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Courses

Semester:

INTL-I 500 TOPICS IN GLOBAL STUDIES (12531)

Instructor: Bosco, David Lyndon
Day & Time: MW 9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Wendell W. Wright 2025
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

Topic: OCEAN GOVERNANCE. This course considers the history and modern practice of ocean governance, with a focus on the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea and challenges to it.

INTL-I 500 TOPICS IN GLOBAL STUDIES (12750)

Instructor: Steinberg, Jessica
Day & Time: MW 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1106
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

How did the protests in Tahrir Square begin? Will China's growth continue? What makes addressing global warming so difficult? How can we explain the reappearance of measles in the U.S.? This course will survey a set of models for thinking about individual, national and international social and political processes. Models discipline our thinking about the world and help us to define and characterize relationships and events with logical consistency and precision. Familiarity with a toolbox of models also allows us to identify specific kinds of political and social obstacles to achieving collective goals (such as problems of aggregation and public choice, monitoring and enforcement, or free-riding) so we can assess potential strategies for overcoming them. In this course we will learn about why and how models are useful, we will develop an understanding of a number of models that characterize individual and system level behavior, and we will evaluate current and historical local, as well as international and global processes and events using these models. While there are no concrete prerequisites, basic knowledge of algebra is a necessity. This course is for both graduate students and undergraduates. Graduate students will have additional reading and more in depth assignments.

INTL-I 500 TOPICS IN GLOBAL STUDIES (32659)

Instructor: Bovingdon, Gardner
Day & Time: F 1:00 PM - 3:30 PM
Building & Room: Lindley Hall 112
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

Topic: TEACHING AREA STUDIES. Why should we teach areas studies? How should we teach area studies? Can and should scholars focusing on different areas learn from each other? Prompted by these and similar questions, this course will address the challenges, opportunities, and enduring questions in area studies. We will read searching critiques and consider important philosophical questions seldom raised in area studies courses, and we will look out various windows at the temptations of other approaches. But we will end with a strong defense of the continuing relevance, and importance, of area studies as practice and as a field of teaching.

INTL-I 500 TOPICS IN GLOBAL STUDIES (32692)

Instructor: Rana, Shruti
Day & Time: R 2:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 7
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

This course is designed as a practicum to provide a high-impact opportunity for students to apply their academic skills and knowledge in a real-world environment, specifically the United Nations and international human rights law. This course aims to provide students with the theoretical knowledge and practical tools needed to effectively engage in policymaking efforts or advocate before international treaty bodies. Students will study United Nations treaty bodies and the international law system, conduct an independent research project, and attend UN treaty body sessions at the UN headquarters in New York during Spring Break. They will obtain a deep understanding of international human rights laws, how the United Nations treaty system works, and how to effectively engage with the treaty making, interpretation, and enforcement process from a variety of perspectives (for example, from the perspective of both state and non-state actors such as government entities, intergovernmental bodies, NGOs, and research organizations). This course is aimed at students interested in pursuing careers in international law, human rights, international institutions, and NGOs.

INTL-I 502 SEM IN GLOBAL HLTH & ENVRNMT (10714)

Instructor: Kane, Stephanie C.
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 6
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

Topic: ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE. Focuses on the global struggle for potable water and healthy rivers. From megacities to villages, we will explore the changing and contested meanings of indigeneity and water landscapes, the passionate organizing efforts of neighborhood environmental activists, the political unconscious of pollution, and the geopolitics of water engineering and international development in wet and dry environments. Our cases draw from three books by anthropologists, two doing ethnographic fieldwork in the Americas (Mexico-U.S. borderlands, Argentina and Brazil) and one on the Nile in Egypt. All three ethnographies grapple with the ends of rivers both physically (as deltas) and symbolically (as an index of our 21st century planet). Students expand the range of environmental justice subjects and geographies through independent research projects. Evaluation is based on writing, oral presentation and participation.

INTL-I 503 SEMINAR IN GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT (30141)

Instructor: Ekbia, Hamid Reza
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM - 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 5
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

Topic: TECHNOLOGY AND DEVELOPMENT. Technology and development seem to have a close connection with each other. In the Western imagination, technology is often tied to modernization, progress, and social good. In modern times, various technologies (from mechanical harvesters to baby bottles and from radio sets to social media) have been introduced to the developing world with a promise of progress. The outcomes, however, have been mixed at best, with such interventions often disrupting established ways of life, replacing them with alternatives that have a fallen-from-sky feel to them. In this course, we study the relationship between technology and development from a socio-technical perspective, with a focus on the future of communities and societies across the globe and how it is being shaped by computer technology. A key premise of this perspective is that technologies are designed, developed, and used according to the specific demands of cultures and places; they are shaped by their contexts of use, and in turn shape those contexts. Like any other technology, and perhaps more strongly, computers are cultural and political artifacts. One of the best ways to understand them, therefore, is through a socio-economic, cultural, and political lens. We will examine this through old and new examples of techno-utopian thinking.

INTL-I 506 SEMINAR IN IDENTITY & CONFLICT (30138)

Instructor: Pinaud, Clemence Marine
Day & Time: MW 9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Cedar Hall C114
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

Topic: WOMEN AND WAR. This course introduces students to the topic of women and war, spanning across different time periods and regions. It equips students to look critically at women's assigned roles and at gendered identities in peace and in wartime, from a solid historical and comparative perspective. By the end of this course, students will understand women's experiences in war, and look critically at concepts such as "motherhood", "combat" or "sexual violence". The course covers five main topics in the study of women and war: an introduction to the concepts of gender, militarization and images of women; women's place in the war economy and as victims (along with men) of sexual/gender-based violence war; women's agency and their multiple roles in armies and other armed groups; women as perpetrators of violence and extremism; and women, the making of gendered ethnic identities and of a national history in the aftermath of war.

INTL-I 515 RESEARCH METHODS INTL STUDIES (10024)

Instructor: Bell, Andrew Michael
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM - 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 3
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

This course introduces students to principles and techniques of research, from formulating a research question to collecting and analyzing data. The course begins with foundational concepts, such as ethics, drawing on literature, and sampling. With this grounding, the course then covers a variety of methods commonly used in international studies, including field experiments, surveys, in-depth interviews, ethnography, case studies, and textual analysis. By the end of the course, students should be able to plan and conduct their own research, including their international studies capstone project, and will be better able to understand and evaluate research undertaken by others.

INTL-I 680 INTL STUDIES MASTER'S CAPSTONE (12829)

Instructor: Gilligan, Emma L.
Day & Time: 10:28 AM - 10:28 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

P:I515 This seminar is designed to consolidate the studies of master's students who have completed all International Studies graduate degree requirements. Students must complete a project that addresses an issue appropriate to international studies.

INTL-I 702 IND STUDY IN GLOBAL STUDIES (8243)

Instructor: Gilligan, Emma L.
Day & Time: 10:28 AM - 10:28 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 4
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

Independent research, investigation, and synthesis of scholarship that crosses disciplines. Supervised by a faculty member upon the approval of the department. May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

INTL-I 705 HUMAN RIGHTS MULTIDISC SEMINAR (12567)

Instructor: Gilligan, Emma L.
Day & Time: M 2:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Building & Room: Wendell W. Wright 3115
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

This multidisciplinary seminar is the gateway course for the Ph.D. Minor in Human Rights, though students from all graduate programs and schools with interests in human rights are welcome to attend.