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Courses

Semester:

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (9521)

Instructor: Banai, Hussein
Day & Time: MW 10:10 AM - 11:00 AM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

Explore a variety of different perspectives for studying and making sense of the world and global issues in the past and present. We will learn how these different perspectives portray the world, interpret events, and often shape human actions. Lecture material and key concepts are organized around the International Studies thematic concentrations, thereby introducing a variety of analytical approaches from the natural and social sciences and the arts and humanities. Assignments and discussion will also incorporate a geographic dimension for analysis. Case studies from different historical periods and parts of the world will illustrate these approaches and key issues.

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (9946)

Instructor: Nemes, Peter Janos
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Student Building 15
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

Explore a variety of different perspectives for studying and making sense of the world and global issues in the past and present. We will learn how these different perspectives portray the world, interpret events, and often shape human actions. Lecture material and key concepts are organized around the International Studies thematic concentrations, thereby introducing a variety of analytical approaches from the natural and social sciences and the arts and humanities. Assignments and discussion will also incorporate a geographic dimension for analysis. Case studies from different historical periods and parts of the world will illustrate these approaches and key issues.

INTL-I 202 GLOBAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENT (10702)

Instructor: Kane, Stephanie C.
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM - 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1112
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

We explore human-environment interactions from international and interdisciplinary perspectives. We consider how and why humans shape the nature they inhabit in particular ways, and how in turn, nature shapes health and disease among humans. We will study how, as global change unfolds in particular cultures, ecologies and geographies, it alters human resistance and susceptibility to disease, and too, alters the access of individuals and communities to conditions of wellness. Drawing from the social and natural sciences and the humanities, the course will provide students with the concepts, theories and analytic tools useful for understanding and addressing the social, political and economic complexities of the fundamental global health and environment issues of our time.

INTL-I 203 GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT (5769)

Instructor: Bauerle, Sarah Elizabeth
Day & Time: TR 4:40 PM - 5:30 PM
Building & Room: Student Building 150
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

Why are some countries rich while other countries remain poor? Why are some societies characterized by relative equality of wealth among its members (i.e. Sweden, China before 1978), while others are vastly unequal (i.e. Brazil)? How do current challenges such as globalization, democratic backsliding, and civil conflict affect global, national, and local efforts at facilitating development? Students will learn about the post-WWII global architecture surrounding international development projects, study both institutional and behavioral factors that influence development outcomes, and use theory and empirical observation to generate insight into the enduring challenges of development as well as the most promising pathways toward development at local, national, and global levels.

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (6241)

Instructor: Gilligan, Emma L.
Day & Time: MW 8:00 AM - 9:15 AM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 221
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

This course considers the relationship between human rights and freedom. We look at the nature and practice of human rights in relationships among individuals, groups, and institutions while also exploring the nature of freedom and how people seek it through human rights. In this course we treat human rights and freedom as ongoing arguments, productive processes, and arenas of contestation, as means of constructing aspirations, seeking and challenging power, developing ways of life, and finding fulfillment. The course considers positive and negative consequences of framing relationships and power in terms of human rights and critically examines uses of human rights to manage problems.

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (13661)

Instructor: Hunt, Katherine Eugene LeBreton
Day & Time: MW 9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1112
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

This course considers the relationship between human rights and freedom. We look at the nature and practice of human rights in relationships among individuals, groups, and institutions while also exploring the nature of freedom and how people seek it through human rights. In this course we treat human rights and freedom as ongoing arguments, productive processes, and arenas of contestation, as means of constructing aspirations, seeking and challenging power, developing ways of life, and finding fulfillment. The course considers positive and negative consequences of framing relationships and power in terms of human rights and critically examines uses of human rights to manage problems.

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (13664)

Instructor: Siqueira, Andrea Dalledone
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM - 12:05 PM
Building & Room: Cedar Hall C006
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

This course considers the relationship between human rights and freedom. We look at the nature and practice of human rights in relationships among individuals, groups, and institutions while also exploring the nature of freedom and how people seek it through human rights. In this course we treat human rights and freedom as ongoing arguments, productive processes, and arenas of contestation, as means of constructing aspirations, seeking and challenging power, developing ways of life, and finding fulfillment. The course considers positive and negative consequences of framing relationships and power in terms of human rights and critically examines uses of human rights to manage problems.

INTL-I 205 CULTURE AND POLITICS (7040)

Instructor: Nemes, Peter Janos
Day & Time: TR 9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1106
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

Examines culture and governance on an international scale, considering how governments, markets, and international organizations deploy or use culture, and how people turn to cultural resources to resist attempts to govern them and/or to assert their own political aims.

INTL-I 205 CULTURE AND POLITICS (12419)

Instructor: Kousaleos, Nicole Serena
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1128
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

Explore the intersection between two highly debated and contested terms -- culture and the global or globalization -- with particular attention to culturally-located examples of screen media, arts, and communication. How do we begin to understand the ways in which cultural institutions, technologies, and practices mediate our links to the world and that of others? What sorts of dynamics and inequalities structure these exchanges? How are cultural formations negotiated within particular ethnic, local, national, or global contexts? Finally, how do we address our place, and the place of others, in relation to all that cultural globalization might promise? How can ethnography be used as a method to understand identity politics and artistic expression?

INTL-I 206 PEACE AND CONFLICT (2855)

Instructor: Bin Ibrahim, Nur Amali
Day & Time: TR 10:10 AM - 11:00 AM
Building & Room: Jordan Hall A100
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

This course will investigate intersections between "identity" and "conflict." We will consider how different forms of identity--such as ethnic, religious, political, and gender--can become the basis for people to mobilize. We will analyze the processes through which certain identities are affirmed at the cost of alternative ones, paying careful attention to how and why people participate in acts of violence and discrimination against those whose identities are deemed undesirable. Rather than view conflicts as irreducibly based in identity, however, we will seek to understand how they emerge out of local conditions and historical legacies, and can be shaped by national, regional, and transnational contexts. Our approach will be interdisciplinary, drawing on readings from anthropology, cultural studies, and political theory. Students will acquire some familiarity with critical concepts such as colonialism and post-colonialism, the nation and the state, race and ethnicity, and globalization and neoliberalism."

INTL-I 210 DIPLOMACY SECURITY GOVERNANCE (7459)

Instructor: Bell, Andrew Michael
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1106
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

Wars in the Middle East. Global financial panics. Nuclear confrontation between two adversaries. Global climate change and catastrophic environmental decline. People around the world struggle to manage these issues, yet they demand our attention. This course will helps you make sense of the conflicts and threats that pervade our world, whether you want to be a diplomat one day or whether you just want to learn more about major topics in the news. We'll explore several key questions. Why have conflicts emerged in international politics? Why, in other instances, has cooperation prevailed? How can theory and history help us understand diplomacy, security, and governance, and what are their limits? Through lectures, discussion activities, and policy workshops this course explores these questions by investigating the theoretical lenses needed to understand why and how policies are made; the history behind diplomacy, security, and governance since 1945; and how such knowledge can help us to grapple with the major diplomatic, security, and governance challenges of the present day.

INTL-I 300 TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL STDS (12624)

Instructor: Bovingdon, Gardner
Day & Time: TR 9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1122
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

Topic: WHAT MOVES US: SPACE, PLACE, AND MOBILITY. This course focuses on how the built environment and modes of transportation interact. What accounts for the locations of sites of dense human habitation? How did various kinds of transportation - ships, planes, trains, and automobiles, but also feet, carts, and bicycles - connect those sites to each other and increase their attractiveness to new migrants? How have changing modes of transportation affected the scale and character of settlements? How have cosmopolitan human settlements and the massive movements of peoples affected, and been affected by, the system of modern states and the assertion of "national identities"?

INTL-I 300 TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL STDS (32644)

Instructor: Liff, Adam Phail
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Cedar Hall C102
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

Topic: U.S. EAST ASIAN RELATIONS. This advanced undergraduate course introduces students to the history and politics of America's strategy toward East Asia. Students will examine the drivers of America's 150+ years of engagement with the region, analyzing the factors shaping U.S. policymakers? decision-making at key historical inflection points (e.g., World War II; post-Soviet collapse). By examining decision-making from the perspective of policymakers themselves, students will develop a deeper understanding of what makes for leadership and policy success (and failure), and hone tools to think critically about the opportunities and challenges facing the United States in East Asia--past, present and future. We will concentrate on the Cold War and contemporary periods, and focus primarily on U.S. policy toward China/Taiwan, Japan, and the Koreas. During the Cold War, East Asia witnessed intense competition and conflict between the U.S. and Soviet superpowers and among the countries in the region. In the post-Cold War era, East Asia has been an engine of global economic growth. Yet the 'rise of China' has precipitated a major geopolitical and geoeconomic shift. Meanwhile, emerging traditional threats (e.g., North Korea) and new non-traditional economic and security issues--to say nothing of domestic political developments at home--also present new, vexing challenges for U.S. strategy. What actions should US policymakers take to minimize conflict and ensure the region's continued peace, prosperity, and stability in the years ahead? Readings will be drawn primarily from history, political science, and international relations theory. Though the course has no concrete prerequisites, it is recommended for upper-level undergraduates with interests in international studies, political science, foreign policy, and/or history.

INTL-I 300 TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL STDS (32645)

Instructor: Liff, Adam Phail
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1128
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

Topic: CONTEMPORARY CHINESE POLITICS. This course is an introduction to contemporary Chinese politics, with a particular focus on China's political development, contemporary political system, and the motley assortment of complex policy challenges that Chinese leaders face today. We begin with a brief survey of the early years of the People's Republic of China (1949- ), rooted in the origins, development and victory of the Chinese Communist Party in a bloody civil war. After comparing and contrasting the "revolutionary" zeal (and widespread political and social upheaval) of the Mao period (1949-1976) with the Post-1978 period of Deng Xiaoping, "Reform and Opening Up," and rapid economic growth and international engagement, we pivot to Chinese politics in the 21st century, with a particular focus on selected policy issues. Major topics include: China's military development and cross-Strait frictions (i.e., with Taiwan), contemporary nationalism, rapid economic growth and its consequences, environmental and social policy, "One Country, Two Systems," the highly volatile and contentious South China Sea dispute, and frictions in U.S.-China relations. Although the primary focus of the course is on China's domestic politics, we will also discuss the influence of international factors on China's development and China's role in the world today.

INTL-I 302 ADV TOPICS IN GLBL HLTH & ENV (12467)

Instructor: Siqueira, Andrea Dalledone
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM - 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 3
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

Topic: FOOD SECURITY IN GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE. This course focus on food security at the local, national and global level. One of its main goals is to understand the main causes of hunger and malnutrition, its social and health consequences, and the paradox of hunger in a world of food abundance, food waste and obesity. We will also address agricultural food systems, resource conservation, and on how trade and climate change impact food security around the world. Students will be reading articles from a variety of disciplines, as well as reports from UN's Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO), Sustainable Development Goals, and NGOS.

INTL-I 303 ADV TOPICS IN GLBL DEVELOPMENT (9483)

Instructor: Dunn, Elizabeth Cullen
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1134
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

Topic: REFUGEES AND DISPLACED PEOPLE. The ongoing refugee crisis has brought new attention to the 66 million refugees and internally displaced people around the world. Why are so displaced people migrating towards Europe? What should happen to them? Why has the UN system failed to keep up with the scale of the crisis? In this course, we will study forced migration, including why people are forced out of their homes, how they access humanitarian aid, and what durable solutions exist for them.

INTL-I 304 ADV TPCS IN HUM RGHTS/INTL LAW (7465)

Instructor: Rana, Shruti
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM - 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Cedar Hall C112
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

Topic: GENDER AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS. International human rights laws and norms are intended to recognize and protect the rights of all people, but have frequently been criticized for failing to recognize or address gendered experiences, perspectives, needs and violations. This course explores the historical, political, and philosophical foundations of the modern international human rights legal system, and examines how and why the current system addresses (or fails to address) gendered problems and experiences. We will study the development, structure, and contemporary jurisprudence of the UN Convention on the Elimination of All Form of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW), as well as how other international human rights laws and treaties intersect with gender-based claims. We will discuss evolving definitions and conceptions of gender-based rights and claims, and ways to improve their recognition and enforcement. We will analyze current cases brought under CEDAW, gender analyses and reports prepared pursuant to CEDAW, as well as campaigns to increase the implementation and reach of CEDAW.

INTL-I 304 ADV TPCS IN HUM RGHTS/INTL LAW (9485)

Instructor: Hunt, Katherine Eugene LeBreton
Day & Time: MW 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Lindley Hall 8
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

Topic: WOMEN, GENDER, AND HUMAN RIGHTS MOVEMENTS. How do social movements fighting for human rights for women and LGBTQI individuals accomplish their goals? This course considers the way groups organizing around gender issues strategize and utilize the tools available to them in their attempts to effect political and social change. In particular, the ways in which these attempts intersect with the media - both traditional media and new media - is given attention. These topics will be examined on a global scale as we consider the specific challenges faced by movements given differences in political, social, and cultural circumstances.

INTL-I 305 ADV TOPICS IN CULTURE&POLITICS (7467)

Instructor: Arjomand, Noah Amir
Day & Time: MW 11:15 AM - 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 3
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

Topic: GLOBAL FAKE NEWS. What makes news real or fake? Who creates fake news, why, and how does it spread? And how do answers to those questions vary over time and around the world? This course will take a global perspective to understanding truth and falsehood in the media and their effects on societies and on international relations. From the philosophy of bullshit to the history of the yellow press to analyses of online networks, we will bring together a wide range of sources and disciplines to consider fake news as a political tool, as a side-effect of the social organization of news making, as a product being sold to consumers, and as either a threat to or an inescapable aspect of democracy.

INTL-I 305 ADV TOPICS IN CULTURE&POLITICS (10712)

Instructor: Deboer, Stephanie
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM - 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Franklin Hall 304C
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

Topic: GLOBAL MEDIA INFRASTRUCTURES: FROM UNDERSEA CABLES TO LOCAL ITINERARIES. Often unseen and unacknowledged in accounts of the global distribution of audio-visual content, our current media landscapes would not exist without our current media infrastructures. The circulation of film and media currently depends upon such things as the following: the upkeep of undersea cables and Internet data centers in locations and seas throughout the globe; the more local repurposing of old infrastructures (water towers, for example) to support new infrastructures (cell phone towers, for example); official film and television industry protocols for media transfer, compression, and distribution; as well as the more unofficial infrastructures of film and television piracy. These infrastructures all influence the material forms, visualities, and experiences of film and media. They often impinge on local to global terms of accesses to water, energy, and other material resources. They are also often linked to adjacent circulations of waste ? from the e-waste of computers and cell phones to the celluloid that once was the bedrock of film stock and footage. This class offers a critical lens for understanding the implications for film and media content?s movement throughout the world and how this movement affects content?s form. In so doing, this course on Global Media Infrastructures calls attention to: the media infrastructures that distribute audio-visual content; the ways industries and people imagine, organize, and use those infrastructures; the varied local to global scales at which they operate; the dynamics of power and politics through which they are negotiated; the ways in which they influence our visual and aural experiences of film and media in a global context. In taking this course, students will be better informed of the often-unacknowledged infrastructures and processes that influence film and media?s distribution and experience. No previous experience with global studies, cinema and media studies, or media technologies and cultures is assumed in this course.

INTL-I 305 ADV TOPICS IN CULTURE&POLITICS (32646)

Instructor: Jikeli, Gunther
Day & Time: MW 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Lindley Hall 35
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

Topic: RESEARCHING ANTISEMITISM IN SOCIAL MEDIA. Online hate speech, including antisemitism, is a growing problem for communication on social media, such as Twitter. This course covers geographical areas of Europe, the U.S., and posts in English from across the globe to ask what are prominent forms of antisemitism online? Who are frequent disseminators and how are they linked internationally? How does hate speech travel across the globe and what can be done about it?

INTL-I 306 ADV TOPICS IN PEACE & CONFLICT (8675)

Instructor: Banai, Hussein
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 3
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

TOPIC: Democracy in Global Politics. This course explores the evolution of thinking about democracy, as both a system of government and a political ideal, in international society. We will investigate the contours of historical and contemporary debates about self-government in the minds of democratic theorists, political figures, and the public at large. The course is divided into three segments. In the first, we will examine the historical forms and theoretical foundations of democracy from ancient Greece to present-day liberal and multinational democratic associations. The second segment of the course focuses more narrowly on the discourses about and the divergent practices of democracy in international and comparative contexts. We will subject to scrutiny key determinants of democracy such as development, civil and political rights, accountable institutions, etc. in reference to the lived experience of democracy. Lastly, we will devote a few sessions to an examination of various crises of democracy in contemporary world politics. Among the topics examined will be the impact of the global economic recession on domestic and international institutions, the aftermath of multiple wars, revolutionary upheavals, and terrorist attacks on democratic decision-making, and the evident turn toward populism and nationalism in Western liberal democratic societies.

INTL-I 306 ADV TOPICS IN PEACE & CONFLICT (13012)

Instructor: Pinaud, Clemence Marine
Day & Time: MW 4:00 PM - 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1134
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

Topic: WAR ECONOMY. This class will adopt a comparative and historical approach to the study of war economy. We will investigate various types of war economies, controlled by states, armed groups, and individuals. We will focus on the idea of production and on its relationship with state-building and social class formation. This will allow us to study the various facets of warfare from medieval to contemporary wars. Cases will include the Mongol Empire, European feudal states, the First and Second World Wars, as well as various contemporary conflicts, from Afghanistan, to Sierra Leone and Syria.

INTL-I 310 ADV TPCS IN DIPL SECURITY GOV (9743)

Instructor: Zajac, Justyna
Day & Time: MW 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 3
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

Topic: CONTEMPORARY SECURITY ISSUES IN EUROPE. This course examines contemporary security challenges facing Europe. It focuses on how major European states and institutions address military and non-military challenges such as engaging Russia, conflicts in the Middle East, refuge crisis, populism and nationalism, ensuring energy supplies, and climate change, among others. The course explores the role of NATO, the European Union, and other institutions in providing security in Europe. It examines European security in the context of the changing international order characterized by redistribution of power in global politics. The goal of the course is to help students gain the appreciation of the complexities of European security issues and enhance students? analytical skills and abilities to think critically about the place of Europe in world politics.

INTL-I 310 ADV TPCS IN DIPL SECURITY GOV (10713)

Instructor: Bauerle, Sarah Elizabeth
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1112
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

Topic: GLOBAL ECONOMIC GOVERNANCE. Today, many political pundits lament the imminent collapse of the "liberal international order," and point to declining support for international economic treaties and organizations as proof. What is the liberal international order anyway, how did it come to be, who benefits from it, why is it under attack, and what might it be replaced with? In this course, you will learn about the key governance structures that have organized the flow of goods and money across borders since 1945, how they work, why they generate controversy, and how global forces are challenging these structures today. Along the way, you will become conversant in the language of trade and finance (no prerequisites required!), learn how to think about cooperation problems like a game theorist, and use case studies to evaluate the normative implications of our current global economic governance system.

INTL-I 315 RSRCH DESIGN IN INTL STUDIES (6242)

Instructor: Steinberg, Jessica
Day & Time: MW 9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Cedar Hall C102
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

Topic: RESEARCH DESIGN FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDIES. I-315 provides a foundation for understanding and conducting research in international studies. Conducting research in the social sciences means identifying a research question, proposing a theory that answers it, developing a research design that fits the research question, gathering and analyzing data, and interpreting these findings. You will learn how to do each of these tasks, exploring different approaches to each, and learning how to navigate theoretical, methodological, and ethical questions that may arise. We will explore both quantitative and qualitative methods for evaluating a research question. In particular, you will become familiar with methodologies such as case study, surveys, field experiments, ethnography, and in depth interviews. At its core, this course is about developing the tools for conducting and evaluating the process of knowledge accumulation about social, political, economic, and cultural processes. In order to give substantive weight to the research design questions explored in this class, we will read works on the theme of democratic erosion. We will evaluate scholarly works addressing the question of how and when democracies deteriorate, using the tools we develop throughout the course.

INTL-I 315 RSRCH DESIGN IN INTL STUDIES (6742)

Instructor: Bell, Andrew Michael
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM - 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 3
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

This class exposes students to the theoretical frameworks, methods and skills necessary for undertaking research in International Studies. Through the semester students will be working collaboratively on a well-conceived and feasible research design, allowing them to explore the interdisciplinary and comparative perspectives of International and Global Studies. This class requires working in groups and active class discussions, i.e., the full participation of each member of the class. While working on the process of research design of a given topic, students will be able to form questions about their own exploratory overseas research and subsequent capstone/paper, as well as to acquire and better their working skills for future employment in public and private sectors.

INTL-I 325 INTL ISSUES THRU FOREIGN LANG (7041)

Instructor: Zlotin, Roman
Day & Time: F 2:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Building & Room: Cedar Hall C101
Credit Hours: 1
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

Topic: ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES IN RUSSIAN. Students discuss in class in Russian on topics of politics, socio-economic conditions and environmental problems in the countries of Eastern Europe, Russian Federation and Central Asia

INTL-I 325 INTL ISSUES THRU FOREIGN LANG (32215)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: R 5:45 PM - 6:35 PM
Building & Room: Geological Sciences 407
Credit Hours: 1
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

INTL-L 350 ORIGINS&EVOLUTION OF INTL LAW (30139)

Instructor: Bosco, David Lyndon
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Recreational Sports 110
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

Topic: ORIGINS AND EVOLUTION OF INTERNATIONAL LAW. This course considers the intellectual and conceptual underpinnings and development of international law, with an emphasis on questions such as natural law, sovereignty, nationalism, and human rights.

INTL-L 352 LAW AND GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT (32694)

Instructor: Ochoa, Christiana
Day & Time: MW 9:30 AM - 10:45 PM
Building & Room: Lowell E. Baier Hall 125
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

Topic: LAW AND GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT. Why are some countries poor while others are not? How can we address global poverty, inequality and development? And does law have any role in addressing these phenomena? This course explores the impact of political and economic historical phenomena as well as modern global development practices on the economic, political and cultural prospects of local societies. In doing so, it evaluates the role of law in implementing and facilitating development practices, as well as looking at the roles played by international institutions, markets, business enterprises, non-governmental organizations, and domestic governance structures in defining and achieving human well-being.

INTL-X 390 INDIV READINGS IN INTL STUDIES (10202)

Instructor: Ekbia, Hamid Reza
Day & Time: 2:27 PM - 2:27 PM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

P: Major or minor in International Studies, application, and approval of department. Students conduct individual research projects on an international issue under the direction of a faculty member. Student and faculty member should develop a project and submit a "contract" to the department for approval.

INTL-X 398 RESEARCH IN INTERNATIONAL STDS (5434)

Instructor: Ekbia, Hamid Reza
Day & Time: 2:27 PM - 2:27 PM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

P: Major or minor in International Studies and permission of department. Overseas faculty-directed research in international studies. Credit given for only one of X398 or I430.

INTL-I 400 INTL STUDIES CAPSTONE SEMINAR (2856)

Instructor: Nemes, Peter Janos
Day & Time: M 9:30 AM - 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Cedar Hall C101
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

P: I315. Demonstrate your accumulated training in International Studies in a single original project of your choice, subject to the instructor's approval and under the supervision of a faculty member. The completed thesis should bring together your academic preparation, your region, your foreign language expertise, and your overseas experience in an 8,000-word essay. Peer review and regular feedback through multiple drafts will help you craft your thesis. By the end of the seminar you will be able to articulate clearly your research argument in a well-written and orally presented project.

INTL-I 400 INTL STUDIES CAPSTONE SEMINAR (4347)

Instructor: Kousaleos, Nicole Serena
Day & Time: F 9:30 AM - 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Lindley Hall 112
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

P: I315. This course is designed to demonstrate your accumulated training in International Studies in a single original project of your choice, subject to the instructor?s approval and under the supervision of a faculty member mentor. The completed thesis should bring together your theme, your region, your foreign language expertise, and your overseas experience in an 8000 word tour de force. The Capstone necessitates multiple drafts of your research that are subjected to heightened peer review and regular feedback from your instructor, your peers and your mentor. By the end of the seminar you will be able to articulate clearly your research argument in a well-written and orally presented project.

INTL-I 400 INTL STUDIES CAPSTONE SEMINAR (9511)

Instructor: Siqueira, Andrea Dalledone
Day & Time: W 2:30 PM - 5:30 PM
Building & Room: Geological Sciences 226
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

P: I315. Demonstrate your accumulated training in International Studies in a single original project of your choice, subject to the instructor's approval and under the supervision of a faculty member. The completed thesis should bring together your academic preparation, your region, your foreign language expertise, and your overseas experience in an 8,000-word essay. Peer review and regular feedback through multiple drafts will help you craft your thesis. By the end of the seminar you will be able to articulate clearly your research argument in a well-written and orally presented project.

INTL-I 400 INTL STUDIES CAPSTONE SEMINAR (13624)

Instructor: Kenney, Padraic Jeremiah
Day & Time: M 2:30 PM - 5:30 PM
Building & Room: Wendell W. Wright 3125
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

P: I315. Demonstrate your accumulated training in International Studies in a single original project of your choice, subject to the instructor's approval and under the supervision of a faculty member. The completed thesis should bring together your academic preparation, your region, your foreign language expertise, and your overseas experience in an 8,000-word essay. Peer review and regular feedback through multiple drafts will help you craft your thesis. By the end of the seminar you will be able to articulate clearly your research argument in a well-written and orally presented project.

INTL-I 401 GLOBAL SERVICE CAPSTONE (10736)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: F 9:00 AM - 10:30 AM
Building & Room: Wylie Hall 111
Credit Hours: 1
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-11 End Date: 2019-04-26

Project or two workshops that captures the student's accumulated knowledge of global service.

INTL-I 406 HONORS INTL STDS CAPSTONE SEM (5433)

Instructor: Kenney, Padraic Jeremiah
Day & Time: M 2:30 PM - 5:30 PM
Building & Room: Wendell W. Wright 3125
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

P: I315, application, and approval of department. Required for departmental honors credit and taught with I-400, for honors-track seniors who have completed all International Studies degree requirements. See I-400 for further information.

INTL-I 425 GENDER: INTERNAT'L PERSPECTIVE (30137)

Instructor: Pinaud, Clemence Marine
Day & Time: MW 9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Cedar Hall C114
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

Topic: WOMEN AND WAR. This course introduces students to the topic of women and war, spanning across different time periods and regions. It equips students to look critically at women's assigned roles and at gendered identities in peace and in wartime, from a solid historical and comparative perspective. By the end of this course, students will understand women's experiences in war, and look critically at concepts such as "motherhood", "combat" or "sexual violence". The course covers five main topics in the study of women and war: an introduction to the concepts of gender, militarization and images of women; women's place in the war economy and as victims (along with men) of sexual/gender-based violence war; women's agency and their multiple roles in armies and other armed groups; women as perpetrators of violence and extremism; and women, the making of gendered ethnic identities and of a national history in the aftermath of war.

INTL-I 426 ADVANCD TOPICS IN INTL STUDIES (10986)

Instructor: Bosco, David Lyndon
Day & Time: MW 9:30 AM - 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Wendell W. Wright 2025
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

Topic: OCEAN GOVERNANCE. This course considers the history and modern practice of ocean governance, with a focus on the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea and challenges to it.

INTL-I 426 ADVANCD TOPICS IN INTL STUDIES (12536)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: 2:27 PM - 2:27 PM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

INTL-I 426 ADVANCD TOPICS IN INTL STUDIES (30140)

Instructor: Ekbia, Hamid Reza
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM - 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 5
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

Topic: TECHNOLOGY AND DEVELOPMENT. Technology and development seem to have a close connection with each other. In the Western imagination, technology is often tied to modernization, progress, and social good. In modern times, various technologies (from mechanical harvesters to baby bottles and from radio sets to social media) have been introduced to the developing world with a promise of progress. The outcomes, however, have been mixed at best, with such interventions often disrupting established ways of life, replacing them with alternatives that have a fallen-from-sky feel to them. In this course, we study the relationship between technology and development from a socio-technical perspective, with a focus on the future of communities and societies across the globe and how it is being shaped by computer technology. A key premise of this perspective is that technologies are designed, developed, and used according to the specific demands of cultures and places; they are shaped by their contexts of use, and in turn shape those contexts. Like any other technology, and perhaps more strongly, computers are cultural and political artifacts. One of the best ways to understand them, therefore, is through a socio-economic, cultural, and political lens. We will examine this through old and new examples of techno-utopian thinking.

INTL-I 427 ISS IN GLBL DEV & POL ECONOMY (12749)

Instructor: Steinberg, Jessica
Day & Time: MW 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1106
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

Topic: MODELS OF SOCIAL AND POLITICAL PROCESSES. How did the protests in Tahrir Square begin? Will China?s growth continue? What makes addressing global warming so difficult? How can we explain the reappearance of measles in the U.S.? This course will survey a set of models for thinking about individual, national and international social and political processes. Models discipline our thinking about the world and help us to define and characterize relationships and events with logical consistency and precision. Familiarity with a toolbox of models also allows us to identify specific kinds of political and social obstacles to achieving collective goals (such as problems of aggregation and public choice, monitoring and enforcement, or free-riding) so we can assess potential strategies for overcoming them. In this course we will learn about why and how models are useful, we will develop an understanding of a number of models that characterize individual and system level behavior, and we will evaluate current and historical local, as well as international and global processes and events using these models. While there are no concrete prerequisites, basic knowledge of algebra is a necessity. This course is for both graduate students and undergraduates. Graduate students will have additional reading and more in depth assignments.

INTL-I 428 SOCIAL JUSTICE AND THE ENVIRON (12562)

Instructor: Kane, Stephanie C.
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 6
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

Topic: ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE. Focuses on the global struggle for potable water and healthy rivers. From megacities to villages, we will explore the changing and contested meanings of indigeneity and water landscapes, the passionate organizing efforts of neighborhood environmental activists, the political unconscious of pollution, and the geopolitics of water engineering and international development in wet and dry environments. Our cases draw from three books by anthropologists, two doing ethnographic fieldwork in the Americas (Mexico-U.S. borderlands, Argentina and Brazil) and one on the Nile in Egypt. All three ethnographies grapple with the ends of rivers both physically (as deltas) and symbolically (as an index of our 21st century planet). Students expand the range of environmental justice subjects and geographies through independent research projects. Evaluation is based on writing, oral presentation and participation.

INTL-L 445 HUMAN RIGHTS LAW & INTL ORGS (32691)

Instructor: Rana, Shruti
Day & Time: R 2:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 7
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

This course is designed as a practicum to provide a high-impact opportunity for students to apply their academic skills and knowledge in a real-world environment, specifically the United Nations and international human rights law. This course aims to provide students with the theoretical knowledge and practical tools needed to effectively engage in policymaking efforts or advocate before international treaty bodies. Students will study United Nations treaty bodies and the international law system, conduct an independent research project, and attend UN treaty body sessions at the UN headquarters in New York during Spring Break. They will obtain a deep understanding of international human rights laws, how the United Nations treaty system works, and how to effectively engage with the treaty making, interpretation, and enforcement process from a variety of perspectives (for example, from the perspective of both state and non-state actors such as government entities, intergovernmental bodies, NGOs, and research organizations). This course is aimed at students interested in pursuing careers in international law, human rights, international institutions, and NGOs.

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (12411)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: F 10:10 AM - 11:00 AM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 121
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (12412)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: F 12:20 PM - 1:10 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 3
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (12413)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: F 1:25 PM - 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 3
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

INTL-I 203 GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT (30119)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: F 10:10 AM - 11:00 AM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 3
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

INTL-I 203 GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT (30120)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: F 11:15 AM - 12:05 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 3
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

INTL-I 203 GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT (30281)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: F 1:25 PM - 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 106
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (30122)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: F 10:10 AM - 11:00 AM
Building & Room: Wendell W. Wright 1006
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (30123)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: F 11:15 AM - 12:05 PM
Building & Room: Wendell W. Wright 1006
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (30124)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: F 1:25 PM - 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Cedar Hall C118
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

INTL-I 206 PEACE AND CONFLICT (30125)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: F 9:05 AM - 9:55 AM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 3
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

INTL-I 206 PEACE AND CONFLICT (30126)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: F 1:25 PM - 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 215
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03

INTL-I 206 PEACE AND CONFLICT (30127)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: F 2:30 PM - 3:20 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 215
Credit Hours: 3
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2019-01-07 End Date: 2019-05-03