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News & Events

The hosting of Central Eurasian themed events is an important component of the IAUNRC's educational outreach efforts. Coverage of events held in the past can be seen at our website's Past Events Highlights page and also in our collection of biannual newsletters. For the latest Center-related news, please see our What's New page.

Upcoming Events

What's New at the IAUNRC

Dr. László Borhi is the Peter A. Kadas Chair Associate Professor of Central European Studies at the Department of Central Eurasian Studies. Professor Borhi also serves as Scientific Counsellor of the Institute of History, Center for Humanities of the Hungarian Academy. He is the author of Hungary in the Cold War, 1945–1956: Between the United States and the Soviet Union (2004), as well as the co-author and co-editor of Soviet Occupation of Romania, Hungary and Austria, 1944–1948 (forthcoming).

For many years now at Indiana University, the Department of Central Eurasian Studies (CEUS) has welcomed Fulbright Language Teaching Assistants (FLTAs) from around the region into CEUS classrooms. The FLTA Program is one part of the larger Fulbright Program, sponsored by the State Department’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (ECA), which brings over 1,800 Foreign Fulbright Fellows to academic programs around the United States each year by providing merit based grants. This year CEUS welcomes five FLTAs from Finland, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Mongolia, and Uzbekistan.

This year at Lotus Festival, Bloomington’s annual international music festival, the IAUNRC is proud to be sponsoring three, folk-inspired acts from Finland and Estonia. Each artist will be playing at least twice within the festival and has been praised for their innovations on more traditional styles. Be sure to check them out at the following venues:

Baltic Crossing ( A folk-dance band combining Scottish, Danish, and Finnish influences.

The Inner Asian and Uralic National Resource Center is beginning the 2015-2016 academic year in the new Global and International Studies Building (GISB). GISB, located between Wells Library and the Radio-TV Building on the east side of campus, is home to the School of Global and International Studies (SGIS). Eight departments and 20 programs reside in the new 165,000 square foot facility; though the school consists of four departments, eighteen centers, three language flagships, and the Summer Language Workshop.

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Past Events Highlights

The following was written by Jason Vincz for the Russian and Eastern European Institute. Reused with permission.

On March 27th, 2015, the Islamic Studies program hosted a talk by IU graduate student Rosemary Pennington entitled “Weaving Together A Socially Mediated Muslim Self.” The subject of the talk was the dynamic process of identity formation among Muslims on the social media site Tumblr. Because of the particularities of Tumblr’s infrastructure, it allows users to create a dialogue about what it means to be a Muslim in the form of reblogs, tags, and likes.

On Thursday, March 26th at Willkie Auditorium, the Navruz Student Association once again hosted Indiana University’s Navruz celebration. The Persian holiday dates back to pre-Islamic times and is now celebrated as a spring festival in Turkey, Central Asia, Iran, Afghanistan, Xinjiang, and myriad diaspora communities. The event was funded by the Indiana University Students Association and the Inner Asian and Uralic National Resource Center.

On March 23rd, 2015, Dr. Anne Tamm, a visiting professor at Johns Hopkins University and Associate Professor at Hungary Károli Gáspár University  gave a presentation as a part of the Spring 2015 CEUS Colloquium talks. Her talk was entitled “Negation in Uralic Languages,” and focused on the extensive forms of negation that are a part of various Uralic languages. Of the seventeen languages that Dr. Tamm used as the basis of her research, the majority are endangered.

On March 10th, 2015, the Hungarian Student Association celebrated the 1848 Hungarian Revolution at the University Club. Following an introductory speech by Dr. Bence Ságvári, a visiting Fulbright Visiting Scholar, Hungarian students performed songs and recited Hungarian poems. Afterward, traditional Hungarian food was served for the many attendees.

Funding was provided by the Hungarian Cultural Association, Central Eurasian and Uralic Studies Department, Inner Asian and Uralic National Resource Center, Russian and East European Institute, and the IU Student Association

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