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Semester:

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (31041)

Instructor: Banai, Hussein
Day & Time: TR 10:10 AM- 11:00 AM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0001
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 1/11/2016 End Date: 5/6/2016

I100 emphasizes the relational and comparative study of the manner in which individuals, groups, localities, and nations have confronted global issues in the past and present. This course teaches different perspectives for studying and making sense of the world. We will learn how these different perspectives portray the world, interpret events, and often shape human actions. Lecture material and key concepts are organized around the International Studies thematic concentrations, thereby introducing a variety of analytical approaches from the natural and social sciences and the arts and humanities. Assignments and discussion will also incorporate a geographic dimension for analysis. Case studies from different historical periods and parts of the world will be used to illustrate these approaches and key issues.

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (31042)

Instructor: Drane, Leslie Elizabeth
Day & Time: F 9:05 AM- 9:55 AM
Building & Room: Student Building 220
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 1/11/2016 End Date: 5/6/2016

I100 emphasizes the relational and comparative study of the manner in which individuals, groups, localities, and nations have confronted global issues in the past and present. This course teaches different perspectives for studying and making sense of the world. We will learn how these different perspectives portray the world, interpret events, and often shape human actions. Lecture material and key concepts are organized around the International Studies thematic concentrations, thereby introducing a variety of analytical approaches from the natural and social sciences and the arts and humanities. Assignments and discussion will also incorporate a geographic dimension for analysis. Case studies from different historical periods and parts of the world will be used to illustrate these approaches and key issues.

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (31043)

Instructor: Drane, Leslie Elizabeth
Day & Time: F 10:10 AM- 11:00 AM
Building & Room: Student Building 220
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 1/11/2016 End Date: 5/6/2016

I100 emphasizes the relational and comparative study of the manner in which individuals, groups, localities, and nations have confronted global issues in the past and present. This course teaches different perspectives for studying and making sense of the world. We will learn how these different perspectives portray the world, interpret events, and often shape human actions. Lecture material and key concepts are organized around the International Studies thematic concentrations, thereby introducing a variety of analytical approaches from the natural and social sciences and the arts and humanities. Assignments and discussion will also incorporate a geographic dimension for analysis. Case studies from different historical periods and parts of the world will be used to illustrate these approaches and key issues.

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (31044)

Instructor: Drane, Leslie Elizabeth
Day & Time: F 11:15 AM- 12:05 PM
Building & Room: Student Building 220
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 1/11/2016 End Date: 5/6/2016

I100 emphasizes the relational and comparative study of the manner in which individuals, groups, localities, and nations have confronted global issues in the past and present. This course teaches different perspectives for studying and making sense of the world. We will learn how these different perspectives portray the world, interpret events, and often shape human actions. Lecture material and key concepts are organized around the International Studies thematic concentrations, thereby introducing a variety of analytical approaches from the natural and social sciences and the arts and humanities. Assignments and discussion will also incorporate a geographic dimension for analysis. Case studies from different historical periods and parts of the world will be used to illustrate these approaches and key issues.

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (33620)

Instructor: Feinstein, Lee Andrew
Day & Time: MW 4:40 PM- 5:30 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0001
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 1/11/2016 End Date: 5/6/2016

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (33621)

Instructor: Buono, Stephen
Day & Time: F 10:10 AM- 11:00 AM
Building & Room: Student Building 231
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 1/11/2016 End Date: 5/6/2016

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (33623)

Instructor: Buono, Stephen
Day & Time: F 11:15 AM- 12:05 PM
Building & Room: Student Building 131
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 1/11/2016 End Date: 5/6/2016

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (33625)

Instructor: Buono, Stephen
Day & Time: F 1:25 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Student Building 220
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 1/11/2016 End Date: 5/6/2016

INTL-I 202 GLOBAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENT (9803)

Instructor: Long, Yan
Day & Time: MW 11:15 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 209
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 1/11/2016 End Date: 5/6/2016

This course will review human-environment interactions from a global perspective, focusing specifically on how global change can alter human susceptibility to disease. Discussions will be focused on the general population and environmental changes that contribute to health deficiencies at the regional and global levels. Specific population changes to be discussed include: general population growth; transportation of people and products; urbanization and lack of sanitation; contact with wildlife (expansion into new areas, ecotourism, and bushmeat); war and social disruption; and public health deficiencies. Specific ecological changes to be discussed include: changes in land use (irrigation, deforestation, and fragmentation); reduced biodiversity (altered host-parasite dynamics); pollution; natural disasters; and climate change (altered habitats of disease vectors). Readings will be selected to reflect the general interests of natural and social scientists alike.

INTL-I 203 GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT (9804)

Instructor: Steinberg, Jessica
Day & Time: TR 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 209
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 1/11/2016 End Date: 5/6/2016

The course will focus on the specifics of and interactions between the political, cultural, social and economic factors that influence human development at global, national and local levels. We will explore these factors at work in developing countries and seek to blend theory with practical application. I203 covers a substantial part of the social sciences literature on development and will include discussions on dependency, globalization and sustainability as well. This course also introduces major theoretical perspectives on the structure, function and governance of international markets and the relevance of international institutions with regards to development.

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (10885)

Instructor: Kousaleos, Nicole Serena
Day & Time: TR 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 208
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 1/11/2016 End Date: 5/6/2016

This class is an introduction to the topic of human rights, the movements to promote them and the forces arrayed against them, both past and present. We will examine many of the key issues of human rights, how they are defined, how respect for them is ensured, and what they are threatened by. The class will not only consider contemporary dilemmas in human rights, like humanitarian intervention, but also historical questions such as how we explain progressive steps like transformations in consciousness and creation and current efficacy of human rights international treaties. Our concerns will be both empirical and normative. We want to understand how human rights have evolved over time, where they have been respected, where they have been violated and why. But we also want to grapple with ethical questions such as how much America's foreign policy should concern itself with human rights, or whether there is a universal definition of human rights. A large focus will be on holistic approaches which address rights through sustainable development. Students will make attempts at activism through serving as advocates for human rights and putting together transnational campaigns on contemporary human rights issues so that you are able to truly, MAKE THE PERSONAL POLITICAL.

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (31075)

Instructor: Kousaleos, Nicole Serena
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 208
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 1/11/2016 End Date: 5/6/2016

This class is an introduction to the topic of human rights, the movements to promote them and the forces arrayed against them, both past and present. We will examine many of the key issues of human rights, how they are defined, how respect for them is ensured, and what they are threatened by. The class will not only consider contemporary dilemmas in human rights, like humanitarian intervention, but also historical questions such as how we explain progressive steps like transformations in consciousness and creation and current efficacy of human rights international treaties. Our concerns will be both empirical and normative. We want to understand how human rights have evolved over time, where they have been respected, where they have been violated and why. But we also want to grapple with ethical questions such as how much America's foreign policy should concern itself with human rights, or whether there is a universal definition of human rights. A large focus will be on holistic approaches which address rights through sustainable development. Students will make attempts at activism through serving as advocates for human rights and putting together transnational campaigns on contemporary human rights issues so that you are able to truly, MAKE THE PERSONAL POLITICAL.

INTL-I 205 INTERNATL COMMUNICATION & ARTS (12207)

Instructor: Nemes, Peter
Day & Time: MW 1:00 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 209
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 1/11/2016 End Date: 5/6/2016

This course addresses the intersection between two highly debated and contested terms -- culture and the global or globalization. It does so with particular attention to culturally-located examples of screen media, arts, and communication. We are bombarded daily with news of how cultural forms are crossing borders with increasing speed, rendering locations across the world more closely connected. Yet such border crossing has long been constituted among a range of contradictory, competing, and even unpredictable locations, powers, and ideologies. How do we begin to understand the ways in which cultural institutions, technologies, and practices mediate our links to the world and that of others? What sorts of dynamics structure these exchanges? How do we approach the ways in which cultural formations are negotiated within or among particular local, national, or global contexts? Finally, how do we address our place, and the place of others, in relation to all that the ideologies of cultural globalization might promise?

INTL-I 206 IDENTITY AND CONFLICT (5168)

Instructor: Bovingdon, Gardner
Day & Time: MW 11:15 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Cedar Hall C002
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 1/11/2016 End Date: 5/6/2016

This course will investigate intersections between ¿identity¿ and ¿conflict.¿ We will consider how different forms of identity¿ethnic, religious, linguistic, political, and caste-based, to cite a few examples¿can become the basis for collectives to mobilize. We will examine how collective forms of identity can be yoked to nationalism, resulting in an exclusionary view of the nation-state and violence against those whose identities are deemed undesirable. Rather than view conflicts as irreducibly based in identity, however, we will also seek to understand how they emerge out of local conditions and colonial legacies, and can be shaped by national, regional, and transnational contexts. Our approach will be interdisciplinary, drawing on readings from anthropology, political theory, history, and literature. Students will acquire a familiarity with critical concepts such as nationalism, ethnicity, gender, political economy, and sectarianism. Learning outcomes include: 1) being able to use critical concepts to map the vectors of different conflicts; 2) understanding that many conflicts have their roots in colonialism; 3) analyzing how different historical and geographical scales, e.g., the local, national, regional, and transnational, shape conflicts; 4) appreciating how conflicts over identity can simultaneously be contests over resources; and 5) developing empathy for those whose lives have been turned upside down by unrest and violence. Students should expect to take three exams and write one 7-8 page paper.

INTL-I 210 DIPLOMACY SECURITY GOVERNANCE (12866)

Instructor: Macekura, Stephen
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 005
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 1/11/2016 End Date: 5/6/2016

Institutions, policies, and events centering on Security, Diplomacy, and Governance result from the interaction of general models developed by scholars with the unique characteristics of the societies within which policy makers are located and with the societies that they violently or peacefully interact. This course simultaneously educates students on two distinct aspects of governance, security policy, and diplomacy: the theoretical lenses needed to understand why and how policies are made, as well as their effects; and, the unique cultures and practices that affect policy making and outcomes.

INTL-I 212 NEGOTIATING GLOBAL CHALLENGES (37413)

Instructor: Kenney, Padraic
Day & Time: MW 9:00 AM- 11:15 AM
Building & Room: Forest Quad C230
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 3/7/2016 End Date: 5/6/2016

INTL-I 220 GLOBAL CONNECTIONS (12870)

Instructor: Siqueira, Andrea Dalledone
Day & Time: MW 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Cedar Hall C002
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: A&H GCC
Start Date: 1/11/2016 End Date: 5/6/2016

This course is a survey and analysis of the scope of global connections and interdependencies in the world today and their profound impact upon individual and collective identities, the rhetoric over human rights discourses, national and regional policies and politics, and our perception of the "other." Through the use of relevant examples and case studies from around the globe we will discuss an array of significant topics, break down stereotypes, contextualize and analyze connections, recognize our place in the global puzzle, and exercise our ability to think ethically about international issues. It will be an enriching and stimulating class that you will greatly benefit from -- both personally and professionally.

INTL-I 300 TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL STDS (8584)

Instructor: Korytova, Stepanka
Day & Time: MW 11:15 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Cedar Hall C102
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 1/11/2016 End Date: 5/6/2016

GLOBAL HUMAN TRAFFICKING: Human trafficking, an invisible challenge to human rights across the globe, is a robust and growing business, only less profitable than the illegal trade in drugs. Women and children are most frequently trafficked in this 21st century slavery. Most people either do not know about the contemporary markets in human beings, or prefer to look the other way. Where are present day abolitionists? We will seek to understand human trafficking as an international crime. To this end we will investigate national and international legislation intended to resolve and rid us of such illegal, inhumane crimes.

INTL-I 300 TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL STDS (31020)

Instructor: Korytova, Stepanka
Day & Time: MW 11:15 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Cedar Hall C102
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 1/11/2016 End Date: 5/6/2016

GLOBAL HUMAN TRAFFICKING: Human trafficking, an invisible challenge to human rights across the globe, is a robust and growing business, only less profitable than the illegal trade in drugs. Women and children are most frequently trafficked in this 21st century slavery. Most people either do not know about the contemporary markets in human beings, or prefer to look the other way. Where are present day abolitionists? We will seek to understand human trafficking as an international crime. To this end we will investigate national and international legislation intended to resolve and rid us of such illegal, inhumane crimes.

INTL-I 300 TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL STDS (33423)

Instructor: Sriphrom, Suriya
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Cedar Hall C101
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 1/11/2016 End Date: 5/6/2016

INTL-I 302 ADV TOPICS IN GLBL HLTH & ENV (12874)

Instructor: Long, Yan
Day & Time: MW 1:00 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Student Building 138
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 1/11/2016 End Date: 5/6/2016

HEALTH GOVERNANCE AND ORGANIZATIONAL MANAGEMENT IN GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE: How are health problems managed at the global level? Students will be introduced to an in-depth investigation in order to attempt to address and answer this question. Much of the discussion will stem from the analysis of significant cases of global health governance, such as epidemic control, international development projects for health, and more. Students will gain a deeper appreciation of how the regulation of health is affected by political, economic and social aspects of globalization.

INTL-I 303 ADV TOPICS IN GLBL DEVELOPMENT (30934)

Instructor: Steinberg, Jessica
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Student Building 220
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 1/11/2016 End Date: 5/6/2016

COMPARATIVE POLITICS OF NATURAL RESOURCES: LINKING THE GLOBAL AND THE LOCAL: Are natural resources like oil, timber, and diamonds necessarily good for development? What is the relationship between natural resources and economic growth? And violent conflict? What are the tools communities and countries have at their disposal to manage natural resources? International institutions, markets, non-governmental organizations, and domestic governance structures all play a role in understanding the politics of natural resource extraction. This class with evaluate the ways in which natural resource extraction shapes and is shaped by political forces. We will consider the role of natural resources in economic development, growth, and conflict, and consider the environmental implications of these relationships. We will also explore the incentives and tools relevant for the management of natural resources, at the local, national, and international level. Cases from developing countries in the primary resource producing regions of the world will be explored, with a slight emphasis on Africa, but we will also consider if and how wealthier countries manage natural resources differently. This course is cross-listed in African Studies and there are no formal prerequisites for this class.

INTL-I 304 ADV TPCS IN HUM RGHTS/INTL LAW (30938)

Instructor: Parnell, Philip C.
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Sycamore Hall 001
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 1/11/2016 End Date: 5/6/2016

HUMAN RIGHTS IN EVERYDAY LIFE: PASSAGEWAYS AND CHRONICLES. This course explores how experiences become rights, how people move human rights into daily practices, and how groups seek to articulate rights as laws and policies. Rights can enter into everyday life also through extra-local sources, such as states and international organizations that frame and govern some relationships as rights-protected and others as rights-free. Today, these passageways of rights -- from the local to the global -- often intersect to reshape relationships among groups by placing them in both local and international contexts. What happens at these intersections will be a major focus of this course. Our discussion first will consider ways that relationships can become rights as well as alternatives to rights -- groups mapping their futures without using rights as destinations. Then we will turn to case studies that illustrate the flow of human rights around local, state, and international intersections that rights-based movements generate. Materials for case studies will include academic research and the personal voices and chronicles of rights-seekers, rights-bearers, and those who try to apportion rights.

INTL-I 304 ADV TPCS IN HUM RGHTS/INTL LAW (12877)

Instructor: Parnell, Philip C.
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Sycamore Hall 001
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 1/11/2016 End Date: 5/6/2016

HUMAN RIGHTS IN EVERYDAY LIFE: PASSAGEWAYS AND CHRONICLES. This course explores how experiences become rights, how people move human rights into daily practices, and how groups seek to articulate rights as laws and policies. Rights can enter into everyday life also through extra-local sources, such as states and international organizations that frame and govern some relationships as rights-protected and others as rights-free. Today, these passageways of rights ¿ from the local to the global ¿ often intersect to reshape relationships among groups by placing them in both local and international contexts. What happens at these intersections will be a major focus of this course. Our discussion first will consider ways that relationships can become rights as well as alternatives to rights ¿ groups mapping their futures without using rights as destinations. Then we will turn to case studies that illustrate the flow of human rights around local, state, and international intersections that rights-based movements generate. Materials for case studies will include academic research and the personal voices and chronicles of rights-seekers, rights-bearers, and those who try to apportion rights.

INTL-I 305 ADV TOP IN INTERNATL COMM/ART (12880)

Instructor: De Boer, Stephanie Ann
Day & Time: T 7:15 PM- 10:15 PM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 007
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 1/11/2016 End Date: 5/6/2016

MEDIA SCREENS AND GLOBAL FRAMES: This course addresses intersections between the cultures of screen media (film, television, video, digital) and the dynamics of cultural globalization. Globalization, in its most general sense, has been said to refer to both to the compression of the world and the intensification of consciousness of the world as a whole. The production, circulation, reception, and use of screen media have played a significant role in debates surrounding the both the awareness of and implications for global processes. Look through any popular or academic publication and you will encounter an overwhelming range of explanations for how local or global film and media cultures are made, to what effects they circulate, and the means through which their representations and identities are produced. This course will thus provide you with a set of frameworks for understanding and questioning the terms through which screen media have been produced in relation to particular processes of globalization. For some, such media have been central platforms for the production of an increasingly interconnected "global village." For others, screen media have been a means for challenging the unequal power dynamics of globalization. For others, they have merely reflected the inequities of global processes. We will explore case studies in screen media from across the globe, including Europe, East and South Asia, West Africa, Central and North America.

INTL-I 306 ADV TOP IN IDENTITY & CONFLICT (15338)

Instructor: Ibrahim, Nur Amali
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 134
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 1/11/2016 End Date: 5/6/2016

NEOLIBERALISM IN CRISIS: Neoliberalism is widely regarded to be the central structuring condition of the contemporary era. It is a theory of the political-economy that proposes that human well-being can best be advanced through the free market. An implication of this theory is that the state should scale back on its economic interventions in order to allow the market to work naturally to set prices. Goods and services like utilities, transportation, prisons, and healthcare should no longer be provided by state-owned enterprises but by private companies instead. Deregulation, privatization, marketization, entrepreneurship, and individual freedom have become buzzwords. Critics of neoliberalism argue, however, that the widespread adoption of neoliberal principles has resulted in numerous social problems. These include: increases in corporate power, widening income gaps, unregulated resource exploitation that is not environmentally sustainable, job loss through downsizing, and declines in welfare programs for poorer citizens. In this course, we will examine the features, histories, and effects of neoliberalism. We will consider, for example, the role played by self-help gurus like Tony Robbins and media personalities like Oprah Winfrey in promoting the ideology of the responsible individual that lies at the heart of neoliberalism. We will also pay attention to contemporary crises generated by neoliberalism and analyze, among others, the proliferation of the Occupy movement, the problem of mounting student debt, and the rise of apocalyptic religious movements.

INTL-I 310 ADV TPCS IN DIPL SECURITY GOV (32500)

Instructor: Bauerle Danzman, Sarah
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Radio-TV 226
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 1/11/2016 End Date: 5/6/2016

GLOBAL ECONOMIC GOVERNANCE: POWER, INSTITUTIONS, AND IDEAS. Historically, international political theorists have seen the lack of a central authority as the defining attribute of international relations and have typically characterized the international system as some variant of Hobbes' state of nature, that is "nasty, brutish [but perhaps not] short." The absence of a central authority suggests international politics should be characterized primarily by conflict. And yet, this is not the case. All around us, we see examples of cooperation even in the face of significant obstacles to agreement. Why would states agree to bind themselves to a constellation of security and economic interstate institutions and to what extent do these institutions influence state behavior? This course will offer you the empirical knowledge and analytical skills necessary to make sense of why international politics is often characterized by cooperation and when we might expect interactions among states to be predominantly conflictual. We start by posing some key questions: Why and when do states cooperate? What makes cooperation more likely to be successful? Do states need institutions to cooperate? How are institutions created and what do they do? Is cooperation actually domination of a particularly powerful state? How can states govern transnational non-state actors? Over the course of the term, we will explore potential answers to these puzzles, emphasizing systematic theorizing and empirical rigor.

INTL-I 315 RSRCH DESIGN IN INTL STUDIES (10886)

Instructor: Nemes, Peter
Day & Time: MW 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0003
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 1/11/2016 End Date: 5/6/2016

This class is designed to help students recognize and learn from the interconnections between people, theories, methods, practices and regions of the world that are at the core of International Studies. It exposes students to the theoretical frameworks, methods and skills necessary for undertaking research in International Studies. Through the semester students will be working collaboratively on a well-conceived and feasible research design, allowing them to explore the interdisciplinary and comparative perspectives of International and Global Studies. This class requires working in groups and active class discussions, i.e., the full participation of each member of the class. While working on the process of research design of a given topic, students will be able to form questions about their own exploratory overseas research and subsequent capstone/paper, as well as to acquire and better their working skills for future employment in public and private sectors

INTL-I 315 RSRCH DESIGN IN INTL STUDIES (11700)

Instructor: Siqueira, Andrea Dalledone
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Student Building 140
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 1/11/2016 End Date: 5/6/2016

This class is designed to help students recognize and learn from the interconnections between people, theories, methods, practices and regions of the world that are at the core of International Studies. It exposes students to the theoretical frameworks, methods and skills necessary for undertaking research in International Studies. Through the semester students will be working collaboratively on a well-conceived and feasible research design, allowing them to explore the interdisciplinary and comparative perspectives of International and Global Studies. This class requires working in groups and active class discussions, i.e., the full participation of each member of the class. While working on the process of research design of a given topic, students will be able to form questions about their own exploratory overseas research and subsequent capstone/paper, as well as to acquire and better their working skills for future employment in public and private sectors

INTL-I 325 INTL ISSUES THRU FOREIGN LANG (12210)

Instructor: Zlotin, Roman
Day & Time: F 2:30 PM- 3:20 PM
Building & Room: Student Building 140
Credit Hours: 1.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 1/11/2016 End Date: 5/6/2016

This course is designed to promote the development of a specialized Russian vocabulary for students interested in geography and environmental issues. Student discussion focuses on causes and consequences of global and regional environmental problems. Discussion will be conducted in Russian.

INTL-I 400 INTL STUDIES CAPSTONE SEMINAR (5169)

Instructor: Siqueira, Andrea Dalledone
Day & Time: M 9:05 AM- 12:05 PM
Building & Room: Martin Hall 012A
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: IW
Start Date: 1/11/2016 End Date: 5/6/2016

P: I315. This course is designed to demonstrate your accumulated training in International Studies in a single original project of your choice, subject to the instructor's approval and under the supervision of a faculty member. The completed thesis should bring together your theme, your region, your foreign language expertise, and your overseas experience in an 8,000-word tour de force. The Capstone necessitates multiple drafts of your research that are subjected to peer-review and regular feedback from your instructor, your peers and your mentor. By the end of the seminar you will be able to articulate clearly your research argument in a well-written and orally presented project.

INTL-I 400 INTL STUDIES CAPSTONE SEMINAR (31005)

Instructor: Nemes, Peter
Day & Time: W 2:30 PM- 5:30 PM
Building & Room: Martin Hall 012A
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: IW
Start Date: 1/11/2016 End Date: 5/6/2016

P: I315. This course is designed to demonstrate your accumulated training in International Studies in a single original project of your choice, subject to the instructor's approval and under the supervision of a faculty member. The completed thesis should bring together your theme, your region, your foreign language expertise, and your overseas experience in an 8,000-word tour de force. The Capstone necessitates multiple drafts of your research that are subjected to peer-review and regular feedback from your instructor, your peers and your mentor. By the end of the seminar you will be able to articulate clearly your research argument in a well-written and orally presented project.

INTL-I 400 INTL STUDIES CAPSTONE SEMINAR (6989)

Instructor: Scheuerman, William
Day & Time: R 9:05 AM- 12:05 PM
Building & Room: Wendell W. Wright 3284
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: IW
Start Date: 1/11/2016 End Date: 5/6/2016

P: I315. This course is designed to demonstrate your accumulated training in International Studies in a single original project of your choice, subject to the instructor's approval and under the supervision of a faculty member. The completed thesis should bring together your theme, your region, your foreign language expertise, and your overseas experience in an 8,000-word tour de force. The Capstone necessitates multiple drafts of your research that are subjected to peer-review and regular feedback from your instructor, your peers and your mentor. By the end of the seminar you will be able to articulate clearly your research argument in a well-written and orally presented project.

INTL-I 406 HONORS INTL STDS CAPSTONE SEM (31007)

Instructor: Nemes, Peter
Day & Time: W 2:30 PM- 5:30 PM
Building & Room: Martin Hall 012A
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: IW
Start Date: 1/11/2016 End Date: 5/6/2016

P: I315, application, and approval of department. Required for departmental honors credit, this seminar is designed to consolidate the studies of honors-track seniors who have completed all International Studies degree requirements. Students must complete a project that addresses an issue appropriate to their concentration.

INTL-I 406 HONORS INTL STDS CAPSTONE SEM (31008)

Instructor: Scheuerman, William
Day & Time: R 9:05 AM- 12:05 PM
Building & Room: Wendell W. Wright 3284
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: IW
Start Date: 1/11/2016 End Date: 5/6/2016

P: I315, application, and approval of department. Required for departmental honors credit, this seminar is designed to consolidate the studies of honors-track seniors who have completed all International Studies degree requirements. Students must complete a project that addresses an issue appropriate to their concentration.

INTL-I 406 HONORS INTL STDS CAPSTONE SEM (9337)

Instructor: Siqueira, Andrea Dalledone
Day & Time: M 9:05 AM- 12:05 PM
Building & Room: Martin Hall 012A
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: IW
Start Date: 1/11/2016 End Date: 5/6/2016

P: I315, application, and approval of department. Required for departmental honors credit, this seminar is designed to consolidate the studies of honors-track seniors who have completed all International Studies degree requirements. Students must complete a project that addresses an issue appropriate to their concentration.

INTL-I 415 INDIV READINGS IN INTL STUDIES (5170)

Instructor: Kalentzidou, Olga
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 1/11/2016 End Date: 5/6/2016

INTL-I 421 HUMAN RIGHTS AND THE ARTS (31026)

Instructor: Kane, Stephanie C.
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0009
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 1/11/2016 End Date: 5/6/2016

GLOBAL ACTIVIST ARTS: Focuses on the relationship between art, activist politics and digital technologies. We will explore performances, occupations, and experiments that bring diverse people together in collectivities and social movements that are organized around globally crucial issues of our times such as inequality and the environment. Reading reflections of artists, curators, scholars, human rights activists and others, students will develop a language with which to talk, write and engage with art as a significant dimension of global politics. Students will be required to examine a particular instance of this interface between activism and art and the tactics that give it meaning.

INTL-I 421 HUMAN RIGHTS AND THE ARTS (31027)

Instructor: Kane, Stephanie C.
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0009
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 1/11/2016 End Date: 5/6/2016

GLOBAL ACTIVIST ARTS: Focuses on the relationship between art, activist politics and digital technologies. We will explore performances, occupations, and experiments that bring diverse people together in collectivities and social movements that are organized around globally crucial issues of our times such as inequality and the environment. Reading reflections of artists, curators, scholars, human rights activists and others, students will develop a language with which to talk, write and engage with art as a significant dimension of global politics. Students will be required to examine a particular instance of this interface between activism and art and the tactics that give it meaning.

INTL-I 422 CONTESTD TERR/CONFLCTD IDENT (32839)

Instructor: Dunn, Elizabeth Cullen
Day & Time: MW 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Jordan Hall A105
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 1/11/2016 End Date: 5/6/2016

HUMANITARIANISM AND DISPLACEMENT: One of the most important, and most unnoticed, developments in international politics since the end of the Cold War is the rise of an international humanitarian order. Now one of the defining features of 21st century liberalism, the humanitarian order encompasses a tight network of global institutions, NGOs, and national governments, as well as people labeled as "donors," "aid workers," "life savers," "victims," "perpetrators," and "beneficiaries." In this course, we will examine the growth of the humanitarian system, the ways it shapes international politics, and the ways it shapes both humanitarians and beneficiaries. What notions of individuality and human rights are mobilized in the discourse of humanitarianism? What kinds of action, including militarism and the erosion of state sovereignty, do humanitarian orders permit? What kind of time frames do ideas of "emergency" and "disaster" create for political leaders? What international institutions have grown up around the saving of lives, and how do they function? How are people transformed as they interact with new regimes of violence and care?

INTL-I 425 GENDER: INTERNAT'L PERSPECTIVE (31029)

Instructor: Allendorf, Keera
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 137
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 1/11/2016 End Date: 5/6/2016

GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT: This course introduces students to the role of gender in development across multiple sectors, including education, work, and health. Through comparisons across geographic locations and socio-economic groups it is shown that gender plays an important role in global development discourses.

INTL-I 426 ADVANCD TOPICS IN INTL STUDIES (32808)

Instructor: Golestaneh, Seema
Day & Time: MW 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 204
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 1/11/2016 End Date: 5/6/2016

This course offers a broad survey of contemporary Shi'i beliefs, practices, and politics with a focus on Twelver or Imami Shi'ism. Through a close examination of ethnographies, intellectual and political histories, theological writings, and more we will investigate the themes which inform the key debates and discourses which define contemporary Shi'ism. In particular, we will highlight the ways in which Shi'is utilize their theological beliefs to negotiate and respond to the socio-political context of the times in which they live. The course begins by examining the early days of what would later be call "Shi'ism." We then examine the key theological concepts which distinguish Shi'ism from Sunnism, including themes of adalat (divine justice), shahadat (martyrdom), the Karbala paradigm, and the role of the imamate and clerical class. The rest of the course is devoted to investigating the ways that Shi'ism informs and interacts with the social realm and vice versa, ranging from negotiations of the everyday to responding to moments of great civil and societal unrest. Travelling from South Asia to the Middle East, from Africa to America, we will ultimately examine how Shi'i beliefs and identity act as a dynamic force for shaping the worlds in which they live today.

INTL-I 427 ISS IN GLBL DEV & POL ECONOMY (31030)

Instructor: Bauerle Danzman, Sarah
Day & Time: MW 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 104
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 1/11/2016 End Date: 5/6/2016

MULTINATIONAL FIRMS IN THE GLOBAL ECONOMY: Corporations that operate across national boundaries powerfully structure the nature of production, consumption, and the distribution of wealth globally. Multinational firms can help bring economic growth and shared prosperity to developing countries, but critics often emphasize the negative consequences such large global firms can have on the local societies. This course examines how multinational firms affect economic development, worker, welfare, political processes, and global market governance.

INTL-I 428 SOCIAL JUSTICE AND THE ENVIRON (31032)

Instructor: Kane, Stephanie C.
Day & Time: W 2:30 PM- 5:00 PM
Building & Room: Sycamore Hall 100
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 1/11/2016 End Date: 5/6/2016

ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE focuses on the global struggle for potable water and healthy rivers. From megacities to villages, we will explore the political unconscious of pollution, the passionate organizing efforts of neighborhood environmental activists, the changing and contested meanings of indigeneity and landscape, and the geopolitics of water engineering and international development. Our cases draw from three books, two by anthropologists doing ethnographic fieldwork in the Americas and one by a journalist whose water reporting extends across the Americas, Asia, Africa, the Middle East and Europe. Students will engage with the global water crisis in required readings, writing assignments and group presentations of site-based images.

INTL-I 428 SOCIAL JUSTICE AND THE ENVIRON (31033)

Instructor: Kane, Stephanie C.
Day & Time: W 2:30 PM- 5:00 PM
Building & Room: Sycamore Hall 100
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 1/11/2016 End Date: 5/6/2016

ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE focuses on the global struggle for potable water and healthy rivers. From megacities to villages, we will explore the political unconscious of pollution, the passionate organizing efforts of neighborhood environmental activists, the changing and contested meanings of indigeneity and landscape, and the geopolitics of water engineering and international development. Our cases draw from three books, two by anthropologists doing ethnographic fieldwork in the Americas and one by a journalist whose water reporting extends across the Americas, Asia, Africa, the Middle East and Europe. Students will engage with the global water crisis in required readings, writing assignments and group presentations of site-based images.

INTL-I 430 RESEARCH IN INTERNATIONAL STDS (9339)

Instructor: Kalentzidou, Olga
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 1/11/2016 End Date: 5/6/2016

P: Major or minor in International Studies and permission of department. Overseas faculty-directed research in international studies.

INTL-I 435 TOPICS WITH SVC LRNING IN INTL (31035)

Instructor: Korytova, Stepanka
Day & Time: MW 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Cedar Hall C101
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 1/11/2016 End Date: 5/6/2016

SEX TRAFFICKING AND DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AT CROSSROADS: This service learning course is a combination of classroom-base work and off-campus location at the Middle Way House. One of the main purposes of the course is to understand the intersection between gender violence and human trafficking, primarily women and children, at local and global scales of analysis. We will try to answer two questions: how are domestic violence and human trafficking correlated; how likely are the children from families where abuse -- whether psychological, physical and or sexual -- to become victims of sex traffickers. Students will be engaged in learning outside the classroom, which will enable them to apply their academic knowledge to "real life" situations by being active participants in a community agency. Through service at the Middle Way House students will be given opportunities to improve their professional skills and evaluate their role as local and global citizens.

INTL-I 435 TOPICS WITH SVC LRNING IN INTL (31036)

Instructor: Korytova, Stepanka
Day & Time: MW 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Cedar Hall C101
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 1/11/2016 End Date: 5/6/2016

SEX TRAFFICKING AND DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AT CROSSROADS: This service learning course is a combination of classroom-base work and off-campus location at the Middle Way House. One of the main purposes of the course is to understand the intersection between gender violence and human trafficking, primarily women and children, at local and global scales of analysis. We will try to answer two questions: how are domestic violence and human trafficking correlated; how likely are the children from families where abuse -- whether psychological, physical and or sexual -- to become victims of sex traffickers. Students will be engaged in learning outside the classroom, which will enable them to apply their academic knowledge to "real life" situations by being active participants in a community agency. Through service at the Middle Way House students will be given opportunities to improve their professional skills and evaluate their role as local and global citizens.

INTL-I 498 INTERNSHIP IN INTL STUDIES (9972)

Instructor: Kalentzidou, Olga
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 1/11/2016 End Date: 5/6/2016

(This section reserved for internships based abroad.) P: Approval of department. Provides students with an opportunity to receive academic credit for a part-time or full-time internship experience abroad. Allows students to apply the knowledge gained through course work in International Studies to the work world, thereby developing additional knowledge and skills and exposing them to professional career options.

INTL-I 498 INTERNSHIP IN INTL STUDIES (6972)

Instructor: Kalentzidou, Olga
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 1/11/2016 End Date: 5/6/2016

(This section reserved for internships based in the U.S.) P: Approval of department. Provides students with an opportunity to receive academic credit for a part-time or full-time internship experience within the U.S. Allows students to apply the knowledge gained through course work in International Studies to the work world, thereby developing additional knowledge and skills and exposing them to professional career options.