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Semester:

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (15818)

Instructor: Nemes, Peter
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Student Building 015
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 8/25/2014 End Date: 12/19/2014

Course Description: I100 emphasizes the relational and comparative study of the manner in which individuals, groups, localities, and nations have confronted global issues in the past and present. This course teaches different perspectives for studying and making sense of the world. We will learn how these different perspectives portray the world, interpret events, and often shape human actions. Lecture material and key concepts are organized around the International Studies thematic concentrations, thereby introducing a variety of analytical approaches from the natural and social sciences and the arts and humanities. Assignments and discussion will also incorporate a geographic dimension for analysis. Case studies from different historical periods and parts of the world will be used to illustrate these approaches and key issues.

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (34487)

Instructor: Nordahl, Per Christian
Day & Time: MW 9:05 AM- 9:55 AM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 101
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 8/25/2014 End Date: 12/19/2014

Course Description: I100 emphasizes the relational and comparative study of the manner in which individuals, groups, localities, and nations have confronted global issues in the past and present. This course teaches different perspectives for studying and making sense of the world. We will learn how these different perspectives portray the world, interpret events, and often shape human actions. Lecture material and key concepts are organized around the International Studies thematic concentrations, thereby introducing a variety of analytical approaches from the natural and social sciences and the arts and humanities. Assignments and discussion will also incorporate a geographic dimension for analysis. Case studies from different historical periods and parts of the world will be used to illustrate these approaches and key issues.

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (34488)

Instructor: Drane, Leslie Elizabeth
Day & Time: F 9:05 AM- 9:55 AM
Building & Room: Cedar Hall C102
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 8/25/2014 End Date: 12/19/2014

Course Description: This is a discussion section for Dr. Per Nordahl's I100.

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (34489)

Instructor: Drane, Leslie Elizabeth
Day & Time: F 10:10 AM- 11:00 AM
Building & Room: Cedar Hall C102
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 8/25/2014 End Date: 12/19/2014

Course Description: This is a discussion section for Dr. Per Nordahl's I100.

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (34490)

Instructor: Drane, Leslie Elizabeth
Day & Time: F 11:15 AM- 12:05 PM
Building & Room: Cedar Hall C102
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 8/25/2014 End Date: 12/19/2014

Course Description: This is a discussion section for Dr. Per Nordahl's I100.

INTL-I 202 GLOBAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENT (15085)

Instructor: Siqueira, Andrea Dalledone
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 149
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 8/25/2014 End Date: 12/19/2014

Course Description: This course will review human-environment interactions from a global perspective, focusing specifically on how global change can alter human susceptibility to disease. Discussions will be focused on the general population and environmental changes that contribute to health deficiencies at the regional and global levels. Specific population changes to be discussed include: general population growth; transportation of people and products; urbanization and lack of sanitation; contact with wildlife (expansion into new areas, ecotourism, and bushmeat); war and social disruption; and public health deficiencies. Specific ecological changes to be discussed include: changes in land use (irrigation, deforestation, and fragmentation); reduced biodiversity (altered host-parasite dynamics); pollution; natural disasters; and climate change (altered habitats of disease vectors). Readings will be selected to reflect the general interests of natural and social scientists alike.

INTL-I 203 GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT (11281)

Instructor: Steinberg, Jessica
Day & Time: MW 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 144
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 8/25/2014 End Date: 12/19/2014

Course Description: The course will focus on the specifics of and interactions between the political, cultural, social and economic factors that influence human development at global, national and local levels. We will explore these factors at work in developing countries and seek to blend theory with practical application. I203 covers a substantial part of the social sciences literature on development and will include discussions on dependency, globalization and sustainability as well. This course also introduces major theoretical perspectives on the structure, function and governance of international markets and the relevance of international institutions with regards to development.

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (15088)

Instructor: Siqueira, Andrea Dalledone
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 208
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 8/25/2014 End Date: 12/19/2014

Course Description: This class is an introduction to the topic of human rights, the movements to promote them and the forces arrayed against them, both past and present. We will examine many of the key issues of human rights, how they are defined, how respect for them is ensured, and what they are threatened by. The class will not only consider contemporary dilemmas in human rights, like humanitarian intervention, but also historical questions such as how we explain progressive steps like transformations in consciousness and creation and current efficacy of human rights international treaties. Our concerns will be both empirical and normative. We want to understand how human rights have evolved over time, where they have been respected, where they have been violated and why. But we also want to grapple with ethical questions such as how much America's foreign policy should concern itself with human rights, or whether there is a universal definition of human rights. A large focus will be on holistic approaches which address rights through sustainable development. Students will make attempts at activism through serving as advocates for human rights and putting together transnational campaigns on contemporary human rights issues so that you are able to truly, MAKE THE PERSONAL POLITICAL.

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (16559)

Instructor: Kousaleos, Nicole Serena
Day & Time: MW 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 244
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 8/25/2014 End Date: 12/19/2014

Course Description: This class is an introduction to the topic of human rights, the movements to promote them and the forces arrayed against them, both past and present. We will examine many of the key issues of human rights, how they are defined, how respect for them is ensured, and what they are threatened by. The class will not only consider contemporary dilemmas in human rights, like humanitarian intervention, but also historical questions such as how we explain progressive steps like transformations in consciousness and creation and current efficacy of human rights international treaties. Our concerns will be both empirical and normative. We want to understand how human rights have evolved over time, where they have been respected, where they have been violated and why. But we also want to grapple with ethical questions such as how much America's foreign policy should concern itself with human rights, or whether there is a universal definition of human rights. A large focus will be on holistic approaches which address rights through sustainable development. Students will make attempts at activism through serving as advocates for human rights and putting together transnational campaigns on contemporary human rights issues so that you are able to truly, MAKE THE PERSONAL POLITICAL.

INTL-I 205 INTERNATL COMMUNICATION & ARTS (19393)

Instructor: Nemes, Peter
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 148
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 8/25/2014 End Date: 12/19/2014

Course description: This course addresses the intersection between two highly debated and contested terms -- culture and the global or globalization. It does so with particular attention to culturally-located examples of screen media, arts, and communication. We are bombarded daily with news of how cultural forms are crossing borders with increasing speed, rendering locations across the world more closely connected. Yet such border crossing has long been constituted among a range of contradictory, competing, and even unpredictable locations, powers, and ideologies. How do we begin to understand the ways in which cultural institutions, technologies, and practices mediate our links to the world and that of others? What sorts of dynamics structure these exchanges? How do we approach the ways in which cultural formations are negotiated within or among particular local, national, or global contexts? Finally, how do we address our place, and the place of others, in relation to all that the ideologies of cultural globalization might promise?

INTL-I 205 INTERNATL COMMUNICATION & ARTS (11375)

Instructor: Kousaleos, Nicole Serena
Day & Time: MW 11:15 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Kirkwood Hall 212
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 8/25/2014 End Date: 12/19/2014

Course description: This course addresses the intersection between two highly debated and contested terms -- culture and the global or globalization. It does so with particular attention to culturally-located examples of screen media, arts, and communication. We are bombarded daily with news of how cultural forms are crossing borders with increasing speed, rendering locations across the world more closely connected. Yet such border crossing has long been constituted among a range of contradictory, competing, and even unpredictable locations, powers, and ideologies. How do we begin to understand the ways in which cultural institutions, technologies, and practices mediate our links to the world and that of others? What sorts of dynamics structure these exchanges? How do we approach the ways in which cultural formations are negotiated within or among particular local, national, or global contexts? Finally, how do we address our place, and the place of others, in relation to all that the ideologies of cultural globalization might promise?

INTL-I 206 IDENTITY AND CONFLICT (14212)

Instructor: Bovingdon, Gardner
Day & Time: MW 11:15 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Kirkwood Hall 203
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 8/25/2014 End Date: 12/19/2014

Course description: This interdisciplinary course will investigate intersections between "identity" and "conflict." We will consider how different forms of identity -- ethnic, religious, linguistic, political, and caste-based, to cite a few examples -- can become the basis for collectives to mobilize. We will examine how collective forms of identity can be yoked to nationalism, resulting in an exclusionary view of the nation-state and violence against those whose identities are deemed undesirable. Rather than view conflicts as irreducibly based in identity, however, we will also seek to understand how they emerge out of local conditions and colonial legacies, and can be shaped by national, regional, and transnational contexts. Students will acquire a familiarity with critical concepts such as nationalism, ethnicity, gender, political economy, and sectarianism through the analysis of conflicts and identities from different areas of the world.

INTL-I 210 DIPLOMACY SECURITY GOVERNANCE (19399)

Instructor: Khanani, Ahmed
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 247
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 8/25/2014 End Date: 12/19/2014

Course description: Institutions, policies, and events centering on Security, Diplomacy, and Governance result from the interaction of general models developed by scholars with the unique characteristics of the societies within which policy makers are located and with the societies that they violently or peacefully interact. This course simultaneously educates students on two distinct aspects of governance, security policy, and diplomacy: the theoretical lenses needed to understand why and how policies are made, as well as their effects; and, the unique cultures and practices that affect policy making and outcomes.

INTL-I 220 GLOBAL CONNECTIONS (30945)

Instructor: Minetti, Alfredo Ignacio
Day & Time: MW 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Cedar Hall C002
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: A&H
Start Date: 8/25/2014 End Date: 12/19/2014

Course Description: This course is a survey and analysis of the scope of global connections and interdependencies in the world today and their profound impact upon individual and collective identities, the rhetoric over human rights discourses, national and regional policies and politics, and our perception of the "other." Through the use of relevant examples and case studies from around the globe we will discuss an array of significant topics, break down stereotypes, contextualize and analyze connections, recognize our place in the global puzzle, and exercise our ability to think ethically about international issues. It will be an enriching and stimulating class that you will greatly benefit from -- both personally and professionally.

INTL-I 300 TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL STDS (16303)

Instructor: Korytova, Stepanka
Day & Time: MW 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 007
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 8/25/2014 End Date: 12/19/2014

GLOBAL HUMAN TRAFFICKING: Human Trafficking, an invisible challenge to human rights across the globe, is a robust and growing business, only less profitable than the illegal trade in drugs. Women and children are most frequently trafficked in this 21st century slavery. Most people either do not know about the contemporary markets in human beings, or prefer to look the other way. Where are present day abolitionists? We will seek to understand Human Trafficking as an international crime. To this end we will investigate national and international legislation intended to resolve and rid us of such illegal, inhumane crimes.

INTL-I 303 ADV TOPICS IN GLBL DEVELOPMENT (35024)

Instructor: Dunn, Elizabeth Cullen
Day & Time: MW 10:10 AM- 12:25 PM
Building & Room: Read Hall 2-120B
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 10/20/2014 End Date: 12/19/2014

FOOD AND DEVELOPMENT: Where does the food you eat come from, and what kinds of global connections does it create? In this course, we will investigate the global food system to understand where food products come from, the conditions under which they are produced, and the kinds of political and economic relationships that global agriculture creates. We will look at how changes in technology have brought new foods like sushi and starfruit to people in the First World, and how importing food from the Third World allows us to eat counterseasonally. We will look at the role of food corporations in the global good system. Since most of the world¿s poor people are farmers, we will look at the relationship between agriculture and economic development, and ask about the ways that farming both creates poverty and can be a route out of it. We will also look at how global economic relationships create famines in the Third World, and what can be done about the problem of hunger. Alongside some serious political economy and a large reading load, this course will also require you to write, shop, cook, taste, photograph, and explore grocery stores and gardens in our own community.

INTL-I 304 ADV TPCS IN HUM RGHTS/INTL LAW (30320)

Instructor: Parnell, Philip C.
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 245
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 8/25/2014 End Date: 12/19/2014

HUMAN RIGHTS IN EVERYDAY LIFE: This course explores how experiences become rights, how people move human rights into daily practices, and how groups seek to articulate rights as laws and policies. Rights can enter into everyday life also through extra-local sources, such as states and international organizations that frame and govern some relationships as rights-protected and others as rights-free. Today, these passageways of rights -- from the local to the global -- often intersect to reshape relationships among groups by placing them in both local and international contexts. What happens at these intersections will be a major focus of this course. Our discussion first will consider ways that relationships can become rights as well as alternatives to rights -- groups mapping their futures without using rights as destinations. Then we will turn to case studies that illustrate the flow of human rights around local, state, and international intersections that rights-based movements generate. Materials for case studies will include academic research and the personal voices and chronicles of rights-seekers, rights-bearers, and those who try to apportion rights.

INTL-I 305 ADV TOP IN INTERNATL COMM/ART (30328)

Instructor: Graves, Margaret Susanna
Day & Time: TR 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 319
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 8/25/2014 End Date: 12/19/2014

MUSEUMS: THE DISPLAY OF CULTURE. Display is never neutral. In the world of museums and exhibitions, what is chosen for display and how those materials are presented to the public are acts with powerful political resonances. Major museums are showcases in which nations model their own image and their relationship to the wider world: the rapid construction of national museums in the Gulf states is one important recent example of this phenomenon. And nowhere is the culture of display more overtly politicized than in the museum presentation of so-called world cultures: the institutional display of "other" cultures can often tell us as much about the society that frames and consumes the display as they reveal about the culture that is being displayed. This course will investigate some of the most potent presentations of both "self" and "other" in the history of museums and exhibitions, and will engage with questions of colonialism and cultural capital, nation-building and self-identity, and the ethnographic and artistic categorization of global cultures.

INTL-I 306 ADV TOP IN IDENTITY & CONFLICT (19396)

Instructor: Kalentzidou, Olga
Day & Time: TR 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 008
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 8/25/2014 End Date: 12/19/2014

FOOD AND NATIONALISM: This course examines the role food plays in shaping nationalist discourses and in eliciting responses regarding policy and action. As one of the understated yet powerful mediums in the creation and maintenance of collective identities, food sets the stage for nationalistic arguments to unfold and local actions to create global responses. Some of the questions we will ask are: How do collective food traditions emerge? How is nationalism performed through food practices? How do so-called ¿food wars¿ shape relations between countries? And, what is the role of food in shaping new identities in recent social movements? In order to answer these questions we will focus on case studies from different parts of the world; analyze food as political action through uprisings and protests, especially in the Mediterranean; and evaluate the role of international institutions in redefining national identity through food aid programs. Through projects and individual assignments students will be able to analyze and interpret how discourse about food impacts group identification and the manner in which it shapes collective action.

INTL-I 306 ADV TOP IN IDENTITY & CONFLICT (33625)

Instructor: Kalentzidou, Olga
Day & Time: TR 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 008
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 8/25/2014 End Date: 12/19/2014

FOOD AND NATIONALISM (Honors Section): This course examines the role food plays in shaping nationalist discourses and in eliciting responses regarding policy and action. As one of the understated yet powerful mediums in the creation and maintenance of collective identities, food sets the stage for nationalistic arguments to unfold and local actions to create global responses. Some of the questions we will ask are: How do collective food traditions emerge? How is nationalism performed through food practices? How do so-called "food wars" shape relations between countries? And, what is the role of food in shaping new identities in recent social movements? In order to answer these questions we will focus on case studies from different parts of the world; analyze food as political action through uprisings and protests, especially in the Mediterranean; and evaluate the role of international institutions in redefining national identity through food aid programs. Through projects and individual assignments students will be able to analyze and interpret how discourse about food impacts group identification and the manner in which it shapes collective action.

INTL-I 310 ADV TPCS IN DIPL SECURITY GOV (30343)

Instructor: Coyle, Gene Arthur
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 246
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 8/25/2014 End Date: 12/19/2014

INTELLIGENCE TECHNIQUES AROUND THE WORLD (Honors Section): Ninety-nine percent of the countries of the world have a defensive, domestic security service and many also have an intelligence agency to collect foreign information, carry out industrial espionage or even to conduct "covert actions." Understanding how this opaque world operates is essential to understanding much of what happens in the world of international relations and diplomacy. This course will look at the basic structures and underlying principles of these organizations, as well as explain the various techniques that many of those countries employ to carry out those assigned missions. We will look at some of the major players like China, Russia and England, down to certain regional powers such as Israel and Third World organizations like the security service of Ghana. We¿ll look at classical HUMINT and SIGINT operations as well as the newer trends of cyber espionage and sabotage and the expansion of drone spying and warfare. We will also study in depth some of the more imaginative intelligence operations and military deceptions that have been performed by a number of major agencies, explore the individuals who had those creative ideas and take a quick look at the question of whether there are in fact methods to make people more creative than they naturally were at birth. The course is taught by a retired, 30-year veteran of the CIA.

INTL-I 310 ADV TPCS IN DIPL SECURITY GOV (19395)

Instructor: Coyle, Gene Arthur
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 246
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 8/25/2014 End Date: 12/19/2014

INTELLIGENCE TECHNIQUES AROUND THE WORLD: Ninety-nine percent of the countries of the world have a defensive, domestic security service and many also have an intelligence agency to collect foreign information, carry out industrial espionage or even to conduct "covert actions." Understanding how this opaque world operates is essential to understanding much of what happens in the world of international relations and diplomacy. This course will look at the basic structures and underlying principles of these organizations, as well as explain the various techniques that many of those countries employ to carry out those assigned missions. We will look at some of the major players like China, Russia and England, down to certain regional powers such as Israel and Third World organizations like the security service of Ghana. We¿ll look at classical HUMINT and SIGINT operations as well as the newer trends of cyber espionage and sabotage and the expansion of drone spying and warfare. We will also study in depth some of the more imaginative intelligence operations and military deceptions that have been performed by a number of major agencies, explore the individuals who had those creative ideas and take a quick look at the question of whether there are in fact methods to make people more creative than they naturally were at birth. The course is taught by a retired, 30-year veteran of the CIA.

INTL-I 315 RSRCH DESIGN IN INTL STUDIES (16560)

Instructor: Kalentzidou, Olga
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Teter Quad F260
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 8/25/2014 End Date: 12/19/2014

Course description: This class is designed to help students recognize and learn from the interconnections between people, theories, methods, practices and regions of the world that are at the core of International Studies. It exposes students to the theoretical frameworks, methods and skills necessary for undertaking research in International Studies. Through the semester students will be working collaboratively on a well-conceived and feasible research design, allowing them to explore the interdisciplinary and comparative perspectives of International and Global Studies. This class requires working in groups and active class discussions, i.e., the full participation of each member of the class. While working on the process of research design of a given topic, students will be able to form questions about their own exploratory overseas research and subsequent capstone/paper, as well as to acquire and better their working skills for future employment in public and private sectors.

INTL-I 315 RSRCH DESIGN IN INTL STUDIES (16228)

Instructor: Nemes, Peter
Day & Time: MW 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Forest Quad C230
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 8/25/2014 End Date: 12/19/2014

Course description: This class is designed to help students recognize and learn from the interconnections between people, theories, methods, practices and regions of the world that are at the core of International Studies. It exposes students to the theoretical frameworks, methods and skills necessary for undertaking research in International Studies. Through the semester students will be working collaboratively on a well-conceived and feasible research design, allowing them to explore the interdisciplinary and comparative perspectives of International and Global Studies. This class requires working in groups and active class discussions, i.e., the full participation of each member of the class. While working on the process of research design of a given topic, students will be able to form questions about their own exploratory overseas research and subsequent capstone/paper, as well as to acquire and better their working skills for future employment in public and private sectors.

INTL-I 400 INTL STUDIES CAPSTONE SEMINAR (11243)

Instructor: Kenney, Padraic
Day & Time: T 9:05 AM- 12:05 PM
Building & Room: Martin Hall 012A
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: IW
Start Date: 8/25/2014 End Date: 12/19/2014

P: I315. This course is designed to demonstrate your accumulated training in International Studies in a single original project of your choice, subject to the instructor's approval and under the supervision of a faculty member. The completed thesis should bring together your theme, your region, your foreign language expertise, and your overseas experience in an 8,000-word tour de force. The Capstone necessitates multiple drafts of your research that are subjected to peer-review and regular feedback from your instructor, your peers and your mentor. By the end of the seminar you will be able to articulate clearly your research argument in a well-written and orally presented project.

INTL-I 400 INTL STUDIES CAPSTONE SEMINAR (13724)

Instructor: Kousaleos, Nicole Serena
Day & Time: F 9:05 AM- 12:05 PM
Building & Room: Martin Hall 012A
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: IW
Start Date: 8/25/2014 End Date: 12/19/2014

P: I315. This course is designed to demonstrate your accumulated training in International Studies in a single original project of your choice, subject to the instructor's approval and under the supervision of a faculty member. The completed thesis should bring together your theme, your region, your foreign language expertise, and your overseas experience in an 8,000-word tour de force. The Capstone necessitates multiple drafts of your research that are subjected to peer-review and regular feedback from your instructor, your peers and your mentor. By the end of the seminar you will be able to articulate clearly your research argument in a well-written and orally presented project.

INTL-I 405 HONORS INDIV RDGS INTL STUDIES (14213)

Instructor: Kalentzidou, Olga
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 8/25/2014 End Date: 12/19/2014

P: Application and approval of department. Students pursuing departmental honors conduct research in preparation for their honors capstone seminar. May not be repeated for credit.

INTL-I 406 HONORS INTL STDS CAPSTONE SEM (14214)

Instructor: Kalentzidou, Olga
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: IW
Start Date: 8/25/2014 End Date: 12/19/2014

P: I315, application, and approval of department. Required for departmental honors credit, this seminar is designed to consolidate the studies of honors-track seniors who have completed all International Studies degree requirements. Students must complete a project that addresses an issue appropriate to their concentration.

INTL-I 422 CONTESTD TERR/CONFLCTD IDENT (30349)

Instructor: Bose, Purnima
Day & Time: MW 11:15 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Swain West 103
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 8/25/2014 End Date: 12/19/2014

PARTITION: Political scientist Brendan O'Leary usefully defines "partition" as occurring when "a previously unified territorial entity is divided into two or more parts, which may be marked with borders, codified in new maps, and operationalized, for example, in demarcated lines, perhaps accompanied by fences, walls, paint or barbed wire, or punctuated with official posts where passes or passports may be demanded." This course will examine the debates about partition as a solution to territorial conflicts, as well as its ongoing legacies. With O'Leary's definition as our starting point, we will survey some of the scholarly literature on partition drawn from a range of disciplines (history, political science, geography, and anthropology), before turning to specific case studies in Ireland, India/Pakistan, Israel/Palestine, and East/West Germany. Because partition necessarily involves a subjective dimension, our readings will also include novels and we will view some films to better understand the lived dimensions of this experience. Students should expect to write one 10-12 page paper, take three exams, and participate actively in class discussion.

INTL-I 422 CONTESTD TERR/CONFLCTD IDENT (33294)

Instructor: Bose, Purnima
Day & Time: MW 11:15 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Swain West 103
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 8/25/2014 End Date: 12/19/2014

PARTITION (Honors Section): Political scientist Brendan O'Leary usefully defines "partition" as occurring when "a previously unified territorial entity is divided into two or more parts, which may be marked with borders, codified in new maps, and operationalized, for example, in demarcated lines, perhaps accompanied by fences, walls, paint or barbed wire, or punctuated with official posts where passes or passports may be demanded." This course will examine the debates about partition as a solution to territorial conflicts, as well as its ongoing legacies. With O'Leary's definition as our starting point, we will survey some of the scholarly literature on partition drawn from a range of disciplines (history, political science, geography, and anthropology), before turning to specific case studies in Ireland, India/Pakistan, Israel/Palestine, and East/West Germany. Because partition necessarily involves a subjective dimension, our readings will also include novels and we will view some films to better understand the lived dimensions of this experience. Students should expect to write one 10-12 page paper, take three exams, and participate actively in class discussion.

INTL-I 422 CONTESTD TERR/CONFLCTD IDENT (33299)

Instructor: Ibrahim, Nur Amali
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 247
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 8/25/2014 End Date: 12/19/2014

YOUTH AND POLITICS: From the Arab Spring protests in the Middle East to the Occupy movement in the United States, the Gezi Park demonstrations in Turkey, and the urban revolts in Brazil, it appears that politically-conscious millennials are playing an instrumental role in trying to effect social change in recent years. The primary question that will be explored in this course is: Can young people make a political difference in the world? Answering this question will require that we make an inquiry into the meaning of "youth," a category that has no universal definition and whose boundaries are fought over everywhere. We will consider whether the experiences often associated with youthhood -- ranging from the putatively biological phase of "storm and stress" to their enrollment in the modern educational system -- have any bearing on their political participation. In addition to exploring the complex reasons behind young people's decisions to become activists, we will also examine various methods of mobilization, such as the use of social media, and cross-generational collaborations with "adult" activists. Our discussions will be based on various sociopolitical campaigns and groupings of the past century in which youths have played a critical role, such as the anti-war and the feminist movements of the 1960s, the religious revitalization of the 1970s, the street gangs associated with the urban decay of the 1980s, as well as more contemporary examples.

INTL-I 422 CONTESTD TERR/CONFLCTD IDENT (33300)

Instructor: Ibrahim, Nur Amali
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 247
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 8/25/2014 End Date: 12/19/2014

YOUTH AND POLITICS (Honors Section): From the Arab Spring protests in the Middle East to the Occupy movement in the United States, the Gezi Park demonstrations in Turkey, and the urban revolts in Brazil, it appears that politically-conscious millennials are playing an instrumental role in trying to effect social change in recent years. The primary question that will be explored in this course is: Can young people make a political difference in the world? Answering this question will require that we make an inquiry into the meaning of "youth," a category that has no universal definition and whose boundaries are fought over everywhere. We will consider whether the experiences often associated with youthhood -- ranging from the putatively biological phase of "storm and stress" to their enrollment in the modern educational system -- have any bearing on their political participation. In addition to exploring the complex reasons behind young people's decisions to become activists, we will also examine various methods of mobilization, such as the use of social media, and cross-generational collaborations with "adult" activists. Our discussions will be based on various sociopolitical campaigns and groupings of the past century in which youths have played a critical role, such as the anti-war and the feminist movements of the 1960s, the religious revitalization of the 1970s, the street gangs associated with the urban decay of the 1980s, as well as more contemporary examples.

INTL-I 424 WAR AND PEACE (33295)

Instructor: Istrabadi, Feisal Amin
Day & Time: MW 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Bldg Not Assigned TBA
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 8/25/2014 End Date: 12/19/2014

AFTER ATROCITIES, RECONSTRUCTING THE PEACE: Despite long-standing international norms against the targeting of civilians, experts estimate that up to 170 million civilians were killed in the course of various conflicts in the twentieth century, many at the hands of their own governments. Countries in transition from such traumatic episodes frequently engender mechanisms for, as historian John Torpey has it, "laying to rest the unquiet past." Some societies do so through the use of formal justice mechanisms, such as the trials in the former Yugoslavia or Rwanda. Others use variations of truth and reconciliation commissions, while some use more informal, traditional means of dispute resolution and reconciliation. Still others opt for outright impunity or some form of conditional amnesty. This course will consider the alternative theories for building the peace after periods of intense violence, including, for example, methods of reconstructing a national discourse that deals with the past. Issues of legality as distinct from legitimacy of such mechanisms will be addressed, as will the often differing or shifting perceptions of who is the victim and who the perpetrator. The course is multi-disciplinary, with readings by historians, philosophers, political scientists, and jurists, among others.

INTL-I 425 GENDER: INTERNAT'L PERSPECTIVE (33289)

Instructor: Allendorf, Keera
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Student Building 231
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 8/25/2014 End Date: 12/19/2014

GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT (Honors Section): This course introduces students to the role of gender in development across multiple sectors, including education, work, and health. Through comparisons across geographic locations and socio-economic groups it is shown that gender plays an important role in global development discourses.

INTL-I 425 GENDER: INTERNAT'L PERSPECTIVE (30355)

Instructor: Allendorf, Keera
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Student Building 231
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 8/25/2014 End Date: 12/19/2014

GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT: This course introduces students to the role of gender in development across multiple sectors, including education, work, and health. Through comparisons across geographic locations and socio-economic groups it is shown that gender plays an important role in global development discourses.

INTL-I 498 INTERNSHIP IN INTL STUDIES (15090)

Instructor: Kalentzidou, Olga
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 8/25/2014 End Date: 12/19/2014

(This section reserved for internships based abroad.) P: Approval of department. Provides students with an opportunity to receive academic credit for a part-time or full-time internship experience abroad. Allows students to apply the knowledge gained through course work in International Studies to the work world, thereby developing additional knowledge and skills and exposing them to professional career options.

INTL-I 498 INTERNSHIP IN INTL STUDIES (11317)

Instructor: Kalentzidou, Olga
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 8/25/2014 End Date: 12/19/2014

(This section reserved for internships based in the U.S.) P: Approval of department. Provides students with an opportunity to receive academic credit for a part-time or full-time internship experience within the U.S. Allows students to apply the knowledge gained through course work in International Studies to the work world, thereby developing additional knowledge and skills and exposing them to professional career options.