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Fall 2012/Spring 2013

On March 19th, 2013, as part of the Tibetan Studies Student Association Lecture Series sponsored by the Department of Central Eurasian Studies, the Inner Asian and Uralic National Resource Center, and the IU Student Association, Dr. Roberto Vitali shared some of his preliminary findings that critically reexamined one of the defining moments in Tibetan-Mongol relations—the Drikung Rebellion of 1290. This rebellion resulted in the devastating massacre at Drikung Monastery by the Mongol armies of Qubilai Qan.

On February 28th, 2013, Professor Carole McGranahan presented a puzzling story that painted an unusual picture of Mao Zedong in Tibet. McGranahan, Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Colorado, Boulder, was part of the Tibetan Studies Student Association Lecture Series sponsored by the Inner Asian and Uralic National Resource Center, Department of Central Eurasian Studies, Sinor Research Institute for Inner Asian Studies, and the Indiana University Student Association.

On February 20th, 2013, Dr. Robert Vitali presented to the Central Eurasian Studies Colloquium a little known version of the least known historical period of Tibet—the “period of fragmentation” following the collapse of the Tibetan Empire in the 10th century. This period, spanning from about the 10th to the early 13th centuries, has been characterized by many scholars as a “dark age” for Tibet, as very little information exists about it in the historical record. Dr. Vitali shed some light on this little understood period, in particular, challenging the dominant historical narrative that claims that Buddhism was extinguished during this time in Tibet.

As part of the Central Eurasian Studies Colloquium, Dr. Saule Satayva gave a talk entitled, Recovering the Richness of Central Asian Nomadic Culture: The Challenges for Public Memory.

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