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Semester:

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (9890)

Instructor: Bovingdon, Gardner
Day & Time: MW 1:25 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0001
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

Explore a variety of different perspectives for studying and making sense of the world and global issues in the past and present. We will learn how these different perspectives portray the world, interpret events, and often shape human actions. Lecture material and key concepts are organized around the International Studies thematic concentrations, thereby introducing a variety of analytical approaches from the natural and social sciences and the arts and humanities. Assignments and discussion will also incorporate a geographic dimension for analysis. Case studies from different historical periods and parts of the world will be used to illustrate these approaches and key issues.

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (15451)

Instructor: Nemes, Peter
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM- 12:05 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0001
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

Explore a variety of different perspectives for studying and making sense of the world and global issues in the past and present. We will learn how these different perspectives portray the world, interpret events, and often shape human actions. Lecture material and key concepts are organized around the International Studies thematic concentrations, thereby introducing a variety of analytical approaches from the natural and social sciences and the arts and humanities. Assignments and discussion will also incorporate a geographic dimension for analysis. Case studies from different historical periods and parts of the world will be used to illustrate these approaches and key issues.

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (32362)

Instructor: Wonder, Thomas Edward
Day & Time: F 10:10 AM- 11:00 AM
Building & Room: Cedar Hall C114
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

Discussion section for G. Bovingdon lecture section.

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (32364)

Instructor: Wonder, Thomas Edward
Day & Time: F 12:20 PM- 1:10 PM
Building & Room: Cedar Hall C114
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

Discussion section for G. Bovingdon lecture section.

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (32365)

Instructor: Wonder, Thomas Edward
Day & Time: F 1:25 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Cedar Hall C114
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

Discussion section for G. Bovingdon lecture section.

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (32366)

Instructor: Hosur, Prashant Suhas
Day & Time: F 2:30 PM- 3:20 PM
Building & Room: Cedar Hall C114
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

Discussion section for G. Bovingdon lecture section.

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (32368)

Instructor: Linden, Kenneth Edward
Day & Time: F 10:10 AM- 11:00 AM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 204
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

Discussion section for P. Nemes lecture section.

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (32872)

Instructor: Linden, Kenneth Edward
Day & Time: F 11:15 AM- 12:05 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 245
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

Discussion section for P. Nemes lecture section.

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (32873)

Instructor: Linden, Kenneth Edward
Day & Time: F 1:25 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 245
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

Discussion section for P. Nemes lecture section.

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (32874)

Instructor: Stewart, Katie Lynn
Day & Time: F 11:15 AM- 12:05 PM
Building & Room: SPEA 275
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

Discussion section for P. Nemes lecture section.

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (35592)

Instructor: Hosur, Prashant Suhas
Day & Time: F 10:10 AM- 11:00 AM
Building & Room: Hodge Hall (Business School) 3050
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (35593)

Instructor: Hosur, Prashant Suhas
Day & Time: F 12:20 PM- 1:10 PM
Building & Room: Hodge Hall (Business School) 3048
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (35595)

Instructor: Stewart, Katie Lynn
Day & Time: F 10:10 AM- 11:00 AM
Building & Room: Hodge Hall (Business School) 3048
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (35596)

Instructor: Stewart, Katie Lynn
Day & Time: F 1:25 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Hodge Hall (Business School) 3046
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

INTL-I 202 GLOBAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENT (9273)

Instructor: Kane, Stephanie C.
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1112
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

We will explore human-environment interactions from international and interdisciplinary perspectives. We will consider how and why humans shape the nature they inhabit in particular ways, and how in turn, nature shapes health and disease among humans. We will study how, as global change unfolds in particular cultures, ecologies and geographies, it alters human resistance and susceptibility to disease, and too, alters the access of individual and communities to conditions of wellness. We will also address the policy roles that international intergovernmental and non-governmental agencies play. Drawing from the social and natural sciences and the humanities, the course will provide students with the concepts, theories and analytic tools useful for understanding and addressing the social, political, economic and legal complexities of the fundamental global health and environment issues of our time.

INTL-I 203 GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT (6153)

Instructor: Steinberg, Jessica
Day & Time: TR 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1112
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

What is development, and how does it work? This course focuses on the specifics of and interactions between the political, cultural, social and economic factors that influence human development at global, national and local levels. We will explore these factors at work in developing countries and seek to blend theory with practical application. Lectures cover a substantial part of the social sciences literature on development and will include discussions on dependency, globalization and sustainability as well. This course also introduces major theoretical perspectives on the structure, function and governance of international markets and the relevance of international institutions with regards to development.

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (32306)

Instructor: Gilligan, Emma L.
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1112
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

This course examines the history and evolution of international human rights law. It will analyze the domestic, regional and international institutions that have become part of the broader human rights agenda, using case studies that include the genocide in Rwanda and the ethnic violence in the former Yugoslavia of the 1990s. It will consider the roles and obligations of non-government organizations and corporations in the enforcement of rights, as well as specialized topics in the field, including truth commissions, international tribunals, humanitarian intervention, the right to a healthy environment and the right to health. At the conclusion of the course, students should be capable of evaluating the nature of state obligations under international law, have a historical understanding of its evolution and think strategically about how to deploy such mechanisms regionally and internationally in the protection human rights.

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (10422)

Instructor: Kousaleos, Nicole Serena
Day & Time: MW 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1122
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

Human rights, the movements to promote them and the forces arrayed against them, both past and present, are the focus of this class. Students will not only consider contemporary dilemmas in human rights, such as humanitarian intervention, but also historical questions like transformations in rights consciousness, or the creation and current efficacy of human rights international treaties. Our concerns will be both empirical and normative. We want to understand how human rights have evolved over time, where they have been respected, where they have been violated and why. But we also want to grapple with ethical questions such as how much America's foreign policy should concern itself with human rights, or whether there is a universal definition of human rights. A large focus will be on holistic approaches addressing rights through sustainable development. Students will make attempts at activism through serving as advocates for human rights and putting together transnational campaigns on contemporary human rights issues so that you are able to truly MAKE THE PERSONAL POLITICAL.

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (33752)

Instructor: Parnell, Philip C.
Day & Time: TR 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 330
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

INTL-I 205 INTERNATL COMMUNICATION & ARTS (6230)

Instructor: Kousaleos, Nicole Serena
Day & Time: MW 1:00 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1112
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

We are bombarded daily with news of how cultural forms are crossing borders with increasing speed, rendering locations across the world more closely connected. Yet such border crossing has long been constituted among a range of contradictory, competing, and even unpredictable locations, powers, and ideologies. In this class, explore the intersection between two highly debated and contested terms -- culture and the global or globalization -- with particular attention to culturally-located examples of screen media, arts, and communication. How do we begin to understand the ways in which cultural institutions, technologies, and practices mediate our links to the world and that of others? What sorts of dynamics structure these exchanges? How are cultural formations negotiated within particular local, national, or global contexts? Finally, how do we address our place, and the place of others, in relation to all that cultural globalization might promise?

INTL-I 206 IDENTITY AND CONFLICT (30867)

Instructor: Pinaud, Clemence Marine
Day & Time: MW 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1112
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

Different forms of identity--ethnic, religious, linguistic, political, and caste-based, for example--can both mobilize people and bring them into conflict with one another. We will examine how collective forms of identity can be yoked to nationalism, resulting in an exclusionary view of the nation-state and violence against those whose identities are deemed undesirable. Rather than view conflicts as irreducibly based in identity, however, we will also seek to understand how they emerge out of local conditions and colonial legacies, and can be shaped by national, regional, and transnational contexts. Our approach will be interdisciplinary, drawing on readings from anthropology, political theory, history, and literature. Students will acquire a familiarity with critical concepts such as nationalism, ethnicity, gender, political economy, and sectarianism. Learning outcomes include: 1) being able to apply critical concepts to different conflicts; 2) understanding how colonialism shapes many conflicts; 3) analyzing how different historical and geographical scales, e.g., the local, national, regional, and transnational, shape conflicts; 4) appreciating how conflicts over identity can simultaneously be contests over resources; and 5) developing empathy for those whose lives have been turned upside down by unrest and violence.

INTL-I 210 DIPLOMACY SECURITY GOVERNANCE (30868)

Instructor: Macekura, Stephen
Day & Time: TR 1:25 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0001
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

Why have conflicts emerged in international politics? Why, in other instances, has cooperation prevailed? How can theory and history help us understand diplomacy, security, and governance, and what are their limits? This course explores these questions by investigating the theoretical lenses needed to understand why and how policies are made; the history behind diplomacy, security, and governance since 1945; and how such knowledge can help us to grapple with the major diplomatic, security, and governance challenges of the present day.

INTL-I 210 DIPLOMACY SECURITY GOVERNANCE (33397)

Instructor: Waterhouse, Amanda Carroll
Day & Time: F 9:05 AM- 9:55 AM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 305
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

Discussion section for S. Macekura lecture section.

INTL-I 210 DIPLOMACY SECURITY GOVERNANCE (33398)

Instructor: Waterhouse, Amanda Carroll
Day & Time: F 10:10 AM- 11:00 AM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 305
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

Discussion section for S. Macekura lecture section.

INTL-I 210 DIPLOMACY SECURITY GOVERNANCE (33399)

Instructor: Waterhouse, Amanda Carroll
Day & Time: F 11:15 AM- 12:05 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 305
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

Discussion section for S. Macekura lecture section.

INTL-I 212 NEGOTIATING GLOBAL CHALLENGES (31146)

Instructor: Minton, Mark Clements
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1134
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

Topic: THE CRAFT OF AMERICAN DIPLOMACY. The course provides a close examination of the operations of U.S. diplomacy in the post-World War II period, and with the countries of Northeast Asia -- Japan, China and Korea -- which was one of the main focal points of attention. We will examine three crucial points of American engagement: the U.S. occupation and rule of Japan from 1945-52; the normalization of relations with the People's Republic of China in the Nixon Administration; U.S. involvement with North and South Korea, particularly efforts to negotiate an end to North Korea's nuclear weapons programs. Although our studies will examine these three cases in detail, we should also acquire perspectives of much broader application in evaluating America's experience in restructuring an entirely different society (Japan); finding a balance in relations with a major competitor (China); and dealing with an enemy (North Korea).

INTL-I 220 GLOBAL CONNECTIONS (32312)

Instructor: Siqueira, Andrea Dalledone
Day & Time: TR 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1134
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: A&H GCC
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

We hear that we live in an "increasingly globalized world," but what does that mean? This course surveys and analyzes the scope of global connections and interdependencies in the world today and their profound impact upon individual and collective identities. Topics include the rhetoric of human rights, national and regional policies and politics, and our perception of the "other." Through the use of relevant examples and case studies from around the globe we will discuss an array of significant topics, break down stereotypes, contextualize and analyze connections, recognize our place in the global puzzle, and exercise our ability to think ethically about international issues. It will be an enriching and stimulating class that you will greatly benefit from -- both personally and professionally.

INTL-I 222 GLOBAL HEALTH CONNECTIONS (32313)

Instructor: Siqueira, Andrea Dalledone
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Jordan Hall 065
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

How does the health of communities around the world depend upon socio-economic, political, environmental and cultural factors? What are some of the challenges health initiatives pose to regional and global development? What role can global health institutions play in promoting health as a human right and addressing the main health challenges of vulnerable communities and populations, such as women and children? This course focuses on the non-medical determinants of health in communities around the world as well as on the most important health challenges the world faces. One of the main goals is to understand and evaluate the importance of local contexts and global processes in addressing health issues today, while also engaging in discussions about human rights, ethics, inequalities, and pragmatic and global solidarity. Students will read articles from a variety of disciplines (social sciences, humanities, natural sciences), and focus on case studies from around the globe to understand the interconnections between health and local contexts and global processes. This course may be of interest to any student interested in international and global studies, as well as to pre-medical students.

INTL-I 300 TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL STDS (32336)

Instructor: Zirogiannis, Nikolaos
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Student Building 220
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

Topic: GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL INSTITUTIONS AND DEVELOPMENT. This class offers an in-depth analysis of environmental institutions at global, national, and local levels. We will start by tracing the history of global environmental institutions, leading up to the 2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference in Paris in December 2015. We will also examine the history of international agreements on environmental and natural resource issues. We will review the literature on environmental policy instruments (command and control vs. incentive based policies), and explore the polycentric approach to environmental governance pioneered by Elinor Ostrom. We will conduct case studies of how communities have succeeded or failed to manage their natural resources (such as cotton production in West Africa, palm oil in Indonesia, tequila in Mexico, lobster fisheries in the US state of Maine, etc.) and the extent to which that management has contributed to sustainable economic development. Another substantive area of analysis will be the interactions between trade and the environment as well as the role of developing nations in global environmental governance.

INTL-I 300 TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL STDS (32996)

Instructor: Spechler, Dina R.
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 005
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

Topic: COMPARATIVE FOREIGN POLICY. Compares factors that influence foreign policy and the foreign policy process. Focuses on domestic or internal sources of foreign policy behavior, including impact of individual leaders, group decision-making processes, bureaucratic politics, ideology and political culture, historical experience, and type of political system. Classroom simulations are central to the course.

INTL-I 302 ADV TOPICS IN GLBL HLTH & ENV (14026)

Instructor: Kane, Stephanie C.
Day & Time: MW 11:15 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Cedar Hall C114
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

Topic: GLOBAL HEALING. In this course, we study traditions, trajectories and technologies of healing in a globalized world. We focus on healing practices that have been traversing the world, some since ancient times, some on the cutting edge of scientific knowledge, bringing their own cultural histories along even as they are transformed by new practitioners, inventions and problems. We focus on the social, political and economic conditions that must be in place for healing practices to thrive; on the social interactional spaces and frameworks of interpretation that different healing practices create; on the interconnections formed among healers, those seeking treatment, and those implicated in causing dis-ease. Who and what is excluded or included by different healing practices? Who exerts power, and how? What identities, stories, and pathways of social change come together through healing practices and how might the curious conjunctures that emerge influence the shape of future worlds? Students will have an opportunity to pursue and present their individual interests, thereby expanding the range of healing practices under discussion and interacting with fellow students by designing and presenting visual image projects.

INTL-I 302 ADV TOPICS IN GLBL HLTH & ENV (14032)

Instructor: Kane, Stephanie C.
Day & Time: MW 11:15 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Cedar Hall C114
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

Topic: GLOBAL HEALING (honors section). In this course, we study traditions, trajectories and technologies of healing in a globalized world. We focus on healing practices that have been traversing the world, some since ancient times, some on the cutting edge of scientific knowledge, bringing their own cultural histories along even as they are transformed by new practitioners, inventions and problems. We focus on the social, political and economic conditions that must be in place for healing practices to thrive; on the social interactional spaces and frameworks of interpretation that different healing practices create; on the interconnections formed among healers, those seeking treatment, and those implicated in causing dis-ease. Who and what is excluded or included by different healing practices? Who exerts power, and how? What identities, stories, and pathways of social change come together through healing practices and how might the curious conjunctures that emerge influence the shape of future worlds? Students will have an opportunity to pursue and present their individual interests, thereby expanding the range of healing practices under discussion and interacting with fellow students by designing and presenting visual image projects.

INTL-I 303 ADV TOPICS IN GLBL DEVELOPMENT (32331)

Instructor: Steinberg, Jessica
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 331
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

Topic: COMPARATIVE POLITICS OF NATURAL RESOURCES: LINKING THE GLOBAL AND THE LOCAL. Are natural resources like oil, timber, and diamonds necessarily good for development? What is the relationship between natural resources, economic growth, and violent conflict? What tools do communities and countries have at their disposal to manage natural resources? International institutions, markets, non-governmental organizations, and domestic governance structures all play a role in the politics of natural resource extraction. This class will evaluate the ways in which natural resource extraction shapes and is shaped by political forces. We will consider the role of natural resources in economic development, growth, and conflict; and the environmental implications of these relationships. We will also explore the incentives and tools relevant for the management of natural resources at the local, national, and international level. Cases from developing countries in the primary resource producing regions of the world will be explored, with a slight emphasis on Africa, but we will also consider if and how wealthier countries manage natural resources differently.

INTL-I 304 ADV TPCS IN HUM RGHTS/INTL LAW (32314)

Instructor: Dunn, Elizabeth Cullen
Day & Time: MW 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0003
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

Topic: REFUGEES AND DISPLACED PEOPLE. Massive streams of refugees and migrations today threaten to disrupt politics and economics across the world. This course explores the experiences of refugees and internally displaced people who have been forced to flee their homes due to war or disaster. It will explore why displaced people leave and the problems they face in resettling. We will look at the kinds of aid provided by the international community, and explore how it both helps and harms the displaced. We will examine how refugee camps can be sources of material aid and new fighters for combatant groups. We will also look at the special challenges that displacement poses to health, employment, gender equality and violence prevention.

INTL-I 304 ADV TPCS IN HUM RGHTS/INTL LAW (32315)

Instructor: Kousaleos, Nicole Serena
Day & Time: TR 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Willkie C C109
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

Topic: BODIES UNDER FIRE: GENDER, VIOLENCE, AND HUMAN RIGHTS. A holistic approach to human rights as related to gender violence requires addressing many interwoven aspects of women¿s lives, including global poverty, maternal health and reproductive rights, female genital mutilation, human trafficking, and violence both within and outside conflict (domestic violence and rape as a weapon of war). The course begins with a theoretical assessment of the intersection of globalization with women's bodily, lived experience and moves into methodological suggestions for best local solutions to contemporary gender and human rights dilemmas. In order to address applied solutions we must first critique and examine blockages to women's empowerment. Students will be trained in ethnographic research methods which forefront collaboration and empowerment in both theory and method. Students will design a multipart research proposal which could be conducted in a foreign research setting.

INTL-I 305 ADV TOP IN INTERNATL COMM/ART (12542)

Instructor: Nemes, Peter
Day & Time: MW 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 319
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

Topic: CULTURE IN THE DIGITAL AGE. How have the production, distribution and consumption of cultural products changed in the ever more digital age that we live in? The effects of the continuous advancement of digital technologies and the penetration of computerized systems into our everyday lives are hard to fully assess because we are not just observers but also participants. Yet our relationship with knowledge, our ability to build meaning through cultural practices, and our very identities are each changing and being challenged. Taking an interdisciplinary approach, this class will consider digital culture, new modes of cultural production, the use of digital technologies in the preservation of non-digital content, copyrights, visual cultural and its effects, and remixing and sharing. Media studies, cultural studies, culturomics, and data science will all be part of our inquiries as we place phenomena and case studies in theoretical and historical contexts. Collaborative learning projects, including creation of audio/video/web content, will allow for an active and creative engagement with the material. Our goal is to be more conscious of how culture in the digital age shapes us and how we, in turn, are able to shape it.

INTL-I 305 ADV TOP IN INTERNATL COMM/ART (14050)

Instructor: Nemes, Peter
Day & Time: MW 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 319
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

Topic: CULTURE IN THE DIGITAL AGE (honors section). How have the production, distribution and consumption of cultural products changed in the ever more digital age that we live in? The effects of the continuous advancement of digital technologies and the penetration of computerized systems into our everyday lives are hard to fully assess because we are not just observers but also participants. Yet our relationship with knowledge, our ability to build meaning through cultural practices, and our very identities are each changing and being challenged. Taking an interdisciplinary approach, this class will consider digital culture, new modes of cultural production, the use of digital technologies in the preservation of non-digital content, copyrights, visual cultural and its effects, and remixing and sharing. Media studies, cultural studies, culturomics, and data science will all be part of our inquiries as we place phenomena and case studies in theoretical and historical contexts. Collaborative learning projects, including creation of audio/video/web content, will allow for an active and creative engagement with the material. Our goal is to be more conscious of how culture in the digital age shapes us and how we, in turn, are able to shape it.

INTL-I 306 ADV TOP IN IDENTITY & CONFLICT (31014)

Instructor: Banai, Hussein
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0003
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

Topic: DEMOCRACY AND GLOBAL POLITICS. How has thinking about democracy, as both a system of government and a political ideal, evolved in international society? We will investigate the contours of historical and contemporary debates about self-government in the minds of democratic theorists, political figures, and the public at large. Accordingly, the course is divided into three parts: history, theory, and politics. In the first, we will examine arguments about the divergent sources, experiences, and merits of democracy across different societies. The second part of the course focuses on different theoretical conceptualizations of democracy based on the success and failure of earlier experiments. We conclude by looking at the politics surrounding the controversial spread of democratic ideals by Western states and non-state institutions.

INTL-I 310 ADV TPCS IN DIPL SECURITY GOV (31162)

Instructor: Istrabadi, Feisal Amin
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 229
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

Topic: WAR AND PEACE IN THE INTERNATIONAL ORDER. In a relatively idealistic moment in world history, the United Nations was created in 1945 in an attempt to regulate war and to minimize its devastating effects. This event was followed shortly by the near-universal ratification of the Four Geneva Conventions in 1949. Yet almost immediately, a Cold War began between the world's two greatest powers, resulting in many hot wars in various places around the globe. This course will explore and analyze the theoretical and practical considerations of the attempt to regulate the use of armed conflict through the United Nations Charter and other international documents. Readings will examine how successful such attempts have been, including attention to such issues as the responsibility to protect, collective security, and the role of the Security Council and the great powers in armed conflict.

INTL-I 310 ADV TPCS IN DIPL SECURITY GOV (12026)

Instructor: Bauerle Danzman, Sarah
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1122
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

Topic: GLOBAL ECONOMIC GOVERNANCE: POWER, INSTITUTIONS, AND IDEAS. International political theorists have seen the lack of a central authority as the defining attribute of international relations, characterizing the international system as some variant of Hobbes' state of nature, that is "nasty, brutish [but perhaps not] short." The absence of a central authority suggests international politics should be characterized primarily by conflict. And yet all around us we see examples of cooperation even in the face of significant obstacles to agreement. Why would states agree to bind themselves to security and economic interstate institutions and to what extent do these institutions influence state behavior? We will focus primarily on the structure of international economic cooperation and governance since World War II, and emphasize the politics of trade, monetary, and financial governance. Four key questions will structure our inquiry: When will states want to cooperate, and when will relations be primarily conflictual? What strategies foster cooperation? Under what conditions and in what ways do institutions influence state behavior? and What will happen to international cooperation as emerging economies become increasingly central to global governance?

INTL-I 315 RSRCH DESIGN IN INTL STUDIES (32332)

Instructor: Allendorf, Keera
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 109
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

This course introduces students to principles and techniques of research, from formulating a research question to collecting and analyzing data. The course begins with foundational concepts, such as ethics, drawing on literature, and sampling. With this grounding, the course then covers a variety of methods commonly used in international studies, including field experiments, surveys, in-depth interviews, ethnography, case studies, and textual analysis. By the end of the course, students should be able to plan and conduct their own research, including their international studies capstone project (I400), and will be better able to understand and evaluate research undertaken by others.

INTL-I 315 RSRCH DESIGN IN INTL STUDIES (10188)

Instructor: Nemes, Peter
Day & Time: MW 1:00 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0003
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

This class exposes students to the theoretical frameworks, methods and skills necessary for undertaking research in International Studies. Through the semester students will be working collaboratively on a well-conceived and feasible research design, allowing them to explore the interdisciplinary and comparative perspectives of International and Global Studies. This class requires working in groups and active class discussions, i.e., the full participation of each member of the class. While working on the process of research design of a given topic, students will be able to form questions about their own exploratory overseas research and subsequent capstone/paper, as well as to acquire and better their working skills for future employment in public and private sectors.

INTL-I 400 INTL STUDIES CAPSTONE SEMINAR (6138)

Instructor: Banai, Hussein
Day & Time: T 2:30 PM- 5:30 PM
Building & Room: Student Building 230
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: IW
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

P: I315. Demonstrate your accumulated training in International Studies in a single original project of your choice, subject to the instructor's approval and under the supervision of a faculty member. The completed thesis should bring together your academic preparation, your region, your foreign language expertise, and your overseas experience in an 8,000-word essay. Peer review and regular feedback through multiple drafts will help you craft your thesis. By the end of the seminar you will be able to articulate clearly your research argument in a well-written and orally presented project.

INTL-I 400 INTL STUDIES CAPSTONE SEMINAR (8222)

Instructor: Macekura, Stephen
Day & Time: R 9:05 AM- 12:05 PM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 112
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: IW
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

P: I315. Demonstrate your accumulated training in International Studies in a single original project of your choice, subject to the instructor's approval and under the supervision of a faculty member. The completed thesis should bring together your academic preparation, your region, your foreign language expertise, and your overseas experience in an 8,000-word essay. Peer review and regular feedback through multiple drafts will help you craft your thesis. By the end of the seminar you will be able to articulate clearly your research argument in a well-written and orally presented project.

INTL-I 406 HONORS INTL STDS CAPSTONE SEM (8613)

Instructor: Banai, Hussein
Day & Time: T 2:30 PM- 5:30 PM
Building & Room: Student Building 230
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: IW
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

P: I315, application, and approval of department. Required for departmental honors credit and taught with I-400, for honors-track seniors who have completed all International Studies degree requirements. See I-400 for further information.

INTL-I 406 HONORS INTL STDS CAPSTONE SEM (14649)

Instructor: Macekura, Stephen
Day & Time: R 9:05 AM- 12:05 PM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 112
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: IW
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

P: I315, application, and approval of department. Required for departmental honors credit and taught with I-400, for honors-track seniors who have completed all International Studies degree requirements. See I-400 for further information.

INTL-I 420 GLOBAL SUSTAINABILITY STUDIES (32344)

Instructor: O'Reilly, Jessica Leigh
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Forest Quad C230
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

Topic: NEGOTIATING CLIMATE: CULTURE, SCIENCE, AND POLITICS OF ENVIRONMENTAL TRANSFORMATION. Understand how humans study, experience, interpret, and mitigate global climate change. Using a cultural focus, we investigate climate science, politics, and economics, and consider how climate change intersects with matters of justice, gender, globalization, media, development, and higher education. As we learn about these topics, we will conduct applied research on particular climate topics at various scales¿local, state, national, and international¿to work towards defining solutions and ways forward in a rapidly changing environment. This course takes place around the two-week long 22nd Conference of Parties (COP22) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). We will use this event as a focal point for our learning, tying together our theoretical and topical interests to track how matters of concern are negotiated through the UNFCCC process and COP22.

INTL-I 422 CONTESTD TERR/CONFLCTD IDENT (32324)

Instructor: Ibrahim, Nur Amali
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM- 3:30 PM
Building & Room: Teter Quad F258
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2016-10-17 End Date: 2016-12-16

Topic: YOUTH AND POLITICS. From the Arab Spring protests to the Occupy movement, the Gezi Park demonstrations in Turkey, and urban revolts in Brazil, politically-conscious millennials appear to play an instrumental role in trying to effect social change in recent years. Can young people make a political difference in the world? Answering this question requires that we consider the meaning of "youth," a category that has no universal definition and whose boundaries are fought over everywhere. We will consider whether the experiences often associated with youthhood--ranging from the putatively biological phase of "storm and stress" to enrollment in the modern educational system--have any bearing on political participation. Exploring the complex reasons behind young people's decisions to become activists, we will also examine various methods of mobilization, such as the use of social media, and cross-generational collaborations with "adult" activists. Our discussions will be based on various sociopolitical campaigns and groupings of the past century in which youths have played a critical role, such as the anti-war and the feminist movements of the 1960s, the religious revitalization of the 1970s, the street gangs associated with urban decay in the 1980s, as well as more contemporary examples.

INTL-I 426 ADVANCD TOPICS IN INTL STUDIES (31035)

Instructor: Bosco, David Lyndon
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0003
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

Topic: GLOBAL GOVERNANCE AND INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS. For centuries, mankind has struggled to find ways to organize international life and restrain the chaos and conflict that have so often plagued it. The increasing destructiveness of warfare and the accelerating pace of economic globalization have made that quest more urgent. But the search for structures to govern the world has always encountered forces that push in the other direction. The desire for uninhibited national sovereignty has been a consistent check on movements for global governance. As daunting have been simple coordination problems. What form should global governance take? What mission should international organizations and institutions have? Who should control them and to whom are they responsible? Today, there exists a group of influential but incomplete and often flawed institutions, including the World Bank, the United Nations, the International Monetary Fund, the International Criminal Court, the European Union, and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. Other less formal global governance initiatives have also emerged as important factors. Understanding the complex interactions between these initiatives and national governments and individuals is essential to understanding contemporary world politics.

INTL-I 427 ISS IN GLBL DEV & POL ECONOMY (31038)

Instructor: Bauerle Danzman, Sarah
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1118
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

Topic: HARNESSING FOREIGN INVESTMENT FOR DEVELOPMENT. Corporations operating across national boundaries structure production, consumption, and the distribution of wealth globally. Multinational enterprises (MNEs) can help bring economic growth and shared prosperity to developing countries, but critics emphasize the negative impacts on local societies. This course will offer students empirical knowledge and analytical skills to make sense of the influence of MNEs at both the local and global level, and the attempts to regulate their behavior. We will begin with an overview of MNEs in the contemporary international system and their effects on development, before turning to three policy-oriented questions: 1) How can firms manage risks associated with investing across borders? and how can states reassure firms of the safety of their investments?; 2) How can governments craft regulatory structures and incentive programs to promote "beneficial" foreign investment?; 3) How can non-governmental organizations effectively pressure MNEs to adopt and comply with high labor and environmental standards? Students will learn about careers associated with MNEs and development, including political risk consulting, investment promotion and locational consulting, and non-profit work to develop and implement ethical labeling and sourcing standards.

INTL-X 370 TOPICS WITH SVC LRNING IN INTL (12028)

Instructor: Kalentzidou, Olga
Day & Time: R 9:30 AM- 12:00 PM
Building & Room: Wendell W. Wright 1201
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

Topic: FOOD SECURITY. This service-learning course examines issues of global food availability and accessibility through active engagement locally. Through direct service-learning in Bloomington¿s food agencies students will: (1) examine the role food plays in debates about individual and collective, especially national identities, (2) evaluate how global and local issues of food security and sovereignty are connected, and (3) appreciate the city of Bloomington and its diverse population and resources. Readings, discussions and reflections will focus on the following questions: How do collective food traditions emerge? How is identity performed through food practices? How do so-called "food wars" shape relations between countries? How do communities ensure their food security; and, through which practices is food sovereignty conveyed? In order to answer these questions we will focus on case studies from different parts of the world; analyze food as political action through uprisings, protests and the policies of international food aid programs; and address issues of food security and food sovereignty. By the end of this course students will be able to: (1) explain, differentiate and analyze how food security is played out in local and global contexts, and (2) understand the significance of service-learning, and how it affects one's strength as a person and informed citizen.

INTL-X 370 TOPICS WITH SVC LRNING IN INTL (31176)

Instructor: Kalentzidou, Olga
Day & Time: R 9:30 AM- 12:00 PM
Building & Room: Wendell W. Wright 1201
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

Topic: FOOD SECURITY (honors section). This service-learning course examines issues of global food availability and accessibility through active engagement locally. Through direct service-learning in Bloomington¿s food agencies students will: (1) examine the role food plays in debates about individual and collective, especially national identities, (2) evaluate how global and local issues of food security and sovereignty are connected, and (3) appreciate the city of Bloomington and its diverse population and resources. Readings, discussions and reflections will focus on the following questions: How do collective food traditions emerge? How is identity performed through food practices? How do so-called "food wars" shape relations between countries? How do communities ensure their food security; and, through which practices is food sovereignty conveyed? In order to answer these questions we will focus on case studies from different parts of the world; analyze food as political action through uprisings, protests and the policies of international food aid programs; and address issues of food security and food sovereignty. By the end of this course students will be able to: (1) explain, differentiate and analyze how food security is played out in local and global contexts, and (2) understand the significance of service-learning, and how it affects one's strength as a person and informed citizen.

INTL-X 390 INDIV READINGS IN INTL STUDIES (32320)

Instructor: Kane, Stephanie C.
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

P: Major or minor in International Studies, application, and approval of department. Students conduct individual research projects on an international issue under the direction of a faculty member. Student and faculty member should develop a project and submit a "contract" to the department for approval.

INTL-X 473 INTERNSHIP IN INTL STUDIES (32322)

Instructor: Kane, Stephanie C.
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

This section is for internships based in the U.S. P: Approval of department. Provides students with an opportunity to receive academic credit for a part-time or full-time internship experience within the U.S. or overseas. Allows students to apply the knowledge gained through course work in International Studies to the work world, thereby developing additional knowledge and skills and exposing them to professional career options.

INTL-X 473 INTERNSHIP IN INTL STUDIES (32323)

Instructor: Kane, Stephanie C.
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2016-08-22 End Date: 2016-12-16

This section is for internships based abroad. P: Approval of department. Provides students with an opportunity to receive academic credit for a part-time or full-time internship experience within the U.S. or overseas. Allows students to apply the knowledge gained through course work in International Studies to the work world, thereby developing additional knowledge and skills and exposing them to professional career options.