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Courses

Semester:

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (11603)

Instructor: Hosur Suhas, Prashant
Day & Time: MW 11:15 AM- 12:05 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0001
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Explore a variety of different perspectives for studying and making sense of the world and global issues in the past and present. We will learn how these different perspectives portray the world, interpret events, and often shape human actions. Lecture material and key concepts are organized around the International Studies thematic concentrations, thereby introducing a variety of analytical approaches from the natural and social sciences and the arts and humanities. Assignments and discussion will also incorporate a geographic dimension for analysis. Case studies from different historical periods and parts of the world will illustrate these approaches and key issues.

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (11604)

Instructor: Johnson, Cathryn Evangeline
Day & Time: F 1:25 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Student Building (Frances Morg 138
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Discussion for P. Hosur lecture section.

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (11605)

Instructor: Johnson, Cathryn Evangeline
Day & Time: F 2:30 PM- 3:20 PM
Building & Room: Student Building (Frances Morg 220
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Discussion for P. Hosur lecture section.

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (11606)

Instructor: Johnson, Cathryn Evangeline
Day & Time: F 9:05 AM- 9:55 AM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 315
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Discussion for P. Hosur lecture section.

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (12132)

Instructor: Nemes, Peter
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Student Building (Frances Morg 015
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Explore a variety of different perspectives for studying and making sense of the world and global issues in the past and present. We will learn how these different perspectives portray the world, interpret events, and often shape human actions. Lecture material and key concepts are organized around the International Studies thematic concentrations, thereby introducing a variety of analytical approaches from the natural and social sciences and the arts and humanities. Assignments and discussion will also incorporate a geographic dimension for analysis. Case studies from different historical periods and parts of the world will illustrate these approaches and key issues.

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (31323)

Instructor: Tezel, Aybike Seyma
Day & Time: F 1:25 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 016
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Discussion for P. Hosur lecture section.

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (31324)

Instructor: Tezel, Aybike Seyma
Day & Time: F 2:30 PM- 3:20 PM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 109
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Discussion for P. Hosur lecture section.

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (31325)

Instructor: Tezel, Aybike Seyma
Day & Time: F 9:05 AM- 9:55 AM
Building & Room: Jordan Hall A105
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Discussion for P. Hosur lecture section.

INTL-I 102 CLIMATE CHANGE-INTL STUDIES (31336)

Instructor: O'Reilly, Jessica Leigh
Day & Time: MW 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1112
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

By examining climate change through the frameworks provided by International Studies, students learn to consider how climate change is framed, how decisions about it are made, and how to build professional skills to contribute to solutions. Students in this class will gain science and media/information literacy skills, improve their understanding about the multidimensional facets of climate change, learn to consider cultural difference in problem-solving, and investigate key issues in climate policy, politics, and governance.

INTL-I 202 GLOBAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENT (14380)

Instructor: Kane, Stephanie C.
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1106
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

We explore human-environment interactions from international and interdisciplinary perspectives. We consider how and why humans shape the nature they inhabit in particular ways, and how in turn, nature shapes health and disease among humans. We will study how, as global change unfolds in particular cultures, ecologies and geographies, it alters human resistance and susceptibility to disease, and too, alters the access of individuals and communities to conditions of wellness. Drawing from the social and natural sciences and the humanities, the course will provide students with the concepts, theories and analytic tools useful for understanding and addressing the social, political and economic complexities of the fundamental global health and environment issues of our time. In this section, we focus on sociocultural and environmental transformations accompanying global management of two modern viral pandemics: HIV/AIDS and Dengue Fever.

INTL-I 202 GLOBAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENT (13107)

Instructor: Long, Yan
Day & Time: MW 1:00 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1112
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

We explore human-environment interactions from international and interdisciplinary perspectives. We consider how and why humans shape the nature they inhabit in particular ways, and how in turn, nature shapes health and disease among humans. We will study how, as global change unfolds in particular cultures, ecologies and geographies, it alters human resistance and susceptibility to disease, and too, alters the access of individuals and communities to conditions of wellness. Drawing from the social and natural sciences and the humanities, the course will provide students with the concepts, theories and analytic tools useful for understanding and addressing the social, political and economic complexities of the fundamental global health and environment issues of our time.

INTL-I 203 GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT (7051)

Instructor: Ochoa, Christiana
Day & Time: MW 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Lowell E Baier Hall 125
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Why are some countries poor while others are not? How can we address global poverty, inequality and development? How can we measure development and what are ethical business practices and policies? This course explores the impact of political and economic historical phenomena as well as modern global development practices on the economic, political and cultural prospects of local societies. In doing so, it evaluates the role international institutions, markets, business enterprises, non-governmental organizations, and domestic governance structures play in development and human well-being.

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (7785)

Instructor: Gilligan, Emma L.
Day & Time: MW 11:15 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1112
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

This course considers the relationship between human rights and freedom. We look at the nature and practice of human rights in relationships among individuals, groups, and institutions while also exploring the nature of freedom and how people seek it through human rights. In this course we treat human rights and freedom as ongoing arguments, productive processes, and arenas of contestation, as means of constructing aspirations, seeking and challenging power, developing ways of life, and finding fulfillment. The course considers positive and negative consequences of framing relationships and power in terms of human rights and critically examines uses of human rights to manage problems

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (13108)

Instructor: Siqueira, Andrea Dalledone
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM- 3:20 PM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 120
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

This course considers the relationship between human rights and freedom. We look at the nature and practice of human rights in relationships among individuals, groups, and institutions while also exploring the nature of freedom and how people seek it through human rights. In this course we treat human rights and freedom as ongoing arguments, productive processes, and arenas of contestation, as means of constructing aspirations, seeking and challenging power, developing ways of life, and finding fulfillment. The course considers positive and negative consequences of framing relationships and power in terms of human rights and critically examines uses of human rights to manage problems

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (11618)

Instructor: Parnell, Philip C.
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM- 12:05 PM
Building & Room: Morrison Hall 007
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

This course considers the relationship between human rights and freedom. We look at the nature and practice of human rights in relationships among individuals, groups, and institutions while also exploring the nature of freedom and how people seek it through human rights. In this course we treat human rights and freedom as ongoing arguments, productive processes, and arenas of contestation, as means of constructing aspirations, seeking and challenging power, developing ways of life, and finding fulfillment. The course considers positive and negative consequences of framing relationships and power in terms of human rights and critically examines uses of human rights to manage problems

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (31338)

Instructor: Chatarpal, Mark Ortez
Day & Time: F 11:15 AM- 12:05 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1118
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Discussion for P. Parnell's lecture section.

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (31339)

Instructor: Chatarpal, Mark Ortez
Day & Time: F 12:20 PM- 1:10 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1118
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Discussion for P. Parnell's lecture section.

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (31340)

Instructor: Chatarpal, Mark Ortez
Day & Time: F 1:25 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1118
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Discussion for P. Parnell's lecture section.

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (31341)

Instructor: Miller, Sharon Steel
Day & Time: F 10:10 AM- 11:00 AM
Building & Room: Sycamore Hall 001
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Discussion for A. Siqueira lecture section.

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (31342)

Instructor: Miller, Sharon Steel
Day & Time: F 11:15 AM- 12:05 PM
Building & Room: SPEA 163
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Discussion for A. Siqueira lecture section.

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (31343)

Instructor: Miller, Sharon Steel
Day & Time: F 2:30 PM- 3:20 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0003
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Discussion for A. Siqueira lecture section.

INTL-I 205 CULTURE AND POLITICS (31345)

Instructor: Nemes, Peter
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1122
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Examines culture and governance on an international scale, considering how governments, markets, and international organizations deploy or use culture, and how people turn to cultural resources to resist attempts to govern them and/or to assert their own political aims.

INTL-I 205 CULTURE AND POLITICS (8727)

Instructor: Kousaleos, Nicole Serena
Day & Time: TR 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Sycamore Hall 103
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Examines culture and governance on an international scale, considering how governments, markets, and international organizations deploy or use culture, and how people turn to cultural resources to resist attempts to govern them and/or to assert their own political aims.

INTL-I 206 PEACE AND CONFLICT (3030)

Instructor: Ibrahim, Nur Amali
Day & Time: MW 1:00 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1122
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

This course will investigate intersections between "identity" and "conflict." We will consider how different forms of identity--such as ethnic, religious, political, and gender--can become the basis for people to mobilize. We will analyze the processes through which certain identities are affirmed at the cost of alternative ones, paying careful attention to how and why people participate in acts of violence and discrimination against those whose identities are deemed undesirable. Rather than view conflicts as irreducibly based in identity, however, we will seek to understand how they emerge out of local conditions and historical legacies, and can be shaped by national, regional, and transnational contexts. Our approach will be interdisciplinary, drawing on readings from anthropology, cultural studies, and political theory. Students will acquire some familiarity with critical concepts such as colonialism and post-colonialism, the nation and the state, race and ethnicity, and globalization and neoliberalism.

INTL-I 206 PEACE AND CONFLICT (13111)

Instructor: Hosur Suhas, Prashant
Day & Time: TR 5:45 PM- 7:00 PM
Building & Room: Lindley Hall 102
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

This course will investigate intersections between "identity" and "conflict." We will consider how different forms of identity--ethnic, religious, linguistic, and political, to cite a few examples--can become the basis for people to mobilize. We will examine how collective forms of identity can be yoked to nationalism, resulting in an exclusionary view of the nation-state and violence against those whose identities are deemed undesirable. Rather than view conflicts as irreducibly based in identity, however, we will also seek to understand how they emerge out of local conditions and colonial legacies, and can be shaped by national, regional, and transnational contexts. Our approach will be interdisciplinary, drawing on readings from anthropology, political theory, and history. Students will acquire a familiarity with critical concepts such as nationalism, ethnicity, gender, political economy, and sectarianism.

INTL-I 210 DIPLOMACY SECURITY GOVERNANCE (13116)

Instructor: Kirchoff, Alisha
Day & Time: R 4:40 PM- 5:30 PM
Building & Room: Wendell W. Wright 1004
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Discussion for S. Macekura's lecture section.

INTL-I 210 DIPLOMACY SECURITY GOVERNANCE (13117)

Instructor: Kirchoff, Alisha
Day & Time: R 5:45 PM- 6:35 PM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 002
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Discussion for S. Macekura's lecture section.

INTL-I 210 DIPLOMACY SECURITY GOVERNANCE (13118)

Instructor: Kirchoff, Alisha
Day & Time: R 6:50 PM- 7:40 PM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 109
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Discussion for S. Macekura's lecture section.

INTL-I 210 DIPLOMACY SECURITY GOVERNANCE (9194)

Instructor: Macekura, Stephen
Day & Time: MW 12:20 PM- 1:10 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0001
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Wars in the Middle East. Global financial panics. Nuclear confrontation between two adversaries. Global climate change and catastrophic environmental decline. People around the world struggle to manage these issues, yet they demand our attention. This course will helps you make sense of the conflicts and threats that pervade our world, whether you want to be a diplomat one day or whether you just want to learn more about major topics in the news. We¿ll explore several key questions. Why have conflicts emerged in international politics? Why, in other instances, has cooperation prevailed? How can theory and history help us understand diplomacy, security, and governance, and what are their limits? Through lectures, discussion activities, and policy workshops this course explores these questions by investigating the theoretical lenses needed to understand why and how policies are made; the history behind diplomacy, security, and governance since 1945; and how such knowledge can help us to grapple with the major diplomatic, security, and governance challenges of the present day.

INTL-I 220 GLOBAL CONNECTIONS (9197)

Instructor: Kousaleos, Nicole Serena
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1106
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: A&H GCC
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

We hear that we live in an "increasingly globalized world," but what does that mean? This course analyzes the scope of global interdependencies today and their profound impact upon individual and collective identities. Topics include the rhetoric of human rights, national and regional politics, and our perception of the "other." Through the use of relevant examples and case studies from around the globe we will break down stereotypes, contextualize and analyze connections, recognize our place in the global puzzle, and exercise our ability to think ethically about international issues. It will be an enriching and stimulating class that you will greatly benefit from -- personally and professionally.

INTL-I 222 GLOBAL HEALTH CONNECTIONS (13121)

Instructor: Siqueira, Andrea Dalledone
Day & Time: TR 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1106
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

How does the health of communities around the world depend upon socio-economic, political, environmental and cultural factors? What role can global health institutions play in promoting health as a human right and addressing the main health challenges of vulnerable communities and populations, such as women and children? This course focuses on the non-medical determinants of health in communities around the world as well as on the most important health challenges the world faces. Students will read articles from a variety of disciplines and focus on case studies from around the globe to understand the interconnections between health and local contexts and global processes. This course will interest students pursuing careers in medicine or public health.

INTL-I 300 TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL STDS (31705)

Instructor: Dekalchuk, Anna
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 104
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Topic: EU-RUSSIA RELATIONS TODAY. This course explores the problems and potential solutions driving EU-Russia relations. We will talk about the internal workings of both the EU and the Russian state, define their foreign policy modes, and trace the way the relations unfolded since the 1989 fall of the Berlin Wall. If you want to learn why Corfu Island is so important for the relations between Brussels and the Kremlin, what EU-Russian Common Spaces are, or trace the role of the Russian national champion Gazprom in EU-Russia energy relations, this course is for you.

INTL-I 300 TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL STDS (32820)

Instructor: Alsaleh, Asaad
Day & Time: MW 2:00 PM- 3:15 PM
Building & Room: School of Public Health (HPER) 017
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Topic: ISIS AND TERRORISM

INTL-I 300 TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL STDS (32822)

Instructor: Bovingdon, Gardner
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 235
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Topic: POLITICS OF IDENTITY IN CHINA AND INNER ASIA. This course challenges the assumption that terms like "Chinese," "Taiwanese," or "Kazakh" represent straightforward concepts. Via theories of identity, and careful attention to the history of China and Inner Asia, we will explore - and explode - the association of identity and descent, language and ethnicity, citizenship and nationality.

INTL-I 300 TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL STDS (32823)

Instructor: Yasuda, John Kojiro
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Wells Library 031
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Topic: CONTEMPORARY CHINESE POLITICS. Analysis of trends and patterns in Chinese politics since 1949, with a focus on ideology and political culture, elites, party and government institutions, the policy-making process, popular political participation, and the relationship between economic and political change. Political evolution of Taiwan is also considered.

INTL-I 302 ADV TOPICS IN GLBL HLTH & ENV (31412)

Instructor: Siqueira, Andrea Dalledone
Day & Time: MW 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 109
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Topic: WOMEN'S RIGHTS AND HEALTH. Despite almost 30 years of the adoption of the Convention for the Elimination of All Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) by the UN General Assembly, women around the world continue to face violations of their fundamental rights. This course address the main challenges faced by women and their fights for the implementation of their rights, especially those related to their socio-economic and reproductive rights. Students will read articles from a variety of disciplines and focus on case studies from around the globe. We will also examine international treaties, national and international policies and programs, social movements, NGOS and transnational networks that strive for implementing women¿s rights.

INTL-I 303 ADV TOPICS IN GLBL DEVELOPMENT (13690)

Instructor: Dunn, Elizabeth Cullen
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM- 5:00 PM
Building & Room: Student Building (Frances Morg 017
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-03-03

Topic: REFUGEES AND DISPLACED PEOPLE. The ongoing refugee crisis has brought new attention to the 66 million refugees and internally displaced people around the world. Why are so displaced people migrating towards Europe? What should happen to them? Why has the UN system failed to keep up with the scale of the crisis? In this course, we will study forced migration, including why people are forced out of their homes, how they access humanitarian aid, and what durable solutions exist for them.

INTL-I 303 ADV TOPICS IN GLBL DEVELOPMENT (11556)

Instructor: O'Reilly, Jessica Leigh
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0003
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Topic: CLIMATE DISASTERS AND RESILIENCE. Development, as a suite of projects, ideas, and attributes, can contribute to building communities resilient to climate change, among other concerns. We will learn to think through the complex sociocultural and natural impacts of climate change in the course, taking the concept and experience of "disaster" as our starting point. The first half of the course borrows from diverse traditions to explore ideas centered around climate development, such as risk, adaptation, resilience, vulnerability, and equity. The second half of the course examines climate-related disasters, broadly conceived--like urbanization, sea level rise, and food systems crises--to analyze techniques and concepts to improve human and environmental resilience.

INTL-I 304 ADV TPCS IN HUM RGHTS/INTL LAW (11558)

Instructor: Parnell, Philip C.
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0009
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Topic: HUMAN RIGHTS IN EVERYDAY LIFE: PASSAGEWAYS AND CHRONICLES. This course focuses on the movement of human rights into everyday practices and relationships, including how people perceive each other, construct aspirations, and develop ways of life. Through readings, assignments, and class discussions we will ask how the contexts in which people live shape the nature, roles, and power of human rights and will consider both positive and negative consequences of framing relationships and power in terms of human rights. Other questions that drive the course interrogate relationships between rights and practices. This course also critically examines the pursuit of human rights as a means of solving problems; in doing so, it considers alternatives to rights seeking in processes of survival and the realization of ideals. Some course interrogations and critiques of human rights derive from non-Western contexts or contexts of rights making and practice that complicate popular Western notions and assumption about rights seeking and ontologies.

INTL-I 304 ADV TPCS IN HUM RGHTS/INTL LAW (9200)

Instructor: Rana, Shruti
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1122
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Topic: GENDER AND INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS. International human rights laws and norms are intended to recognize and protect the rights of all people, but have frequently been criticized for failing to recognize or address gendered experiences, perspectives, needs and violations. This course explores the historical, political, and philosophical foundations of the modern international human rights legal system, and examines how and why the current system addresses (or fails to address) gendered problems and experiences. We will study the development, structure, and contemporary jurisprudence of the UN Convention on the Elimination of All Form of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW), as well as how other international human rights laws and treaties intersect with gender-based claims. We will discuss evolving definitions and conceptions of gender-based rights and claims, and ways to improve their recognition and enforcement. We will analyze current cases brought under CEDAW, gender analyses and reports prepared pursuant to CEDAW, as well as campaigns to increase the implementation and reach of CEDAW.

INTL-I 305 ADV TOPICS IN CULTURE&POLITICS (9203)

Instructor: Kousaleos, Nicole Serena
Day & Time: MW 1:00 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1118
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Topic: THE RAINBOW SPECTRUM: GLOBAL GENDER DISPLAY, CULTURAL POLITICS AND RESISTANCE. Multiple factors influence embodied gender identity performance in today's global context. Explore gender performance in Zar cult rituals and spirit possession, Filipino transgender beauty pageants, the hyper-masculine hyper-reality of some video games, "Bishounen" character tropes in East Asia, the politicization of queer identities in Uganda, policing of LGBTQ identities in Russia through the use of violence, American gendered body modification through plastic surgery, and the YPJ--Kurdish women's army and its ideology of Jineology. What can be learned through critical study of gender performance in a post binary context? Where does performance mean resistance and where does the performance further encode hegemonic power dynamics? Which theoretical frameworks help us to best interpret global cultural politics and performance?

INTL-I 305 ADV TOPICS IN CULTURE&POLITICS (13125)

Instructor: Graves, Margaret Susanna
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM- 6:30 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 208
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-03-05 End Date: 2018-05-04

Topic: MUSEUMS: THE DISPLAY OF CULTURE. Display is never neutral. Museums and exhibitions are showcases in which nations and cultures model their own images and their relationships with the wider world. Nowhere is the culture of display more overtly politicized than in the museum presentation of so-called world cultures: the institutional display of ¿other¿ cultures can often tell us as much about the society that frames and consumes the display as it reveals about the culture on display. This course will investigate some of the most potent presentations of both "self" and "other" in the history of museums, and will engage with issues of colonialism and cultural capital, nation-building and self-identity.

INTL-I 306 ADV TOPICS IN PEACE & CONFLICT (10598)

Instructor: Stein, Elizabeth
Day & Time: MW 5:45 PM- 7:00 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0003
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Topic: The Politics of Protest. To protest means to express strong disapproval or objection to something. With regard to the politics of protest, individuals or groups express their dissent or disapproval to a particular audience¿usually local, national or even international governments, but also corporations, school administrations, etc. and the broader public¿with the objective to change the behavior or policies that provoked their protest. Protestors use myriad tactics to assert and publicize their dissent such as provocative art, cyber-attacks, street demonstrations and even violent rebellion, just to name a few examples. When protestors organize, we refer to the protesters as social movements, but other people also engage in less systematic protest. We will study who engages in protest and to whom they protest. We examine why various people or groups protest, and when and how they are likely to do so. We will compare various protest campaigns around the world¿most concerned with issues of human rights, equality and justice¿to learn what factors are more likely to produce successful outcomes and which protests fizzle out or fail. We will study social movements and the literature about them, but we also will examine less traditional forms of protest, focusing primarily on the period from 1960s to today.

INTL-I 306 ADV TOPICS IN PEACE & CONFLICT (32250)

Instructor: TBD
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1112
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Topic: POLITICAL THEORIES OF WAR AND PEACE . This course deals with competing theories of war and peace in a historical and systematic way. Special emphasis will be placed on how war and peace is connected with the organization of the state. According to Rousseau, war could only be a relation between states; he rejects Hobbes' description of the state of nature as a state of war between individuals. This demonstrates the importance of peace and war as core aspects of the state and of the political: The state can either be seen as a guarantor of peace or the reason for war. Depending on which view authors defend, theories of war and peace differ. This controversy runs through the history of political theory. Today it relates to different views about human rights and democracy. The course will study classical as well as current authors from Plato to Habermas. It is structured in five sections: war against the "Other" (Plato, Aristotle, John Stuart Mill), war and the state of nature (Hobbes, Rousseau, Kant), war and the political (Carl Schmitt, Morgenthau, Mouffe), just war and humanitarian intervention (Walzer, Weiss), peace through law (Kant, Bentham, Kelsen, Habermas). The course provides an overview of different theoretical paradigms about war and peace.

INTL-I 306 ADV TOPICS IN PEACE & CONFLICT (33095)

Instructor: Borhi, Laszlo
Day & Time: MW 5:30 PM- 8:15 PM
Building & Room: Sycamore Hall 006
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2018-03-05 End Date: 2018-05-04

Topic: WAR AND PEACE IN EASTERN EUROPE. This course will focus on the history of war genocide and totalitarian dictatorships in the lands between Germany and Russia, a region where twenty million people were murdered in the course of a decade. Among other things course will address the roots of the Great War of 1914-1918, the first total war in history, Hitler and the origins of the Second World War, the genocidal German attack on the Soviet Union, the Holocaust, Stalin¿s Great Terror and the Stalinization of Eastern Europe. Students will discuss the causes of war and genocidal conflict in an ethnically highly diverse region.

INTL-I 310 ADV TPCS IN DIPL SECURITY GOV (31468)

Instructor: Bell, Andrew Michael
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0003
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Topic: CHALLENGES IN MODERN CONFLICT. How will global security challenges will shape international politics in the 21st century? This course seeks to provide a framework for thinking about the key issues of security and conflict in the modern era. In this course, we will examine issues such as civil war, counterinsurgency, terrorism, humanitarian intervention, peacekeeping, drones, and technology in warfare. We will approach these issues from empirical, theoretical, and policy perspectives to understand how such issues will influence international politics today and in the decades to come. By the end of this course, students will be able to apply this knowledge in order to assess global policies to promote international stability and human security. Students pursuing careers in human rights, security, diplomacy, intelligence, law, or international policy will find this course useful.

INTL-I 310 ADV TPCS IN DIPL SECURITY GOV (13126)

Instructor: Banai, Hussein
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0003
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Topic: INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL THOUGHT. Since the dawn of the modern states system in the early seventeenth century, the 'international' has signified both an empirical reality and a political ideal. It has been an especially powerful organizing principle for thinking about how individuals and collectives pursue their interests, make demands of each other, and approach their common problems. This course offers a survey of key themes, concepts, and historical developments as they relate to the evolution of thought about the international. In particular, it surveys mainstream as well as critical approaches to the study of empire and post-imperialism, sovereignty and nationalism, diplomacy and security, commerce and globalization, and democracy and global governance. The chief aim of the course is to demonstrate how theory provides a road map, toolkit or lens by which to examine international events and processes. Although there is no mandatory prerequisite for this course, prior enrollment is INTL I-100 is recommended.

INTL-I 310 ADV TPCS IN DIPL SECURITY GOV (11856)

Instructor: Macekura, Stephen
Day & Time: MW 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 104
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Topic: EMPIRE, WAR, AND DEVELOPMENT: THE HISTORY OF U.S. NATION-BUILDING IN GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE. President Donald Trump promised an end to U.S. nation-building projects overseas, yet in his first year he has deepened American involvement in Afghanistan, Iraq, and elsewhere. Why? More broadly, why does the United States spend so much blood and treasure to remake other countries? We¿ll seek to answer those questions by analyzing the history of the United States¿ efforts at development and nation-building around the world. We¿ll do so by investigating a set of broader queries: Why has the United States dedicated so much time and effort to develop and build societies across the globe? Which ideas and experiences have U.S. policymakers drawn upon to construct other nations? To what extent have U.S. efforts been challenged and resisted, and to what effect? In our study, we will explore the geopolitical context in which nation-building projects took place - from the age of empire to the Cold War through recent globalization - to explain the relationship between ideology, environmental, and strategic factors that defined how and why U.S. officials attempted to reshape entire societies and the consequences of those actions for the entire world.

INTL-I 315 RSRCH DESIGN IN INTL STUDIES (7786)

Instructor: Long, Yan
Day & Time: MW 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0003
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

This class exposes students to the theoretical frameworks, methods and skills necessary for undertaking research in International Studies. Through the semester students will be working collaboratively on a well-conceived and feasible research design, allowing them to explore the interdisciplinary and comparative perspectives of International and Global Studies. This class requires working in groups and active class discussions, i.e., the full participation of each member of the class. While working on the process of research design of a given topic, students will be able to form questions about their own exploratory overseas research and subsequent capstone/paper, as well as to acquire and better their working skills for future employment in public and private sectors.

INTL-I 315 RSRCH DESIGN IN INTL STUDIES (8379)

Instructor: Bauerle Danzman, Sarah
Day & Time: MW 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0003
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

This class exposes students to the theoretical frameworks, methods and skills necessary for undertaking research in International Studies. Through the semester students will be working collaboratively on a well-conceived and feasible research design, allowing them to explore the interdisciplinary and comparative perspectives of International and Global Studies. This class requires working in groups and active class discussions, i.e., the full participation of each member of the class. While working on the process of research design of a given topic, students will be able to form questions about their own exploratory overseas research and subsequent capstone/paper, as well as to acquire and better their working skills for future employment in public and private sectors.

INTL-I 315 RSRCH DESIGN IN INTL STUDIES (31469)

Instructor: Steinberg, Jessica
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0003
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

This class exposes students to the theoretical frameworks, methods and skills necessary for undertaking research in International Studies. Through the semester students will be working collaboratively on a well-conceived and feasible research design, allowing them to explore the interdisciplinary and comparative perspectives of International and Global Studies. This class requires working in groups and active class discussions, i.e., the full participation of each member of the class. While working on the process of research design of a given topic, students will be able to form questions about their own exploratory overseas research and subsequent capstone/paper, as well as to acquire and better their working skills for future employment in public and private sectors.

INTL-I 325 INTL ISSUES THRU FOREIGN LANG (8728)

Instructor: Zlotin, Roman
Day & Time: F 2:30 PM- 3:20 PM
Building & Room: Student Building (Frances Morg 231
Credit Hours: 1.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

This seminar will examine an international issue through a foreign perspective. Course readings and discussions will be conducted in a foreign language at an advanced level. The seminar's objective is to expose participants to global problems utilizing non-U.S. sources.

INTL-I 400 INTL STUDIES CAPSTONE SEMINAR (11590)

Instructor: Banai, Hussein
Day & Time: T 9:05 AM- 12:05 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1023
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: IW
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

P: I315. Demonstrate your accumulated training in International Studies in a single original project of your choice, subject to the instructor¿s approval and under the supervision of a faculty member. The completed thesis should bring together your theme, your region, your foreign language expertise, and your overseas experience in an 8000 word tour de force. The Capstone necessitates multiple drafts of your research that are subjected to heightened peer review and regular feedback from your instructor, your peers and your mentor. By the end of the seminar you will be able to articulate clearly your research argument in a well-written and orally presented project and participate in the Capstone Symposium.

INTL-I 400 INTL STUDIES CAPSTONE SEMINAR (3031)

Instructor: Bosco, David Lyndon
Day & Time: M 9:05 AM- 12:05 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1023
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: IW
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

P: I315. Demonstrate your accumulated training in International Studies in a single original project of your choice, subject to the instructor¿s approval and under the supervision of a faculty member. The completed thesis should bring together your theme, your region, your foreign language expertise, and your overseas experience in an 8000 word tour de force. The Capstone necessitates multiple drafts of your research that are subjected to heightened peer review and regular feedback from your instructor, your peers and your mentor. By the end of the seminar you will be able to articulate clearly your research argument in a well-written and orally presented project and participate in the Capstone Symposium.

INTL-I 400 INTL STUDIES CAPSTONE SEMINAR (4616)

Instructor: Nemes, Peter
Day & Time: T 2:30 PM- 5:30 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1023
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: IW
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

P: I315. Demonstrate your accumulated training in International Studies in a single original project of your choice, subject to the instructor¿s approval and under the supervision of a faculty member. The completed thesis should bring together your theme, your region, your foreign language expertise, and your overseas experience in an 8000 word tour de force. The Capstone necessitates multiple drafts of your research that are subjected to heightened peer review and regular feedback from your instructor, your peers and your mentor. By the end of the seminar you will be able to articulate clearly your research argument in a well-written and orally presented project and participate in the Capstone Symposium.

INTL-I 401 GLOBAL SERVICE CAPSTONE (13160)

Instructor: Kalentzidou, Olga
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 1.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Project or two workshops that captures the student's accumulated knowledge of global service.

INTL-I 406 HONORS INTL STDS CAPSTONE SEM (6669)

Instructor: Sela, Ron
Day & Time: F 9:00 AM- 12:00 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1023
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: IW
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

P: I315, application, and approval of department. Required for departmental honors credit and taught with I-400, for honors-track seniors who have completed all International Studies degree requirements. See I-400 for further information.

INTL-I 423 POSTCOLONIAL/POSTCOMM DISCOURS (31515)

Instructor: Lipman, Maria
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0009
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Topic: PUTIN'S RUSSIA. The Soviet empire held sway over half the world and collapsed a quarter of a century ago. Contemporary Russia is a different country; it is neither communist, nor an empire. Unlike its Soviet predecessor, which set out to build a new world, today's Russia does not reject its Soviet legacy; instead, it seeks to embrace it along with the earlier history of tzars and princes. In this course we will trace Russia's recent history in order to understand how today's Russia has come about. We will look into why the USSR stagnated in the 1970s; why Mikhail Gorbachev, the first and last president of the Soviet Union, launched Perestroika; why Gorbachev's reforms, instead of reinvigorating the Soviet Union, precipitated its death; and why so few people lamented its passing at the time, and so many miss it today. Today's Russia is habitually referred as Putin's Russia; it has come to be feared and resented the way the Soviet Union once was. But this course seeks to provoke curiosity, not resentment, and we will not focus too much on politics. Instead, we will explore Russian society and culture by reading texts by US scholars and journalists and watching contemporary Russian films.

INTL-I 424 WAR AND PEACE (13134)

Instructor: Istrabadi, Feisal Amin
Day & Time: MW 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Psychology 113
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Topic: AFTER ATROCITIES, RECONSTRUCTING THE PEACE. Despite a long-standing international legal norm against the targeting of civilians in armed conflict, experts estimate that no less than 100 million civilians were killed in the course of such conflicts in the twentieth century. Since the trials of the German and Japanese leaderships for the crimes they perpetrated during the Second World War, there has been some precedent of holding high-ranking individuals to account for the commission of crimes against humanity, war crimes, and genocide. This course will examine the legal, historical, political, and philosophical underpinnings of the modern era of accountability, starting with the first modern international tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda in the mid-1990s, through to the International Criminal Court. Topics to be considered will include impunity (especially in ostensible exchange for peace) and amnesty, as well alternatives to international and hybrid judicial systems, such as local tribunals, truth and reconciliation systems, and other alternatives. The writings of political scientists, historians, philosophers, sociologists, jurists, and practitioners, among others, will be considered. This class touches upon issues related to conflict resolution and peace-building, international human rights norms, and, to some extent, the law of armed conflict.

INTL-I 426 ADVANCD TOPICS IN INTL STUDIES (13691)

Instructor: Rana, Shruti
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0009
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Topic: CULTURE, COMMERCE, AND COURTS: THE LAW OF INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS. Markets and legal systems are becoming increasingly international and intertwined. Consequently, it is important for policymakers and businesspeople to understand the variety of business law systems that have developed around the world, as well as some of the legal, cultural, and commercial principles and concepts underlying these systems. This course will focus on the intersection of law and markets by comparing how major legal systems seek to regulate commercial activity, and what happens when these systems cooperate or collide. It will introduce students to business law systems in three regions of the world: the United States, the Middle East, and China, and examine some of the cultural and historical forces shaping these systems. Throughout, we will consider how these systems handle questions of human rights and corporate social responsibility, and whether a modern, global lex mercatoria (the "law merchant") is now emerging in the international arena.

INTL-I 426 ADVANCD TOPICS IN INTL STUDIES (31524)

Instructor: Bovingdon, Gardner
Day & Time: TR 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0009
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

INTL-I 426 ADVANCD TOPICS IN INTL STUDIES (33186)

Instructor: Golestaneh, Seema
Day & Time: TR 6:45 PM- 8:00 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 231
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

INTL-I 427 ISS IN GLBL DEV & POL ECONOMY (31541)

Instructor: Bauerle Danzman, Sarah
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 109
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Topic: HARNESSING FOREIGN INVESTMENT FOR DEVELOPMENT. Corporations that operate across national boundaries powerfully structure the nature of production, consumption, and the distribution of wealth globally. Multinational enterprises (MNEs) can help bring economic growth and shared prosperity to developing countries, but critics often emphasize the negative consequences such large global firms can have on local societies. How can states, international development organizations, and transnational social justice networks harness the positive potential of MNEs while minimizing their potential for exploitation? This course will offer students the empirical knowledge and analytical skills necessary to make sense of the influence of MNEs at both the local and global level, and the attempts to regulate their behavior. We will begin by providing an overview of MNEs in the contemporary international system and their effects on development. The remainder of the course will be organized around three policy-oriented questions: 1) How can firms manage the risks associated with investing across borders (and how can states reassure firms of the safety of their investments)?; 2) How can governments craft regulatory structures and incentive programs to promote "beneficial" foreign investment?; 3) How can non-governmental organizations effectively pressure MNEs to adopt and comply with high labor and environmental standards? Throughout the course, students will learn about careers paths associated with MNEs and development, including political risk consulting, investment promotion and locational consulting, and non-profit work to develop and implement ethical labeling and sourcing standards.

INTL-I 427 ISS IN GLBL DEV & POL ECONOMY (32258)

Instructor: Steinberg, Jessica
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0003
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Topic: MODELS OF SOCIAL AND POLITICAL PROCESSES. How did the protests in Tahrir Square begin? Will China¿s growth continue? What makes addressing global warming so difficult? How can we explain the reappearance of measles in the U.S.? This course will survey a set of models for thinking about individual, national and international social and political processes. Models discipline our thinking about the world and help us to define and characterize relationships and events with logical consistency and precision. Familiarity with a toolbox of models also allows us to identify specific kinds of political and social obstacles to achieving collective goals (such as problems of aggregation and public choice, monitoring and enforcement, or free-riding) so we can assess potential strategies for overcoming them. In this course we will learn about why and how models are useful, we will develop an understanding of a number of models that characterize individual and system level behavior, and we will evaluate current and historical local, as well as international and global processes and events using these models. While there are no concrete prerequisites, basic knowledge of algebra is a necessity.

INTL-I 428 SOCIAL JUSTICE AND THE ENVIRON (31552)

Instructor: Kane, Stephanie C.
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0011
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Topic: ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE. Focuses on the global struggle for potable water and healthy rivers. From megacities to villages, we will explore the political unconscious of pollution, the passionate organizing efforts of neighborhood environmental activists, the changing and contested meanings of indigeneity and landscape, and the geopolitics of water engineering and international development in wet and dry environments. Our cases draw from three books by anthropologists, two doing ethnographic fieldwork in the Americas (Mexico-U.S. borderlands, Argentina and Brazil) and one on the Nile in Egypt. Students will engage with the global water crisis in required readings, writing assignments and group presentations of site-based images.

INTL-L 250 INTRO TO INTL LAW&LEGAL INST (31390)

Instructor: Bosco, David Lyndon
Day & Time: MW 1:00 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1100
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

Introduces the central instruments and methodological tools of international law through study of international law cases, major treaties, and key institutions such as the United Nations and the International Criminal Court.

INTL-X 390 INDIV READINGS IN INTL STUDIES (12429)

Instructor: Ekbia, Hamid
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

P: Major or minor in International Studies, application, and approval of department. Students conduct individual research projects on an international issue under the direction of a faculty member. Student and faculty member should develop a project and submit a "contract" to the department for approval.

INTL-X 398 RESEARCH IN INTERNATIONAL STDS (6670)

Instructor: Ekbia, Hamid
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-01-08 End Date: 2018-05-04

P: Major or minor in International Studies and permission of department. Overseas faculty-directed research in international studies. Credit given for only one of X398 or I430.