Indiana University Bloomington
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Courses

Semester:

INTL-I 500 TOPICS IN GLOBAL STUDIES (32329)

Instructor: Bosco, David Lyndon
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0003
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

Topic: GLOBAL GOVERNANCE AND INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS. For centuries, mankind has struggled to find ways to organize international life and restrain the chaos and conflict that have so often plagued it. The increasing destructiveness of warfare and the accelerating pace of economic globalization have made that quest more urgent. But the search for structures to govern the world has always encountered forces that push in the other direction. The desire for uninhibited national sovereignty has been a consistent check on movements for global governance. As daunting have been simple coordination problems. What form should global governance take? What mission should international organizations and institutions have? Who should control them and to whom are they responsible? Today, there exists a group of influential but incomplete and often flawed institutions, including the World Bank, the United Nations, the International Monetary Fund, the International Criminal Court, the European Union, and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. Other less formal global governance initiatives have also emerged as important factors. Understanding the complex interactions between these initiatives and national governments and individuals is essential to understanding contemporary world politics.

INTL-I 502 SEM IN GLOBAL HLTH & ENVRNMT (32549)

Instructor: O'Reilly, Jessica Leigh
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Forest Quad C230
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

Understand how humans study, experience, interpret, and mitigate global climate change. Using a cultural focus, we investigate climate science, politics, and economics, and consider how climate change intersects with matters of justice, gender, globalization, media, development, and higher education. As we learn about these topics, we will conduct applied research on particular climate topics at various scales--local, state, national, and international--to work towards defining solutions and ways forward in a rapidly changing environment. This course takes place around the two-week long 22nd Conference of Parties (COP22) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). We will use this event as a focal point for our learning, tying together our theoretical and topical interests to track how matters of concern are negotiated through the UNFCCC process and COP22.

INTL-I 502 SEM IN GLOBAL HLTH & ENVRNMT (32550)

Instructor: Long, Yan
Day & Time: MW 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0013
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

Social movements within different countries and across national borders have developed in response to injustices in public health--some of which have been exacerbated by economic and political globalization. Meanwhile, alternative visions of health policies and global governance are emerging from the bottom up. The course offers tools to understand why and how people engage in collective action around health issues, paying specific attention to transnational advocacy networks and global civil society. We begin by examining the major theoretical paradigms in the study of contentious politics and global health. We then turn to cases and critical issues in health movements such as science and epidemiology, body and biocitizenship, political opportunities, resource mobilization, framing, networks, culture and identity, strategy repertoires, and policy outcomes. We explore different forms of contentious politics around the globe in areas such as healthcare reform, mental health, disability rights, reproductive health, HIV/AIDS, food security, and environmental justice. The readings are chosen from the areas of social movements, human rights, international relations, world politics, global health, and development.

INTL-I 503 SEMINAR IN GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT (32829)

Instructor: Bauerle Danzman, Sarah
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1118
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

Corporations operating across national boundaries structure production, consumption, and the distribution of wealth globally. Multinational enterprises (MNEs) can help bring economic growth and shared prosperity to developing countries, but critics emphasize the negative impacts on local societies. This course will offer students empirical knowledge and analytical skills to make sense of the influence of MNEs at both the local and global level, and the attempts to regulate their behavior. We will begin with an overview of MNEs in the contemporary international system and their effects on development, before turning to three policy-oriented questions: 1) How can firms manage risks associated with investing across borders ¿ and how can states reassure firms of the safety of their investments?; 2) How can governments craft regulatory structures and incentive programs to promote "beneficial" foreign investment?; 3) How can non-governmental organizations effectively pressure MNEs to adopt and comply with high labor and environmental standards? Students will learn about careers associated with MNEs and development, including political risk consulting, investment promotion and locational consulting, and non-profit work to develop and implement ethical labeling and sourcing standards.

INTL-I 515 RESEARCH METHODS INTL STUDIES (32334)

Instructor: Allendorf, Keera
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 109
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

This course introduces students to principles and techniques of research, from formulating a research question to collecting and analyzing data. The course begins with foundational concepts, such as ethics, drawing on literature, and sampling. With this grounding, the course then covers a variety of methods commonly used in international studies, including field experiments, surveys, in-depth interviews, ethnography, case studies, and textual analysis. By the end of the course, students should be able to plan and conduct their own research, including their international studies capstone project, and will be better able to understand and evaluate research undertaken by others.

INTL-I 702 IND STUDY IN GLOBAL STUDIES (12552)

Instructor: Gilligan, Emma L.
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 4.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

Independent research, investigation, and synthesis of scholarship that crosses disciplines. Supervised by a faculty member upon the approval of the department.

INTL-I 705 HUMAN RIGHTS MULTIDISC SEMINAR (32853)

Instructor: Kenney, Padraic
Day & Time: M 4:00 PM- 6:30 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1023
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

This multidisciplinary seminar is the gateway course for the Ph.D. Minor in Human Rights. Discussion of the history, theory and politics of human rights. Open to students from all graduate programs and schools with an interest in human rights.