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Mongolia

In the Wake of Vilmos Diószegi: Collecting Folk Belief and Religious Folklore in Northern Mongolia

Descriptive Text: 

 Mongolian and Turkic shamanism has long drawn scholarly interest. Between 1957 and 1964 the Hungarian ethnologist, Vilmos Diószegi, visited several Turkic and Mongolic peoples in Southern Siberia and Northern Mongolia. Unfortunately due to his early death he only published a few items from his materials. I am preparing his precious manuscript legacy for publication.

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Morin Khuur Past and Present

Descriptive Text: 
Podcast recording of a lecture demonstration on the Morin Khuur or Mongolian horse-headed fiddle. Tsend Batchuluun lectures on the Morin Khuur past and present and his student Gantukga Urtnasan demonstrates by playing the instrument. The Morin Khuur is the most important musical instrument of the Mongolian people and is considered a symbol of the Mongolian nation. When Mongolians were entirely a nomadic nation, the horse was their only means of transportation, as well as ‘man’s best friend.’
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Modern Mongolia

In 1900 Mongolia was a largely nomadic country, with an aristocratic government of the descendants of Genghis Khan and an established Buddhist church, and dominated by viceroys from China’s last, Manchu, dynasty. In 1950, it was the Soviet Union most loyal satellite ruled by Mongolia little Stalin, the dictator Choibalsang. Mongolia entered the new millennium as an independent nation and a multi-party democracy, sandwiched between China and Russia, and struggling to enter the ranks of Asia economic success stories.
Regions Covered: 
Mongolia
Course Code: 
R560

Mongolia

Most famous for the conquest of much of the Eurasian landmass in the 13th century under the leadership of Chinggis Khan, the Mongols proved an important military and administrative influence on many European and Asian civilizations. States centered in Mongolia dominated Inner Asia for more than two thousand years but Chinggis Khan's Mongol Empire was the height of Mongolian and Eurasian steppe power and was the largest contiguous empire in history. Although notorious for their conquests, the Mongols famously promoted cultural, material, and intellectual exchange across Eurasia.

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