy, the medical disciplines, and the development of experiment. Students from a broad variety of backgrounds will be welcome and their varied expertise in the science, humanities, or languages will be valued highly. This is an introductory course designed for all students with an interest in the history of the sciences and their cultural contexts. We will cover select topics from Greek to early modern science, emphasizing both primary sources and contemporary historiographical debates. The course will pay particular attention to a number of figures, including Vesalius, Galileo, Descartes, and Newton. We will include aspects of natural philosophy, astronomy, the medical disciplines, and the development of experiment. Students from a broad variety of backgrounds will be welcome and their varied expertise in the science, humanities, or languages will be valued highly.

HPSC-X 551 Survey of the Philosophy of Science
Elisabeth Lloyd
Th 11:00AM - 1:30PM
Goodbody Hall (GB) 107

We will review some of the most influential texts and figures of Anglo-American philosophy of science in the 20th-21st Century, aiming to give both undergraduate and graduate students a strong background in the key positions and issues that serve as the background of the field today. Students will read, study, discuss, and write about popular as well as controversial figures such as Karl Popper, Thomas S. Kuhn, Carl Hempel, Larry Lauden, N.R. Hanson, Imre Lakatos, Helen Longino, Bas van Fraassen, Ernst Nagel, Carol Cleland, Ian Hacking, and others. The syllabus for the course is oriented around topics for each week, and while the reading list is not long, the students are expected to read each selection three times before seminar meets. Class requirements involve weekly writings, seminar presentations, and a term paper on a choice of assigned topics (this last requirement for the graduate students only). The emphasis in this seminar is on sympathetic, fair interpretations of author¿s writings, respectful and deep discussion of the philosophical issues, and the development of responsible criticism. We usually also have lots of fun in this seminar.

HPSC-X 600 Advanced Readings Course
Sander Gliboff
ARR
ARR

No description available

HPSC-X 700 A M Thesis
Sander Gliboff
ARR
ARR

No description available

HPSC-X 706 SP Topics in History and Philosophy of Science
Jutta Schickore
Tu 8:30AM - 11:00AM
Goodbody Hall (GB) 107

This seminar explores the world of "Big Science" in its historical and philosophical dimensions. In the first part of the course, we will seek to clarify the many meanings of "big," including notions of scope, scale, and significance, as they relate to the rise of modern science. We will see how large-scale research has been treated in various historiographical contexts, including astronomy, high-energy physics, and biomedicine.
In the second part of the course, we will turn to epistemological and ethical issues arising from large-scale science and ¿big data¿. Topics include the epistemology of data-driven research, changes in standards of evidence, the role of trust and expertise in big science, epistemic values and the commercialization of research, and analyses of scientific authorship.

HPSC-X 755 SP Topics in Philosophy of Science
Amit Hagar
We 10:00AM - 12:30PM
Goodbody Hall (GB) 107

Demons in Physics

Many theories and models from physics are probabilistic. This observation raises several philosophical questions: What are probabilities in physics? Do they reflect objective chances which exist independently of the human mind? Or do they only express subjective credences and thus capture our own uncertainty about the world? Finally, which metaphysical lessons, if at all, can one draw from the largely probabilistic character of physics?

In this 4 credits research seminar we shall investigate these question through the lenses of two famous demons, namely Laplace¿s and Maxwell¿s, which have shaped the development of our best theories of matter, spacetime, and information. Our discussion will be based on an open access volume of collected papers on the subject, augmented with additional articles and book chapters. Particular emphasis is laid upon statistical physics and quantum mechanics, whose basic mathematical structure will be explained in class. Assessment will be based on class participation, weekly writing assignments, and a final term paper.

HPSC-X 800 PH D Thesis
Sander Gliboff
ARR
ARR

No description available