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Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region

Islamic-Hagiography of Central Asia

This course will provide a general survey of the political, social, and cultural history of Islamic Central Asia from the 16th century down to the Russian conquest. Introductory lectures will outline the geographical and ethnic context of Central Asian history, and the political and social legacies of the Mongol conquest in Central Asia; developments in sedentary Central Asia under Timurid rule and the emergence of the nomadic Uzbek confederation in the steppe will be given special attention, before turning to the Uzbek conquest of Central Asia at the beginning of the 16th century.

Regions Covered: 
Afghanistan
Iran
Kazakhstan
Kyrgyzstan
Tajikistan
Turkmenistan
Uzbekistan
Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region
Historical Central Eurasia
Professor: 
/~iaunrc/content/devin-deweese
Course Code: 
R629

Central Asia under Russian Rule

This class carries COLL S & H distribution credit

“Central Asia under Russian Rule” surveys the history of the complex relations between Russia and Central Asia. We will explore the Russian expansion into the region in the 16th century and the conquest of Central Asia in the 19th century, discuss the political and social developments under Russian rule, and conclude with the emergence of modern nations in Soviet Central Asia in the 1920s.

Regions Covered: 
Kazakhstan
Kyrgyzstan
Tajikistan
Turkmenistan
Uzbekistan
Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region
Historical Central Eurasia
Professor: 
/~iaunrc/content/ron-sela
Course Code: 
R612

Islam and Modernity in Central Eurasia

Regions Covered: 
Afghanistan
Azerbaijan
Kazakhstan
Kyrgyzstan
Tajikistan
Tatarstan
Turkey
Turkmenistan
Uzbekistan
Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region
Historical Central Eurasia

Current events have brought the Islamic religion and its putative supporters to the headlines of the daily media, usually in ways that emphasize the Arab-Israeli conflict and/or the equally painful results of terrorist acts and smart bombs.

Professor: 
/~iaunrc/content/edward-lazzerini-0
Course Code: 
R627
When Taught: 
Spring 2013

Islamization in Inner Asia

This course carries Culture Studies & COLL A & H distribution credit

Regions Covered: 
Afghanistan
Kazakhstan
Kyrgyzstan
Tajikistan
Turkmenistan
Uzbekistan
Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region
Historical Central Eurasia
Professor: 
/~iaunrc/content/devin-deweese
Course Code: 
R514

History of Xinjiang to 1911

The region today known as Xinjiang has had a tumultuous political history, often at the margin of other empires, sometimes itself the seat of empires, and sometimes parceled into warring statelets. It is geographically part of Central Asia, though it has also come under the political ambit of China. Peoples inhabiting the region have been animists, Zoroastrians, Nestorian Christians, Buddhists, and Muslims.

Regions Covered: 
China
Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region
Historical Central Eurasia
Professor: 
/~iaunrc/content/gardner-bovingdon-0
Course Code: 
R532

Politics of Identity in China and Inner Asia

Regions Covered: 
Afghanistan
China
Kazakhstan
Kyrgyzstan
Tajikistan
Turkmenistan
Uzbekistan
Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region
Historical Central Eurasia

Many people take terms like "Chinese," "Taiwanese," or "Kazakh" to represent straightforward concepts. This course will challenge that assumption. Battles over states and borders have powerfully affected the formation of identities in China and Inner Asia. As rulers and alliances changed, some identities emerged, some merged, and some disappeared. Through a study of theories of identity and modern state formation, combined with careful attention to the history of China and Inner Asia over the last century or so, we will examine the politics of identity in this vast region.

Professor: 
/~iaunrc/content/gardner-bovingdon-0
Course Code: 
R595
When Taught: 
Spring 2013

Politics in Xinjiang

In a scant one hundred twenty years, part or all of the region now known as Xinjiang has been a colony of the Qing empire, a warlord fiefdom, an independent republic, and a province of China. Today it is, like its southern neighbor Tibet, an "autonomous region" in China. As with Tibet, its politics long remained recondite to the outside world. The last two decades have seen an explosion in research on Xinjiang. It is now possible to gain an extensive understanding of the region through works of political science, anthropology, sociology, and history.

Regions Covered: 
China
Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region
Historical Central Eurasia
Professor: 
/~iaunrc/content/gardner-bovingdon-0
Course Code: 
R530

Property in Central Eurasia

Regions Covered: 
China
Hungary
Iran
Kazakhstan
Mongolia
Romania
Tajikistan
Turkmenistan
Uzbekistan
Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region
Historical Central Eurasia

A land of nomads and industrialists, communists and capitalists, media moguls and pirates all at the same time, Central Eurasia has been a testing ground-and battleground-for some of society’s greatest experiments in property: what can (or should) be owned, who can own it, and what they can do with it. This course explores the development of conceptions of property and property rights in Central Eurasia, from the establishment of rights over hunting and grazing grounds to fights over copyright and patents.

Professor: 
/~iaunrc/content/kathryn-graber
Course Code: 
R599
When Taught: 
Spring 2013

Buddhism in Central Asia

Regions Covered: 
Afghanistan
Tajikistan
Turkmenistan
Uzbekistan
Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region
Historical Central Eurasia

The Buddha, who flourished around 500 BC, is believed to have achieved enlightenment in eastern India. But the earliest evidence for Early Buddhism, and for the Normative Buddhism that developed in the first or second century AD, comes from Gandhara, a country in the southeastern corner of Central Asia (now in Afghanistan) and northwestern corner of India (now in Pakistan). Scholars of Buddhism have written much on legendary ¿early¿ Buddhism, but what was the earliest known Buddhism really like? What do the early accounts say the Buddha actually taught?

Professor: 
/~iaunrc/content/christopher-i-beckwith
Course Code: 
R529
When Taught: 
Fall 2013

Frontier China: Migrants, Nomads, and Borderland Nobodies

Regions Covered: 
China
Mongolia
Tibet
Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region
Historical Central Eurasia

There is a rich China, a beautiful China. And there is a China that is anything but: poor, marginal, and hardscrabble. In our minds, a Great Wall separates the two. High civilization, productivity, and the state lie on one side, crude lawlessness lies on the other. Yet, throughout Chinese history, ordinary people straddled the line between heartland and frontier: settlers, immigrants, merchants, missionaries, runaways, and nomads. What, then, did the Great Wall represent? What dynamics defined the historical relations between settled and mobile communities in China?

Professor: 
/~iaunrc/content/jonathan-schlesinger
Course Code: 
G200
When Taught: 
Fall 2013

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