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Indiana University Bloomington

Courses

 

Fall 2017

HPSC-X 111 Issues in Bio-Medical Ethics (3)
E Arnet
Class #13922
Regular Academic Session
TR 9:30a-10:45a SE 245

Investigation of ethical issues that arise in the biological and medical sciences, the impact of these issues on the behavior of scientists during the conduct of scientific research, and on the role of science in discussions about ethics and public policy. The course will focus on specific cases and debates arising from and within biology and medicine, and in related fields such as ecology or clinical psychology. The course will provide an introduction to critical reasoning in ethics and an overview of major ethical theories. No prior background is required.

HPSC-X 102 Revolutions in Science: Plato to NATO (3)
D Bertoloni Meli
Class #9038 RB 110
IUB GenEd S&H credit
IUB GenEd World Culture credit
COLL (CASE) S&H Breadth of Inquiry credit
Regular Academic Session
MW 1:25p-2:15p

Class #12227 F 1:25p-2:15p SY 103 Discussion Leader: J Newman
Class #2706 Time: TBA Location TBA Discussion Leader: J Newman
 

 

An introduction to the formative steps in the scientific tradition as well as philosophical investigations of the nature of science. The course will survey in a chronological sequence aspects of the Aristotelian world view, the Copernican revolution, the mechanical philosophy, the chemical and Darwinian revolution, and the rise of twentieth century science. Where did modern science come from? Is it a stockpile of technique and knowledge that has accumulated slowly and steadily over the centuries? This course presents a more complex and dynamic picture, in which the history of science also takes unexpected twists, turns and conceptual leaps, in response to changing social, political and religious interests, and to shifting scientific assumptions, methods, and forms of organization. The course introduces the most important formative steps in the scientific tradition, each of which overturned earlier ways of investigating and understanding nature. These include Aristotelian physics, Ptolomaic astronomy and Galenic medicine in the ancient and Medieval world; the scientific revolutions of the 15th- through the 18th centuries that ushered in Copernican astronomy, Newtonian physics, and new ideas about physiology and medicine; the chemical and Darwinian revolutions; and the rise of modern physics and other 20th-century innovations and problems. This survey of scientific change will also be used to introduce foundational issues in the history and philosophy of science, such as: What distinguishes science as a unique method of investigation? What is the relationship between theory and evidence? and What is the the structure of scientific change?


HPSC-X 102 Science & Religion (3)
S Reynolds
Class #35065
Second 8 Weeks
TR 4:00p-6:30p BH 347

An introduction to the formative steps in the scientific tradition as well as philosophical investigations of the nature of science. The course will survey in a chronological sequence aspects of the Aristotelian world view, the Copernican revolution, the mechanical philosophy, the chemical and Darwinian revolution, and the rise of twentieth century science. Where did modern science come from? Is it a stockpile of technique and knowledge that has accumulated slowly and steadily over the centuries? This course presents a more complex and dynamic picture, in which the history of science also takes unexpected twists, turns and conceptual leaps, in response to changing social, political and religious interests, and to shifting scientific assumptions, methods, and forms of organization. The course introduces the most important formative steps in the scientific tradition, each of which overturned earlier ways of investigating and understanding nature. These include Aristotelian physics, Ptolomaic astronomy and Galenic medicine in the ancient and Medieval world; the scientific revolutions of the 15th- through the 18th centuries that ushered in Copernican astronomy, Newtonian physics, and new ideas about physiology and medicine; the chemical and Darwinian revolutions; and the rise of modern physics and other 20th-century innovations and problems. This survey of scientific change will also be used to introduce foundational issues in the history and philosophy of science, such as: What distinguishes science as a unique method of investigation? What is the relationship between theory and evidence? and What is the the structure of scientific change?

HPSC-X 200 Scientific Reasoning (3)
A Hagar
Class #9038 RB 110
Topic: The Problem of Cancer
Regular Academic Session
MW 1:25p-2:15p CH 033

Class # 12228 F 9:05a-9:55a BH 146 Discussion Leader: L Melo
Class # 12229 F 10:10a-11:00a BH 146Discussion Leader: L Melo
 

Patterns of scientific reasoning presented in a simple form useful to both non-scientists and prospective scientists for understanding and evaluating scientific information of all sorts. This term we shall demonstrate these patterns by focusing on the problem of cancer. Illustrations in the natural, biological, behavioral, and bio-medical sciences relevant to this problem will be drawn from a wide variety of historical and contemporary sources, including popular magazines and newspapers. Emphasis will be on group projects and discussions. No pre-requisites besides curiosity and willingness to learn.


HPSC-X 200 Scientific Reasoning (3)
R O'Loughlin
Second 8 Weeks
Class #33299
MW 1:00p-3:30p BH 347


Science is the most successful way humans have found to produce knowledge of the world. But the success of science lies in the fact that it is not just a collection of facts and theories -- science's success comes from critical attitudes and methodologies.This course covers topics essential for understanding scientific reasoning.  By the end of the course, students will understand the concepts of logical validity and soundness, laws of nature and scientific models, causation, principles of statistical reasoning, experimental design, and pseudoscience.  Other topics may include ethics in science, decision theory, and scientific realism.

HPSC-X 206 Who's Afraid of Radiation? (3)
J Cat
Class #33316
Regular Academic Session
MW 1:00p-2:15p AC C002

Who’s afraid of nuclear weapons, nuclear plants or X-rays? Why? The course offers an introductory look at the uses and fears of radiation and nuclear power. It examines the history of uses and fears of nuclear power and radiation. It starts with the discovery of radioactivity, the origins of nuclear research, the first radiation craze and the development of the atomic bomb. It examines risks and benefits of nuclear power and radioactivity in the age of climate change, alternative power sources and medical technology. It emphasizes the methodological, political, moral challenges of judging risks and making decisions about human health and environmental safety.
The course looks selectively at two interrelated histories: the history of nuclear research and nuclear weapons, with an emphasis on the making and testing of the atomic bomb and the H-bomb, and the history of risks and benefits of radioactivity. The two histories are connected through scientific, technological, political and moral issues. These issues are often inseparable; one common challenge is making scientific, political and medical decisions based on a rational and objective assessment of risks and benefits. In realistic situations the challenge involves considering particular circumstances, interests and values: for instance, how we evaluate evidence and hypotheses and identify new kinds of entities, how we define, measure and value personal health and environmental safety, how we factor in economic cost, scientific goals and political interests or how we blur the distinction between the natural and the artificial, discovery and invention, experimentation and explanation, target and tool, rational and irrational fear, laboratory and battlefield, or war and terrorism. Nuclear weapon research changed science itself and the possibility of mass-extinction has given human technology renewed significance and given scientists renewed moral responsibility. Many of these anxieties and challenges have been dramatized in public information and popular culture.

 

HPSC-X 207 Occult in Western Civil (3)
W Newman
Class #12222
Regular Academic Session
MW 9:30a-10:45a PV 277

The occult is a theme that is deeply ingrained in the history of Western Civilization.  From antiquity to the present, segments of our society have laid claim to a secret wisdom that could only be revealed to those who are worthy of its exercise.  Such “occult” pursuits as alchemy, astrology, and magic played an important role in the formation of modern science during the scientific revolution of seventeenth century, and subsequently had a major impact on poetry, music and the pictorial arts.  And yet, if we considered pursuits that are usually deemed to make up “the occult,” it is remarkable how little these fields have to do with one another.  What does alchemy, and artisanal pursuit related to metallurgy, have in common with divinatory practices such as astrology, oneiromancy, or crystal-gazing?  What does witchcraft have to do with extraterrestrial life?  The Occult in Western Civilization will answer these questions and others.  It will also argue that the occult sciences-especially alchemy, astrology, and natural magic-were originally predicted on quite reasonable bases consistent with the best science and philosophy of their time, however, they may have been altered in late twentieth-century culture.  By thinking carefully about the relationships among science, philosophy, and those disciplines traditionally classified as “occult” students will learn about the nature of scientific knowledge more generally.  The basic goals of the course, then, will be to instill a historical understanding of the occult while at the same time stimulating philosophical reflection on the nature of scientific knowledge in general.

HPSC-X 406/506 Survey of History of Science to 1750 (3)
W Newman
Class (HPSC X-406) #31399 (HPSC X-506) #31400
Regular Academic Session
MW 1:00p-2:30p BH 664

This course provides an advanced introduction to and survey of the history of Western science since 1750. Emphasizing recent secondary literature on canonical episodes, the course will consider the physical, biological, and earth sciences, science in international comparison and in social, political, intellectual, and institutional context, as well as the history of technology and medicine. There are no prerequisites, but some knowledge of modern science or modern
European or American history will be helpful.

HPSC-X 424 Neuropsychological Pathography (3)
J Capshew
Class #31345
Regular Academic Session
TR 2:00p-3:00p BH 137

What does it feel like to experience depression, autism, or bipolar disorder? Traumatic brain injury or stroke? Obsessive-compulsive disorder, Alzheimer’s, or locked-in syndrome? This seminar explores personal narratives of mental trauma and psychological distress, and seeks to understand neurological damage and emotional affliction from the perspective of the sufferer as well as the scientist. We will read and discuss various sources, both literary and scientific, in our investigation of ideas of the self and personal identity, the social construction of illness, and the role of narrative in scientific understanding. The major learning goal is to deepen understanding of neuropsychology through exposure and analysis of personal narratives, and to assess their contributions to clinical science, rehabilitative services, and prevalent notions of human resilience.

HPSC-X 452/552 Modern Philosophy of Science (3)
J Cat
Class (HPSC X-452)#11068 (HPSC X-552)#11071
Regular Academic Session
MW 4:00p-5:15p BH 664

The term “biology” was first used at the turn of the nineteenth century to denote a new scientific or philosophical approach to the study of life, distinct from natural history, natural theology, and medicine. But what did it mean to be “scientific”? What was this new science going to tell us about the organic world and ourselves? Where and how and by whom was biological research to be done, with what resources? This seminar is a survey of key figures and pivotal moments in the history of modern biology, that have re-defined its scientific character, by either opening new lines of inquiry and explanation, developing new kinds of instruments, practices, and institutions, or changing the social role of the biological scientist. Coverage includes, e.g., Lamarck, Mendel, Darwin, Haeckel, Pavlov, classical and molecular genetics, embryology, evolution, and ecology. There are no prerequisites, but knowledge of modern biology or modern. European or American history will be helpful.

 

HPSC-X 501 Professional Development Seminar (0.5)
A Hagar and S Gliboff
Class #10525
Regular Academic Session
T 11:00a-12:00p

 

HPSC-X 632 History of Medicine and Life Science (3)
S Gliboff
Class #12223
Topic: Survey of the Hisory of Biology
Regular Academic Session
T 2:30p-5:00p BH 664

The term "biology" was first used at the turn of the nineteenth century to distinguish a new ?scientific? or ?philosophical? approach to the study of life, distinct from natural history, natural theology, and medicine. But what did it mean to be scientific?either then or for the ensuing two hundred years? Biology has continually transformed itself, in keeping with changing ideals of how to do science. This seminar is a survey of key figures and pivotal moments in the history of modern biology that have re-defined its scientific character, by either opening new lines of inquiry and explanation, developing new kinds of instruments, practices, and institutions, or changing the social role of the biological scientist. There are no formal prerequisites, but knowledge of modern biology or modern European or American history will be helpful.

COLL-C 104 Critical Approaches (S & H)  (3)
TOPIC: Genetics and Eugenics
S Gliboff
Class # 14139
Regular Academic Session
MW 10:10a-11:00a GA 1106
Discussion sections:

Class # 14140 T 9:05a-9:55a WY 008 Discussion Leader: B Jackson
Class # 14141 F 10:10a-11:00a WY 008 Discussion Leader: B Jackson

Science is not one thing or one kind of thing. Yet knowing whether something is scientific often matters. This course addresses the question of the nature of science by surveying a broad range of aspects of that complex world that for centuries has been identified as science as a human activity from different perspectives that focus on specific ideas and questions, and different methodologies: from facts to values, from evolving basic notions of what we know (scientific models of matter, mind, life and society) and how we know it (methods of inquiry) to a number of aspects of science that reveal its important links to many aspects of human nature and culture (ethical, religious, political, cognitive and aesthetic values and interests). In fact, science could not survive and develop without them. Science is radically human, so it is no surprise that it expresses what characterizes our humanity: the myriad of human capacities and conflicts, interests and resources, strengths and limitations. Science is an enduring part of our world, our history and our civilization. To ignore it is to dismiss and neglect all that, and to diminish our role and responsibilities in it. 

COLL-C 104 Critical Approaches (S & H)  (3)
TOPIC: Genetics and Eugenics
E Lloyd
Class # 8078
Regular Academic Session
MW 10:10a-11:00a GA 0001
Discussion sections:

Class # 10286 F 10:10a-11:00a BH 005 J Slattery
Class # 10014 F 11:15a-12:05p BH 005 J Slattery
Class # 8079 F 2:25p-2:15p HU 111 J Aames
Class # 8080 F 2:30p-3:20p HU 111 J Aames
 

Science is not one thing or one kind of thing. Yet knowing whether something is scientific often matters. This course addresses the question of the nature of science by surveying a broad range of aspects of that complex world that for centuries has been identified as science as a human activity from different perspectives that focus on specific ideas and questions, and different methodologies: from facts to values, from evolving basic notions of what we know (scientific models of matter, mind, life and society) and how we know it (methods of inquiry) to a number of aspects of science that reveal its important links to many aspects of human nature and culture (ethical, religious, political, cognitive and aesthetic values and interests). In fact, science could not survive and develop without them. Science is radically human, so it is no surprise that it expresses what characterizes our humanity: the myriad of human capacities and conflicts, interests and resources, strengths and limitations. Science is an enduring part of our world, our history and our civilization. To ignore it is to dismiss and neglect all that, and to diminish our role and responsibilities in it. 

 

HUBI-B 300 Human Dilemmas  (4)
TOPIC: Tuberculosis: Historical and Current Perspectives
D Bertoloni Meli
Class # 10415
Regular Academic Session
MW 1:00p-2:15p MO 107
Discussion sections:

Class # 10418 R 10:10a-11:00a MO 103 Disscusion Leader: Nicholas Zautra
Class # 10186 R10:10a-11:00a MO 103 Disscusion Leader: Nicholas Zautra
Class # 10190 R 3:35p-4:25p MO 103 Discussion Leader: Nicholas Zautra

In this course you will be introduced to Tuberculosis the disease, the bacteria that cause the disease and current approaches to diagnosing and dealing with the burden of Tuberculosis. The course involves a section on current scientific understanding and a historical section on how tuberculosis – in its many different manifestations – was understood in the past from the Hippocratic Corpus to the invention of the stethoscope and the discovery of the relevant bacteria in the 19th century, and what methods were used in the attempt to cure it from bleeding to the discovery of antibiotics in the 20th century. We will also touch upon international efforts for TB eradication and discuss their successes and failures and work as a group to think about effective ways to take the science from TB research and apply it to the field.