Indiana University Bloomington
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Courses

Semester:

INTL-I 500 TOPICS IN GLOBAL STUDIES (32567)

Instructor: Ekbia, Hamid
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 331
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

Topic: COMPUTERS, CULTURES, AND OUR GLOBALIZED FUTURE. Has computer technology made the world a better place ¿ more prosperous, more informed, more tolerant, and more peaceful? This is a question that is on many people's minds, but with no easy answer. Computing has transformed people's ways of life around the globe. Work, leisure, commerce, communication, politics, war, and education are now conducted very differently from a few of decades ago. While many of these changes seem to have a global character, they take specific forms in various cultures and societies. The way social media are used, for instance, is different in Brazil from how it is in Angola, and these are yet quite distinct from Russia, China, Sweden, Iran, or South Korea. This, however, is not unique to social media. All technologies are designed, developed, and used according to the demands of cultures and places; they are shaped by their contexts of use, and in turn shape those contexts. Like any other technology, and perhaps more strongly, computers are cultural and political artifacts. One of the best ways to understand them, therefore, is through a socio-economic, cultural, and political lens. This course explores computing from such a perspective, with a focus on the future of communities and societies across the globe.

INTL-I 502 SEM IN GLOBAL HLTH & ENVRNMT (30801)

Instructor: Macekura, Stephen
Day & Time: MW 1:00 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0011
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

Today, talk of "sustainability" is all the rage. Yet for most of human history, most practices were "un-sustainable." Why? What ideas and institutions gave rise to such destructive habits? How have those past experiences shaped the world of today? Why only in recent decades has talk of sustainability become so popular? In what ways has the concept of sustainability itself been challenged or reformed on ground of political, economic, and social justice? We'll explore these questions by investigating the history behind unsustainable and sustainable practices around the globe. We will examine long-term changes in both space and time to develop a keener understanding of how the human-nature relationship has evolved. We will pay particularly close attention to the relationship between "the West" and the rest of the globe, as well as the relationship between notions of "development" and "modernization" that led people to alter the natural world in many different ways.

INTL-I 504 SEM IN HUMAN RGHTS & INTL LAW (30822)

Instructor: Gilligan, Emma L.
Day & Time: MW 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0011
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

Topic: GENOCIDE AFTER WWII. Since the end of WWII, the 1948 Genocide Convention has provided the international community with a framework to address the gross violation of human rights on the bases on ethnic, racial, national or religious origins. This semester we will seek to understand what genocide is and analyze together the causes of several instances of genocide in the post war era: Cambodia (1975-1979), Rwanda(1994) and the former Yugoslavia (1990-1999). We will begin by studying the 1948 Genocide Convention and its historical evolution in the wake of the Holocaust. We will trace the causes and underlying dynamics of genocide with an emphasis on the international response and critically evaluate measures taken to prevent genocidal acts. We will address the emergence of terms such as ethnic cleansing and zachistka (sweep operation) to characterize particularly gross human rights violations and the role of these emerging terms in genocide prevention. This course is designed to assist undergraduate students to develop an understanding of the origins of the genocide debate, to deepen our understanding of the historical causes of genocide and to critically appraise the reaction of the international community and the future of the 1948 Genocide Convention in human rights history.

INTL-I 515 RESEARCH METHODS INTL STUDIES (17503)

Instructor: Allendorf, Keera
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Swain West 221
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

This course introduces students to principles and techniques of research, from formulating a research question to collecting and analyzing data. The course begins with foundational concepts, such as ethics, drawing on literature, and sampling. With this grounding, the course then covers a variety of methods commonly used in international studies, including field experiments, surveys, in-depth interviews, ethnography, case studies, and textual analysis. By the end of the course, students should be able to plan and conduct their own research, including their international studies capstone project, and will be better able to understand and evaluate research undertaken by others.

INTL-I 701 INTERDISC SEM - GLOBAL STUDIES (16873)

Instructor: Bosco, David Lyndon
Day & Time: W 3:00 PM- 5:30 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1023
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

The goal of this seminar is to help graduate students generate a transnational, international, or global research framework that incorporates various disciplinary perspectives and complements and strengthens their own disciplinary and regionally specific academic interests.

INTL-I 702 IND STUDY IN GLOBAL STUDIES (14204)

Instructor: Gilligan, Emma L.
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 4.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05