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Courses

Semester:

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (7742)

Instructor: Bovingdon, Gardner
Day & Time: MW 1:25 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 101
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

Explore a variety of different perspectives for studying and making sense of the world and global issues in the past and present. We will learn how these different perspectives portray the world, interpret events, and often shape human actions. Lecture material and key concepts are organized around the International Studies thematic concentrations, thereby introducing a variety of analytical approaches from the natural and social sciences and the arts and humanities. Assignments and discussion will also incorporate a geographic dimension for analysis. Case studies from different historical periods and parts of the world will illustrate these approaches and key issues.

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (12069)

Instructor: Banai, Hussein
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM- 3:20 PM
Building & Room: Wendell W. Wright 1120
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

Explore a variety of different perspectives for studying and making sense of the world and global issues in the past and present. We will learn how these different perspectives portray the world, interpret events, and often shape human actions. Lecture material and key concepts are organized around the International Studies thematic concentrations, thereby introducing a variety of analytical approaches from the natural and social sciences and the arts and humanities. Assignments and discussion will also incorporate a geographic dimension for analysis. Case studies from different historical periods and parts of the world will illustrate these approaches and key issues.

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (13144)

Instructor: Cesnik, Matthew Philip
Day & Time: F 10:10 AM- 11:00 AM
Building & Room: Cedar Hall C002
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (13145)

Instructor: Cesnik, Matthew Philip
Day & Time: F 12:20 PM- 1:10 PM
Building & Room: Student Building (Frances Morg 220
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (13146)

Instructor: Cesnik, Matthew Philip
Day & Time: F 1:25 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Psychology 115
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (13147)

Instructor: Tezel, Aybike Seyma
Day & Time: F 10:10 AM- 11:00 AM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 340
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (13148)

Instructor: Johnson, Cathryn Evangeline
Day & Time: F 10:10 AM- 11:00 AM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 347
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (13315)

Instructor: Johnson, Cathryn Evangeline
Day & Time: F 11:15 AM- 12:05 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 305
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (13316)

Instructor: Johnson, Cathryn Evangeline
Day & Time: F 1:25 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 002
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (13317)

Instructor: Tichindelean, Matei
Day & Time: F 10:10 AM- 11:00 AM
Building & Room: Cedar Hall C112
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (14211)

Instructor: Tezel, Aybike Seyma
Day & Time: F 12:20 PM- 1:10 PM
Building & Room: Hutton Honors College 111
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (14212)

Instructor: Tezel, Aybike Seyma
Day & Time: F 1:25 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Radio-TV 226
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (14213)

Instructor: Tichindelean, Matei
Day & Time: F 11:15 AM- 12:05 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 209
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (14214)

Instructor: Tichindelean, Matei
Day & Time: F 1:25 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Fine Arts 010
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (30178)

Instructor: Banai, Hussein
Day & Time: R 1:25 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1023
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

INTL-I 102 CLIMATE CHANGE-INTL STUDIES (30705)

Instructor: O'Reilly, Jessica Leigh
Day & Time: MW 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1122
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

Climate change is a cross-cutting contemporary problem: it intersects with issues of culture and politics, conflict, security, human rights, development, and governance. This class explores the basic science and policy of climate change, along with these intersections.

INTL-I 202 GLOBAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENT (30177)

Instructor: Kane, Stephanie C.
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1134
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

We explore human-environment interactions from international and interdisciplinary perspectives. We consider how and why humans shape the nature they inhabit in particular ways, and how in turn, nature shapes health and disease among humans. We will study how, as global change unfolds in particular cultures, ecologies and geographies, it alters human resistance and susceptibility to disease, and too, alters the access of individuals and communities to conditions of wellness. Drawing from the social and natural sciences and the humanities, the course will provide students with the concepts, theories and analytic tools useful for understanding and addressing the social, political and economic complexities of the fundamental global health and environment issues of our time.

INTL-I 202 GLOBAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENT (7302)

Instructor: Long, Yan
Day & Time: MW 5:45 PM- 7:00 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1112
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

We explore human-environment interactions from international and interdisciplinary perspectives. We consider how and why humans shape the nature they inhabit in particular ways, and how in turn, nature shapes health and disease among humans. We will study how, as global change unfolds in particular cultures, ecologies and geographies, it alters human resistance and susceptibility to disease, and too, alters the access of individuals and communities to conditions of wellness. Drawing from the social and natural sciences and the humanities, the course will provide students with the concepts, theories and analytic tools useful for understanding and addressing the social, political and economic complexities of the fundamental global health and environment issues of our time.

INTL-I 203 GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT (31194)

Instructor: Steinberg, Jessica
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM- 3:20 PM
Building & Room: Chemistry 001
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

Explore the political, economic, social and cultural forces and effects of global development, including questions such as: why are some countries poor while others are not? What is the effect of globalization on development at the local and national level? And who are the actors and institutions, and what are the challenges and strategies in addressing global poverty, inequality, and development?

INTL-I 203 GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT (31195)

Instructor: Chatarpal, Mark Ortez
Day & Time: F 9:05 AM- 9:55 AM
Building & Room: Cedar Hall C116
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

Explore the political, economic, social and cultural forces and effects of global development, including questions such as: why are some countries poor while others are not? What is the effect of globalization on development at the local and national level? And who are the actors and institutions, and what are the challenges and strategies in addressing global poverty, inequality, and development?

INTL-I 203 GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT (31203)

Instructor: Chatarpal, Mark Ortez
Day & Time: F 10:10 AM- 11:00 AM
Building & Room: Radio-TV 226
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

Explore the political, economic, social and cultural forces and effects of global development, including questions such as: why are some countries poor while others are not? What is the effect of globalization on development at the local and national level? And who are the actors and institutions, and what are the challenges and strategies in addressing global poverty, inequality, and development?

INTL-I 203 GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT (31204)

Instructor: Chatarpal, Mark Ortez
Day & Time: F 11:15 AM- 12:05 PM
Building & Room: Wells Library 031
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

Explore the political, economic, social and cultural forces and effects of global development, including questions such as: why are some countries poor while others are not? What is the effect of globalization on development at the local and national level? And who are the actors and institutions, and what are the challenges and strategies in addressing global poverty, inequality, and development?

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (30181)

Instructor: Rana, Shruti
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 104
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

This course aims to provide an introduction to the foundations and practice of international human rights law. We will study the origins and foundations of the contemporary human rights system, and conduct a critical examination of its potential and problems. We will discuss the development, structure, and contemporary jurisprudence of the major human rights treaty bodies, and gain an understanding of how the current system of international human rights law operates. We will also consider how rights evolve over time, and ways to improve the recognition and enforcement of human rights. Our course assignments will focus on learning how to use international human rights laws as legal, policymaking, and advocacy tools.

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (33324)

Instructor: Siqueira, Andrea Dalledone
Day & Time: TR 10:10 AM- 11:00 AM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0001
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

This course considers the relationship between human rights and freedom. We look at the nature and practice of human rights in relationships among individuals, groups, and institutions while also exploring the nature of freedom and how people seek it through human rights. In this course we treat human rights and freedom as ongoing arguments, productive processes, and arenas of contestation, as means of constructing aspirations, seeking and challenging power, developing ways of life, and finding fulfillment. The course considers positive and negative consequences of framing relationships and power in terms of human rights and critically examines uses of human rights to manage problems.

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (33325)

Instructor: Miller, Sharon Steel
Day & Time: F 9:05 AM- 9:55 AM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 106
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

This course considers the relationship between human rights and freedom. We look at the nature and practice of human rights in relationships among individuals, groups, and institutions while also exploring the nature of freedom and how people seek it through human rights. In this course we treat human rights and freedom as ongoing arguments, productive processes, and arenas of contestation, as means of constructing aspirations, seeking and challenging power, developing ways of life, and finding fulfillment. The course considers positive and negative consequences of framing relationships and power in terms of human rights and critically examines uses of human rights to manage problems.

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (33326)

Instructor: Miller, Sharon Steel
Day & Time: F 10:10 AM- 11:00 AM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1128
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

This course considers the relationship between human rights and freedom. We look at the nature and practice of human rights in relationships among individuals, groups, and institutions while also exploring the nature of freedom and how people seek it through human rights. In this course we treat human rights and freedom as ongoing arguments, productive processes, and arenas of contestation, as means of constructing aspirations, seeking and challenging power, developing ways of life, and finding fulfillment. The course considers positive and negative consequences of framing relationships and power in terms of human rights and critically examines uses of human rights to manage problems.

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (33327)

Instructor: Miller, Sharon Steel
Day & Time: F 11:15 AM- 12:05 PM
Building & Room: Wylie Hall 115
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

This course considers the relationship between human rights and freedom. We look at the nature and practice of human rights in relationships among individuals, groups, and institutions while also exploring the nature of freedom and how people seek it through human rights. In this course we treat human rights and freedom as ongoing arguments, productive processes, and arenas of contestation, as means of constructing aspirations, seeking and challenging power, developing ways of life, and finding fulfillment. The course considers positive and negative consequences of framing relationships and power in terms of human rights and critically examines uses of human rights to manage problems.

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (33328)

Instructor: Vanderburgh, Dana Scott
Day & Time: F 9:05 AM- 9:55 AM
Building & Room: Hutton Honors College 108
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

This course considers the relationship between human rights and freedom. We look at the nature and practice of human rights in relationships among individuals, groups, and institutions while also exploring the nature of freedom and how people seek it through human rights. In this course we treat human rights and freedom as ongoing arguments, productive processes, and arenas of contestation, as means of constructing aspirations, seeking and challenging power, developing ways of life, and finding fulfillment. The course considers positive and negative consequences of framing relationships and power in terms of human rights and critically examines uses of human rights to manage problems.

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (33329)

Instructor: Vanderburgh, Dana Scott
Day & Time: F 10:10 AM- 11:00 AM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 121
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

This course considers the relationship between human rights and freedom. We look at the nature and practice of human rights in relationships among individuals, groups, and institutions while also exploring the nature of freedom and how people seek it through human rights. In this course we treat human rights and freedom as ongoing arguments, productive processes, and arenas of contestation, as means of constructing aspirations, seeking and challenging power, developing ways of life, and finding fulfillment. The course considers positive and negative consequences of framing relationships and power in terms of human rights and critically examines uses of human rights to manage problems.

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (33330)

Instructor: Vanderburgh, Dana Scott
Day & Time: F 11:15 AM- 12:05 PM
Building & Room: Wylie Hall 101
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

This course considers the relationship between human rights and freedom. We look at the nature and practice of human rights in relationships among individuals, groups, and institutions while also exploring the nature of freedom and how people seek it through human rights. In this course we treat human rights and freedom as ongoing arguments, productive processes, and arenas of contestation, as means of constructing aspirations, seeking and challenging power, developing ways of life, and finding fulfillment. The course considers positive and negative consequences of framing relationships and power in terms of human rights and critically examines uses of human rights to manage problems.

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (13113)

Instructor: Gilligan, Emma L.
Day & Time: MW 11:15 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1112
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

This course considers the relationship between human rights and freedom. We look at the nature and practice of human rights in relationships among individuals, groups, and institutions while also exploring the nature of freedom and how people seek it through human rights. In this course we treat human rights and freedom as ongoing arguments, productive processes, and arenas of contestation, as means of constructing aspirations, seeking and challenging power, developing ways of life, and finding fulfillment. The course considers positive and negative consequences of framing relationships and power in terms of human rights and critically examines uses of human rights to manage problems.

INTL-I 205 CULTURE AND POLITICS (4552)

Instructor: Kousaleos, Nicole Serena
Day & Time: MW 1:00 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1112
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

Examines culture and governance on an international scale, considering how governments, markets, and international organizations deploy or use culture, and how people turn to cultural resources to resist attempts to govern them and/or to assert their own political aims.

INTL-I 205 CULTURE AND POLITICS (30182)

Instructor: Nemes, Peter
Day & Time: TR 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1134
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

Examines culture and governance on an international scale, considering how governments, markets, and international organizations deploy or use culture, and how people turn to cultural resources to resist attempts to govern them and/or to assert their own political aims.

INTL-I 206 PEACE AND CONFLICT (30183)

Instructor: Hosur Suhas, Prashant
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1134
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

This course will investigate intersections between ¿identity¿ and ¿conflict.¿ We will consider how different forms of identity--ethnic, religious, linguistic, and political, to cite a few examples--can become the basis for people to mobilize. We will examine how collective forms of identity can be yoked to nationalism, resulting in an exclusionary view of the nation-state and violence against those whose identities are deemed undesirable. We will seek to understand how conflicts emerge out of local conditions and colonial legacies, and can be shaped by national, regional, and transnational contexts. Our approach will be interdisciplinary, drawing on readings from anthropology, political theory, and history. Students will acquire a familiarity with critical concepts such as nationalism, ethnicity, gender, political economy, and sectarianism.

INTL-I 210 DIPLOMACY SECURITY GOVERNANCE (33947)

Instructor: Waters, Timothy William
Day & Time: MW 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Lowell E Baier Hall 121
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

Why have conflicts emerged in international politics? Why, in other instances, has cooperation prevailed? This course uses theory and history to help us understand conflict and cooperation in the modern world. We pay particular attention to diplomacy, security, and governance efforts since 1945, and we examine a range of institutions and mechanisms, including international organizations and international law, that have been used to manage international security.

INTL-I 210 DIPLOMACY SECURITY GOVERNANCE (36373)

Instructor: Bell, Andrew Michael
Day & Time: TR 5:45 PM- 7:00 PM
Building & Room: Swain East 010
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

Why have conflicts emerged in international politics? Why, in other instances, has cooperation prevailed? This course uses theory and history to help us understand conflict and cooperation in the modern world. We pay particular attention to diplomacy, security, and governance efforts since 1945, and we examine a range of institutions and mechanisms, including international organizations and international law, that have been used to manage international security.

INTL-I 220 GLOBAL CONNECTIONS (13117)

Instructor: Nemes, Peter
Day & Time: MW 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1134
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: A&H GCC
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

We hear that we live in an ¿increasingly globalized world,¿ but what does that mean? This course analyzes the scope of global interdependencies today and their profound impact upon individual and collective identities. Topics include the rhetoric of human rights, national and regional politics, and our perception of the ¿other.¿ Through the use of relevant examples and case studies from around the globe we will break down stereotypes, contextualize and analyze connections, recognize our place in the global puzzle, and exercise our ability to think ethically about international issues. It will be an enriching and stimulating class that you will greatly benefit from -- personally and professionally.

INTL-I 222 GLOBAL HEALTH CONNECTIONS (13118)

Instructor: Siqueira, Andrea Dalledone
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1118
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

How does the health of communities around the world depend upon socio-economic, political, environmental and cultural factors? What role can global health institutions play in promoting health as a human right and addressing the main health challenges of vulnerable communities and populations, such as women and children? This course focuses on the non-medical determinants of health in communities around the world as well as on the most important health challenges the world faces. Students will read articles from a variety of disciplines and focus on case studies from around the globe to understand the interconnections between health and local contexts and global processes. This course will interest students pursuing careers in medicine or public health.

INTL-I 300 TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL STDS (13405)

Instructor: Zadoff, Mirjam
Day & Time: MW 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 121
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

Topic: REFUGEES & MIGRANTS: FROM ELLIS ISLAND TO BUDAPEST TRAIN STATION. Today there are over 65 million forcibly displaced people worldwide, not including migrants on the move due to economic hardship, hunger and global warming. We will trace the realities and images of refugees, undocumented immigrants and asylum seekers over the course of the last century, beginning with the millions of Irish, Jewish, Italian and other immigrants arriving at Ellis Island. We¿ll examine the refugee crisis of WW I, the Holocaust and mass displacement in WWII, national and international Human Rights legislation and humanitarian organizations. We¿ll then discuss the present global refugee crisis, the closing of borders, and the identification of refugees with terrorism. The everyday life experiences of migrants and stories of their journeys will accompany our exploration.

INTL-I 300 TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL STDS (13132)

Instructor: Zirogiannis, Nikolaos
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Hutton Honors College 111
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

Topic: GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL INSTITUTIONS AND DEVELOPMENT. What are the most important environmental problems that nations face? Are there institutions in place (at the global, national and local level) responsible for crafting solutions? What role do developing countries have in the global environmental forum? What is the relationship between economic development and environmental protection? This class will address those questions, initially through the prism of climate change, ¿the mother of all environmental problems.¿ We will then examine a series of case studies including cotton production in Benin, lobster fishing in Maine, palm oil cultivation in Indonesia, forest conservation in Bolivia, and tequila distilling in Mexico. Open to Honors students only; of particular interest to those pursuing careers in international development and environmental policy/advocacy.

INTL-I 300 TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL STDS (32973)

Instructor: Spechler, Dina R.
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 121
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

Comparative Foreign Policy: Why Nations Go to War? Why did the United States get involved in Vietnam, and why did it stay in the war long after U.S. leaders knew we could not win? Why did the Soviets invade Afghanistan when they well knew that others' attempts to conquer that country had repeatedly failed? Why did Hitler attack the Soviet Union despite the fact that no outside power since the 15th century had succeeded in subduing Russia? History and contemporary international relations are replete with examples of the risks, costs and difficulties of attacking and invading other states and intervening militarily in the politics and conflicts of others. This course will explore the question of why nations go to war when survival is not at stake. There will be many case studies, including some quite recent cases, but the focus will be on theories that help us understand this puzzling behavior on the part of states and those who determine or influence national policy. We will be examining the impact of individual leaders, their personal characteristics, beliefs, perceptions and misperceptions, as well as decision-making groups, government bureaucracies, national values and belief systems, and the nature and functioning of various kinds of political systems. A role-playing exercise at the end of the semester will give students an opportunity to simulate national decision-makers confronting the question of whether or not to use force. The course requirements will be two exams (short answer and essay questions), two short papers and participation in class. No textbook will be used. All readings will be available on Canvas and possibly in the form of a course packet. Key words: foreign policy, international relations, war, force, intervention, leaders, decision-making, simulation

INTL-I 300 TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL STDS (36559)

Instructor: Zirogiannis, Nikolaos
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Hutton Honors College 111
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

Topic: GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL INSTITUTIONS AND DEVELOPMENT. What are the most important environmental problems that nations face? Are there institutions in place (at the global, national and local level) responsible for crafting solutions? What role do developing countries have in the global environmental forum? What is the relationship between economic development and environmental protection? This class will address those questions, initially through the prism of climate change, ¿the mother of all environmental problems.¿ We will then examine a series of case studies including cotton production in Benin, lobster fishing in Maine, palm oil cultivation in Indonesia, forest conservation in Bolivia, and tequila distilling in Mexico. Of particular interest to those pursuing careers in international development and environmental policy/advocacy.

INTL-I 302 ADV TOPICS IN GLBL HLTH & ENV (11126)

Instructor: Long, Yan
Day & Time: MW 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Auditorium A151
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

Topic: HEALTH GOVERNANCE AND ORGANIZATIONAL MANAGEMENT IN GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE. Why was the World Health Organization slow in responding to Ebola? How are national security interests served by China and the U.S. making massive investments in health programs in Africa? We¿ll study how health policy is increasingly being shaped beyond the level of the nation state, focusing on the roles of international organizations, national governments, the business sector and civil society. Students will explore the landscape of major organizations that deal with health issues at the global level and their effectiveness for promoting health action. Much of the discussion will stem from case studies of epidemic control, international development projects for health, grassroots health advocacy, and private biocapital regulations.

INTL-I 302 ADV TOPICS IN GLBL HLTH & ENV (11131)

Instructor: Kane, Stephanie C.
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Cedar Hall C102
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

Topic: GLOBAL HEALING. We study healing practices that have been traversing the world, some since ancient times, some on the cutting edge of scientific knowledge, their cultural histories being transformed by new practitioners, inventions and problems. We focus on the social, political and economic conditions that allow healing practices to thrive; the social spaces and frameworks of interpretation that different healing practices create; and the interconnections among healers, patients, and those implicated in causing disease. Ethnographies will guide our critical thinking and writing about shamanism and development among indigenous rainforest people of Panama, the social body in wartime and peacetime El Salvador, and how changing visual and sound technologies shape diagnoses and treatment in a Dutch hospital.

INTL-I 303 ADV TOPICS IN GLBL DEVELOPMENT (13127)

Instructor: Stein, Elizabeth
Day & Time: MW 1:00 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0003
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

Topic: POLITICAL CHANGE AND DEVELOPMENT. Democratization, revolution and economic development all arise from and trigger major political and social changes. We first discuss changes in political regimes, examining the rise and fall of modern states, transitions from colonization to decolonization, from authoritarianism to democracy (and back again), from elite-led to mass-based movements and what happens to states after these transitions. Next we touch on political issues relating to economic development, such as the influences of industrialization, foreign aid, natural resources, inequality and globalization. Lastly we explore social change from a political perspective including major transformations that have occurred due to mass migration, religious upheaval, technological innovation and the changing environment.

INTL-I 303 ADV TOPICS IN GLBL DEVELOPMENT (35098)

Instructor: Schmitz, Volker
Day & Time: MW 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 245
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

All countries must be able to address the political, social, and economic problems that come from scarcity. But just how these problems are tackled varies widely from country to country. What accounts for differences in public policies, policy outputs, and policy outcomes? For example, why do people in some countries pay more for health care than others? Why have societies responded differently to pressures of increased immigration? How does an increased number of elderly affect government spending? What is the relationship between national ideologies - liberal, conservative, and the like - and the size and nature of national welfare states? And how have rising inequality and economic decline affected policy performance in the U.S. and elsewhere? These are just some of the questions to be addressed in this course. We will examine several policy areas, including immigration, the environment, the economy, taxes, health care, social policy, and education. We will learn about how and why these policies work in the way they do in a range of countries, including the "rich" countries of the global north and the poorer countries of the global south. A central goal of the course will be to draw comparisons among these cases - and to the United States - to gain new perspective on current policy debates in American politics. Students studying political science, economics, public affairs, sociology, and other areas will find this course of interest.

INTL-I 304 ADV TPCS IN HUM RGHTS/INTL LAW (13119)

Instructor: Kousaleos, Nicole Serena
Day & Time: MW 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0003
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

Topic: BODIES UNDER FIRE: GENDER VIOLENCE AND HUMAN RIGHTS. Gender violence is a critical issue today. Drawing on medical anthropology, culture studies, global studies, gender studies and human rights, we ask what is at stake for women across the globe as they live their daily lives within female bodies? A holistic approach to human rights requires addressing the interwoven aspects of women¿s lives. The main areas of consideration will be: maternal health, FGC, human trafficking, and violence within and outside conflict. We will begin with a theoretical assessment of the intersection of globalization with women¿s bodily, lived experience and move into methodological suggestions for best local solutions to contemporary gender and human rights dilemmas.

INTL-I 305 ADV TOPICS IN CULTURE&POLITICS (10074)

Instructor: Nemes, Peter
Day & Time: TR 8:00 AM- 9:15 AM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0003
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

Topic: CULTURE IN THE DIGITAL AGE. How have the production, distribution and consumption of cultural products changed in our digital age? The effects of the continuous advancement of digital technologies and the penetration of computerized systems into our everyday lives are hard to fully assess because we are not just observers but also participants. Our relationship with knowledge, our ability to build meaning through cultural practices, and our very identities are each changing and being challenged. This class will consider digital and visual culture, modes of cultural production, preservation of non-digital content, copyrights, and remixing and sharing. Collaborative learning projects, including creation of audio/video/web content, will allow for an active and creative engagement with the material.

INTL-I 305 ADV TOPICS IN CULTURE&POLITICS (33319)

Instructor: Todd, Meagan Lucinda
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 336
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

This course offers a political geographic approach to understanding contemporary Islam. Political geography is the study of how power is exercised through space, from nation-states to networks. We will use academic texts and assignments to develop a nuanced understanding of key issues facing Muslim societies such as Islamophobia, reform movements, and gender politics. Our interest will be in probing their relationship to globalization, nationalism, and democracy. The first section of the course will build a theoretical and historical foundation for our study. This section includes units on Understanding Islam, and Orientalism and Representations. The second section of the course consists of thematic units on the multifaceted politics of Islam. This will include units on American Muslim Identities; Democracy and Body Politics in Turkey; Revolution in Iran; and Nationality and Networks in Russia.

INTL-I 305 ADV TOPICS IN CULTURE&POLITICS (30399)

Instructor: Graves, Margaret Susanna
Day & Time: TR 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Fine Arts 010
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: A&H GCC
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

Topic: MUSEUMS: THE DISPLAY OF CULTURE. Display is never neutral. Museums and exhibitions are showcases in which nations and cultures model their own images and their relationships with the wider world. Nowhere is the culture of display more overtly politicized than in the museum presentation of so-called world cultures: the institutional display of ¿other¿ cultures can often tell us as much about the society that frames and consumes the display as it reveals about the culture on display. This course will investigate some of the most potent presentations of both "self" and "other" in the history of museums, and will engage with issues of colonialism and cultural capital, nation-building and self-identity.

INTL-I 306 ADV TOPICS IN PEACE & CONFLICT (12839)

Instructor: Ibrahim, Nur Amali
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0003
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

Topic: NEOLIBERALISM IN CRISIS. Neoliberalism proposes that human well-being can best be advanced through the free market. Under neoliberalism, the state should scale back on its economic interventions to allow the market to naturally set prices. Deregulation, privatization, marketization, entrepreneurship, and individual freedom have become buzzwords. Critics of neoliberalism argue, however, that the widespread adoption of neoliberalism has resulted in increased corporate power, widening income gaps, unregulated resource exploitation that is not environmentally sustainable, job loss through downsizing, and declines in welfare programs for poorer citizens. This course examines the features and histories of neoliberalism, as well as its effects on the lives of ordinary people in the U.S. and beyond.

INTL-I 310 ADV TPCS IN DIPL SECURITY GOV (12917)

Instructor: Minton, Mark Clements
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 104
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

Topic: THE U.N. SECURITY COUNCIL: SANCTIONS, PEACEKEEPING AND MAJOR POWER POLITICS. What does the United Nations Security Council actually do? Quite a lot, it turns out. Its decisions are international law and it currently deploys over 100,000 peacekeepers in 16 missions from Lebanon to Kosovo to Liberia. It imposes economic sanctions on countries for their dangerous behavior: for example, against North Korea for its nuclear weapons tests. But behind the unity of its words and actions, the Security Council is also the scene of alternating conflict and cooperation among the major powers, especially its permanent five members. To understand international politics and security, then, one needs to understand the UNSC. Students will study the structure and history of the body through case studies and class role-playing exercises.

INTL-I 310 ADV TPCS IN DIPL SECURITY GOV (9643)

Instructor: Scheuerman, William
Day & Time: TR 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 104
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

Topic: COMPETING VISIONS OF GLOBAL (DIS)ORDER. Global politics seems plagued by endless conflict, strife, and violence. Global social and economic affairs appear unjust (especially to those whom they fail to benefit) and no less conflict-laden. Given the seeming disorder of international politics and society, how can some measure of order and stability ever be achieved? We consider both hard-nosed power-political "realist" views and "cosmopolitan" attempts to achieve permanent peace via universal or global governance. Students should expect to read a wide range of "classical" authors who have tried to understand international politics and society (e.g., Machiavelli, Rousseau, Kant, Marx) as well as contemporary writers. The course concludes with a discussion of how these ideas help us understand President Trump¿s advocacy of "America-First."

INTL-I 315 RSRCH DESIGN IN INTL STUDIES (8017)

Instructor: Steinberg, Jessica
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0003
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

This class exposes students to the theoretical frameworks, methods and skills necessary for undertaking research in International Studies. Through the semester students will be working collaboratively on a well-conceived and feasible research design, allowing them to explore the interdisciplinary and comparative perspectives of International and Global Studies. This class requires working in groups and active class discussions, i.e., the full participation of each member of the class. While working on the process of research design of a given topic, students will be able to form questions about their own exploratory overseas research and subsequent capstone/paper, as well as to acquire and better their working skills for future employment in public and private sectors.

INTL-I 315 RSRCH DESIGN IN INTL STUDIES (13128)

Instructor: Allendorf, Keera
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0003
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

This class exposes students to the theoretical frameworks, methods and skills necessary for undertaking research in International Studies. Through the semester students will be working collaboratively on a well-conceived and feasible research design, allowing them to explore the interdisciplinary and comparative perspectives of International and Global Studies. This class requires working in groups and active class discussions, i.e., the full participation of each member of the class. While working on the process of research design of a given topic, students will be able to form questions about their own exploratory overseas research and subsequent capstone/paper, as well as to acquire and better their working skills for future employment in public and private sectors.

INTL-I 400 INTL STUDIES CAPSTONE SEMINAR (6357)

Instructor: Kousaleos, Nicole Serena
Day & Time: R 9:30 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1023
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: IW
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

P: I315. Demonstrate your accumulated training in International Studies in a single original project of your choice, subject to the instructor's approval and under the supervision of a faculty member. The completed thesis should bring together your academic preparation, your region, your foreign language expertise, and your overseas experience in an 8,000-word essay. Peer review and regular feedback through multiple drafts will help you craft your thesis. By the end of the seminar you will be able to articulate clearly your research argument in a well-written and orally presented project.

INTL-I 400 INTL STUDIES CAPSTONE SEMINAR (4470)

Instructor: Gilligan, Emma L.
Day & Time: W 2:30 PM- 5:30 PM
Building & Room: Sycamore Hall 0013
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: IW
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

P: I315. Demonstrate your accumulated training in International Studies in a single original project of your choice, subject to the instructor's approval and under the supervision of a faculty member. The completed thesis should bring together your academic preparation, your region, your foreign language expertise, and your overseas experience in an 8,000-word essay. Peer review and regular feedback through multiple drafts will help you craft your thesis. By the end of the seminar you will be able to articulate clearly your research argument in a well-written and orally presented project.

INTL-I 401 GLOBAL SERVICE CAPSTONE (30241)

Instructor: Kalentzidou, Olga
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 1.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

INTL-I 406 HONORS INTL STDS CAPSTONE SEM (6697)

Instructor: Gilligan, Emma L.
Day & Time: W 2:30 PM- 5:30 PM
Building & Room: Sycamore Hall 0013
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: IW
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

P: I315, application, and approval of department. Required for departmental honors credit and taught with I-400, for honors-track seniors who have completed all International Studies degree requirements. See I-400 for further information.

INTL-I 406 HONORS INTL STDS CAPSTONE SEM (11554)

Instructor: Kousaleos, Nicole Serena
Day & Time: R 9:30 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1023
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: IW
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

P: I315, application, and approval of department. Required for departmental honors credit and taught with I-400, for honors-track seniors who have completed all International Studies degree requirements. See I-400 for further information.

INTL-I 420 GLOBAL SUSTAINABILITY STUDIES (13138)

Instructor: O'Reilly, Jessica Leigh
Day & Time: MW 1:00 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 108
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

Topic: NEGOTIATING CLIMATE: CULTURE, SCIENCE, AND POLITICS OF ENVIRONMENTAL TRANSFORMATION. How do people study, experience, interpret, and mitigate global climate change? We investigate climate science, politics, and economics, along with how climate change intersects with matters of justice, gender, globalization, media, development, and higher education. As we learn about these topics, we will conduct applied research on particular climate topics at various scales¿local, state, national, and international¿to work towards defining solutions and ways forward in a rapidly changing environment. We will explore the domains of climate science, policy, economics, and development, and then work to integrate these through mock climate negotiations coupled with a climate model. Students will develop a topic of climate expertise related to their own topical or geographic interests to track throughout the semester, including through remote participation at the Conference of Parties of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.

INTL-I 422 CONTESTD TERR/CONFLCTD IDENT (13124)

Instructor: Dunn, Elizabeth Cullen
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM- 5:00 PM
Building & Room: Student Building (Frances Morg 017
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-10-16 End Date: 2017-12-15

Topic: INTERNATIONAL HUMANITARIAN AID. There are 65 million refugees and internally displaced people in the world today. The ongoing refugee crisis in Europe has brought the lives displaced people live to public attention. Many of them are stuck in camps, with little prospect of leaving them. Others are adrift in large urban areas, forced to live in derelict housing or to send their young children out to work. What should be done to help these people? What problems do nation-states, aid agencies, businesses and volunteers face when they try to address this crisis? Can displaced people themselves construct meaningful lives while they remain "permanently temporary"? We will address this issue on global, regional, national and personal levels, trying to discover how to provide help that really helps.

INTL-I 424 WAR AND PEACE (30247)

Instructor: Bell, Andrew Michael
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0009
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

Why do armed groups engage in violence against civilians? What are the consequences for such conduct? Can such violence be limited in future conflicts? This course seeks to provide a framework for thinking about violence against civilians in war. We will approach these issues from theoretical, ethical, legal, empirical, and policy perspectives, examining the main moral and legal arguments prohibiting the targeting of civilians as well as theories used to understand variation in such armed group conduct. By the end of this course, students will be able to apply this knowledge in order to assess global policies to promote human security. Students pursuing careers in human rights, security, diplomacy, law, or international policy will find this course useful.

INTL-I 425 GENDER: INTERNAT'L PERSPECTIVE (36473)

Instructor: Pinaud, Clemence Marine
Day & Time: MW 5:45 PM- 8:00 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 138
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-10-16 End Date: 2017-12-15

Topic: WOMEN AND WAR. We will look critically at women's assigned roles and at gendered identities and experiences in peace and in wartime, from a historical and comparative perspective, considering such concepts as gender, motherhood, combat, and sexual violence. Further topics include women's place in the war economy and as victims (along with men) of sexual/gender-based violence war; women's agency and their multiple roles in armies and other armed groups; women as perpetrators of violence and extremism; and the making of gendered ethnic identities and of national history in the aftermath of war.

INTL-I 426 ADVANCD TOPICS IN INTL STUDIES (35404)

Instructor: Ekbia, Hamid
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 139
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

Topic: COMPUTERS, CULTURES, AND OUR GLOBALIZED FUTURE. Has computer technology made the world a better place -- more prosperous, more informed, more tolerant, and more peaceful? This is a question that is on many people's minds, but with no easy answer. Computing has transformed people's ways of life around the globe. Work, leisure, commerce, communication, politics, war, and education are now conducted very differently from a few of decades ago. While many of these changes seem to have a global character, they take specific forms in various cultures and societies. The way social media are used, for instance, is different in Brazil from how it is in Angola, and these are yet quite distinct from Russia, China, Sweden, Iran, or South Korea. This, however, is not unique to social media. All technologies are designed, developed, and used according to the demands of cultures and places; they are shaped by their contexts of use, and in turn shape those contexts. Like any other technology, and perhaps more strongly, computers are cultural and political artifacts. One of the best ways to understand them, therefore, is through a socio-economic, cultural, and political lens. This course explores computing from such a perspective, with a focus on the future of communities and societies across the globe.

INTL-X 370 TOPICS WITH SVC LRNING IN INTL (9644)

Instructor: Kalentzidou, Olga
Day & Time: R 9:30 AM- 12:00 PM
Building & Room: Willkie C C111
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

Would you like to volunteer in local agencies and get to know Bloomington? Want to be able to complete a project about issues of food scarcity and nutrition? Food Security is the class for you! Through direct service learning in Bloomington¿s three food agencies, you will: (a) evaluate how global and local issues of food security and sovereignty are connected; (b) understand the policies of international food aid programs in select case studies from around the world; and (c) appreciate the city of Bloomington and its diverse population and resources.

INTL-X 370 TOPICS WITH SVC LRNING IN INTL (12925)

Instructor: Kalentzidou, Olga
Day & Time: R 9:30 AM- 12:00 PM
Building & Room: Willkie C C111
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

Would you like to volunteer in local agencies and get to know Bloomington? Want to be able to complete a project about issues of food scarcity and nutrition? Food Security is the class for you! Through direct service learning in Bloomington¿s three food agencies, you will: (a) evaluate how global and local issues of food security and sovereignty are connected; (b) understand the policies of international food aid programs in select case studies from around the world; and (c) appreciate the city of Bloomington and its diverse population and resources.

INTL-X 390 INDIV READINGS IN INTL STUDIES (13121)

Instructor: Ekbia, Hamid
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

P: Major or minor in International Studies, application, and approval of department. Students conduct individual research projects on an international issue under the direction of a faculty member. Student and faculty member should develop a project and submit a "contract" to the department for approval.

INTL-X 390 INDIV READINGS IN INTL STUDIES (34182)

Instructor: Dunn, Elizabeth Cullen
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2017-08-21 End Date: 2017-12-15

P: Major or minor in International Studies, application, and approval of department. Students conduct individual research projects on an international issue under the direction of a faculty member. Student and faculty member should develop a project and submit a "contract" to the department for approval.