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Mongolia

Teresa Nichols "Making and Managing Mongolian Heritage" Brown Bag

Date: 
Tuesday, October 29, 2013 - 12:00pm

Please join us for the Inner Asian and Uralic National Resource Center’s new Graduate Student Brown Bag Talks. All are invited to hear a presentation from graduate students that study the region, who will be discussing their research methods, recent work, and experiences.

The Secret History of the Mongols

The Secret History of the Mongols is Mongolian’s great classic and one of the greatest pieces of history ever written. In this seminar we will read it slowly, exploring it from historical, textual (philological), source-critical, literary, ideological, folkloric, linguistic, and many other points of view. Students will write a seminar paper which will be critiqued by the class in the last two weeks of class.

Regions Covered: 
Mongolia
Historical Central Eurasia
Course Code: 
R760
When Taught: 
Spring 2012

Mongolian Literature and Folklore

This course carries COLL S & H distribution credit

The written and oral art of word, interaction of orality and writing. History of Mongol literary studies. Collections of monuments; internal and external sources. Broad and narrow concepts of literature. Periods and areas. Connections with other arts (music, drama, visual arts) and with the sacred.. Authorship and anonymity. Original and translated works. Indo-Tibetan, Chinese, Turkic and Western influences. Forms and functions. Prose and verse. Narrative and lyric genres. The Mongol verse.

Regions Covered: 
Mongolia
Historical Central Eurasia
Professor: 
/~iaunrc/content/gy%C3%B6rgy-kara
Course Code: 
R661

Mongolian Languages and Dialects

Introduction to Mongolian traditional civilization: elements of the material culture (dwelling, wear, food, transport, warfare, hunting, animal husbandry, crafts, agriculture, orientation, reckoning of time, etc.), social and spiritual life (kinship, wedding, family, birth, name, childhood, toys and games, races, medicine, death; folk religion, Buddhism and monastic lore, shamanism, beliefs and ideals, values and taboos, omens, divinatory practices), folk arts (music, oral literature, dance, etc.).

No knowledge of Mongolian is required.

Regions Covered: 
Mongolia
Historical Central Eurasia
Professor: 
/~iaunrc/content/gy%C3%B6rgy-kara
Course Code: 
R562

Shamanism and Folk Religion of the Mongols

In the last eight centuries the Mongols embraced several dogmatic religions: Buddhism, Christianity and Islam. From among these three world-religions Buddhism in its Tibetan form proved to be the dominant system for the majority of the Mongolian-speaking peoples. In spite of suppression and persecution, their primitive system of beliefs and practices called shamanism never ceased to exist, not even under the rule of the official atheist ideology of the near past, but in its struggle with Buddhism it has been transformed.

Regions Covered: 
Mongolia
Historical Central Eurasia
Professor: 
/~iaunrc/content/gy%C3%B6rgy-kara
Course Code: 
R564

Mongolia's Middle Ages

Asked about Mongolia, the average person knows only about the world empire built by Genghis Khan. Recent visitors to Mongolia may have heard about the 1990 democratic transition, the previous Communist rule, and Russo-Chinese rivalries. But what happened in between the fall of the Mongol empire in 1368 and the twentieth century? This class “fills in the gaps” in our common knowledge of Mongolia.

Regions Covered: 
Mongolia
Historical Central Eurasia
Course Code: 
R561
When Taught: 
Spring 2013

Modern Inner Mongolia

What region in the world has the largest population of ethnic Mongols? What region in Chinese was the first testing ground for the Chinese Communist minority policy? What region in China has had the most lasting impact from the Japanese occupation during World War II? What region of the world produces the largest part of the world’s cashmere and most of its rare earths? Which region in China suffered the most in the Cultural Revolution? The answer to all these questions is: Inner Mongolia.

Regions Covered: 
China
Mongolia
Course Code: 
R662
When Taught: 
Fall 2011

Mongol Century

This course deals with the empire built by the Mongols in the 13th century—the largest land empire in the world. Most readings will be from translated primary sources of the 13th and 14th centuries, written by the Mongols themselves and also by Persians, Chinese, Eastern Christians, Europeans, and other peoples that fought, surrendered to, or traded with the Mongol conquerors.

Regions Covered: 
Mongolia
Historical Central Eurasia
Course Code: 
R593
When Taught: 
Fall 2010

Property in Central Eurasia

Regions Covered: 
China
Hungary
Iran
Kazakhstan
Mongolia
Romania
Tajikistan
Turkmenistan
Uzbekistan
Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region
Historical Central Eurasia

A land of nomads and industrialists, communists and capitalists, media moguls and pirates all at the same time, Central Eurasia has been a testing ground-and battleground-for some of society’s greatest experiments in property: what can (or should) be owned, who can own it, and what they can do with it. This course explores the development of conceptions of property and property rights in Central Eurasia, from the establishment of rights over hunting and grazing grounds to fights over copyright and patents.

Professor: 
/~iaunrc/content/kathryn-graber
Course Code: 
R599
When Taught: 
Spring 2013

Mongolian Languages and Dialects

Regions Covered: 
Mongolia

The course investigates the following topics in all attested Mongolic languages: language and dialects; periods, sources, and scripts; vowels & vowel harmony; consonants; historical morphology; personal pronouns; the n-stems; changes of in verb systems; plurals; fusion, contraction; syntax change; negation & interrogation; word order; lexicon and loan words.

Professor: 
/~iaunrc/content/gy%C3%B6rgy-kara
Course Code: 
R666
When Taught: 
Fall 2013

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