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Indiana University Bloomington

Courses

 

Spring 2016

HPSC-X 100 Human Perspectives on Science (3)
TOPIC : Animal Research Ethics - Poynter Fellowship
Nick Zautra
Class #5136
Regular Acadmeic Session 1/11- 5/6
MWF 12:20 PM - 1:10 PM SY 002

TBA

HPSC-X 102 Revolutions in Science: Plato to NATO (3)
Domenico Bertoloni Meli
Class #5137
Regular Academic Session 1/11 - 5/6
MW 2:30 PM – 3:20 PM CH 001 <

An introduction to the formative steps in the scientific tradition. The course will survey in a chronological sequence aspects of the Aristotelian world view, the Copernican revolution, the mechanical philosophy, the chemical and Darwinian revolution, and the rise of twentieth century science. Where did modern science come from? Is it a stockpile of technique and knowledge that has accumulated slowly and steadily over the centuries? This course presents a more complex and dynamic picture, in which the history of science also takes unexpected twists, turns and conceptual leaps, in response to changing social, political and religious interests, and to shifting scientific assumptions, methods, and forms of organization. The course introduces the most important formative steps in the scientific tradition, each of which overturned earlier ways of investigating and understanding nature. These include Aristotelian physics, Ptolmaic astronomy and Galenic medicine in the ancient and Medieval world; the scientific revolutions of the 15th- through the 18th centuries that ushered in Copernican astronomy, Newtonian physics, and new ideas about physiology and medicine; the chemical and Darwinian revolutions; and the rise of modern physics and other 20th-century innovations and problems.

IUB GenEd S&H credit
IUB GenEd World Culture credit
COLL (CASE) S&H Breadth of Inquiry credit.



Discussion Sections:
15325 Regular Academic Session 1/11 – 5/6 F 3:35 PM - 4:25 PM GA 1100
15326 Regular Academic Session 1/11 – 5/6 F 2:30 PM - 3:20 PM GA 1100

Also: Instructor TBA
Class #11697
Second Eight Week Session 3/7 - 5/6
Tu Th 4:00 PM – 6:00 PM SE 010

HPSC-X 123 Perspectives on Science: Social and Historical (3)
TOPIC: Witches, Science and Society
Kate Grauvogel
Class #14895
Second Eight Week Session 3/7 – 5/6
Tu Th 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM WY 115

Lynda Roper, an eminent scholar of withcraft, described the fervor surrounding the witch-hunts as a "craze". In her book, Witch Craze: Terror and Fantasy in Barouque Germany (2004), Roper explores how witch accusations in teh 16th and 17th centuries (German speaking countries in particluar) became linked to fears concerning women and fertility. Fears about women and fertility extended to fears about disruption of the natural order of things for men and women, famine, death, and sickness. Using ideas from Witch Craze as a jumping off point, we will explore witch accusations in early modern Europe, and how they both reinforced existing ideas about female sexuality and influenced new perceptions about women and fertility. As for the "science" component of the course, we will investigate the popular idea that witchcraft declined during the "scientific revolution". In particular, historians (such as Roper) have argued that the dissmenination of scientific knowledge offered an explanation for phenomena that had previously been attributed to witchcraft, such as how disease was transmitted and why crops failed. At the same time, anatomists were taking an interest in the bodies of women, paying particular attention to the bodies of witches and pregnant women. Finally, we will explore how the promulgation of these practices and ideas about women shaped and continue to shape misogynistic attitudes and societal perceptions about female reproduction and sexuality


HPSC-X 126 Perspectives on Science: Natural and Mathematical (3)
TOPIC: TBA
TBA
Class #16294
Second Eight Week Session 3/7 - 5/6
MW 9:00 AM – 11:00 AM WY 101

Case studies illustrating, from a variety of perspectives, the logic and methods of the natural and mathematical sciences. Examples illustrating these methods are presented at an introductory level.

HPSC-X 200 Scientific Reasoning (3)
Kimberly Brumble
Class #30746
Regular Academic Session 1/11 - 5/6
Tu Th 9:30 AM - 10:45 AM SY 200

Ryan Ketcham
Class #11698
Regular Academic Session 1/11 - 5/6
Tu Th 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM SY 200

Patterns of scientific reasoning presented in a simple form useful to both non-scientists and prospective scientists for understanding and evaluating scientific information of all sorts. Illustrations in the natural, biological, behavioral, and bio-medical sciences are drawn from a wide variety of historical and contemporary sources, including popular magazines and newspapers.

HPSC-X 227 Computers Limited: What They Cannot Do (3)
Amit Hagar
Class #33112
2nd 8 weeks session 3/7 - 5/6
Mo We 5:45 PM - 7:45 PM SY103

In 1984, the TIME magazine ran a cover story on computer software. In the otherwise excellent article, an editor of a certain software magazine was quoted as saying:"Put the right kind of software into a computer, and it will do whatever you want it to. There may be limits on what you can do with machines themselves, but there are no limits on what you can do with software". A simple way of summarizing this course is that it is devoted to describing and explaining the facts that refute - no, shutter! - this claim. In the 5 modules that comprise this course we will acquaint ourselves with the logical limits of computation, as they were conceived within the framework of the foundations of mathematics. We will get to know the standard model for computation, the Turing machine, and learn about problems that it can and cannot solve. Turning to physics, we will find parallel definitions for computability in dynamical systems and in spacetime theories, and use notions from complexity theory to reframe long-standing problems in the philosophy of mind about free will, creativity, and the mind-body problem. Each module will be composed of frontal lectures, 2-3 writing assignments, and a group project that will be presented in class. Typically, these projects will consist of a digital presentation and an exposition of one of the concepts that will be discussed in the respective module, with an emphasis on its use and mention (or, as usually is the case, abuse and misinterpretation) inside academia and outside it in the popular culture. The course is self-contained and presupposes a mathematical background at the high-school level.

HPSC-X 229 History & Philosophy of Modern Physics (3)
Jordi Cat
Class #14908
Regular Academic Session 1/11 - 5/6
Tu Th 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM BH 242

The course will focus mainly on four physical theories that were developed in the turn of the last century, namely, statistical mechanics, quantum mechanics, special relativity and general relativity. It will start examining the standard of classical physics these theories aimed to develop or challenge, and will emphasize both the historical aspects and philosophical questions that surround their development, evaluation and reception (experimental, methodological, philosophical, institutional, disciplinary, etc). Throughout the course the use of mathematics will be kept to an absolute minimum, the emphasis will be on historical, methodological and conceptual discussion. The course will cover topics such as irreversibility and the thermodynamical arrow of time, the origins and interpretations of probability and populations in statistical physics, chaos and dynamical instability, the fate of the distinction between particles and fields, the fate of the classical concepts of individuals, properties, composites, matter, determinism and causality, special relativistic principles, effects and paradoxes, time machines, black holes, quantum interpretations, jumps and paradoxes, quantum logic, information and computing, Feynman diagrams, strings, and methodological issues such as the point and challenges of modeling, interpretation, realism, understanding, explanation and reduction, and the role of symmetries and unification. Yes, along the way, we will discuss the significance of Maxwell's demon, Schrödinger's cat, Heisenberg's uncertainty and Einstein's clocks.

HPSC-X 300 Undergraduate Readings in History & Philosophy of Science (1 - 5)
Amit Hagar
Class #5139
Regular Academic Session 1/11 - 5/6

Individualized readings for students in history and philosophy of science.

HPSC-X 305 History & Philosophy of Medicine (3)
Elisabeth Lloyd
Class #14916
Second Eight Week Session 3/7 - 5/6
TR 9:00 AM - 11:00 AM MY 130

We will study the history of medicine from the time of the Greeks to the 20th C. through reading the biographies of influential doctors, and at the same time study issues in contemporary public health and medicine, all taken from contemporary sources provided on Canvas. Our topics will include the issues of genetic diseases and predispositions: What does it mean to say that a person "has a gene for" heart disease or breast cancer? What are the ethics of smoking, alochol use, and eating right? ARe we completely free to choose these behaviors? Should we disallow large soft drinks? Other topics include the AIDS/HIV vase as a modern crisis in public heath, the effects of stress, defining mental illness, and whether vaccines are dangerous. Finally, we will consider new, emerging challenges to medicince and public health.

HPSC-X 333 Captsone Project in History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine (3)
Class #32268
Regular Academic Session 1/11 - 5/6
Tu Th 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM WY 015

HPSC-X 407 Survey of History of Science since 1750 (3)
James Capshew
Class #5140
Regular Academic Session 1/11 - 5/6
Tu 1:00 PM - 3:30 PM SE 245

Growth of quantitative methods in physical science and experimental methods in natural history. Gradual separation of science from philosophy and theology.

HPSC-X 420 Computational Approaches to History and Philosophy of Science (3)
Collin Allen
Class #30571
Regular Academic Session 1/11 - 5/6
Tu Th 9:30 AM - 10:45 AM SY 103

How can quantitative analysis of texts and other products of scientific activity be used to address traditional questions in the history & philosophy of science? This course aims to introduce students to a variety of techniques used in the Digital Humanities, from relatively simple methods of counting words, or building co-citation and correspondence networks, to more advanced techniques using latent semantic analysis and topic modeling of texts. We will cover the construction and curation digital scholarly collections, various ways in which structured and unstructured data can be analyzed, using techniques ranging from simple spreadsheet entry to more sophisticated tools for analysis and visualization. No prior experience with computer programming is assumed, although by the end of the course, everyone should be able to use existing software tools to address questions of interest, and will be introduced to the underlying code with the goal of making small modifications to explore research questions. Our focus throughout will be on analyzing specific datasets of interest to historians and philosophers of science, such as IU projects focused on writings of Isaac Newton and the readings and writings of Charles Darwin, as well as on larger-scale datasets involving multiple sciences and scientists. We will be concerned throughout with the historical, philosophical, and cognitive interpretation of the results of such analyses. There will also be the opportunity for students to apply the techniques to datasets of their own construction.

HPSC-X 451 Scientific Understanding (3)
Jordi Cat
Class #30572
Regular Academic Session 1/11 - 5/
W 1:00 PM - 3:30 PM WY 118

The course is a survey of issues in the philosophy of science and issues in the philosophy of special sciences (mathematical, physical, biological, psychological, social and technological). The courses will cover received views that informed central issues in the second half of the 20th-century, subsequent developments and new issues. General topics include observation, experimentation, modeling, simulations, explanation, understanding, testing, realism, causation, values, unity and pluralism, and the relation of philosophy of science to the sciences, history and science studies.

HPSC-X 501 Professional Development Seminar (.5)

Amit Hagar and Jutta Schickore
Class #16244
Regular Academic Session 1/11 - 5/6
M 9:30 AM - 10:30 AM WY 115

Designed for beginning graduate students, but repeateable for credit, this course addresses some of the practical aspects of professional life in History and Philosohpy of Science and related fields. Topics include research tools, grant proposals, presentation skills, research ethics, job applications, teaching, and challenges facing underreprented groups in the academy.

HPSC-X 507 Survey of Hisotry of Science Since 1750

James Capshew
Class #5141
Regular Academic Session 1/11 - 5/6
Tu 1:00 PM - 3:30 PM SE 245

Growth of quantitative methods in physical science and experimental methods in natural history. Gradual separation of science from philosophy and theology

HPSC-X 521 Computational Approaches to History & Philosophy of Science (3)
Colin Allen
Class #14929
Regular Academic Session 1/11 - 5/6
Tu Th 9:30 AM - 10:45 AM SY 103

How can quantitative analysis of texts and other products of scientific activity be used to address traditional questions in the history & philosophy of science? This course aims to introduce students to a variety of techniques used in the Digital Humanities, from relatively simple methods of counting words, or building co-citation and correspondence networks, to more advanced techniques using latent semantic analysis and topic modeling of texts. We will cover the construction and curation digital scholarly collections, various ways in which structured and unstructured data can be analyzed, using techniques ranging from simple spreadsheet entry to more sophisticated tools for analysis and visualization. No prior experience with computer programming is assumed, although by the end of the course, everyone should be able to use existing software tools to address questions of interest, and will be introduced to the underlying code with the goal of making small modifications to explore research questions. Our focus throughout will be on analyzing specific datasets of interest to historians and philosophers of science, such as IU projects focused on writings of Isaac Newton and the readings and writings of Charles Darwin, as well as on larger-scale datasets involving multiple sciences and scientists. We will be concerned throughout with the historical, philosophical, and cognitive interpretation of the results of such analyses. There will also be the opportunity for students to apply the techniques to datasets of their own construction.

HPSC-X 551 Scientific Understanding (3)
Jordi Cat
Class #30572
Regular Academic Session 1/11 - 5/
W 1:00 PM - 3:30 PM WY 118

The course is a survey of issues in the philosophy of science and issues in the philosophy of special sciences (mathematical, physical, biological, psychological, social and technological). The courses will cover received views that informed central issues in the second half of the 20th-century, subsequent developments and new issues. General topics include observation, experimentation, modeling, simulations, explanation, understanding, testing, realism, causation, values, unity and pluralism, and the relation of philosophy of science to the sciences, history and science studies.

HPSC-X 600 Advanced Reading Course (1 - 4)
Class #5142
Regular Academic Session 1/11 - 5/6

Readings.

HPSC-X 693 Philosophy of Biology (3)
Elisabeth Lloyd
Class #14937
Regular Academic Session 1/11 - 5/6
W 10:00 AM - 12:30 PM WH 004

This graduate seminar in philosophy of biology will be a survey of both old and new core issues in the field. We will be working from two excellent texts, one by Elliot Sober, and one by Paul Griffiths and Kim Sterenly, listed below, as well as a useful collection of primary sources editied by Elliott Sober, and texts on Oncourse. Our focus will be on evolutionary biology, as this reflects the primary focus of the field, but we will also touch on other topics. I the course, we will cover foundational notions such as fitness, adaptation and adaptationism, units of selection, mismatch, drift, sociobiology and evolutionary psychology, (both good and not so good), niche construction, and gene/cultural evolution. I will also survey the class for additional topics you wish to be covered.

HPSC-X 700 MA Thesis (1 - 6)
Class #5143
Regular Academic Session 1/11 - 5/6

Research.

HPSC-X 733 Colloquium Series (.5)
Class #3269
Regular Academic Session 1/12 - 5/8
Th 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM WY 015

HPSC-X 800 PhD Thesis (1 - 12)
Class #12014 Regular Academic Session 1/11 - 5/6
Class #5144 Regular Academic Session 1/11 - 5/6

Research.

HPSC-G 901 Advanced Research (6)
Class #5135
Regular Academic Session 1/11 - 5/6

Available to graduate students who have completed all course requirements for their doctorates, have passed doctoral qualifying examinations, and have the requisite number of degree credit hours, this course provides the advanced research student with a forum for sharing ideas and problems under the supervision of a senior researcher.

COLL-C 104 Critical Approaches (S & H) (3)
TOPIC: Scientific Revolution and the Birth of Modern Science
Domenico Bertoloni Meli
Class # 29948
Regular Academic Session
MWF 1:25PM - 2:15PM CH 033

This course covers the transformations in the understanding of nature and in the way scientific ideas were disseminated in the period between 1450 and 1700. We will be discussing the rise and impact of the printing press, the Copernican Revolution and the new anatomy, the discovery of the circulation of the blood and the rise of microscopy, the origin of scientific societies and journals, and the new physics of Galileo and Newton. No special scientific prerequisites are required.

COLL-C 105 Critical Approaches (N & M) (3)
TOPIC: Quantum Mysteries for Everyone
Amit Hagar
Class #32721
Regular Academic Session 1/11 - 5/6
MWF 9:05AM - 9:55AM GA 0001

Quantum theory is the best theory we have of microscopic things, but it is also extremely hard to understand what exactly the theory is saying. We will begin this course by describing a few simple quantum experiments to see just why the theory is so strange, and then we will begin to look more closely at the formalism of the theory and at the philosophical puzzles raised by its interpretations. After suggesting several solutions, we shall adopt a more instrumental view, on which these puzzles may be considered an important resource that, if harnessed, may have some surprising implications on the way we manipulate information and perform computations. Along the way, we will learn how to think critically and carefully about science and scientific theories, and how to approach a given problem from several different philosophical angles. The course will have both lecture and discussion. There will be weekly writing assignments of 1 page each (30%), three small quizzes (30%), a group project (20%) and a final multiple-choice exam (20%). The final exam is a necessary requirement for the final grade. It will be waived for the students with the best group presentation!

HUBI-B 400 Human Dilemmas (3)
TOPIC: Engaging Biology: Communication and Public Understanding of Biological Research
Jutta Schickore
Class # 15327
Regular Academic Session 1/11 -5/6
MW 2:30PM - 3:45 PM MO107

Modern biology is a highly specialized activity, pursued by trained experts at research labs or universities. But of course, biology, like other sciences, is not confined to the laboratory or academy. The outcome of biological research informs and shapes our society and culture at all levels. We encounter science in the media, in museums, or in the court room. Politicians, lawyers, and other professionals draw on, assess, and sometimes seek to restrict scientific activity. This course explores how science engages with the public, how the public engages with science, and how the relation between science and the public has changed over time. The emphasis is on themes relevant to human biology.

Fall 2015

HPSC-X 100 Human Perspectives on Science (3)
TOPIC:  Disordered Minds:  the History and Philosophy of Psychiatry
Nick Zautra
Class # 4509
Regular Academic Session
MWF 11:15a-12:05p SY002

This course will explore historical, philosophical, and ethical dimensions of research with nonhuman animals. We will describe and critically assess the rationale for and limits of laboratory animal experimentation in biology, engineering, and biomedicine. We will also explore the ethical issues raised by ecological field research involving wild animals. Much of this discussion focuses on resolving philosophical and practical conflicts between the suffering of non-human animals and the well-being of humans, and between individualistic treatments of animal welfare and more holistic concerns about the health of populations, species, and ecological systems. This course should be of interest to undergraduate students in the life sciences and engineering who conduct basic and/or applied research with nonhuman animals, students studying the history and philosophy of science, ethics, policy, and law, as well as those students with a general interest in our cultural, ethical, biological, and historical relationships with nonhuman animals.

HPSC-X102 Revolutions in Science: Plato to NATO (3)
Aaron Martinez
Class # 4510
Regular Academic Session
MWF 12:20p-1:10p SY200

Where did modern science come from? Traditional wisdom has said that it is a stockpile of techniques and knowledge that has accumulated linearly over the centuries. This course presents a more complex and dynamic picture, in which the history of science also takes unexpected twists, turns and conceptual leaps in response to a wide array of scientific and non-scientific stimuli. Indeed we will see that far from opperating in isolation, the scientific tradition has always (for better or worse) maintained a symbiotic relationship with wider intellectual and social trends. The course introduces the most important formative episodes in the western scientific tradition, each of which overturned earlier ways of investigating and understanding nature. These include Aristotelian physics, Ptolemaic astronomy and Galenic medicine in the ancient and Medieval world; the scientific revolutions of the 15th-18th centuries that ushered in Copernican astronomy, Newtonian physics, and new ideas about physiology and medicine; the Darwinian revolutions; and the rise of modern physics and other 20th-century innovations and problems.

HPSC-X102 Revolutions in Science: Plato to NATO (3)
Instructor TBA
Class #12489
Regular Academic Session
TR 9:30a-10:45a SY200

Where did modern science come from? Traditional wisdom has said that it is a stockpile of techniques and knowledge that has accumulated linearly over the centuries. This course presents a more complex and dynamic picture, in which the history of science also takes unexpected twists, turns and conceptual leaps in response to a wide array of scientific and non-scientific stimuli. Indeed we will see that far from opperating in isolation, the scientific tradition has always (for better or worse) maintained a symbiotic relationship with wider intellectual and social trends. The course introduces the most important formative episodes in the western scientific tradition, each of which overturned earlier ways of investigating and understanding nature. These include Aristotelian physics, Ptolemaic astronomy and Galenic medicine in the ancient and Medieval world; the scientific revolutions of the 15th-18th centuries that ushered in Copernican astronomy, Newtonian physics, and new ideas about physiology and medicine; the Darwinian revolutions; and the rise of modern physics and other 20th-century innovations and problems.

HPSC-X123 Perspectives on Science:  Social and Historical (3)
TOPIC: Witches, Science and Society
Kate Grauvogel
Class #30554
Regular Academic Session
TR 11:15a-12:30p SY200

This course investigates some of the ideas and works that likely motivated the witch trials, from early pagan practices to heresy and publications on witchcraft. We will also broach the subject of the dissection of witches for the purpose of finding physical "evidence" of witchcraft. Finally, we will explore how the dissemination of ideas and practices regarding witches continue to shape attitudes and societal perceptions about reproduction and sexuality.

HPSC-X123 Perspectives on Science:  Social and Historical (3)
TOPIC:  Apocalypse & Uncertainty: Philosophy of Climate Change
Kimberly Brumble
Class # 30563
Eight Week - Second 10/19 - 12/18
TR 5:45p-7:45p GY436

TBA

HPSC-X200 Scientific Reasoning (3)
Samuel Ketcham
Class #10005
Regular Academic Session
MWF 12:20p-1:10p SY002

Scientific reasoning has provided one of the best sources of knowledge that has ever been available.  It has been used to craft theories that allow people to explain events, predict the future, and intervene in the natural world.  While scientific reasoning cannot lead to certain knowledge, it underlies a scientific enterprise that is revisable in the face of new information, and grows in response to new research.  What is scientific reasoning, and what about it makes it scientific?  In this course we will explore philosophical and historical answers to this question, evaluating different conceptions of scientific reasoning.  Some rely on identifying natural laws, while others involve building models.  We will examine how scientific reasoning relates to uncertainty, and what sort of evidence is necessary to evaluate statistical and causal hypotheses.  Finally, we will examine the relationship between scientific reasoning, objectivity, and the role of values in science.  This course will draw from Understanding Scientific Reasoning by Ronald Giere, John Bickle, and Robert Mauldin, but will also include a variety of other written material to supplement topics for discussion.  The format of this course will be a combination of lectures, discussions and class exercises.  Scientific reasoning is one of the most powerful tools available in our modern world.  This course will survey different accounts of just how that tool works.

HPSC-X200 Scientific Reasoning (3)
Instructor TBA
Class #30579
Regular Academic Session
MWF 1:25p-2:15p SY002

TBA

HPSC-X220 Issues in Science: Humanistic (3)
TOPIC:  Arborescence: Keeping Trees in Mind
James Capshew
Class # 14935
Regular Academic Session
TR 2:30p-3:45p SY002

Examines trees and forests as conspicuous natural objects that play a multivalent role in human imagination, thinking, and emotion. Explores the intertwined natural and cultural trajectory of trees along evolutionary, historical, and psychological dimensions. Topics include ecosystem services, human uses and attitudes, deforestation, IU's woodland campus, and ecological ethics.  

HPSC-X320 Topics in Science: Humanistic (3)
TOPIC: Philosophy of Physics
Amit Hagar
Class #12499
Regular Academic Session
TR 9:30a-10:45a SY103

The course will focus on the physics of information and will be divided into four modules in which we shall discuss two physical theories that were developed in the turn of the last century, namely, statistical mechanics and quantum mechanics, emphasizing both the historical aspects as well the philosophical questions that surround these theories. Throughout the four modules the use of mathematics will be kept to an absolute minimum (no more than basic high school algebra and geometry will be needed), and emphasis will be given to historical and conceptual analysis. We will cover topics such as irreversibility and the thermodynamic arrow in time, the origins of probability in statistical physics, chaos and dynamical instability, quantum paradoxes, and quantum information protocols. Students will be assessed on the ability to grasp the conceptual issues, and to critically discuss and analyze the arguments and the foundational problems in each of the topics presented. Special emphasis will be given to developing writing skills and the ability to present complex ideas clearly and critically.

Each module will be composed of frontal lectures, 3 writing assignments, and a group project that will be presented in class. Typically, these projects will consist of an exposition of one of the concepts that will be discussed in the respective module, with an emphasis on its use (or, as usually is the case, abuse) outside it in the popular culture. The course is self-contained and presupposes a mathematical background at the high-school level.

HPSC-X340 Scientific Methods: How Science Really Works (3)
Jutta Schickore
Class # 30595
Eight Week - Second 10/19 - 12/18
MW 2:30p-3:45p WY101

As all researchers know, the activity of science is governed by methods: methods of doing experiments, methods for analyzing data, methods for testing hypotheses, methods for writing scientific papers, and so on. But it is by no means easy to give clear descriptions of these methods. In science classes, students learn how to perform research, but general methodological questions are rarely addressed. This course introduces students to philosophical and historical debates about scientific methods. Students will acquire general conceptual tools that help them to express what they are doing when they are doing science and to discuss and evaluate research practices. We will talk about models and visualization, "big data", collaboration and collective authorship, trust and expertise, biases, negative results, and much more.

HPSC-X424 Neuropsychological Pathography (3)
James Capshew
Class # 14936
Eight Week - Second 10/19 - 12/18
TR 11:15a-12:30p BH321

What does it feel like to experience depression, autism, or bipolar disorder? Traumatic brain injury or stroke? Obsessive-compulsive disorder, Alzheimer's, or locked-in syndrome? This seminar explores personal narratives of mental trauma and psychological distress, and seeks to understand neurological damage and emotional affliction from the perspective of the sufferer as well as the scientist. We will read and discuss various sources, both literary and scientific, in our investigation of ideas of the self and personal identity, the social construction of illness, and the role of narrative in scientific understanding. The major learning goal is to deepen understanding of neuropsychology through exposure to and analysis of personal narratives, and to assess their contributions to clinical science, rehabilitative services, and prevalent notions of human resilience.

HPSC-X452 Modern Philosophy of Science (3)
Jordi Cat
Class #30603
Regular Academic Session
MW 4p-5:15p GB107

This course will trace the historical development of the philosophy of science from approximately early 17th century to the mid-twentieth century, beginning with a quick survey of the philosophies of Galileo, Bacon, Descartes, Newton and Leibniz, then turning to the philosophy of Newtonian science developed by Immanuel Kant, its developments and reactions, and ending with French conventionalism, logical positivism, Popper and Quine. In the twentieth century philosophy of science begins to take shape as a specialized discipline within philosophy more generally. Its problems are motivated and framed by the interplay of earlier philosophical questions and more recent revolutionary developments in nineteenth century science: the discovery of non-Euclidean geometries, the wave theory of light and electrodynamics, thermodynamics and the conservation of energy, and molecular-atomic theory. Canons of scientific methodology were introduced in the 19th century in Britain by Herschel, Whewell and Mill. Work in philosophy of science was undertaken next by professional scientists attempting to come to terms with these new developments-in particular, by Herman Von Helmholtz, Ernst Mach, Pierre Duhem and Henri Poincaré. Around the turn of the century, philosophy of science is stimulated once again by revolutionary developments: Einstein relativity theory, on the one hand, and new work in logic and the foundations of mathematics by Gottlob Frege, Bertrand Russell, and David Hilbert, on the other. Philosophical developments took place as well, such as neo-Kantianism and phenomenology. Philosophy of science was now pursued by professional philosophers, although most trained in the sciences, in particular Karl Popper and the members of the so-called Vienna Circle of logical positivists such as Moritz Schlick, Otto Neurath and Rudolph Carnap. Neurath and Ernst Cassirer try to engage the social sciences as well. The work of all these philosophers sets the stage for most of post-war twentieth century philosophy of science. Alongside the relevant philosophical and scientific problems and ideas, this course will expose the students to examples of different approaches to the history of philosophy.

HPSC-X501 Professional Development Seminar
Instructor TBA
Class #15029
Regular Academic Session
GB107

TBA

HPSC-X552 Modern Philosophy of Science (3)
Jordi Cat
Class # 30611
Regular Academic Session
MW 4p-5:15p GB107

This course will trace the historical development of the philosophy of science from approximately early 17th century to the mid-twentieth century, beginning with a quick survey of the philosophies of Galileo, Bacon, Descartes, Newton and Leibniz, then turning to the philosophy of Newtonian science developed by Immanuel Kant, its developments and reactions, and ending with French conventionalism, logical positivism, Popper and Quine. In the twentieth century philosophy of science begins to take shape as a specialized discipline within philosophy more generally. Its problems are motivated and framed by the interplay of earlier philosophical questions and more recent revolutionary developments in nineteenth century science: the discovery of non-Euclidean geometries, the wave theory of light and electrodynamics, thermodynamics and the conservation of energy, and molecular-atomic theory. Canons of scientific methodology were introduced in the 19th century in Britain by Herschel, Whewell and Mill. Work in philosophy of science was undertaken next by professional scientists attempting to come to terms with these new developments-in particular, by Herman Von Helmholtz, Ernst Mach, Pierre Duhem and Henri Poincaré. Around the turn of the century, philosophy of science is stimulated once again by revolutionary developments: Einstein relativity theory, on the one hand, and new work in logic and the foundations of mathematics by Gottlob Frege, Bertrand Russell, and David Hilbert, on the other. Philosophical developments took place as well, such as neo-Kantianism and phenomenology. Philosophy of science was now pursued by professional philosophers, although most trained in the sciences, in particular Karl Popper and the members of the so-called Vienna Circle of logical positivists such as Moritz Schlick, Otto Neurath and Rudolph Carnap. Neurath and Ernst Cassirer try to engage the social sciences as well. The work of all these philosophers sets the stage for most of post-war twentieth century philosophy of science. Alongside the relevant philosophical and scientific problems and ideas, this course will expose the students to examples of different approaches to the history of philosophy.

HPSC-X705 Spec Topics in the History of Science (1-5)
TOPIC: Cabinets of Curiosities, Collections, Museums
Domenico Bertoloni Meli
Class # 33063
T 2p-4:30p GB107

Collections played an important role in European intellectual life starting from the Renaissance; they included naturalia and artificialia, marvels and rarities from the old and the new worlds. The growing literature on this topic is highly interdisciplinary and includes, but is not limited to, antiquarianism, the history of art, of several sciences (notably medicine and natural history), and, more broadly, of collecting and displaying. Collections and museums reflected and at the same time contributed to shaping European sensibilities and attitudes to geography, the natural world, the past, the intellectual and monetary values of objects. This class reflects the interdisciplinary nature of the field; students from different fields and perspectives are welcome.

HPSC-X 706 Sp Topics in History and Philosophy of Science
TOPIC: Historiography, Philosophical Methods & Integrated HPS
Jutta Schickore
Class # 11407
Regular Academic Session
T 9a-11:30a GB107

This seminar takes as its central problematic the changing relations between history of science and philosophy of science from the 19th century to the present. It deals with historiography, taken in its various senses, and philosophical methods, broadly considered, to seek to identify various strands that have contributed to the scholarly understanding of science.

Proceeding chronologically (roughly), the course surveys a wide range of approaches to the theory, study, and writing of history and philosophy of science. We will discuss how various trends in 20th-century history and philosophy of science may have facilitated or obstructed the exchanges between the two fields. Topics include the distinction between the contexts of discovery and justification, the "historical turn" in philosophy of science, ethnography of the laboratory, new experimentalism, and historical epistemology. A portion of the course will be devoted to recent discussions about the merits and potential of integrated history and philosophy of science.

HPSC-X755 Sp Topics in Philosophy of Science
TOPIC: History & Philosophy of Comparative Cognition
Colin Allen
Class #30619
Regular Academic Session
M 1p-3:30p GB107

In the 19th Century, Darwin revolutionized the study of animal behavior and animal minds. Darwin recognized that human mental powers were a potential point of difficulty for his ideas of evolution by natural selection, involving common descent and gradual differentiation. He and his followers were therefore keen to stress mental continuity between humans and other animals. In their zeal to promote the idea of mental continuity, early comparative psychologists, especially Darwin's protégé George Romanes, left themselves open to the charge that they were too reliant on anecdotes and anthropomorphic thinking.

In the early 20th Century, many psychologists, especially in the United States, rejected the idea that inner mental causes of behavior could be studied scientifically, and announced their distrust of field observations as a source of knowledge about the causes of animal behavior. These "behaviorists" sought to discover general laws of learning by experimental methods, moving comparative psychology into a laboratory setting, effectively reducing the range of species studied. In contrast, the new field of ethology, which arose in Europe after the First World War, insisted on the importance of naturalistic observations.  Ethologists framed their studies as essentially involving comparison of behavioral similarities and differences that could be understood as specific adaptations to particular social and ecological niches. However, like the behaviorists, they tended to shy away from attributing mental qualities to animals. By the late 20th Century, after behaviorism was no longer so dominant among psychologists, and ethology had fractionated into several other subspecialties within biology, scientists from both traditions began returning to comparative questions about animal minds.

In this course we will study the philosophical and scientific contexts in which the different approaches to animal behavior emerged, and the different approaches to Darwinian continuity that persist to the present day. A major goal of the course is to relate ongoing debates to their historical antecedents, and students will be encouraged to pursue research projects which deepen our understanding of the foundational philosophical disputes, by examining the methods and presuppositions of key participants in those disputes.

COGS-Q 101 Introduction to Cognitive Science (3)
Colin Allen
Class # 12011
Regular Academic Session
TTh 5:45p-6:35p + F 10:10a-11:00a JH A100

TBA

COLL-C 104 Critical Approaches (S & H)  (3)
TOPIC: What is Science and Who Cares?
Jordi Cat
Class # 11104
Regular Academic Session
MW 1:25p-2:15p + F sections BH 109

Science is not one thing or one kind of thing. Yet knowing whether something is scientific often matters. This course addresses the question of the nature of science by surveying a broad range of aspects of that complex world that for centuries has been identified as science as a human activity from different perspectives that focus on specific ideas and questions, and different methodologies: from facts to values, from evolving basic notions of what we know (scientific models of matter, mind, life and society) and how we know it (methods of inquiry) to a number of aspects of science that reveal its important links to many aspects of human nature and culture (ethical, religious, political, cognitive and aesthetic values and interests). In fact, science could not survive and develop without them. Science is radically human, so it is no surprise that it expresses what characterizes our humanity: the myriad of human capacities and conflicts, interests and resources, strengths and limitations. Science is an enduring part of our world, our history and our civilization. To ignore it is to dismiss and neglect all that, and to diminish our role and responsibilities in it.

HUBI-B 300 Human Dilemmas (3)
TOPIC: Tuberculosis: historical and current perspectives
Domenico Bertoloni Meli
Class # 14803
Regular Academic Session
MW 1:00p-2:15p + W 4:40p-5:30p MO107

In this course you will be introduced to Tuberculosis the disease, the bacteria that causes the disease and current approaches to diagnosing and dealing with the burden of Tuberculosis. The course involves a section on current scientific understanding and a historical section on how tuberculosis - in its many different manifestations – was understood in the past, and what methods were used in the attempt to cure it. We will also touch upon international efforts for TB eradication and discuss their successes and failures and work as a group to think about effective ways to take the science from TB research and apply it to the field.