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Indiana University Bloomington
 
Social Movements in Modern America: Labor, Civil Rights, and Feminism
NEH Summer Institute for School Teachers, July 11-31, 2010
Institute Content and Schedule

social movements

Daily Schedule:
9:00-12:00   Morning session
12:00-1:30  Lunch
1:30-4:00  Afternoon session
7:00-9:30  Evening session (selected evenings)

All classes will be held in the Tree Suites rooms on the mezzanine level of the Indiana Memorial Union unless otherwise indicated.

Core texts

  • Priscilla Murolo and A. B. Chitty, From the Folks Who Brought You the Weekend: A Short Illustrated History of Labor in the United States (2001)
  • Shelton Stromquist and Marvin Bergman, Unionizing the Jungles: Labor and Community in the Twentieth-Century Meatpacking Industry (1997)
  • Barbara Ransby, Ella Baker and the Black Freedom Movement: A Radical Democratic Vision (2003)
  • Hasan K. Jeffries, Bloody Lowndes: Civil Rights and Black Power in Alabama's Black Belt (2009)
  • Ruth Rosen, The World Split Open: How the Modern Women’s Movement Changed America (2000)
  • Guerilla Girls, The Guerilla Girls’ Bedside Companion to the History of Western Art (1998)
  • Frederick D. Drake and Lynn R. Nelson, Engagement in Teaching History: Theory and Practices for Middle and Secondary Teachers.  2nd Edition. (2009)

NOTE: Other readings—both secondary and primary sources—are available to institute participants as PDFs through the IU online course delivery platform called Oncourse. Online readings are hyperlinked on this schedule.

Assignments: Sharing Historical Understanding with Teachers and their Students

One of our responsibilities, as participants in the Institute, is to disseminate the ideas and understandings gained in the course of our readings, lectures and discussions.  Participants represent a wide spectrum of expertise interests and enthusiasms, but we all are united in a devotion to understanding the past with all of its nuances, complexities and contradictions and we are committed to sharing our understanding with students.
 
In order to share your understanding of Social Movements in America we ask you to create three primary source-based activities to share with other Institute participants and to be available to teachers via the NEH Summer Institute web site.  Each participant will post one activity related to each of the three social movements.  These activities will be posted following each segment of the institute.

Each of the three activities will consist of two components: the student activity and a brief lesson plan.  The activity will contain the primary and secondary sources and all the instructions, handouts and other materials distributed to students.  The student activity will synthesize the issues considered in our seminars with your historical interests and creativity.  The lesson plan will be fairly brief with sections describing your rationale, standards, objectives, assessments, procedures and resources.  Lesson planning is not a favorite activity of teachers; however, your plan will benefit teachers whose expertise resides outside the social movements we are studying, but are considering the addition of your activity to their curriculum.  The end result of our work will be the creation of seventy-five activities enriching our teaching and the classrooms of countless colleagues and their students.

Week One: July 12-16—Labor Movement

Sunday July 11

Federal Room, Indiana Memorial Union, 6:00-8:00 p.m.

Roundtable discussion on Social Movements in Modern America and group dinner.

Required reading (provided and assigned before participants arrive):

  • Doug McAdam, "The Classical Model of Social Movements Examined," and "The Political Process Model," in Steven Buechler and F. Kurt Cylke, Jr., Social Movements: Perspectives and Issues (1997), 135-48, 172-92.
  • Paul Rogat Loeb, "The Real Rosa Parks," Los Angeles Times (January 4, 2000), http://motherjones.com/print/12327.
  • Rosa Parks short biography, http://www.rosaparks.org/bio.html.
  • David Snow, E. Burke Rochford, Jr., Steven Worden and Robert Bensford, "Frame Alignment Processes, Micromobilization, and Movement Participation," in Steven Buechler and F. Kurt Cylke, Jr., Social Movements: Perspectives and Issues (1997), 211-27.
  • "Or Does it Explode?" in Howard Zinn, A People's History of the United States (1980), 435-39.
  • Selections from Howard Zinn and Anthony Arnove, eds., Voices of a People's History of the United States (2008)
  • Frederick D. Drake and Lynn R. Nelson, Engagement in Teaching History (2009), 3-31.

Monday, July 12

Sassafras Room, Indiana Memorial Union

Morning: The Labor Movement in the World War I Era, lecture and discussion
Afternoon: Showing of excerpts of film drama The Killing Floor based on the World War I-era battle for a union in the Chicago packinghouses, discussion of film and group work with primary documents.

Required reading:

  • Labor and Empire; in Murolo, 138-73.
  • Selections from Upton Sinclair, The Jungle.

Oncourse:

  • James Barrett, Work and Community in the Jungle, 188-231.
  • Charles Neill and James Reynolds, Conditions in Chicago Stock Yards, June 4, 1906(Report to U.S. Congress)

Tuesday, July 13

Sassafras Room, Indiana Memorial Union

Morning: Labor’s Giant Step: the birth of mass industrial unionism, lecture and discussion
Afternoon: “Black and White: Unite and Fight”?—the Challenge of solidarity”: reconstructing labor’s story with oral histories.

Required reading:

  • "Labor on the March" in Murolo, 192-220
  • Peter Rachleff, "Organizing Wall-to-Wall," and Rick Halpern, "Race and Radicalism in the Chicago Stockyards," in Stromquist and Bergman, 51-95.

Oncourse:

  • Selected oral histories from Rick Halpern and Roger Horowitz, Meatpackers: An Oral History of Black Packinghouse Workers and Their Struggle for Racial and Economic Equality (1997)

Evening: Forum with local labor activists, 7:30-9:30 p.m. in the Sassafras Room, IMU

ladies tailor picket 1919Wednesday, July 14

Walnut Room, Indiana Memorial Union

Morning: Hot War, Cold War and the labor movement, lecture and discussion
Afternoon: The Taft-Hartley Act and Communists in the labor movement--simulation and debate on McCarthyism in the unions

Required reading:

  • "Hot War, Cold War" in Murolo, 221-45.
  • Roger Horowitz, "This Community of Our Union: Shopfloor Power and Social Unionism in the Postwar UPWA," "The Only Hope We Had: UPWA Local 46 and the Struggle for Racial Equality in Waterloo, Iowa, 1948-1960," in Stromquist and Bergman, 96-127, 159-87.

Oncourse:

  • Primary documents on the cold war and labor, drawn from Eileen Boris and Nelson Lichtenstein, eds., Major Problems in the History of American Workers (1991)
  • Readings on Salt of the Earth.

Evening: Film showing of Salt of the Earth on the Empire Zinc mining strike, and discussion with Carl Weinberg, Walnut Room, 7:00-9:30 p.m.

Thursday, July 15

Walnut Room, Indiana Memorial Union

Morning: The Labor Movement in Hard Times, lecture and discussion
Afternoon: Visit Center for Study of History and Memory—work with oral history resources on labor movement, workers and deindustrialization of Indiana.

Required reading:

  • "Hard Times," in Murolo, 276-307.
  • Deborah Fink, "Reorganizing Inequality: Gender and Structural Transformation in Iowa Meatpacking," in Stromquist and Bergman, 218-41.

Oncourse:

  • National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation website: (Defending America's Workers from the Abuses of Compulsory Unionism since 1968)
  • Selections from Peter Rachleff, Hard-Pressed in the Heartland: The Hormel Strike and the Future of the Labor Movement; Fred Halstead, The 1985-86 Hormel Meatpackers Strike; and Neala J. Schleuning, Women, Community, and the Hormel Strike.

Friday, July 16

Field trip to processsing plant and visit with union workers.

Saturday, July 17

Persimmon Room, Indiana Memorial Union

Morning: The Labor Movement Today: Back to the Jungle?, including video clip from "UFCW Organizing at Cagle-Keystone,"(Albany, KY, 2000)

Required reading:

  • "Brave New World," in Murolo, 308-30
  • Mark Grey, "Storm Lake, Iowa, and the Meatpacking Revolution: Historical and Ethnographic Perspectives on a Community in Transition," in Stromquist and Bergman, 242-61.

Oncourse:

Afternoon: Curriculum planning with Lynn Nelson

  • Explanation and discussion of the Institute expectations regarding the creation and posting of primary source activities for teachers.
  • Organizing teaching around Institute themes and ideas.
  • Historical Thinking and learning history
  • The use of primary source documents with your students. 

Required reading:

  • “Historical Thinking,” in Drake and Nelson, 52-71.
  • “Using Primary Sources: The First-, Second-, and Third-Order Approach,” in Drake and Nelson, 137-154.
  • “Lesson and Unit Planning,” in Drake and Nelson, 96- 111.

Week Two: July 19-23--Civil Rights Movement

Monday, July 19

Sassafras Room, Indiana Memorial Union

Morning: Jim Crow America, lecture and discussion
Afternoon: Agents of Change: Local people, excerpts of  PBS Documentary, The Rise and Fall of Jim Crow (2002), discussion of reading and primary sources.

Required reading:

  • Introduction and "Now, who are your people?" in Ransby, 1-45.

Oncourse:

  • “The Long Civil Rights Movement and the Political Uses of the Past,” Jacquelyn Dowd Hall, The Journal of American History, Vol. 91, Issue 4.
  • "Setting the Stage," in Charles Payne, 7-28.
  • Selected letters to the Defender newspaper from African American migrants to Chicago

Tuesday, July 20

Sassafras Room, Indiana Memorial Union

Morning: Seed Time: World War II and the birth of a mass civil rights movement
Afternoon: The first mass campaigns and resistance to civil rights, discussion of readings and viewing of excerpts of "Awakening" episode of Eyes on the Prize (1987)

Required reading:

  • "Fighting her own wars: the NAACP National Office, 1940-46," in Ransby, 105-48
  • “Conditions Unfavorable to the Rise of the Negro: The Pursuit of Freedom Rights Before the Civil Rights Era,” and “I Didn’t Come Here to Knock: The Making of a Grassroots Social Movement,” in Jeffries, 7-80 (Chapters 1 and 2)

Oncourse:

civil rights march 1965Wednesday, July 21

Walnut Room, Indiana Memorial Union

Morning: Sit-ins and Freedom Rides, lecture and discussion, with excerpts from "Ain't Scared of Your Jails" episode of Eyes on the Prize (1987)
Afternoon: Visit Indiana University's Black Film Archive to explore film resources on the history of the civil rights movement.

Required reading:

  • "Mentoring a New Generation of Activists: The Birth of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee," in Ransby, 239-72.
  • “We Ain’t Gonna Shed a Tear for Jon: School Segregation, White Resistance and the African American Response,” and “I’m Going to Try to Make Some of the Freedom Here Back Home: The Federal Government and the Fight for Freedom Rights,” in Jeffries, 81-142 (Chapters 3 and 4)

Oncourse:

  • Aldon Morris, "Black Southern Student Sit-in Movement: An Analysis of Internal Organization," in Doug McAdam and David Snow, eds., Social Movements: Readings on Their Emergence, Mobilization, and Dynamics (1997), 90-109.
  • "A Call for Unity"
  • "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" (in response to "A Call for Unity")

Evening: Film showing of Spike Lee's Four Little Girls (1997), (running time 102 minutes), and discussion with Jeffrey Ogbar, Walnut Room, 7:00-9:30 p.m.

Thursday, July 22

Walnut Room, Indiana Memorial Union

Morning: The Mississippi campaign, the rise of a new militancy, and lecture and discussion of readings
Afternoon: Discussion of documents, with viewing an excerpt from "Mississippi: Is this America?" episode of Eyes on the Prize (1987)

Required reading:

  • "Mississippi Goddamn: Fighting for Freedom in the Belly of the Beast of Southern Racism," in Ransby, 299-329
  • “We Gonna Show Alabama Just How Bad We Are: The Birth of the Original Black Panther Party and the Development of Freedom Politics,” “Tax the Rich and Feed the Poor: Black Power and the Election of 1966,” in Jeffries 143-206 (Chapters 5 and 6)

Oncourse:

  • "Letters from Mississippi," in Takin' it to the Streets: A Sixties Reader, 34-39.

Demonstration of "Virtual Congress," 4 p.m.

Friday, July 23

Walnut Room, Indiana Memorial Union

Morning: Black Power and its legacy

Required reading:

  • "The Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party and the Radical Campaigns of the 1960s and 1970s," in Ransby, 330-356.
  • “Now is the Time for Work to Begin: Black Politics in the Post-Civil Rights Era,” and “Epilogue: The Black Dirt Gets in Your Soul: The Fight for Freedom Rights in the Days Ahead,” (Chapter 7 and Epilogue)

Oncourse:

  • "The McCone Commission Report on Watts, Violence in the City--An End or a Beginning?" all in Takin' it to the Streets: A Sixties Reader, 142-151.
  • “Move Over or We’ll Move Over on You,” and “Rainbow Radicalism: The Rise of Radical Ethnic Nationalism,” in Jeffrey O.G. Ogbar, Black Power: Radical Politics and African American Identity (2005)
  • Richard Nixon, "If Mob Rule Takes Hold in the U.S.," Ronald Reagan, "Freedom vs. Anarchy on Campus," Pete Hamill, "Wallace," Michael Novak, "Why Wallace?," and "Tony Imperiale Stands Vigilant for Law and Order," all in Takin' it to the Streets: A Sixties Reader, 338-342, 345-347, 348-351, 351-354, 358-363; Roy Wilkins, “Crisis and Commitment,” New York Times, July 6, 1966.

Afternoon: Curriculum planning with Lynn Nelson

  • The Politics of Teaching History, How will we teach Institute themes in classrooms?
  • Progress Report, How are we doing in creating our student activities?  Issues include the selection of primary source documents; the creation of analysis guides; and the written plans to guide teachers.

Required reading:

“Teaching History,” in Drake and Nelson, 2-31.
“ Creating Historical Understanding and Communication Through Performance Assessment,” in Drake and Nelson, 112- 135.

Saturday, July 24

Field trip to DuSable Museum of African-American History and Bronzeville neighborhood in Chicago, IL. 888-881-3284 or Historic Bronzeville:
Chicago Neighborhood Tours
77 E. Randolph St.
Chicago IL 60602
Phone: 312.742.1190

Required reading:

Week Three: July 26-30--Feminist Movement

Monday, July 26

Walnut Room, Indiana Memorial Union

Morning: What Feminism?  Why Feminism?
World War II and the Origins of Modern Feminism
Afternoon: Father Knows Best: Women in the 1950s
Viewing excerpt of documentary film The Life and Times of Rosie the Riveter

Required reading:

  • “Dawn of Discontent,” “Female Generation Gap,” in Rosen, 3-59.

Oncourse:

  • Freedman, Estelle.  Chapter Three, “Women’s Rights, Women’s Work, and Women’s Sphere,” in  No Turning Back: History of Feminism and the Future of Women.  Ballantine Books: 2003 (from now on referred to as “Freedman”)
  • Freedman, Estelle.  Chapter Eight, “Workers and Mothers: Feminist Social Policies”
  • Fudge, Rachel.  “Celebrity Jeopardy”
  • Hoagland, Lisa, “Fear of Feminism: Why Young Women Get the Willies”
  • Maureen Honey, "The 'Womanpower' Campaign: Advertising and Recruitment Propaganda during World War II"
  • McIntosh, Peggy.  “White Privilege and Male Privilege”

Tuesday, July 27

Sassafras Room, Indiana Memorial Union

Morning: The limits of liberalism under Kennedy and Johnson
Afternoon: Feminists organize
Required reading:

  • “Limits of Liberalism,” in Rosen, 63-93.

Oncourse:

  • Betty Friedan, “The Problem That Has No Name,” (from the Feminine Mystique)
  • Gloria Steinem, “What Would it Be Like if Women Win” Freedman Selections
  • Freedman, Chapter Four, “Race and the Politics of Identity in U.S. Feminism”
  • Zeisler, Andi, “Marketing Miss Right: Meet the Single Girl, Twenty-First Century Style”
  • NOW Bill of Rights

Wednesday, July 28

Sassafras Room, Indiana Memorial Union

Morning: The Second “second wave”: radical feminism
Afternoon: Visit Indiana University’s Kinsey Institute/Lilly Library for Research in Sex, Gender and Reproduction to explore  resources related to history of feminist movement
Required reading:

  • “Leaving the Left” and ”Hidden Injuries of Sex” in Rosen
  • Freedman Chapter Six: “Never Done: Women’s Domestic Labor”

Oncourse:

  • Casey Hayden and Mary King, “Sex and Caste: A Kind of Memo”
  • Robin Morgan, “No More Miss America”
  • Anne Koedt, “The Myth of the Vaginal Orgasm”

womens lib march 1970Thursday, July 29

Walnut Room, Indiana Memorial Union

Morning: Feminism and anti-feminism

Required reading:

  • “Passion and Politics,” in Rosen, 196-226.
  • “Epilogue: Beyond Backlash,” in Rosen, 331-344.

Oncourse:

  • Freedman, Chapter Ten, “Reproduction: The Politics of Choice”
  • Hyman, Rebecca, “Full Frontal Offense: Bringing Abortion Rights to the Ts”
  • Wood, Summer, “On Language: Choice”
  • Hughes, Richard L., “‘The Civil Rights Movement of the 1990s?’: The Anti-Abortion Movement and the Struggle for Racial Justice”

Afternoon: Curriculum planning with Lynn Nelson

  • Ideas turned into accomplishments.  Please come prepared to share the activities you are posting for others to use.

Evening: film screening: Mad Men (2009), Sassafras Room, 7:00-9:30 p.m.

Friday, July 30

Walnut Room, Indiana Memorial Union

Morning: The Personal is the Political
Afternoon: Feminism and Popular Culture

Required reading:

  • Guerilla, 6-45

Oncourse:

  • Laura Mulvey, "Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema"
  • Nolan, Monica.  “Mother Inferior: How Hollywood Keeps Single Moms in Their Place”
  • Oler, Tammy, “Bloodletting: Female Adolescence in Modern Horror Films”

Evening:  Individual work with Lynn Nelson if needed, Maple Room, 7:00-9:30 p.m.

Saturday, July 31

Field Trip to Indianapolis Museum of Art.

Required reading:

  • Guerilla, 46-91

State Room West, Indiana Memorial Union, 5:00-8:00 p.m.

Closing session and group dinner.

 

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