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Courses

Semester:

INTL-I 500 TOPICS IN GLOBAL STUDIES (13692)

Instructor: Lipman, Maria
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0009
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Topic: PUTIN'S RUSSIA. The Soviet empire held sway over half the world and collapsed a quarter of a century ago. Contemporary Russia is a different country; it is neither communist, nor an empire. Unlike its Soviet predecessor, which set out to build a new world, today¿s Russia does not reject its Soviet legacy; instead, it seeks to embrace it along with the earlier history of tzars and princes. In this course we will trace Russia¿s recent history in order to understand how today¿s Russia has come about. We will look into why the USSR stagnated in the 1970s; why Mikhail Gorbachev, the first and last president of the Soviet Union, launched Perestroika; why Gorbachev¿s reforms, instead of reinvigorating the Soviet Union, precipitated its death; and why so few people lamented its passing at the time, and so many miss it today. Today¿s Russia is habitually referred as Putin¿s Russia; it has come to be feared and resented the way the Soviet Union once was. But this course seeks to provoke curiosity, not resentment, and we will not focus too much on politics. Instead, we will explore Russian society and culture by reading texts by US scholars and journalists and watching contemporary Russian films.

INTL-I 500 TOPICS IN GLOBAL STUDIES (31518)

Instructor: Rana, Shruti
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Psychology 111
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Topic: CULTURE, COMMERCE, AND COURTS: THE LAW OF INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS. Markets and legal systems are becoming increasingly international and intertwined. Consequently, it is important for policymakers and businesspeople to understand the variety of business law systems that have developed around the world, as well as some of the legal, cultural, and commercial principles and concepts underlying these systems. This course will focus on the intersection of law and markets by comparing how major legal systems seek to regulate commercial activity, and what happens when these systems cooperate or collide. It will introduce students to business law systems in three regions of the world: the United States, the Middle East, and China, and examine some of the cultural and historical forces shaping these systems. Throughout, we will consider how these systems handle questions of human rights and corporate social responsibility, and whether a modern, global lex mercatoria (the "law merchant") is now emerging in the international arena.

INTL-I 500 TOPICS IN GLOBAL STUDIES (31519)

Instructor: Bovingdon, Gardner
Day & Time: TR 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0009
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

In 1900, roughly one in eight people on earth lived in a city. Today more than half of the world¿s population is now urban, and by 2050 the proportion will be two thirds. How has humanity urbanized so fast beginning in the twentieth century, and what have been the major consequences? How have the world¿s largest cities spread out and sprouted upward, accumulated wealth and human capital, and become both centers of innovation and sources of problems affecting the globe? This course will focus attention on a small number of large cities around the world dubbed "global cities" because of their influence on regions far beyond their own borders. We will explore the ways global cities relate to their hinterlands. Do they follow the leads of their national governments, or do they instead operate in a supra-national realm, a web of central places linked through commerce, culture, and human movements over which national governments have little influence? This course will acquaint students with some of the best writings on the history of urbanization, city planning, and globalization, as well as documentary and feature films on today¿s global cities and Teju Cole¿s novel Open City.

INTL-I 500 TOPICS IN GLOBAL STUDIES (32259)

Instructor: Steinberg, Jessica
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0003
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Topic: MODELS OF SOCIAL AND POLITICAL PROCESSES. How did the protests in Tahrir Square begin? Will China¿s growth continue? What makes addressing global warming so difficult? How can we explain the reappearance of measles in the U.S.? This course will survey a set of models for thinking about individual, national and international social and political processes. Models discipline our thinking about the world and help us to define and characterize relationships and events with logical consistency and precision. Familiarity with a toolbox of models also allows us to identify specific kinds of political and social obstacles to achieving collective goals (such as problems of aggregation and public choice, monitoring and enforcement, or free-riding) so we can assess potential strategies for overcoming them. In this course we will learn about why and how models are useful, we will develop an understanding of a number of models that characterize individual and system level behavior, and we will evaluate current and historical local, as well as international and global processes and events using these models. While there are no concrete prerequisites, basic knowledge of algebra is a necessity.

INTL-I 500 TOPICS IN GLOBAL STUDIES (32260)

Instructor: Istrabadi, Feisal Amin
Day & Time: MW 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Radio-TV 226
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Topic: AFTER ATROCITIES, RECONSTRUCTING THE PEACE. Despite a long-standing international legal norm against the targeting of civilians in armed conflict, experts estimate that no less than 100 million civilians were killed in the course of such conflicts in the twentieth century. Since the trials of the German and Japanese leaderships for the crimes they perpetrated during the Second World War, there has been some precedent of holding high-ranking individuals to account for the commission of crimes against humanity, war crimes, and genocide. This course will examine the legal, historical, political, and philosophical underpinnings of the modern era of accountability, starting with the first modern international tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda in the mid-1990s, through to the International Criminal Court. Topics to be considered will include impunity (especially in ostensible exchange for peace) and amnesty, as well alternatives to international and hybrid judicial systems, such as local tribunals, truth and reconciliation systems, and other alternatives. The writings of political scientists, historians, philosophers, sociologists, jurists, and practitioners, among others, will be considered. This class touches upon issues related to conflict resolution and peace-building, international human rights norms, and, to some extent, the law of armed conflict.

INTL-I 500 TOPICS IN GLOBAL STUDIES (32824)

Instructor: Yasuda, John Kojiro
Day & Time: W 10:10 AM- 12:40 PM
Building & Room: Sycamore Hall 002
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Topic: CHINA'S POLITICAL ECONOMY. Examines key aspects of China's political economy: the obstacles and sources of economic development, the foundations for democratization, the distribution of political power, and the forces affecting national unity. Use of comparative and historical perspectives, with emphasis on the Reform era. Sources range from macro analyses to company case studies.

INTL-I 500 TOPICS IN GLOBAL STUDIES (33188)

Instructor: Golestaneh, Seema
Day & Time: TR 6:45 PM- 8:00 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 231
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

INTL-I 502 SEM IN GLOBAL HLTH & ENVRNMT (13128)

Instructor: Kane, Stephanie C.
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0011
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Topic: ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE. Focuses on the global struggle for potable water and healthy rivers. From megacities to villages, we will explore the political unconscious of pollution, the passionate organizing efforts of neighborhood environmental activists, the changing and contested meanings of indigeneity and landscape, and the geopolitics of water engineering and international development in wet and dry environments. Our cases draw from three books by anthropologists, two doing ethnographic fieldwork in the Americas (Mexico-U.S. borderlands, Argentina and Brazil) and one on the Nile in Egypt. Students will engage with the global water crisis in required readings, writing assignments and group presentations of site-based images.

INTL-I 503 SEMINAR IN GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT (31546)

Instructor: Bauerle Danzman, Sarah
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 109
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Topic: HARNESSING FOREIGN INVESTMENT FOR DEVELOPMENT. Corporations that operate across national boundaries powerfully structure the nature of production, consumption, and the distribution of wealth globally. Multinational enterprises (MNEs) can help bring economic growth and shared prosperity to developing countries, but critics often emphasize the negative consequences such large global firms can have on local societies. How can states, international development organizations, and transnational social justice networks harness the positive potential of MNEs while minimizing their potential for exploitation? This course will offer students the empirical knowledge and analytical skills necessary to make sense of the influence of MNEs at both the local and global level, and the attempts to regulate their behavior. We will begin by providing an overview of MNEs in the contemporary international system and their effects on development. The remainder of the course will be organized around three policy-oriented questions: 1) How can firms manage the risks associated with investing across borders (and how can states reassure firms of the safety of their investments)?; 2) How can governments craft regulatory structures and incentive programs to promote "beneficial" foreign investment?; 3) How can non-governmental organizations effectively pressure MNEs to adopt and comply with high labor and environmental standards? Throughout the course, students will learn about careers paths associated with MNEs and development, including political risk consulting, investment promotion and locational consulting, and non-profit work to develop and implement ethical labeling and sourcing standards.

INTL-I 515 RESEARCH METHODS INTL STUDIES (12227)

Instructor: Bauerle Danzman, Sarah
Day & Time: MW 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0003
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

This course introduces students to principles and techniques of research, from formulating a research question to collecting and analyzing data. The course begins with foundational concepts, such as ethics, drawing on literature, and sampling. With this grounding, the course then covers a variety of methods commonly used in international studies, including field experiments, surveys, in-depth interviews, ethnography, case studies, and textual analysis. By the end of the course, students should be able to plan and conduct their own research, including their international studies capstone project, and will be better able to understand and evaluate research undertaken by others.

INTL-I 680 INTL STUDIES MASTER'S CAPSTONE (32480)

Instructor: Gilligan, Emma L.
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

P:I515 This seminar is designed to consolidate the studies of master's students who have completed all International Studies graduate degree requirements. Students must complete a project that addresses an issue appropriate to international studies.

INTL-I 702 IND STUDY IN GLOBAL STUDIES (10072)

Instructor: Gilligan, Emma L.
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 4.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Independent research, investigation, and synthesis of scholarship that crosses disciplines. Supervised by a faculty member upon the approval of the department. May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

INTL-I 705 HUMAN RIGHTS MULTIDISC SEMINAR (31558)

Instructor: Gilligan, Emma L.
Day & Time: W 2:30 PM- 5:00 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1023
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

This multidisciplinary seminar is the gateway course for the Ph.D. Minor in Human Rights, though students from all graduate programs and schools with interests in human rights are welcome to attend.