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Tibet

Sino-Tibetan Relations

This course carries Culture Studies & COLL S & H distribution credit

Regions Covered: 
China
Tibet
Course Code: 
R572

Introduction to the History of Tibet

This course carries Culture Studies & COLL S & H distribution credit

This course will survey Tibet's history from its earliest period up through the present day. Students will become acquainted with several facets of Tibet's history, including the Tibetan empire of the 7th-9th centuries, the impact of Buddhism on Tibetan political and social structures, aspects of Tibet's relations with neighboring peoples, the development of the Dalai Lama's government, and the current issue of Tibet. This course has been approved for credit as a culture option course.

Regions Covered: 
Tibet
Course Code: 
R570

Buddhist Lives: The Buddha, Milarepa, and the Dalai Lama

Regions Covered: 
Tibet
Historical Central Eurasia

What can we learn from the lives of Siddhartha Gautama, Jetsun Milarepa, and Tenzin Gyatso, better known as the Buddha, Milarepa and the 14th Dalai Lama, respectively? By examining their deeds and beliefs, as well as canonical and non-canonical texts, the meaning of the dharma and Buddhism in general will be explored. No knowledge of Pali or Tibetan is necessary, just an interest in the religion and region.

Professor: 
/~iaunrc/content/gedun-rabsal
Course Code: 
R199
When Taught: 
Fall 2012
Fall 2013

Frontier China: Migrants, Nomads, and Borderland Nobodies

Regions Covered: 
China
Mongolia
Tibet
Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region
Historical Central Eurasia

There is a rich China, a beautiful China. And there is a China that is anything but: poor, marginal, and hardscrabble. In our minds, a Great Wall separates the two. High civilization, productivity, and the state lie on one side, crude lawlessness lies on the other. Yet, throughout Chinese history, ordinary people straddled the line between heartland and frontier: settlers, immigrants, merchants, missionaries, runaways, and nomads. What, then, did the Great Wall represent? What dynamics defined the historical relations between settled and mobile communities in China?

Professor: 
/~iaunrc/content/jonathan-schlesinger
Course Code: 
G200
When Taught: 
Fall 2013

The Civilization of Tibet

This course carries Culture Studies & COLL S & H distribution credit

Regions Covered: 
Tibet
Historical Central Eurasia
Course Code: 
R270
When Taught: 
Fall 2013

The 20th Annual Association of Central Eurasian Students' Conference Keynote Lecture: Tibet and Mongolia: The search for nationhood in the early 20th century

Descriptive Text: 

Dr. Shakya is Canada Research Chair in Religion and Contemporary Society in Asia at the Institute of Asian Research, University of British Columbia

His lecture was entited: Tibet and Mongolia: The search for nationhood in the early 20th century

 

 

Related Regions: 

Mongolia and Tibet: Nation-building at the dawn of the nation-state era

On the evening of April 6th, 2013, the conference goers of the 20th Annual Central Eurasian Studies Conference filled a lecture room in Woodburn Hall for the keynote address. This year’s keynote speaker was Professor Tsering Shakya, Canada Research Chair in Religion and Contemporary Society in Asia, Institute of Asian Research, University of British Columbia.

Karma Exhausted: The Role of Tibetans and Mongols In High Asia’s Most Traumatic Event of the 13th Century

On March 19th, 2013, as part of the Tibetan Studies Student Association Lecture Series sponsored by the Department of Central Eurasian Studies, the Inner Asian and Uralic National Resource Center, and the IU Student Association, Dr. Roberto Vitali shared some of his preliminary findings that critically reexamined one of the defining moments in Tibetan-Mongol relations—the Drikung Rebellion of 1290. This rebellion resulted in the devastating massacre at Drikung Monastery by the Mongol armies of Qubilai Qan.

Mao in Tibetan Disguise: the Social Truths in Excesses

On February 28th, 2013, Professor Carole McGranahan presented a puzzling story that painted an unusual picture of Mao Zedong in Tibet. McGranahan, Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Colorado, Boulder, was part of the Tibetan Studies Student Association Lecture Series sponsored by the Inner Asian and Uralic National Resource Center, Department of Central Eurasian Studies, Sinor Research Institute for Inner Asian Studies, and the Indiana University Student Association.

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