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Courses

Semester:

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (30751)

Instructor: Wonder, Thomas Edward
Day & Time: F 9:05 AM- 9:55 AM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0013
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

Discussion for H. Banai's lecture section.

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (30752)

Instructor: Wonder, Thomas Edward
Day & Time: F 10:10 AM- 11:00 AM
Building & Room: Hodge Hall (Business School) 3046
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

Discussion for H. Banai's lecture section.

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (30753)

Instructor: Wonder, Thomas Edward
Day & Time: F 11:15 AM- 12:05 PM
Building & Room: Hodge Hall (Business School) 3046
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

Discussion for H. Banai's lecture section.

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (16489)

Instructor: Banai, Hussein
Day & Time: TR 10:10 AM- 11:00 AM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0001
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

Explore a variety of different perspectives for studying and making sense of the world and global issues in the past and present. We will learn how these different perspectives portray the world, interpret events, and often shape human actions. Lecture material and key concepts are organized around the International Studies thematic concentrations, thereby introducing a variety of analytical approaches from the natural and social sciences and the arts and humanities. Assignments and discussion will also incorporate a geographic dimension for analysis. Case studies from different historical periods and parts of the world will be used to illustrate these approaches and key issues.

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (16490)

Instructor: Hosur Suhas, Prashant
Day & Time: F 9:05 AM- 9:55 AM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0011
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

Discussion for H. Banai's lecture section.

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (16491)

Instructor: Hosur Suhas, Prashant
Day & Time: F 10:10 AM- 11:00 AM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0011
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

Discussion for H. Banai's lecture section.

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (16492)

Instructor: Hosur Suhas, Prashant
Day & Time: F 11:15 AM- 12:05 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0011
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

Discussion for H. Banai's lecture section.

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (17357)

Instructor: Nemes, Peter
Day & Time: MW 11:15 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Student Building (Frances Morg 015
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

Explore a variety of different perspectives for studying and making sense of the world and global issues in the past and present. We will learn how these different perspectives portray the world, interpret events, and often shape human actions. Lecture material and key concepts are organized around the International Studies thematic concentrations, thereby introducing a variety of analytical approaches from the natural and social sciences and the arts and humanities. Assignments and discussion will also incorporate a geographic dimension for analysis. Case studies from different historical periods and parts of the world will be used to illustrate these approaches and key issues.

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (32958)

Instructor: Nemes, Peter
Day & Time: MW 11:15 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Student Building (Frances Morg 015
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

Explore a variety of different perspectives for studying and making sense of the world and global issues in the past and present. We will learn how these different perspectives portray the world, interpret events, and often shape human actions. Lecture material and key concepts are organized around the International Studies thematic concentrations, thereby introducing a variety of analytical approaches from the natural and social sciences and the arts and humanities. Assignments and discussion will also incorporate a geographic dimension for analysis. Case studies from different historical periods and parts of the world will be used to illustrate these approaches and key issues.

INTL-I 202 GLOBAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENT (35377)

Instructor: Kane, Stephanie C.
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0011
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

INTL-I 202 GLOBAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENT (30756)

Instructor: O'Reilly, Jessica Leigh
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1112
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

We explore human-environment interactions from international and interdisciplinary perspectives. We consider how and why humans shape the nature they inhabit in particular ways, and how in turn, nature shapes health and disease among humans. We will study how, as global change unfolds in particular cultures, ecologies and geographies, it alters human resistance and susceptibility to disease, and too, alters the access of individuals and communities to conditions of wellness. Drawing from the social and natural sciences and the humanities, the course will provide students with the concepts, theories and analytic tools useful for understanding and addressing the social, political and economic complexities of the fundamental global health and environment issues of our time.

INTL-I 203 GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT (10640)

Instructor: Bauerle Danzman, Sarah
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1100
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

Why are some countries rich while other countries remain poor? Why are some societies characterized by relative economic equality (i.e. Sweden, China before 1978), while others are vastly unequal (i.e. Brazil)? How do recent challenges such as globalization, democratic backsliding, and global climate change affect global, national, and local efforts at facilitating development? Students will learn about the post-WWII global architecture surrounding global development governance, study both institutional and behavioral factors that influence development outcomes, and use both theory and empirical observation to generate insight into the enduring challenges of development as well as the most promising pathways toward development at local, national, and global levels.

INTL-I 203 GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT (33896)

Instructor: Ochoa, Christiana
Day & Time: MW 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Lowell E Baier Hall 125
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

Why are some countries poor while others are not? How can we address global poverty, inequality and development? How can we measure development and what are ethical business practices and policies? Professor of Law Christiana Ochoa's course explores the impact of global development practices on the economic, political and cultural prospects of local societies, and evaluates the role of international institutions, markets, non-governmental organizations, and domestic governance structures on international business activities.

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (16513)

Instructor: Gilligan, Emma L.
Day & Time: MW 1:00 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1128
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

This course examines the history and evolution of international human rights law. It will analyze the domestic, regional and international institutions that have become part of the broader human rights agenda, using case studies that include the genocide in Rwanda and the ethnic violence in the former Yugoslavia of the 1990s. It will consider the roles and obligations of non-government organizations and corporations in the enforcement of rights, as well as specialized topics in the field, including truth commissions, international tribunals, humanitarian intervention, the right to a healthy environment and the right to health. At the conclusion of the course, students should be capable of evaluating the nature of state obligations under international law, have a historical understanding of its evolution and think strategically about how to deploy such mechanisms regionally and internationally in the protection human rights.

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (11578)

Instructor: Kousaleos, Nicole Serena
Day & Time: MW 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1112
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

Human Rights and International Law is an introduction to the topic of human rights, the movements to promote them and the forces arrayed against them, both past and present. We will examine many of the key issues of human rights, how they are defined, how respect for them is ensured, and what they are threatened by. We will not only consider contemporary dilemmas in human rights, like humanitarian intervention, but also historical questions such as how we explain progressive steps like transformations in consciousness and the creation and current efficacy of human rights protections in international treaties. We will focus on holistic approaches which address rights through sustainable development in local cultural contexts as suggested by the 2015 U.N. Sustainability Goals. We will examine cultural definitions and meanings and we will look critically at these contextual issues through an exploration of cases. You and your classmates will also serve as advocates for human rights, putting together campaigns on contemporary human rights issues. We will try to engage your major studies in our work so that you are able to truly, MAKE THE PERSONAL POLITICAL.

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (30757)

Instructor: Parnell, Philip C.
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1128
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

This course considers human rights in the contexts of international legal forums with an emphasis on relationships between human rights and freedom. We look at the nature, work and practice of human rights in relationships among individuals, groups, and institutions while also exploring the nature of freedom and how people seek it through human rights. In this course we treat human rights and freedom as ongoing arguments, productive processes, and arenas of contestation¿as means of constructing aspirations, seeking and challenging power, developing ways of life, and finding fulfillment. The course considers positive and negative consequences of framing relationships and power in terms of human rights and critically examines uses of human rights to manage problems. Primary goals are to develop student knowledge, abilities and inclinations to think critically and search independently for knowledge and understanding of human rights as legal phenomena.

INTL-I 205 INTERNATL COMMUNICATION & ARTS (12664)

Instructor: Kousaleos, Nicole Serena
Day & Time: MWF 1:25 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1122
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

International Communication and the Arts explores the intersection between two highly debated and contested terms -- culture and the global or globalization -- with particular attention to culturally-located examples of screen media, arts, and communication. How do we begin to understand the ways in which cultural institutions, technologies, and practices mediate our links to the world and that of others? What sorts of dynamics structure these exchanges? How are cultural formations negotiated within particular local, national, or global contexts? Finally, how do we address our place, and the place of others, in relation to all that cultural globalization might promise? Defining individual identity, ethnicity, and creative expression within the context of globalization will be a major focus. We will explore individual cases through ethnographic accounts of artistic expression by under-represented or marginalized groups. The course pays critical attention to issues of stereotypes and racism, classism, sexism, xenophobia, exclusive nationalism, homophobia, and communicative structures which undergird global problems such as inequalities, neo-colonialism, and racism. Our course focus will be on representation and power with artistic expression examined as an agency-centered form of identity creation within globalization.

INTL-I 206 IDENTITY AND CONFLICT (30761)

Instructor: Ibrahim, Nur Amali
Day & Time: MW 11:15 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1112
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

This course will investigate intersections between "identity" and "conflict." We will consider how different forms of identity¿ethnic, religious, linguistic, and political, to cite a few examples¿can become the basis for people to mobilize. We will examine how collective forms of identity can be yoked to nationalism, resulting in an exclusionary view of the nation-state and violence against those whose identities are deemed undesirable. Rather than view conflicts as irreducibly based in identity, however, we will also seek to understand how they emerge out of local conditions and colonial legacies, and can be shaped by national, regional, and transnational contexts. Our approach will be interdisciplinary, drawing on readings from anthropology, political theory, and history. Students will acquire a familiarity with critical concepts such as nationalism, ethnicity, gender, political economy, and sectarianism.

INTL-I 206 IDENTITY AND CONFLICT (6316)

Instructor: Pinaud, Clemence Marine
Day & Time: MWF 10:10 AM- 11:00 AM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1122
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

Different forms of identity--ethnic, religious, linguistic, political, and caste-based, for example--can both mobilize people and bring them into conflict with one another. We will examine how collective forms of identity can be yoked to nationalism, resulting in an exclusionary view of the nation-state and violence against those whose identities are deemed undesirable. Rather than view conflicts as irreducibly based in identity, however, we will also seek to understand how they emerge out of local conditions and colonial legacies, and can be shaped by national, regional, and transnational contexts. Our approach will be interdisciplinary, drawing on readings from anthropology, political theory, history, and literature. Students will acquire a familiarity with critical concepts such as nationalism, ethnicity, gender, political economy, and sectarianism. Learning outcomes include: 1) being able to apply critical concepts to different conflicts; 2) understanding how colonialism shapes many conflicts; 3) analyzing how different historical and geographical scales, e.g., the local, national, regional, and transnational, shape conflicts; 4) appreciating how conflicts over identity can simultaneously be contests over resources; and 5) developing empathy for those whose lives have been turned upside down by unrest and violence.

INTL-I 210 DIPLOMACY SECURITY GOVERNANCE (13201)

Instructor: Bosco, David Lyndon
Day & Time: MW 12:20 PM- 1:10 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0001
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

Why have conflicts emerged in international politics? Why, in other instances, has cooperation prevailed? This course uses theory and history to help us understand conflict and cooperation in the modern world. We pay particular attention to diplomacy, security, and governance efforts since 1945, and we examine a range of institutions and mechanisms, including international organizations and international law, that have been used to manage international security.

INTL-I 210 DIPLOMACY SECURITY GOVERNANCE (30766)

Instructor: Waterhouse, Amanda Carroll
Day & Time: F 9:05 AM- 9:55 AM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0009
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

Discussion section for D. Bosco lecture section.

INTL-I 210 DIPLOMACY SECURITY GOVERNANCE (30767)

Instructor: Waterhouse, Amanda Carroll
Day & Time: F 10:10 AM- 11:00 AM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0009
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

Discussion section for D. Bosco lecture section.

INTL-I 210 DIPLOMACY SECURITY GOVERNANCE (30768)

Instructor: Waterhouse, Amanda Carroll
Day & Time: F 11:15 AM- 12:05 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0009
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

Discussion section for D. Bosco lecture section.

INTL-I 210 DIPLOMACY SECURITY GOVERNANCE (30769)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: F 9:05 AM- 9:55 AM
Building & Room: Hodge Hall (Business School) 3048
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

Discussion section for D. Bosco lecture section.

INTL-I 210 DIPLOMACY SECURITY GOVERNANCE (30770)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: F 10:10 AM- 11:00 AM
Building & Room: Hodge Hall (Business School) 3050
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

Discussion section for D. Bosco lecture section.

INTL-I 210 DIPLOMACY SECURITY GOVERNANCE (30771)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: F 11:15 AM- 12:05 PM
Building & Room: Hodge Hall (Business School) 3050
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

Discussion section for D. Bosco lecture section.

INTL-I 220 GLOBAL CONNECTIONS (13205)

Instructor: Siqueira, Andrea Dalledone
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Cedar Hall C002
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: A&H GCC
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

We hear that we live in an "increasingly globalized world," but what does that mean? This course surveys and analyzes the scope of global connections and interdependencies in the world today and their profound impact upon individual and collective identities. Topics include the rhetoric of human rights, national and regional policies and politics, and our perception of the "other." Through the use of relevant examples and case studies from around the globe we will discuss an array of significant topics, break down stereotypes, contextualize and analyze connections, recognize our place in the global puzzle, and exercise our ability to think ethically about international issues. It will be an enriching and stimulating class that you will greatly benefit from -- both personally and professionally.

INTL-I 222 GLOBAL HEALTH CONNECTIONS (30776)

Instructor: Siqueira, Andrea Dalledone
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Cedar Hall C002
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

How does the health of communities around the world depend upon socio-economic, political, environmental and cultural factors? What are some of the challenges health initiatives pose to regional and global development? What role can global health institutions play in promoting health as a human right and addressing the main health challenges of vulnerable communities and populations, such as women and children? This course focuses on the non-medical determinants of health in communities around the world as well as on the most important health challenges the world faces. One of the main goals is to understand and evaluate the importance of local contexts and global processes in addressing health issues today, while also engaging in discussions about human rights, ethics, inequalities, and pragmatic and global solidarity. Students will read articles from a variety of disciplines (social sciences, humanities, natural sciences), and focus on case studies from around the globe to understand the interconnections between health and local contexts and global processes. This course may be of interest to any student interested in international and global studies, as well as to pre-medical students.

INTL-I 300 TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL STDS (9526)

Instructor: Zadoff, Mirjam
Day & Time: TR 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 002
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

Topic: REFUGEES AND MIGRANTS: FROM ELLIS ISLAND TO BUDAPEST TRAIN STATION. As a result of wars, persecution and conflicts worldwide replacement hits all time high: 59.5 million people, every 122 human is a refugee or seeking asylum--half of them children. These numbers don't include migrants, who are on the move due to economic hardship, hunger and global warming. Yet the problem is not new, and so we will start our course with the history of migrants and refugees in the 19th century: Then Jews, Irish, Italians and others left there homes in search for a better world, only to find the poverty of the other side of the Atlantic. We will then turn to the 20th century, to World War I, the Holocaust as a paradigmatic moment of displacement, and the introduction of national and international Human Rights legislations. We will finally arrive at the present state of refugees and migrants all over the globe, and especially the current 'European refugee crisis'. Throughout the course we'll discuss legislations, national and communal relief organization, and the everyday life experiences of migrants, their journeys and arrivals at their destinations.

INTL-I 300 TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL STDS (17288)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: W 1:00 PM- 3:30 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1112
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

Topic: ETHICS AND DECISION-MAKING IN INTERNATIONAL POLITICS. Exclusive to Indiana University, Tod Lindberg presents his required ethics course from the Master of Science in Foreign Service program at Georgetown University, here retooled for upper-level undergraduates. This course explores the role of ethics and moral considerations in how and why states and politicians act internationally. Although some portray international politics as a realm of clashing national interest bereft of moral consideration, at the level of the individual, political leaders from antiquity to the present have sought to justify their actions in moral terms. This class explores normative reasoning--what should I do?--in all its aspects as applied to questions of international politics, including: whether to go to war and how to fight; what if any obligations the developed world owes to the developing world; whether and how to promote human rights and democratic government; moral justifications for authoritarian government; and national borders and who can cross them. Readings range from classics including Thucydides, Machiavelli, and Kant to modern works by Michael Walzer and Kwame Anthony Appiah. Students will write short papers every other week. The final take-home written exam presents scenarios placing students in challenging situations that call for them to exercise their best ethical judgment.

INTL-I 303 ADV TOPICS IN GLBL DEVELOPMENT (32565)

Instructor: Dunn, Elizabeth Cullen
Day & Time: TR 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1128
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

Topic: GLOBAL HUMANITARIANISM. This course looks at the theory and practice of humanitarian aid. Students will learn about complex humanitarian emergencies, investigate the system of donor governments, UN Agencies, and NGOs that manage aid, and take a critical look at the effect of aid on the people ostensibly being helped. We will especially focus on current attempts to reform the aid system.

INTL-I 303 ADV TOPICS IN GLBL DEVELOPMENT (16407)

Instructor: O'Reilly, Jessica Leigh
Day & Time: TR 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 331
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

Topic: CLIMATE DISASTERS AND RESILIENCE. Development, as a suite of projects, ideas, and attributes, can contribute to building communities resilient to climate change, among other concerns. We will learn to think through the complex sociocultural and natural impacts of climate change in the course, taking the concept and experience of "disaster" as our starting point. In what ways is climate change a disaster, and in what ways does climate fail to receive the attention that more conventional, spectacular disasters garner? The first half of the course borrows from diverse traditions to explore ideas centered around climate development, such as risk, adaptation, resilience, vulnerability, and equity. The second half of the course examines climate-related disasters, broadly conceived--like urbanization, sea level rise, and food systems crises--to analyze development techniques and concepts to improve human and environmental resilience.

INTL-I 304 ADV TPCS IN HUM RGHTS/INTL LAW (16409)

Instructor: Kenney, Padraic
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Cedar Hall C118
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

Topic: TECHNIQUES AND IDEAS IN CONTEMPORARY REVOLUTIONS. What is a revolution in the world today: a bloody uprising in which a dictator is overthrown, or a peaceful negotiation between old and new elites? Are crowds on the streets required, or are they just a distraction from real decisions being made elsewhere? What role do foreign governments (like the United States) have in bringing about regime change? And finally, have digital media transformed grassroots protest, or not? We will examine these and other questions by looking at the theory and practice of successful and unsuccessful regime changes around the world in the last three decades.

INTL-I 304 ADV TPCS IN HUM RGHTS/INTL LAW (13210)

Instructor: Rana, Shruti
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1122
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

Topic: GENDER AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS. International human rights laws and norms are intended to recognize and protect the rights of all people, but have frequently been criticized for failing to recognize or address gendered experiences, perspectives, needs and violations. This course explores the historical, political, and philosophical foundations of the modern international human rights legal system, and examines how and why the current system addresses (or fails to address) gendered problems and experiences. We will study the development, structure, and contemporary jurisprudence of the UN Convention on the Elimination of All Form of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW), as well as how other international human rights laws and treaties intersect with gender-based claims. We will discuss evolving definitions and conceptions of gender-based rights and claims, and ways to improve their recognition and enforcement. We will analyze current cases brought under CEDAW, gender analyses and reports prepared pursuant to CEDAW, as well as campaigns to increase the implementation and reach of CEDAW.

INTL-I 305 ADV TOP IN INTERNATL COMM/ART (13213)

Instructor: De Boer, Stephanie Ann
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Jordan Hall 440
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

I305 Global Media Infrastructures Professor Stephanie DeBoer Often unseen and unacknowledged in accounts of the distribution of audio-visual content, our current media landscapes would not exist without our current media infrastructures. The circulation of film and media currently depends upon such things as the following: - the upkeep of undersea cables and Internet data centers in locations and seas throughout the globe; - the more local repurposing of old infrastructures (water towers, for example) to support new infrastructures (cell phone towers, for example); - official film and television industry protocols for media transfer, compression, and distribution; - as well as the more unofficial infrastructures of film and television piracy. These infrastructures all influence the material forms, visualities, and experiences of film and media. They often impinge on local to global terms of accesses to water, energy, and other material resources. They are also often linked to adjacent circulations of waste ¿ from the e-waste of computers and cell phones to the celluloid that once was the bedrock of film stock and footage. This class offers a critical lens for understanding the implications for film and media content¿s movement throughout the world and how this movement affects content¿s form. In so doing, this course on Global Media Infrastructures calls attention to: - the media infrastructures that distribute audio-visual content; - the ways industries and people imagine, organize, and use those infrastructures; - the varied local to global scales at which they operate; - the dynamics of power and politics through which they are negotiated; - the ways in which they influence our visual and aural experiences of film and media. In taking this course, students will be better informed of the often-unacknowledged infrastructures and processes that influence film and media¿s distribution and experience. No previous experience with global studies or cinema and media studies is assumed in this course.

INTL-I 305 ADV TOP IN INTERNATL COMM/ART (30793)

Instructor: Stein, Elizabeth
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1112
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

Topic: MEDIA & POLITICS FROM A COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVE. This class is an overview of media, politics and society from a comparative perspective. We will learn about the news media's economic, political and social role in countries around the world. We examine how the media act (or fail to act) as a watchdog for citizens and how they may influence public opinion and popular mobilization in both developed and developing democracies and in countries under authoritarian rule. We will examine issues related to media ownership, ideological biases in the news, the media's influence on campaigns and elections and how the media affect public policy, social movements, and international and domestic conflict. We will look at the evolution of media technologies from traditional media to online social networks to understand how changes in the technological environment may have led to changes in the media's role in society.

INTL-I 306 ADV TOP IN IDENTITY & CONFLICT (14899)

Instructor: Bovingdon, Gardner
Day & Time: TR 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 236
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

Topic: IDENTITY POLITICS IN DIVIDED SOCIETIES. Is national unity a realistic goal or a pipe dream? Is the nation-state in crisis? Is globalization making nations obsolete? Are there better and worse policies for managing divided societies? This course will address these and other questions, considering cases from around the world, including Asia, Africa, and Europe.

INTL-I 310 ADV TPCS IN DIPL SECURITY GOV (30794)

Instructor: Banai, Hussein
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Student Building (Frances Morg 231
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

Topic: INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL THOUGHT. Since the dawn of the modern states system in the early seventeenth century, the 'international' has signified both an empirical reality and a political ideal. It has been an especially powerful organizing principle for thinking about how individuals and collectives pursue their interests, make demands of each other, and approach their common problems. This course offers a survey of key themes, concepts, and historical developments as they relate to the evolution of thought about the international. In particular, it surveys mainstream as well as critical approaches to the study of empire and post-imperialism, sovereignty and nationalism, diplomacy and security, commerce and globalization, and democracy and global governance. The chief aim of the course is to demonstrate how theory provides a road map, toolkit or lens by which to examine international events and processes. Although there is no mandatory prerequisite for this course, prior enrollment is INTL I-100 is recommended.

INTL-I 310 ADV TPCS IN DIPL SECURITY GOV (16874)

Instructor: Macekura, Stephen
Day & Time: MW 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 214
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

Topic: EMPIRE, WAR AND DEVELOPMENT: THE HISTORY OF U.S. NATION-BUILDING IN GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE. What do the reconstruction of the U.S. South after the Civil War, dam-building schemes on the Mekong River in the 1960s, and counter-insurgency campaigns in present-day Afghanistan have in common? We'll seek to answer that question by analyzing the history of the United States' efforts at development and nation-building around the world. We'll do so by investigating a set of broader queries: Why has the United States dedicated so much time and effort to develop and build societies across the globe? Which ideas and experiences have U.S. policymakers drawn upon to construct other nations? To what extent have U.S. efforts been challenged and resisted, and to what effect? In our study, we will explore the geopolitical context in which nation-building projects took place - from the age of empire to the Cold War through recent globalization - to explain the relationship between ideology, environmental, and strategic factors that defined how and why U.S. officials attempted to remake entire societies and the consequences of those actions for the entire world.

INTL-I 315 RSRCH DESIGN IN INTL STUDIES (11579)

Instructor: Nemes, Peter
Day & Time: MW 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 140
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

This class exposes students to the theoretical frameworks, methods and skills necessary for undertaking research in International Studies. Through the semester students will be working collaboratively on a well-conceived and feasible research design, allowing them to explore the interdisciplinary and comparative perspectives of International and Global Studies. This class requires working in groups and active class discussions, i.e., the full participation of each member of the class. While working on the process of research design of a given topic, students will be able to form questions about their own exploratory overseas research and subsequent capstone/paper, as well as to acquire and better their working skills for future employment in public and private sectors.

INTL-I 315 RSRCH DESIGN IN INTL STUDIES (12247)

Instructor: Allendorf, Keera
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Swain West 221
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

This class exposes students to the theoretical frameworks, methods and skills necessary for undertaking research in International Studies. Through the semester students will be working collaboratively on a well-conceived and feasible research design, allowing them to explore the interdisciplinary and comparative perspectives of International and Global Studies. This class requires working in groups and active class discussions, i.e., the full participation of each member of the class. While working on the process of research design of a given topic, students will be able to form questions about their own exploratory overseas research and subsequent capstone/paper, as well as to acquire and better their working skills for future employment in public and private sectors.

INTL-I 325 INTL ISSUES THRU FOREIGN LANG (12667)

Instructor: Zlotin, Roman
Day & Time: F 1:25 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Student Building (Frances Morg 140
Credit Hours: 1.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

Topic: ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES IN RUSSIAN. This course is designed to promote the development of a specialized Russian vocabulary for students interested in geography and environmental issues. Student discussion focuses on causes and consequences of global and regional environmental problems. Discussion will be conducted in Russian.

INTL-I 400 INTL STUDIES CAPSTONE SEMINAR (6317)

Instructor: Bauerle Danzman, Sarah
Day & Time: T 2:30 PM- 5:30 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1023
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: IW
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

P: I315. Demonstrate your accumulated training in International Studies in a single original project of your choice, subject to the instructor¿s approval and under the supervision of a faculty member. The completed thesis should bring together your theme, your region, your foreign language expertise, and your overseas experience in an 8000 word tour de force. The Capstone necessitates multiple drafts of your research that are subjected to heightened peer review and regular feedback from your instructor, your peers and your mentor. By the end of the seminar you will be able to articulate clearly your research argument in a well-written and orally presented project and participate in the Capstone Symposium.

INTL-I 400 INTL STUDIES CAPSTONE SEMINAR (8020)

Instructor: Kousaleos, Nicole Serena
Day & Time: F 9:30 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Wylie Hall 115
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: IW
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

P: I315. Demonstrate your accumulated training in International Studies in a single original project of your choice, subject to the instructor¿s approval and under the supervision of a faculty member. The completed thesis should bring together your theme, your region, your foreign language expertise, and your overseas experience in an 8000 word tour de force. The Capstone necessitates multiple drafts of your research that are subjected to heightened peer review and regular feedback from your instructor, your peers and your mentor. By the end of the seminar you will be able to articulate clearly your research argument in a well-written and orally presented project and participate in the Capstone Symposium .

INTL-I 400 INTL STUDIES CAPSTONE SEMINAR (16463)

Instructor: Pinaud, Clemence Marine
Day & Time: W 4:00 PM- 7:00 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 137
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: IW
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

P: I315. Demonstrate your accumulated training in International Studies in a single original project of your choice, subject to the instructor¿s approval and under the supervision of a faculty member. The completed thesis should bring together your theme, your region, your foreign language expertise, and your overseas experience in an 8000 word tour de force. The Capstone necessitates multiple drafts of your research that are subjected to heightened peer review and regular feedback from your instructor, your peers and your mentor. By the end of the seminar you will be able to articulate clearly your research argument in a well-written and orally presented project and participate in the Capstone Symposium.

INTL-I 401 GLOBAL SERVICE CAPSTONE (30908)

Instructor: Kalentzidou, Olga
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 1.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

INTL-I 406 HONORS INTL STDS CAPSTONE SEM (16465)

Instructor: Pinaud, Clemence Marine
Day & Time: W 4:00 PM- 7:00 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 137
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: IW
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

P: I315, application, and approval of department. Required for departmental honors credit and taught with I-400, for honors-track seniors who have completed all International Studies degree requirements. See I-400 for further information.

INTL-I 406 HONORS INTL STDS CAPSTONE SEM (16466)

Instructor: Kousaleos, Nicole Serena
Day & Time: F 9:30 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Wylie Hall 115
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: IW
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

P: I315, application, and approval of department. Required for departmental honors credit and taught with I-400, for honors-track seniors who have completed all International Studies degree requirements. See I-400 for further information.

INTL-I 406 HONORS INTL STDS CAPSTONE SEM (10216)

Instructor: Bauerle Danzman, Sarah
Day & Time: T 2:30 PM- 5:30 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1023
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: IW
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

P: I315, application, and approval of department. Required for departmental honors credit and taught with I-400, for honors-track seniors who have completed all International Studies degree requirements. See I-400 for further information.

INTL-I 420 GLOBAL SUSTAINABILITY STUDIES (30800)

Instructor: Macekura, Stephen
Day & Time: MW 1:00 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0011
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

Today, talk of "sustainability" is all the rage. Yet for most of human history, most practices were "un-sustainable." Why? What ideas and institutions gave rise to such destructive habits? How have those past experiences shaped the world of today? Why only in recent decades has talk of sustainability become so popular? In what ways has the concept of sustainability itself been challenged or reformed on ground of political, economic, and social justice? We'll explore these questions by investigating the history behind unsustainable and sustainable practices around the globe. We will examine long-term changes in both space and time to develop a keener understanding of how the human-nature relationship has evolved. We will pay particularly close attention to the relationship between "the West" and the rest of the globe, as well as the relationship between notions of "development" and "modernization" that led people to alter the natural world in many different ways.

INTL-I 424 WAR AND PEACE (30820)

Instructor: Gilligan, Emma L.
Day & Time: MW 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0011
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

Since the end of WWII, the 1948 Genocide Convention has provided the international community with a framework to address the gross violation of human rights on the bases on ethnic, racial, national or religious origins. This semester we will seek to understand what genocide is and analyze together the causes of several instances of genocide in the post war era: Cambodia (1975-1979), Rwanda(1994) and the former Yugoslavia (1990-1999). We will begin by studying the 1948 Genocide Convention and its historical evolution in the wake of the Holocaust. We will trace the causes and underlying dynamics of genocide with an emphasis on the international response and critically evaluate measures taken to prevent genocidal acts. We will address the emergence of terms such as ethnic cleansing and zachistka (sweep operation) to characterize particularly gross human rights violations and the role of these emerging terms in genocide prevention. This course is designed to assist undergraduate students to develop an understanding of the origins of the genocide debate, to deepen our understanding of the historical causes of genocide and to critically appraise the reaction of the international community and the future of the 1948 Genocide Convention in human rights history.

INTL-I 426 ADVANCD TOPICS IN INTL STUDIES (32566)

Instructor: Ekbia, Hamid
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 331
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

Topic: COMPUTERS, CULTURES, AND OUR GLOBALIZED FUTURE. Has computer technology made the world a better place--more prosperous, more informed, more tolerant, and more peaceful? This is a question that is on many people's minds, but with no easy answer. Computing has transformed people's ways of life around the globe. Work, leisure, commerce, communication, politics, war, and education are now conducted very differently from a few of decades ago. While many of these changes seem to have a global character, they take specific forms in various cultures and societies. The way social media are used, for instance, is different in Brazil from how it is in Angola, and these are yet quite distinct from Russia, China, Sweden, Iran, or South Korea. This, however, is not unique to social media. All technologies are designed, developed, and used according to the demands of cultures and places; they are shaped by their contexts of use, and in turn shape those contexts. Like any other technology, and perhaps more strongly, computers are cultural and political artifacts. One of the best ways to understand them, therefore, is through a socio-economic, cultural, and political lens. This course explores computing from such a perspective, with a focus on the future of communities and societies across the globe.

INTL-X 390 INDIV READINGS IN INTL STUDIES (28640)

Instructor: Kane, Stephanie C.
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

INTL-X 398 RESEARCH IN INTERNATIONAL STDS (10217)

Instructor: Kane, Stephanie C.
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

INTL-X 473 INTERNSHIP IN INTL STUDIES (30840)

Instructor: Kane, Stephanie C.
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05

INTL-X 473 INTERNSHIP IN INTL STUDIES (30841)

Instructor: Kane, Stephanie C.
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-01-09 End Date: 2017-05-05