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Semester:

INTL-I 500 TOPICS IN GLOBAL STUDIES (33296)

Instructor: Istrabadi, Feisal Amin
Day & Time: MW 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Bldg Not Assigned TBA
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 8/25/2014 End Date: 12/19/2014

AFTER ATROCITIES, RECONSTRUCTING THE PEACE: Despite long-standing international norms against the targeting of civilians, experts estimate that up to 170 million civilians were killed in the course of various conflicts in the twentieth century, many at the hands of their own governments. Countries in transition from such traumatic episodes frequently engender mechanisms for, as historian John Torpey has it, "laying to rest the unquiet past." Some societies do so through the use of formal justice mechanisms, such as the trials in the former Yugoslavia or Rwanda. Others use variations of truth and reconciliation commissions, while some use more informal, traditional means of dispute resolution and reconciliation. Still others opt for outright impunity or some form of conditional amnesty. This course will consider the alternative theories for building the peace after periods of intense violence, including, for example, methods of reconstructing a national discourse that deals with the past. Issues of legality as distinct from legitimacy of such mechanisms will be addressed, as will the often differing or shifting perceptions of who is the victim and who the perpetrator. The course is multi-disciplinary, with readings by historians, philosophers, political scientists, and jurists, among others. (Class meets at 201 N. Indiana Ave., Center for the Study of Global Change.)

INTL-I 500 TOPICS IN GLOBAL STUDIES (33567)

Instructor: Lanham, Alexis D
Day & Time: W 3:25 PM- 5:25 PM
Building & Room: Law 216
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 8/25/2014 End Date: 12/19/2014

WORLD WAR I: It was only after a second global cataclysm in the 20th century that the events of 1914 to 1918 came to be known as the First World War; before that, they were known simply as the Great War. It was the first true war of the modern era: industrialized, mass-mobilized, drawing on all the resources of the bureaucratic state and altering the construction of the societies that fought. This seminar will recover the overshadowed memory of this, the most disruptive and decisive event of our era, with special attention to the way law was shaped by the shock of a violent modernity: its profound influences on the nature and regulation of war, international law, international institutions, democracy and popular sovereignty. Through the prism of the Great War, students will consider such problems as the ability of law to respond to changing technology; (today we struggle to craft law for drones and cyber-warfare, but the shock of technology in the Great War -- aerial bombing, poison gas, submarine warfare, the tank, the trench system, industrial mobilization -- was magnitudes greater); the first, failed efforts at international criminal law and the quest to assign legal and moral responsibility for war; the difficulties of dismantling empires and creating national states; and the challenges of crafting a general peace and a global system of security. The principal focus of the course will be on contemporary interactions of the war and international law; where clear linkages or contrasts exist, the course will also examine the abiding lessons and legacies of the war for today's legal regimes. Students will produce a seminar research paper.

INTL-I 500 TOPICS IN GLOBAL STUDIES (38254)

Instructor: Coyle, Gene Arthur
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 246
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 8/25/2014 End Date: 12/19/2014

INTL-I 701 INTERDISC SEM - GLOBAL STUDIES (30363)

Instructor: Kahn, Hilary E
Day & Time: R 9:00 AM- 11:30 AM
Building & Room: Bldg Not Assigned TBA
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 8/25/2014 End Date: 12/19/2014

This graduate seminar is designed to stimulate students to think critically about a broad range of theoretical and methodological issues involved in global research, including ethics, qualitative and quantitative approaches, the intersection of the global and local, and research designs from different disciplinary perspectives. (Class meets at 201 N. Indiana Ave., Center for the Study of Global Change.)

INTL-I 702 IND STUDY IN GLOBAL STUDIES (30369)

Instructor: Kahn, Hilary E
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 4.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 8/25/2014 End Date: 12/19/2014

Independent research, investigation, and synthesis of scholarship that crosses disciplines. Supervised by a faculty member upon the approval of the department.