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Mongolia

Mongolia's Middle Ages

Asked about Mongolia, the average person knows only about the world empire built by Genghis Khan. Recent visitors to Mongolia may have heard about the 1990 democratic transition, the previous Communist rule, and Russo-Chinese rivalries. But what happened in between the fall of the Mongol empire in 1368 and the twentieth century? This class “fills in the gaps” in our common knowledge of Mongolia.

Regions Covered: 
Mongolia
Historical Central Eurasia
Course Code: 
R561
When Taught: 
Spring 2013

Modern Inner Mongolia

What region in the world has the largest population of ethnic Mongols? What region in Chinese was the first testing ground for the Chinese Communist minority policy? What region in China has had the most lasting impact from the Japanese occupation during World War II? What region of the world produces the largest part of the world’s cashmere and most of its rare earths? Which region in China suffered the most in the Cultural Revolution? The answer to all these questions is: Inner Mongolia.

Regions Covered: 
China
Mongolia
Course Code: 
R662
When Taught: 
Fall 2011

Mongol Century

This course deals with the empire built by the Mongols in the 13th century—the largest land empire in the world. Most readings will be from translated primary sources of the 13th and 14th centuries, written by the Mongols themselves and also by Persians, Chinese, Eastern Christians, Europeans, and other peoples that fought, surrendered to, or traded with the Mongol conquerors.

Regions Covered: 
Mongolia
Historical Central Eurasia
Course Code: 
R593
When Taught: 
Fall 2010

Property in Central Eurasia

Regions Covered: 
China
Hungary
Iran
Kazakhstan
Mongolia
Romania
Tajikistan
Turkmenistan
Uzbekistan
Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region
Historical Central Eurasia

A land of nomads and industrialists, communists and capitalists, media moguls and pirates all at the same time, Central Eurasia has been a testing ground-and battleground-for some of society’s greatest experiments in property: what can (or should) be owned, who can own it, and what they can do with it. This course explores the development of conceptions of property and property rights in Central Eurasia, from the establishment of rights over hunting and grazing grounds to fights over copyright and patents.

Professor: 
/~iaunrc/content/kathryn-graber
Course Code: 
R599
When Taught: 
Spring 2013

Mongolian Languages and Dialects

Regions Covered: 
Mongolia

The course investigates the following topics in all attested Mongolic languages: language and dialects; periods, sources, and scripts; vowels & vowel harmony; consonants; historical morphology; personal pronouns; the n-stems; changes of in verb systems; plurals; fusion, contraction; syntax change; negation & interrogation; word order; lexicon and loan words.

Professor: 
/~iaunrc/content/gy%C3%B6rgy-kara
Course Code: 
R666
When Taught: 
Fall 2013

New Mongol Literatures

Regions Covered: 
Mongolia

The course offers an overview of the main modern central and southeastern Mongol, Buryat and Kalmyk writers, poets, novelists and playwrights, their lives and works, ideals and ideas, their quest for national identity in a widening world.

No knowledge of a Mongolic language is required.

Professor: 
/~iaunrc/content/gy%C3%B6rgy-kara
Course Code: 
R569
When Taught: 
Fall 2013

Frontier China: Migrants, Nomads, and Borderland Nobodies

Regions Covered: 
China
Mongolia
Tibet
Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region
Historical Central Eurasia

There is a rich China, a beautiful China. And there is a China that is anything but: poor, marginal, and hardscrabble. In our minds, a Great Wall separates the two. High civilization, productivity, and the state lie on one side, crude lawlessness lies on the other. Yet, throughout Chinese history, ordinary people straddled the line between heartland and frontier: settlers, immigrants, merchants, missionaries, runaways, and nomads. What, then, did the Great Wall represent? What dynamics defined the historical relations between settled and mobile communities in China?

Professor: 
/~iaunrc/content/jonathan-schlesinger
Course Code: 
G200
When Taught: 
Fall 2013

Empire of the Mongols

This course is an introduction to the Mongols Empire of the 13th century—the largest land empire in the world. In the class, we will look at the Mongols’ unique steppe nomadic lifestyle, how it prepared them for military success, and then how Chinggis Khan (known in the West as Genghis) added rapid adaption to siege warfare and governmental institutions to that foundation.

Regions Covered: 
Mongolia
Historical Central Eurasia
Course Code: 
R193
When Taught: 
Spring 2013

Lotus World Music and Arts Festival

Date: 
Wednesday, September 25, 2013 - 4:00pm to Sunday, September 29, 2013 - 5:00pm

 

 

The 20th Annual Association of Central Eurasian Students' Conference Keynote Lecture: Tibet and Mongolia: The search for nationhood in the early 20th century

Descriptive Text: 

Dr. Shakya is Canada Research Chair in Religion and Contemporary Society in Asia at the Institute of Asian Research, University of British Columbia

His lecture was entited: Tibet and Mongolia: The search for nationhood in the early 20th century

 

 

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