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Semester:

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (10692)

Instructor: Nemes, Peter
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Student Building 015
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 8/24/2015 End Date: 12/18/2015

I100 emphasizes the relational and comparative study of the manner in which individuals, groups, localities, and nations have confronted global issues in the past and present. This course teaches different perspectives for studying and making sense of the world. We will learn how these different perspectives portray the world, interpret events, and often shape human actions. Lecture material and key concepts are organized around the International Studies thematic concentrations, thereby introducing a variety of analytical approaches from the natural and social sciences and the arts and humanities. Assignments and discussion will also incorporate a geographic dimension for analysis. Case studies from different historical periods and parts of the world will be used to illustrate these approaches and key issues.

INTL-I 202 GLOBAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENT (10015)

Instructor: Long, Yan
Day & Time: MW 11:15 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 111
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 8/24/2015 End Date: 12/18/2015

This course will review human-environment interactions from a global perspective, focusing specifically on how global change can alter human susceptibility to disease. Discussions will be focused on the general population and environmental changes that contribute to health deficiencies at the regional and global levels. Specific population changes to be discussed include: general population growth; transportation of people and products; urbanization and lack of sanitation; contact with wildlife (expansion into new areas, ecotourism, and bushmeat); war and social disruption; and public health deficiencies. Specific ecological changes to be discussed include: changes in land use (irrigation, deforestation, and fragmentation); reduced biodiversity (altered host-parasite dynamics); pollution; natural disasters; and climate change (altered habitats of disease vectors). Readings will be selected to reflect the general interests of natural and social scientists alike.

INTL-I 203 GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT (6598)

Instructor: Steinberg, Jessica
Day & Time: TR 8:00 AM- 9:15 AM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 005
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 8/24/2015 End Date: 12/18/2015

The course will focus on the specifics of and interactions between the political, cultural, social and economic factors that influence human development at global, national and local levels. We will explore these factors at work in developing countries and seek to blend theory with practical application. I203 covers a substantial part of the social sciences literature on development and will include discussions on dependency, globalization and sustainability as well. This course also introduces major theoretical perspectives on the structure, function and governance of international markets and the relevance of international institutions with regards to development.

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (10017)

Instructor: Siqueira, Andrea Dalledone
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 305
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 8/24/2015 End Date: 12/18/2015

This class is an introduction to the topic of human rights, the movements to promote them and the forces arrayed against them, both past and present. We will examine many of the key issues of human rights, how they are defined, how respect for them is ensured, and what they are threatened by. The class will not only consider contemporary dilemmas in human rights, like humanitarian intervention, but also historical questions such as how we explain progressive steps like transformations in consciousness and creation and current efficacy of human rights international treaties. Our concerns will be both empirical and normative. We want to understand how human rights have evolved over time, where they have been respected, where they have been violated and why. But we also want to grapple with ethical questions such as how much America's foreign policy should concern itself with human rights, or whether there is a universal definition of human rights. A large focus will be on holistic approaches which address rights through sustainable development. Students will make attempts at activism through serving as advocates for human rights and putting together transnational campaigns on contemporary human rights issues so that you are able to truly, MAKE THE PERSONAL POLITICAL.

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (11293)

Instructor: Kousaleos, Nicole Serena
Day & Time: MW 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 111
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 8/24/2015 End Date: 12/18/2015

This class is an introduction to the topic of human rights, the movements to promote them and the forces arrayed against them, both past and present. We will examine many of the key issues of human rights, how they are defined, how respect for them is ensured, and what they are threatened by. The class will not only consider contemporary dilemmas in human rights, like humanitarian intervention, but also historical questions such as how we explain progressive steps like transformations in consciousness and creation and current efficacy of human rights international treaties. Our concerns will be both empirical and normative. We want to understand how human rights have evolved over time, where they have been respected, where they have been violated and why. But we also want to grapple with ethical questions such as how much America's foreign policy should concern itself with human rights, or whether there is a universal definition of human rights. A large focus will be on holistic approaches which address rights through sustainable development. Students will make attempts at activism through serving as advocates for human rights and putting together transnational campaigns on contemporary human rights issues so that you are able to truly, MAKE THE PERSONAL POLITICAL.

INTL-I 205 INTERNATL COMMUNICATION & ARTS (6684)

Instructor: Minetti, Alfredo Ignacio
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 205
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 8/24/2015 End Date: 12/18/2015

This course addresses the intersection between two highly debated and contested terms -- culture and the global or globalization. It does so with particular attention to culturally-located examples of screen media, arts, and communication. We are bombarded daily with news of how cultural forms are crossing borders with increasing speed, rendering locations across the world more closely connected. Yet such border crossing has long been constituted among a range of contradictory, competing, and even unpredictable locations, powers, and ideologies. How do we begin to understand the ways in which cultural institutions, technologies, and practices mediate our links to the world and that of others? What sorts of dynamics structure these exchanges? How do we approach the ways in which cultural formations are negotiated within or among particular local, national, or global contexts? Finally, how do we address our place, and the place of others, in relation to all that the ideologies of cultural globalization might promise?

INTL-I 206 IDENTITY AND CONFLICT (9261)

Instructor: Sela, Ron
Day & Time: TR 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 305
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 8/24/2015 End Date: 12/18/2015

This course will investigate intersections between "identity" and "conflict." We will consider how different forms of identity--ethnic, religious, linguistic, political, and caste-based, to cite a few examples--can become the basis for collectives to mobilize. We will examine how collective forms of identity can be yoked to nationalism, resulting in an exclusionary view of the nation-state and violence against those whose identities are deemed undesirable. Rather than view conflicts as irreducibly based in identity, however, we will also seek to understand how they emerge out of local conditions and colonial legacies, and can be shaped by national, regional, and transnational contexts. Students will acquire a familiarity with critical concepts such as nationalism, ethnicity, gender, political economy, and sectarianism. Learning outcomes include: 1) being able to use critical concepts to map the vectors of different conflicts; 2) understanding that many conflicts have their roots in colonialism; 3) analyzing how different historical and geographical scales, e.g., the local, national, regional, and transnational, shape conflicts; 4) appreciating how conflicts over identity can simultaneously be contests over resources; and 5) developing empathy for those whose lives have been turned upside down by unrest and violence.

INTL-I 210 DIPLOMACY SECURITY GOVERNANCE (13290)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 345
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 8/24/2015 End Date: 12/18/2015

Institutions, policies, and events centering on Security, Diplomacy, and Governance result from the interaction of general models developed by scholars with the unique characteristics of the societies within which policy makers are located and with the societies that they violently or peacefully interact. This course simultaneously educates students on two distinct aspects of governance, security policy, and diplomacy: the theoretical lenses needed to understand why and how policies are made, as well as their effects; and, the unique cultures and practices that affect policy making and outcomes.

INTL-I 220 GLOBAL CONNECTIONS (14489)

Instructor: Minetti, Alfredo Ignacio
Day & Time: MW 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 004
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: A&H GCC
Start Date: 8/24/2015 End Date: 12/18/2015

This course is a survey and analysis of the scope of global connections and interdependencies in the world today and their profound impact upon individual and collective identities, the rhetoric over human rights discourses, national and regional policies and politics, and our perception of the "other." Through the use of relevant examples and case studies from around the globe we will discuss an array of significant topics, break down stereotypes, contextualize and analyze connections, recognize our place in the global puzzle, and exercise our ability to think ethically about international issues. It will be an enriching and stimulating class that you will greatly benefit from -- both personally and professionally.

INTL-I 300 TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL STDS (11083)

Instructor: Korytova, Stepanka
Day & Time: MW 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Jordan Hall A105
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 8/24/2015 End Date: 12/18/2015

GLOBAL HUMAN TRAFFICKING: Human Trafficking, an invisible challenge to human rights across the globe, is a robust and growing business, only less profitable than the illegal trade in drugs. This Themester course is about social suffering and poverty in a global context with a focus on human labor trafficking. We will explore this phenomenon as it has evolved from an exploration of migration to a broadly defined voluntary and forced movement of people in search of work around the globe. We start with historical enquiries of this phenomenon and continue with an interdisciplinary approach in the study of labor practices that are connected to human trafficking within international, global and local contexts. The analytical framework used in this course is shaped by the post-colonial perception of the Other, and neoliberal theories that identify profit as the driving force between the Global North and the Global South division. In addition to readings and discussions, students will be engaging in service-learning projects in Bloomington in order to fully evaluate labor practices as they relate to social suffering.

INTL-I 302 ADV TOPICS IN GLBL HLTH & ENV (30813)

Instructor: Kane, Stephanie C.
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 305
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 8/24/2015 End Date: 12/18/2015

GLOBAL HEALING: In this course, we study traditions, trajectories and technologies of healing in a globalized world. We focus on healing practices that have been traversing the world, some since ancient times, some on the cutting edge of scientific knowledge, bringing their own cultural histories along even as they are transformed by new practitioners, inventions and problems. We focus on the social, political and economic conditions that must be in place for healing practices to thrive; on the social interactional spaces and frameworks of interpretation that different healing practices create; on the interconnections formed among healers, those seeking treatment, and those implicated in causing dis-ease. Who and what is excluded or included within the spaces of different healing practices? What are the geometries and geographies of power involved? What identities, stories, and pathways of social change come together through healing practices and how might the curious conjunctures that emerge influence the shape of future worlds? Student evaluation is based on independent writing assignments and on class participation. Students also have an opportunity to pursue and present their individual interests, thereby expanding the range of healing practices under discussion and interacting with fellow students by designing and presenting visual image projects.

INTL-I 302 ADV TOPICS IN GLBL HLTH & ENV (30821)

Instructor: Kane, Stephanie C.
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 305
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 8/24/2015 End Date: 12/18/2015

GLOBAL HEALING (Honors Section): In this course, we study traditions, trajectories and technologies of healing in a globalized world. We focus on healing practices that have been traversing the world, some since ancient times, some on the cutting edge of scientific knowledge, bringing their own cultural histories along even as they are transformed by new practitioners, inventions and problems. We focus on the social, political and economic conditions that must be in place for healing practices to thrive; on the social interactional spaces and frameworks of interpretation that different healing practices create; on the interconnections formed among healers, those seeking treatment, and those implicated in causing dis-ease. Who and what is excluded or included within the spaces of different healing practices? What are the geometries and geographies of power involved? What identities, stories, and pathways of social change come together through healing practices and how might the curious conjunctures that emerge influence the shape of future worlds? Student evaluation is based on independent writing assignments and on class participation. Students also have an opportunity to pursue and present their individual interests, thereby expanding the range of healing practices under discussion and interacting with fellow students by designing and presenting visual image projects.

INTL-I 303 ADV TOPICS IN GLBL DEVELOPMENT (30828)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: MW 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Student Building 231
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 8/24/2015 End Date: 12/18/2015

TO BE ANNOUNCED: Advanced topics examining the interaction between social, political, and economic forces and human development at global, national, and subnational scales; in-depth analysis of theoretical perspectives on economic development and the function of markets.

INTL-I 304 ADV TPCS IN HUM RGHTS/INTL LAW (30837)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: MW 11:15 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Wylie Hall 101
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 8/24/2015 End Date: 12/18/2015

TO BE ANNOUNCED: Advanced topics focusing on human rights discourse and the role international law, treaties and conventions play in addressing these rights globally. Topics are interdisciplinary in theory and method.

INTL-I 304 ADV TPCS IN HUM RGHTS/INTL LAW (13975)

Instructor: Kousaleos, Nicole Serena
Day & Time: MW 1:00 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 305
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 8/24/2015 End Date: 12/18/2015

BODIES UNDER FIRE: GENDER, VIOLENCE, AND HUMAN RIGHTS: This course will examine the human rights issue of contemporary gender violence. A holistic approach to human rights requires addressing the interwoven aspects of women's lives. Women live through their bodies: thus the main areas of consideration in this course will be: global poverty, maternal health and reproductive rights, FGM, human trafficking, and violence both within and outside conflict (domestic violence and rape as a weapon of war). The course begins with a theoretical assessment of the intersection of globalization with women's bodily, lived experience and moves into methodological suggestions for best local solutions to contemporary gender and human rights dilemmas. In order to address applied solutions we must first critique and examine blockages to women's empowerment. Students will be trained in ethnographic research methods which forefront collaboration and empowerment in both theory and method. Students will design a multipart research proposal which could be conducted in a foreign research setting.

INTL-I 305 ADV TOP IN INTERNATL COMM/ART (13981)

Instructor: Nemes, Peter
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 305
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 8/24/2015 End Date: 12/18/2015

CULTURE IN THE DIGITAL AGE: This class is trying to answer the question of how the production, distribution and consumption of cultural products and, ultimately, the meaning of culture have changed in the more and more digital age that we are living in. Although the effects of the continuous advancement of digital technologies and the penetration of computerized systems into our everyday lives are hard to fully assess as we are not just observers but also participants, it is clear that our relationship with knowledge, our development of identities, our position in the communicative process of building meaning that is at the core of cultural practices is at once changing and is being challenged. Taking an interdisciplinary approach this class will try to unpack questions of digital culture, of new modes of cultural production, of the use of digital technologies in the preservation of non-digital content, of copyrights, of visual cultural and its effects, of new taxonomies and of remixing and sharing. Media studies, cultural studies, culturomics, and data science will all be part of our inquiries and we will utilize both theoretically grounded and historically positioned understanding of phenomena and relevant case studies. Collaborative learning projects, including the creation of final projects involving audio/video/web content, will allow for an active and creative engagement with the material. We will try to understand the conditions of culture in our times and actively participate in it. The goal is to be more conscious of how culture in the digital age shapes us and how we, in turn, are able to shape it.

INTL-I 305 ADV TOP IN INTERNATL COMM/ART (30845)

Instructor: Nemes, Peter
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 305
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 8/24/2015 End Date: 12/18/2015

CULTURE IN THE DIGITAL AGE (Honors Section): This class is trying to answer the question of how the production, distribution and consumption of cultural products and, ultimately, the meaning of culture have changed in the more and more digital age that we are living in. Although the effects of the continuous advancement of digital technologies and the penetration of computerized systems into our everyday lives are hard to fully assess as we are not just observers but also participants, it is clear that our relationship with knowledge, our development of identities, our position in the communicative process of building meaning that is at the core of cultural practices is at once changing and is being challenged. Taking an interdisciplinary approach this class will try to unpack questions of digital culture, of new modes of cultural production, of the use of digital technologies in the preservation of non-digital content, of copyrights, of visual cultural and its effects, of new taxonomies and of remixing and sharing. Media studies, cultural studies, culturomics, and data science will all be part of our inquiries and we will utilize both theoretically grounded and historically positioned understanding of phenomena and relevant case studies. Collaborative learning projects, including the creation of final projects involving audio/video/web content, will allow for an active and creative engagement with the material. We will try to understand the conditions of culture in our times and actively participate in it. The goal is to be more conscious of how culture in the digital age shapes us and how we, in turn, are able to shape it.

INTL-I 310 ADV TPCS IN DIPL SECURITY GOV (13288)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: MW 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 205
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 8/24/2015 End Date: 12/18/2015

TOPIC: To be determined.

INTL-I 315 RSRCH DESIGN IN INTL STUDIES (11024)

Instructor: Nemes, Peter
Day & Time: MW 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Forest Quad C230
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 8/24/2015 End Date: 12/18/2015

INTL-I315 is designed to help students recognize and learn from the interconnections between people, theories, methods, practices and regions of the world that are at the core of International Studies. It exposes students to theoretical frameworks, methods and skills necessary for undertaking research in International Studies. Throughout the semester students will be working collaboratively on a well-conceived and feasible research design project, allowing them to explore the interdisciplinary and comparative perspectives of International and Global Studies. While working on the process of research design of a given topic, students will be able to: (a) form questions about their own exploratory research overseas; (b) better prepare for their subsequent capstone/paper; (c) practice their presentation skills through in-class presentations and participation in the Undergraduate Capstone Symposium; and (d) acquire teamwork skills, essential to their future career plans.

INTL-I 315 RSRCH DESIGN IN INTL STUDIES (11294)

Instructor: Kalentzidou, Olga
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Forest Quad C230
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 8/24/2015 End Date: 12/18/2015

INTL-I315 is designed to help students recognize and learn from the interconnections between people, theories, methods, practices and regions of the world that are at the core of International Studies. It exposes students to theoretical frameworks, methods and skills necessary for undertaking research in International Studies. Throughout the semester students will be working collaboratively on a well-conceived and feasible research design project, allowing them to explore the interdisciplinary and comparative perspectives of International and Global Studies. While working on the process of research design of a given topic, students will be able to: (a) form questions about their own exploratory research overseas; (b) better prepare for their subsequent capstone/paper; (c) practice their presentation skills through in-class presentations and participation in the Undergraduate Capstone Symposium; and (d) acquire teamwork skills, essential to their future career plans.

INTL-I 400 INTL STUDIES CAPSTONE SEMINAR (6576)

Instructor: Siqueira, Andrea Dalledone
Day & Time: T 9:05 AM- 12:05 PM
Building & Room: Martin Hall 012A
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: IW
Start Date: 8/24/2015 End Date: 12/18/2015

P: I315. This course is designed to demonstrate your accumulated training in International Studies in a single original project of your choice, subject to the instructor's approval and under the supervision of a faculty member. The completed thesis should bring together your theme, your region, your foreign language expertise, and your overseas experience in an 8,000-word tour de force. The Capstone necessitates multiple drafts of your research that are subjected to peer-review and regular feedback from your instructor, your peers and your mentor. By the end of the seminar you will be able to articulate clearly your research argument in a well-written and orally presented project.

INTL-I 400 INTL STUDIES CAPSTONE SEMINAR (8814)

Instructor: Kousaleos, Nicole Serena
Day & Time: F 9:05 AM- 12:05 PM
Building & Room: Martin Hall 012A
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: IW
Start Date: 8/24/2015 End Date: 12/18/2015

P: I315. This course is designed to demonstrate your accumulated training in International Studies in a single original project of your choice, subject to the instructor's approval and under the supervision of a faculty member. The completed thesis should bring together your theme, your region, your foreign language expertise, and your overseas experience in an 8,000-word tour de force. The Capstone necessitates multiple drafts of your research that are subjected to peer-review and regular feedback from your instructor, your peers and your mentor. By the end of the seminar you will be able to articulate clearly your research argument in a well-written and orally presented project.

INTL-I 405 HONORS INDIV RDGS INTL STUDIES (9262)

Instructor: Kalentzidou, Olga
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 8/24/2015 End Date: 12/18/2015

P: Application and approval of department. Students pursuing departmental honors conduct research in preparation for their honors capstone seminar. May not be repeated for credit.

INTL-I 406 HONORS INTL STDS CAPSTONE SEM (9263)

Instructor: Siqueira, Andrea Dalledone
Day & Time: T 9:05 AM- 12:05 PM
Building & Room: Martin Hall 012A
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: IW
Start Date: 8/24/2015 End Date: 12/18/2015

P: I315, application, and approval of department. Required for departmental honors credit, this seminar is designed to consolidate the studies of honors-track seniors who have completed all International Studies degree requirements. Students must complete a project that addresses an issue appropriate to their concentration.

INTL-I 406 HONORS INTL STDS CAPSTONE SEM (33107)

Instructor: Kousaleos, Nicole Serena
Day & Time: F 9:05 AM- 12:05 PM
Building & Room: Martin Hall 012A
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: IW
Start Date: 8/24/2015 End Date: 12/18/2015

INTL-I 420 GLOBAL SUSTAINABILITY STUDIES (33105)

Instructor: Kane, Stephanie C.
Day & Time: W 2:30 PM- 5:00 PM
Building & Room: Jordan Hall 065
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 8/24/2015 End Date: 12/18/2015

NATURE AND THE CITY: In this course we explore the topic of sustainability by studying rivers as they flow through cities. River ecosystems are fundamental to cities; they provide essential resources and create symbolic landscapes that organize social lives. We study the ways that rivers and associated infrastructures connect humans to habitats, and cities to their hinterlands, to other cities, and ultimately to the sea. In addition to connecting cities to the world around them, riverine green spaces enhance the aesthetic pleasures (and sometimes heighten the dangers of) living in cities. As we read and write about scholarly ideas in urban planning, anthropology and geography, students will draw on them to organize and inspire the new knowledge that emerges from their own ethnographic fieldwork with Bloomington inhabitants who use and enjoy the parks. The goal will be to learn now to observe, participate, analyze and interpret the entanglements of city folk and aquatic landscapes. Through service learning and applied (or process) ethnography, students will actively contribute to the social (re)imagination and practice of sustainability in our city and in our world.

INTL-I 420 GLOBAL SUSTAINABILITY STUDIES (33106)

Instructor: Kane, Stephanie C.
Day & Time: W 2:30 PM- 5:00 PM
Building & Room: Jordan Hall 065
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 8/24/2015 End Date: 12/18/2015

NATURE AND THE CITY (Honors Section): In this course we explore the topic of sustainability by studying rivers as they flow through cities. River ecosystems are fundamental to cities; they provide essential resources and create symbolic landscapes that organize social lives. We study the ways that rivers and associated infrastructures connect humans to habitats, and cities to their hinterlands, to other cities, and ultimately to the sea. In addition to connecting cities to the world around them, riverine green spaces enhance the aesthetic pleasures (and sometimes heighten the dangers of) living in cities. As we read and write about scholarly ideas in urban planning, anthropology and geography, students will draw on them to organize and inspire the new knowledge that emerges from their own ethnographic fieldwork with Bloomington inhabitants who use and enjoy the parks. The goal will be to learn now to observe, participate, analyze and interpret the entanglements of city folk and aquatic landscapes. Through service learning and applied (or process) ethnography, students will actively contribute to the social (re)imagination and practice of sustainability in our city and in our world.

INTL-I 424 WAR AND PEACE (15076)

Instructor: Istrabadi, Feisal Amin
Day & Time: MW 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 245
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 8/24/2015 End Date: 12/18/2015

AFTER ATROCITIES, RECONSTRUCTING THE PEACE: Despite long-standing international norms against the targeting of civilians, experts estimate that up to 170 million civilians were killed in the course of various conflicts in the twentieth century, many at the hands of their own governments. Countries in transition from such traumatic episodes frequently engender mechanisms for, as historian John Torpey has it, "laying to rest the unquiet past." Some societies do so through the use of formal justice mechanisms, such as the trials in the former Yugoslavia or Rwanda. Others use variations of truth and reconciliation commissions, while some use more informal, traditional means of dispute resolution and reconciliation. Still others opt for outright impunity or some form of conditional amnesty. This course will consider the alternative theories for building the peace after periods of intense violence, including, for example, methods of reconstructing a national discourse that deals with the past. Issues of legality as distinct from legitimacy of such mechanisms will be addressed, as will the often differing or shifting perceptions of who is the victim and who the perpetrator. The course is multi-disciplinary, with readings by historians, philosophers, political scientists, and jurists, among others.

INTL-I 424 WAR AND PEACE (30853)

Instructor: Istrabadi, Feisal Amin
Day & Time: MW 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 245
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 8/24/2015 End Date: 12/18/2015

AFTER ATROCITIES, RECONSTRUCTING THE PEACE (Honors Section): Despite long-standing international norms against the targeting of civilians, experts estimate that up to 170 million civilians were killed in the course of various conflicts in the twentieth century, many at the hands of their own governments. Countries in transition from such traumatic episodes frequently engender mechanisms for, as historian John Torpey has it, "laying to rest the unquiet past." Some societies do so through the use of formal justice mechanisms, such as the trials in the former Yugoslavia or Rwanda. Others use variations of truth and reconciliation commissions, while some use more informal, traditional means of dispute resolution and reconciliation. Still others opt for outright impunity or some form of conditional amnesty. This course will consider the alternative theories for building the peace after periods of intense violence, including, for example, methods of reconstructing a national discourse that deals with the past. Issues of legality as distinct from legitimacy of such mechanisms will be addressed, as will the often differing or shifting perceptions of who is the victim and who the perpetrator. The course is multi-disciplinary, with readings by historians, philosophers, political scientists, and jurists, among others.

INTL-I 425 GENDER: INTERNAT'L PERSPECTIVE (14004)

Instructor: Bose, Purnima
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 305
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 8/24/2015 End Date: 12/18/2015

WOMEN AND WORK: This course will investigate the culture of work for women in the context of globalization. We will begin by reading theoretical treatments of work that consider themes such as alienation, the nature of industrial production, the gendering of work and its relation to biological difference, movements for gender income equality and wages for housework, and globalization and unequal development. Course readings will be drawn from a range of disciplines, including political theory, feminist economics, cultural studies, and anthropology. Turning to accounts of women's labor in Malaysia, the Caribbean, India, and the US, we will consider different forms of work, ranging from the labor of surrogacy, factory production, and pink collar labor and white collar work. My selection of readings aims to illustrate the development of capitalism and changes in the global economy from the early 80s to the present. I am interested in how women's labor contributes directly to the global economy through the production of commodities and services, and how their labor in their homes and for their families indirectly facilitates the capitalist economy. To gain some sense of the texture of women's work lives, we will supplement our readings by watching several documentaries and, most likely, listening to segments of radio broadcasts. Students should expect to participate actively in discussion, take three exams, and write one seven to eight page paper which will be broken into smaller assignments. By the end of the course students will be able to: 1) summarize world trends; 2) identify global inequalities and how they are manifest in specific world regions; 3) conduct independent research; 4) use interdisciplinary approaches and recognize multiple cultural perspectives; 5) evaluate one's own cultural and ethical values; 6) question cultural, political and ethical behavior across world regions as they pertain to labor issues; 7) recognize the US as a piece of the complex global puzzle.

INTL-I 425 GENDER: INTERNAT'L PERSPECTIVE (15073)

Instructor: Bose, Purnima
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 305
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 8/24/2015 End Date: 12/18/2015

WOMEN AND WORK (Honors Section): This course will investigate the culture of work for women in the context of globalization. We will begin by reading theoretical treatments of work that consider themes such as alienation, the nature of industrial production, the gendering of work and its relation to biological difference, movements for gender income equality and wages for housework, and globalization and unequal development. Course readings will be drawn from a range of disciplines, including political theory, feminist economics, cultural studies, and anthropology. Turning to accounts of women's labor in Malaysia, the Caribbean, India, and the US, we will consider different forms of work, ranging from the labor of surrogacy, factory production, and pink collar labor and white collar work. My selection of readings aims to illustrate the development of capitalism and changes in the global economy from the early 80s to the present. I am interested in how women's labor contributes directly to the global economy through the production of commodities and services, and how their labor in their homes and for their families indirectly facilitates the capitalist economy. To gain some sense of the texture of women's work lives, we will supplement our readings by watching several documentaries and, most likely, listening to segments of radio broadcasts. Students should expect to participate actively in discussion, take three exams, and write one seven to eight page paper which will be broken into smaller assignments. By the end of the course students will be able to: 1) summarize world trends; 2) identify global inequalities and how they are manifest in specific world regions; 3) conduct independent research; 4) use interdisciplinary approaches and recognize multiple cultural perspectives; 5) evaluate one's own cultural and ethical values; 6) question cultural, political and ethical behavior across world regions as they pertain to labor issues; 7) recognize the US as a piece of the complex global puzzle.

INTL-I 427 ISS IN GLBL DEV & POL ECONOMY (34123)

Instructor: Steinberg, Jessica
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 237
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 8/24/2015 End Date: 12/18/2015

MODELS OF SOCIAL AND POLITICAL PROCESSES. How did the protests in Tahrir Square begin? Will China's growth continue? What makes addressing global warming so difficult? How can we explain the reappearance of measles in the U.S.? This course will survey a set of models for thinking about individual, national and international social and political processes. Models discipline our thinking about the world and help us to define and characterize relationships and events with logical consistency and precision. Familiarity with a toolbox of models also allows us to identify specific kinds of political and social obstacles to achieving collective goals (such as problems of aggregation and public choice, monitoring and enforcement, or free-riding) so we can assess potential strategies for overcoming them. In this course we will learn about why and how models are useful, we will develop an understanding of a number of models that characterize individual and system level behavior, and we will evaluate current and historical local, as well as international and global processes and events using these models. While there are no concrete prerequisites, basic knowledge of algebra is a necessity.

INTL-I 435 TOPICS WITH SVC LRNING IN INTL (13291)

Instructor: Kalentzidou, Olga
Day & Time: TR 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 112
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 8/24/2015 End Date: 12/18/2015

FOOD SECURITY: This service-learning course examines issues of global food availability and accessibility through active engagement locally. Through direct service-learning in Bloomington¿s food agencies students will: (1) examine the role food plays in debates about individual and collective, especially national identities, (2) evaluate how global and local issues of food security and sovereignty are connected, and (3) appreciate the city of Bloomington and its diverse population and resources. Readings, discussions and reflections will focus on the following questions: How do collective food traditions emerge? How is identity performed through food practices? How do so-called ¿food wars¿ shape relations between countries? How do communities ensure their food security; and, through which practices is food sovereignty conveyed? In order to answer these questions we will focus on case studies from different parts of the world; analyze food as political action through uprisings, protests and the policies of international food aid programs; and address issues of food security and food sovereignty. By the end of this course students will be able to: (1) explain, differentiate and analyze how food security is played out in local and global contexts, and (2) understand the significance of service-learning, and how it affects one¿s strength as a person and informed citizen.

INTL-I 498 INTERNSHIP IN INTL STUDIES (10019)

Instructor: Kalentzidou, Olga
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 8/24/2015 End Date: 12/18/2015

(This section reserved for internships based abroad.) P: Approval of department. Provides students with an opportunity to receive academic credit for a part-time or full-time internship experience abroad. Allows students to apply the knowledge gained through course work in International Studies to the work world, thereby developing additional knowledge and skills and exposing them to professional career options.

INTL-I 498 INTERNSHIP IN INTL STUDIES (6626)

Instructor: Kalentzidou, Olga
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 8/24/2015 End Date: 12/18/2015

(This section reserved for internships based in the U.S.) P: Approval of department. Provides students with an opportunity to receive academic credit for a part-time or full-time internship experience within the U.S. Allows students to apply the knowledge gained through course work in International Studies to the work world, thereby developing additional knowledge and skills and exposing them to professional career options.