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Courses

Semester:

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (7324)

Instructor: Bovingdon, Gardner
Day & Time: TR 10:10 AM- 11:00 AM
Building & Room: Fine Arts 015
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

Explore a variety of different perspectives for studying and making sense of the world and global issues in the past and present. We will learn how these different perspectives portray the world, interpret events, and often shape human actions. Lecture material and key concepts are organized around the International Studies thematic concentrations, thereby introducing a variety of analytical approaches from the natural and social sciences and the arts and humanities. Assignments and discussion will also incorporate a geographic dimension for analysis. Case studies from different historical periods and parts of the world will illustrate these approaches and key issues.

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (11130)

Instructor: Macekura, Stephen
Day & Time: TR 3:35 PM- 4:25 PM
Building & Room: Wendell W. Wright 1120
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

Explore a variety of different perspectives for studying and making sense of the world and global issues in the past and present. We will learn how these different perspectives portray the world, interpret events, and often shape human actions. Lecture material and key concepts are organized around the International Studies thematic concentrations, thereby introducing a variety of analytical approaches from the natural and social sciences and the arts and humanities. Assignments and discussion will also incorporate a geographic dimension for analysis. Case studies from different historical periods and parts of the world will illustrate these approaches and key issues.

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (11752)

Instructor: Lawnicki, Amanda Marie
Day & Time: F 9:05 AM- 9:55 AM
Building & Room: Cedar Hall C116
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (11753)

Instructor: Lawnicki, Amanda Marie
Day & Time: F 10:10 AM- 11:00 AM
Building & Room: Wendell W. Wright 1225
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (11754)

Instructor: Lawnicki, Amanda Marie
Day & Time: F 11:15 AM- 12:05 PM
Building & Room: Wendell W. Wright 1225
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (11755)

Instructor: Cesnik, Matthew Philip
Day & Time: F 9:05 AM- 9:55 AM
Building & Room: Swain West 221
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (11756)

Instructor: Tichindelean, Matei
Day & Time: F 10:10 AM- 11:00 AM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 219
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (11860)

Instructor: Tichindelean, Matei
Day & Time: F 12:20 PM- 1:10 PM
Building & Room: Spruce Hall B111
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (11861)

Instructor: Tichindelean, Matei
Day & Time: F 1:25 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Swain East 010
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (11862)

Instructor: Hulstine, Matt
Day & Time: F 10:10 AM- 11:00 AM
Building & Room: Wendell W. Wright 1230
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (12548)

Instructor: Cesnik, Matthew Philip
Day & Time: F 10:10 AM- 11:00 AM
Building & Room: Wendell W. Wright 1210
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (12549)

Instructor: Cesnik, Matthew Philip
Day & Time: F 11:15 AM- 12:05 PM
Building & Room: Wendell W. Wright 1210
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (12550)

Instructor: Hulstine, Matt
Day & Time: F 12:20 PM- 1:10 PM
Building & Room: Spruce Hall B109
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

INTL-I 100 INTRO TO INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (12551)

Instructor: Hulstine, Matt
Day & Time: F 1:25 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Auditorium A152
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

INTL-I 202 GLOBAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENT (12869)

Instructor: Siqueira, Andrea Dalledone
Day & Time: TR 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1118
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

We explore human-environment interactions from international and interdisciplinary perspectives. We consider how and why humans shape the nature they inhabit in particular ways, and how in turn, nature shapes health and disease among humans. We will study how, as global change unfolds in particular cultures, ecologies and geographies, it alters human resistance and susceptibility to disease, and too, alters the access of individuals and communities to conditions of wellness. Drawing from the social and natural sciences and the humanities, the course will provide students with the concepts, theories and analytic tools useful for understanding and addressing the social, political and economic complexities of the fundamental global health and environment issues of our time.

INTL-I 202 GLOBAL HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENT (6908)

Instructor: O'Reilly, Jessica Leigh
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1128
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

We explore human-environment interactions from international and interdisciplinary perspectives. We consider how and why humans shape the nature they inhabit in particular ways, and how in turn, nature shapes health and disease among humans. We will study how, as global change unfolds in particular cultures, ecologies and geographies, it alters human resistance and susceptibility to disease, and too, alters the access of individuals and communities to conditions of wellness. Drawing from the social and natural sciences and the humanities, the course will provide students with the concepts, theories and analytic tools useful for understanding and addressing the social, political and economic complexities of the fundamental global health and environment issues of our time.

INTL-I 203 GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT (13533)

Instructor: Musthaq, Fathimath
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM- 3:20 PM
Building & Room: Wells Library 033
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

Why are some countries poor while others are not? How can we address global poverty, inequality and development? How can we measure development and what are ethical business practices and policies? This course explores the impact of political and economic historical phenomena as well as modern global development practices on the economic, political and cultural prospects of local societies. In doing so, it evaluates the role international institutions, markets, business enterprises, non-governmental organizations, and domestic governance structures play in development and human well-being.

INTL-I 203 GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT (13534)

Instructor: Nighswander, Tyler Brent
Day & Time: F 10:10 AM- 11:00 AM
Building & Room: Wylie Hall 115
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

INTL-I 203 GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT (13540)

Instructor: Nighswander, Tyler Brent
Day & Time: F 11:15 AM- 12:05 PM
Building & Room: Cedar Hall C118
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

INTL-I 203 GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT (13541)

Instructor: Nighswander, Tyler Brent
Day & Time: F 1:25 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Hutton Honors College 217
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (14044)

Instructor: Siqueira, Andrea Dalledone
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM- 12:05 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0001
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

This course considers the relationship between human rights and freedom. We look at the nature and practice of human rights in relationships among individuals, groups, and institutions while also exploring the nature of freedom and how people seek it through human rights. In this course we treat human rights and freedom as ongoing arguments, productive processes, and arenas of contestation, as means of constructing aspirations, seeking and challenging power, developing ways of life, and finding fulfillment. The course considers positive and negative consequences of framing relationships and power in terms of human rights and critically examines uses of human rights to manage problems.

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (14045)

Instructor: Soyka, Ellen Marie
Day & Time: F 10:10 AM- 11:00 AM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0013
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (14046)

Instructor: Soyka, Ellen Marie
Day & Time: F 11:15 AM- 12:05 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0013
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (14047)

Instructor: Soyka, Ellen Marie
Day & Time: F 12:20 PM- 1:10 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0013
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (14048)

Instructor: Schmitz, Volker
Day & Time: F 10:10 AM- 11:00 AM
Building & Room: School of Public Health (HPER) 019
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (14049)

Instructor: Schmitz, Volker
Day & Time: F 11:15 AM- 12:05 PM
Building & Room: School of Public Health (HPER) 019
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (14050)

Instructor: Schmitz, Volker
Day & Time: F 12:20 PM- 1:10 PM
Building & Room: School of Public Health (HPER) 019
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (11726)

Instructor: Gilligan, Emma L.
Day & Time: MW 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1112
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

This course considers the relationship between human rights and freedom. We look at the nature and practice of human rights in relationships among individuals, groups, and institutions while also exploring the nature of freedom and how people seek it through human rights. In this course we treat human rights and freedom as ongoing arguments, productive processes, and arenas of contestation, as means of constructing aspirations, seeking and challenging power, developing ways of life, and finding fulfillment. The course considers positive and negative consequences of framing relationships and power in terms of human rights and critically examines uses of human rights to manage problems.

INTL-I 204 HUMAN RIGHTS AND INTERNATL LAW (12871)

Instructor: Hunt, Kate
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0013
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

This course considers the relationship between human rights and freedom. We look at the nature and practice of human rights in relationships among individuals, groups, and institutions while also exploring the nature of freedom and how people seek it through human rights. In this course we treat human rights and freedom as ongoing arguments, productive processes, and arenas of contestation, as means of constructing aspirations, seeking and challenging power, developing ways of life, and finding fulfillment. The course considers positive and negative consequences of framing relationships and power in terms of human rights and critically examines uses of human rights to manage problems.

INTL-I 205 CULTURE AND POLITICS (12872)

Instructor: Kousaleos, Nicole Serena
Day & Time: TR 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1134
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

Examines culture and governance on an international scale, considering how governments, markets, and international organizations deploy or use culture, and how people turn to cultural resources to resist attempts to govern them and/or to assert their own political aims.

INTL-I 205 CULTURE AND POLITICS (33907)

Instructor: Castaneda, Quetzil E
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Lindley Hall 316
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

This course explores the histories and cultures of colonial Latin America from pre-Columbian Indigenous cultures and civilizations to the early 19th century. This is the first of a two semester sequence on Latin American cultures and civilizations. The course is based on a past historical content but the approach is less historical than issue based and concept-oriented. The course investigates and is organized around four sets of issues: 1) Pre-1492, Cultural Legacies & Heritage of Spain & Indigenous Civilizations; 2) Myths, Meanings & Realities of Conquest and Colonization; 3) Political-Economic Structures & Processes that shape Colonial Latin America; 4) Socio-Cultural Processes and Lived Experiences of sexualities/gender, race, slavery-freeman communities, Church, religious syncretism, Indigenous cultures, family institutions, social and economic class stratification, cultural mixing.

INTL-I 206 PEACE AND CONFLICT (31357)

Instructor: Bose, Purnima
Day & Time: MW 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1112
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

This course will investigate intersections between "identity" and "conflict." We will consider how different forms of identity--such as ethnic, religious, political, and gender--can become the basis for people to mobilize. We will analyze the processes through which certain identities are affirmed at the cost of alternative ones, paying careful attention to how and why people participate in acts of violence and discrimination against those whose identities are deemed undesirable. Rather than view conflicts as irreducibly based in identity, however, we will seek to understand how they emerge out of local conditions and historical legacies, and can be shaped by national, regional, and transnational contexts. Our approach will be interdisciplinary, drawing on readings from anthropology, cultural studies, and political theory. Students will acquire some familiarity with critical concepts such as colonialism and post-colonialism, the nation and the state, race and ethnicity, and globalization and neoliberalism.

INTL-I 206 PEACE AND CONFLICT (12873)

Instructor: Pinaud, Clemence Marine
Day & Time: MW 5:45 PM- 7:00 PM
Building & Room: Student Building (Frances Morg 150
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H GCC
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

This course will investigate intersections between "identity" and "conflict." We will consider how different forms of identity--such as ethnic, religious, political, and gender--can become the basis for people to mobilize. We will analyze the processes through which certain identities are affirmed at the cost of alternative ones, paying careful attention to how and why people participate in acts of violence and discrimination against those whose identities are deemed undesirable. Rather than view conflicts as irreducibly based in identity, however, we will seek to understand how they emerge out of local conditions and historical legacies, and can be shaped by national, regional, and transnational contexts. Our approach will be interdisciplinary, drawing on readings from anthropology, cultural studies, and political theory. Students will acquire some familiarity with critical concepts such as colonialism and post-colonialism, the nation and the state, race and ethnicity, and globalization and neoliberalism.

INTL-I 210 DIPLOMACY SECURITY GOVERNANCE (37538)

Instructor: Zajac, Justyna
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 111
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

Wars in the Middle East. Global financial panics. Nuclear confrontation between two adversaries. Global climate change and catastrophic environmental decline. People around the world struggle to manage these issues, yet they demand our attention. This course will helps you make sense of the conflicts and threats that pervade our world, whether you want to be a diplomat one day or whether you just want to learn more about major topics in the news. We'll explore several key questions. Why have conflicts emerged in international politics? Why, in other instances, has cooperation prevailed? How can theory and history help us understand diplomacy, security, and governance, and what are their limits? Through lectures, discussion activities, and policy workshops this course explores these questions by investigating the theoretical lenses needed to understand why and how policies are made; the history behind diplomacy, security, and governance since 1945; and how such knowledge can help us to grapple with the major diplomatic, security, and governance challenges of the present day.

INTL-I 300 TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL STDS (34527)

Instructor: Michelson, Ethan
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Lowell E. Baier Hall 125
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

Topic: LAW AND AUTHORITARIANISM: CHINA. We are witnessing a global turn towards populist and illiberal governance. Authoritarian leaders often embrace international legal norms symbolically and rhetorically while ignoring or subverting in various ways. This course uses the case of China to explore the functions and behavior of legal systems in authoritarian political contexts because China overwhelmingly dominates scholarship on the topic. We will consider the applicability of China to other contexts, including Russia. In the specific case of China, we know a lot about the reconstruction, expansion, and proliferation of laws, courts, and lawyers since 1979, but far less about the significance and implications of these developments. Does the Chinese legal system offer meaningful redress to people with grievances, or should it be understood as ornamental "window dressing"? Does it do more to limit or to strengthen the power of the government and its ruling party? Does it do more to help people challenge or to prevent people from challenging the state? In this interdisciplinary course we will not only explore and debate these questions, but will also (re)consider conventional scholarly notions about authoritarianism and popular political participation, single-party rule and judicial governance, democracy and political legitimacy, and legal professionals and their fights for legal and political freedoms. In the process we will scrutinize recent developments in China, including the so-called "turn from law," the rise of "stability maintenance," and a crackdown on lawyers. Our inquiry will be heavily empirical and evidence-based. When we attempt to reconcile, adjudicate, or explain scholarly disagreements, we will scrutinize available data on the issue at hand. Our approach will be not only empirical, but also comparative. Throughout the semester we will endeavor to situate China in comparative global perspective. We will read scholarly research and watch documentary films.

INTL-I 300 TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL STDS (34719)

Instructor: Liff, Adam Phail
Day & Time: MW 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Lindley Hall 008
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

In this **new** course at IU, we will explore the history and politics of U.S.-Japan relations in a regional and global context. We will place particular emphasis on America's and Japan's shared 21st century political and foreign policy challenges, e.g., the opportunities and challenges posed by the rapid rise of China; North Korea's nuclear weapons program; free trade policy; aging populations; gender imbalances; and climate change. Students will have ample opportunity to discuss and debate various issues affecting Japanese and U.S. politics and foreign policy, as well as current events making global headlines in real time during the semester. We will also have opportunities to engage outside experts visiting IU from Washington, DC and beyond to offer guest lectures on Japan and contemporary East Asia. Example lecture topics: The Pacific War, The U.S. Postwar Occupation and its Contemporary Legacy, The Politics of U.S. military bases in Japan, China and the U.S.-Japan Security Alliance, Climate Change Beyond the Paris Agreement, Article 9 and Revision of Japan's Pacifist, Constitution, Japan's Territorial Disputes, and Japan and TPP-11: Free Trade in the Trump Era. Please note: this course will have both undergraduate and graduate components (in EALC, undergrads should register for E350 and only graduate students should register for E505). This course has **NO PREREQUISITES** and is open to all undergraduate and graduate students.

INTL-I 300 TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL STDS (15047)

Instructor: Zirogiannis, Nikolaos
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Godfrey Grad&Exec Ed Ctr 0001
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

Topic: International Energy Markets: Environmental, Economic and Health Aspects. Does electricity generation result in asthma attacks? Do urban or rural areas have a greater energy footprint? What role do carbon taxes and cap-and-trade systems play in the energy markets around the world? Has renewable energy gained enough traction relative to fossil fuels? Are electric vehicles the best way to ease our dependence on oil? This class will explore the environmental, economic and health aspects of international energy markets. We will focus on the energy sectors (electricity and transportation) of key industrialized economies (US, EU, China) as well as those of developing nations and examine their impacts on the global (climate change) and local (air quality) environment. Our discussion will also center on policies and incentives that can alleviate the negative impacts of energy generation and consumption.

INTL-I 300 TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL STDS (31370)

Instructor: Lindberg, Tod
Day & Time: W 2:30 PM- 5:00 PM
Building & Room: Wendell W. Wright 1204
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

Topic: ETHICS AND DECISION-MAKING IN INTERNATIONAL POLITICS. Exclusive to Indiana University, Tod Lindberg presents his required ethics course from the Master of Science in Foreign Service program at Georgetown University, here retooled for upper-level undergraduates. This course explores the role of ethics and moral considerations in how and why states and politicians act internationally. Although some portray international politics as a realm of clashing national interest bereft of moral consideration, at the level of the individual, political leaders from antiquity to the present have sought to justify their actions in moral terms. This class explores normative reasoning--what should I do?--in all its aspects as applied to questions of international politics, including: whether to go to war and how to fight; what if any obligations the developed world owes to the developing world; whether and how to promote human rights and democratic government; moral justifications for authoritarian government; and national borders and who can cross them. Readings range from classics including Thucydides, Machiavelli, and Kant to modern works by Michael Walzer and Kwame Anthony Appiah.

INTL-I 300 TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL STDS (13913)

Instructor: Spechler, Dina R.
Day & Time: TR 5:45 PM- 7:00 PM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 121
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: S&H
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

Topic: COMPARATIVE FOREIGN POLICY: WHY NATIONS GO TO WAR. Why did the United States get involved in Vietnam, and why did it stay in the war long after U.S. leaders knew we could not win? Why did the Soviets invade Afghanistan when they well knew that others' attempts to conquer that country had repeatedly failed? Why did Hitler attack the Soviet Union despite the fact that no outside power since the 15th century had succeeded in subduing Russia? History and contemporary international relations are replete with examples of the risks, costs and difficulties of attacking and invading other states and intervening militarily in the politics and conflicts of others. This course will explore the question of why nations go to war when survival is not at stake. There will be many case studies, including some quite recent cases, but the focus will be on theories that help us understand this puzzling behavior on the part of states and those who determine or influence national policy. We will be examining the impact of individual leaders, their personal characteristics, beliefs, perceptions and misperceptions, as well as decision-making groups, government bureaucracies, national values and belief systems, and the nature and functioning of various kinds of political systems. A role-playing exercise at the end of the semester will give students an opportunity to simulate national decision-makers confronting the question of whether or not to use force.

INTL-I 300 TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL STDS (11741)

Instructor: Zirogiannis, Nikolaos
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Godfrey Grad&Exec Ed Ctr 0001
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

Topic: International Energy Markets: Environmental, Economic and Health Aspects (HONORS). Does electricity generation result in asthma attacks? Do urban or rural areas have a greater energy footprint? What role do carbon taxes and cap-and-trade systems play in the energy markets around the world? Has renewable energy gained enough traction relative to fossil fuels? Are electric vehicles the best way to ease our dependence on oil? This class will explore the environmental, economic and health aspects of international energy markets. We will focus on the energy sectors (electricity and transportation) of key industrialized economies (US, EU, China) as well as those of developing nations and examine their impacts on the global (climate change) and local (air quality) environment. Our discussion will also center on policies and incentives that can alleviate the negative impacts of energy generation and consumption.

INTL-I 302 ADV TOPICS IN GLBL HLTH & ENV (10329)

Instructor: Siqueira, Andrea Dalledone
Day & Time: MW 4:00 PM- 5:15 PM
Building & Room: Teter Quad F102
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

Topic: WOMEN'S RIGHTS AND HEALTH. Despite almost 30 years of the adoption of the Convention for the Elimination of All Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) by the UN General Assembly, women around the world continue to face violations of their fundamental rights. This course address the main challenges faced by women and their fights for the implementation of their rights, especially those related to their socio-economic and reproductive rights. Students will read articles from a variety of disciplines and focus on case studies from around the globe. We will also examine international treaties, national and international policies and programs, social movements, NGOS and transnational networks that strive for implementing women's rights.

INTL-I 302 ADV TOPICS IN GLBL HLTH & ENV (10334)

Instructor: Kane, Stephanie C.
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0003
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

Topic: ARCTIC ENCOUNTERS: ANIMALS, PEOPLE AND SHIPS. Turning the globe to look at the planet from the High North, with the North Pole and the frozen Arctic Sea in the center, we see that eight nation-states have carved out sovereign claims [Canada, Denmark (Greenland) Finland, Iceland, Norway, Russia, Sweden, and U.S.A.]. Their claims overlay maritime territories that since time immemorial have been the homelands of indigenous peoples and their animal counterparts, homelands imagined by those from southern latitudes as a vast, isolated, frozen and forbidding place. But in our times, animal/human encounters are taking place in the context of a warming climate. For the first time since humans have walked the earth, the extent of summer sea ice melt is opening up new shipping routes across parts of the coldest and biologically richest habitats at the top of the world, potentially linking far-flung cultures, courts, markets, media and port infrastructures. In this way, climate change, a scientific fact-of-life on earth, is triggering the global imaginations and investments of industrial shipping, mining and tourist interests as well as of social scientists, humanities scholars, artists, story-tellers, hunters and gatherers, fishers, conservationists, film-makers and experts in maritime law and policy. Interdisciplinary study of Arctic geopolitics, culture, law and ecology will broaden and deepen our understanding of the planet¿s rapidly transforming animal/human relationships and guide our evaluation of possible pathways toward diverse, spiritually-attuned and socially just versions of Arctic sustainability. Student evaluation is based on independent writing assignments and on class participation. Students also have an opportunity to pursue individual interests while interacting with fellow students in the process of designing and presenting visual image projects.

INTL-I 302 ADV TOPICS IN GLBL HLTH & ENV (34163)

Instructor: Kane, Stephanie C.
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1134
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

Topic: GLOBAL HEALING. We study traditions, trajectories and technologies of healing in a globalized world. We focus on healing practices that have been traversing the world, some since ancient times, some on the cutting edge of scientific knowledge, bringing their own cultural histories along even as they are transformed by new practitioners, inventions and problems. We discuss the social, political and economic conditions that must be in place for healing practices to thrive; on the social interactional spaces and frameworks of interpretation that different healing practices create; on the interconnections formed among healers, those seeking treatment, and those implicated in causing dis-ease. Who and what is excluded or included within the spaces of different healing practices? How is power distributed among actors, places and historical periods? What identities, stories, and pathways of social change come together through healing practices and how might the curious conjunctures that emerge influence the shape of future worlds? Student evaluation is based on independent writing assignments and on class participation. Students also have an opportunity to pursue and present their individual interests, thereby expanding the range of healing practices under discussion and interacting with fellow students by designing and presenting visual image projects. Three books, written by ethnographers who write creatively about their participant observation fieldwork on healing in Central America (Panama), Europe (the Netherlands) and Oceania (Australia) will provide us with ideas and materials to think critically through our questions and concerns. We begin with anthropologist Kane¿s Phantom Gringo Boat, which takes an experimental approach to the classic anthropological subject of shamanism, showing how it is both an indigenous practice for healing spiritual dis-ease and a language for stretching the imagination toward the unknown forces propelling untoward changes in the Darién rainforest. In the second part, we will read political theorist Mol¿s The Body Multiple, which takes us into the nooks and crannies of a modern Dutch hospital. She shows how the interactions of doctors, patients and technologies, their many images and measurements, diagnoses, treatments, talk and manipulation work together to create a coherent object that is recognized as atherosclerosis. In the third part, we read Margaret Somerville¿s Water in a Dry Land, which intertwines aboriginal art and story telling to heal relationships between people and places. Together, the three books will guide our critical thinking about global healing practices as embodied, spiritual, political and technological.

INTL-I 303 ADV TOPICS IN GLBL DEVELOPMENT (36560)

Instructor: Hunt, Kate
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1128
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

What is a "developing" country? Often also referred to as "non-western" or part of the "third-world," this course will explore definitions of these terms and the politics and specific challenges that face countries that are typically categorized as developing. We will read both academic and creative works in our exploration of these politics. Central to our discussions will be definitions of democracy and autocracy and what these look like in the developing world, globalization and colonization, human rights, and the media. This class will focus on the common themes and issues faced by developing countries. Although the course is about the politics of the developing world, it is inevitable that we should discuss the politics of the developed world, as well, given the historical and contemporary relationships between the developing and developed world.

INTL-I 304 ADV TPCS IN HUM RGHTS/INTL LAW (11732)

Instructor: Kousaleos, Nicole Serena
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1122
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

Topic: BODIES UNDER FIRE: GENDER, VIOLENCE, AND HUMAN RIGHTS. This course will examine the human rights issue of contemporary gender violence within the context of globalization. The course materials bridge the fields of medical anthropology, culture studies, global studies, gender studies and human rights to ask the critical question: what is at stake for women across the globe as they live their daily lives within female bodies? While Nickolas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn argue in Half the Sky that global women's rights is the critical cause of our time (2009) and the UN Sustainable Development Goals identify the need to promote gender equality and empower women, few agree as to the best methods for future research and policy development (Khan 2009: 53) . Kimberle Crenshaw argues that the intersection of race, gender, class and sexuality creates the context for higher vulnerability to violence (#Sayhername project). We will utilize this framework for analyzing global experiences of and vulnerabilities to violence in this course with emphasis on issues of underdevelopment and the Banjul Charter's (African Charter on Human and Peoples' Rights) demand for the "right to development" (2005).

INTL-I 305 ADV TOPICS IN CULTURE&POLITICS (9415)

Instructor: Nemes, Peter
Day & Time: MW 11:15 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0003
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

Topic: CULTURE IN THE DIGITAL AGE. How have the production, distribution and consumption of cultural products changed in our digital age? The effects of the continuous advancement of digital technologies and the penetration of computerized systems into our everyday lives are hard to fully assess because we are not just observers but also participants. Our relationship with knowledge, our ability to build meaning through cultural practices, and our very identities are each changing and being challenged. This class will consider digital and visual culture, modes of cultural production, preservation of non-digital content, copyrights, and remixing and sharing. Collaborative learning projects, including creation of audio/video/web content, will allow for an active and creative engagement with the material.

INTL-I 305 ADV TOPICS IN CULTURE&POLITICS (39245)

Instructor: Arjomand, Noah
Day & Time: MW 5:45 PM- 8:15 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 005
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-10-15 End Date: 2018-12-14

Topic: MEDIA AND THE MIDDLE EAST. This course will explore media representations of Middle Eastern societies, as well as the role of media in Middle Eastern countries with an emphasis on Iran, Turkey, Egypt, and the Levant. Beginning with foundational media theory, we will then consider the history of mass media in the region, including print, radio, and television. The course will go on to treat the roles of old, new and social media in political and cultural revolutions of recent decades, along with the complexities of globalized media production involving transnational collaboration and diaspora populations.

INTL-I 305 ADV TOPICS IN CULTURE&POLITICS (13026)

Instructor: Kousaleos, Nicole Serena
Day & Time: MW 1:00 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1106
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

Topic: THE RAINBOW SPECTRUM: GLOBAL GENDER DISPLAY, CULTURAL POLITICS AND RESISTANCE. Multiple factors influence embodied gender identity performance in today's global context. Explore gender performance in Zar cult rituals and spirit possession, Filipino transgender beauty pageants, the hyper-masculine hyper-reality of some video games and shows, "Bishounen" character tropes in East Asia, the politicization of queer identities in Uganda, policing of LGBTQ identities in Russia through the use of violence, American gendered body modification through plastic surgery. What can be learned through critical study of gender performance in a post binary context? Where does performance mean resistance and where does the performance further encode hegemonic power dynamics? Which theoretical frameworks help us to best interpret global cultural politics and performance? We will dissect and discuss previous frameworks and methods and read many specific cases. Students will plan and conduct their own embodiment study of gendered performativity (fieldwork) as well as write statements on theory and compile annotated bibliographies to supplement ethnographic work.

INTL-I 306 ADV TOPICS IN PEACE & CONFLICT (11568)

Instructor: Pinaud, Clemence Marine
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0003
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

Topic: GENOCIDES IN WORLD HISTORY: FROM CONQUEST TO MASS MURDER. This class will adopt a comparative and historical approach to the study of genocide. Based on Raphael Lemkin's holistic understanding of what constitutes genocide, and departing from the strict definition of genocide in the UN 1948 Convention, we will investigate various forms of destruction ¿ from mass murder to cultural destruction. We will focus on the idea of conquest and on its relationship with imperial state-building. This will allow us to study the various facets of both colonial and post-WWII genocides. Cases will include the French revolution, Australia's Aboriginals, the Native Americans, the Armenian genocide, the Holocaust, Rwanda, Syria's Yazidis, and South Sudan.

INTL-I 310 ADV TPCS IN DIPL SECURITY GOV (9026)

Instructor: Minton, Mark Clements
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Woodburn Hall 111
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

Topic: CASE STUDIES IN U.S. DIPLOMACY: OPENING TO CHINA, ENDING THE BALKAN WAR, NEGOTIATING WITH NORTH KOREA. This course, taught by a retired U.S. ambassador, focuses on three major events in recent American diplomacy: normalization of U.S.-China relations during the Nixon Administration; negotiations to end ethnic war in the Balkans in the Clinton Administration; and continuing diplomatic efforts to eliminate North Korea's nuclear weapons program from the Clinton Administration to the present. In addition to readings, the course will feature films as well as student discussion and debate about diplomatic strategy with the instructor drawing on his 35-year experience as a career diplomat.

INTL-I 315 RSRCH DESIGN IN INTL STUDIES (7576)

Instructor: Nemes, Peter
Day & Time: MW 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1134
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

This class exposes students to the theoretical frameworks, methods and skills necessary for undertaking research in International Studies. Through the semester students will be working collaboratively on a well-conceived and feasible research design, allowing them to explore the interdisciplinary and comparative perspectives of International and Global Studies. This class requires working in groups and active class discussions, i.e., the full participation of each member of the class. While working on the process of research design of a given topic, students will be able to form questions about their own exploratory overseas research and subsequent capstone/paper, as well as to acquire and better their working skills for future employment in public and private sectors.

INTL-I 315 RSRCH DESIGN IN INTL STUDIES (11737)

Instructor: Allendorf, Keera
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1112
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

This course introduces students to principles and techniques of research, from formulating a research question to collecting and analyzing data. The course begins with foundational concepts, such as ethics, drawing on literature, and sampling. With this grounding, the course then covers a variety of methods commonly used in international studies, including field experiments, surveys, in-depth interviews, ethnography, case studies, and textual analysis. By the end of the course, students should be able to plan and conduct their own research, including their international studies capstone project (I400), and will be better able to understand and evaluate research undertaken by others.

INTL-I 400 INTL STUDIES CAPSTONE SEMINAR (36305)

Instructor: Nemes, Peter
Day & Time: F 9:00 AM- 12:00 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1023
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: IW
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

P: I315. Demonstrate your accumulated training in International Studies in a single original project of your choice, subject to the instructor's approval and under the supervision of a faculty member. The completed thesis should bring together your academic preparation, your region, your foreign language expertise, and your overseas experience in an 8,000-word essay. Peer review and regular feedback through multiple drafts will help you craft your thesis. By the end of the seminar you will be able to articulate clearly your research argument in a well-written and orally presented project.

INTL-I 400 INTL STUDIES CAPSTONE SEMINAR (4247)

Instructor: Gilligan, Emma L.
Day & Time: W 2:30 PM- 5:30 PM
Building & Room: Cedar Hall C107
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: IW
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

P: I315. Demonstrate your accumulated training in International Studies in a single original project of your choice, subject to the instructor's approval and under the supervision of a faculty member. The completed thesis should bring together your academic preparation, your region, your foreign language expertise, and your overseas experience in an 8,000-word essay. Peer review and regular feedback through multiple drafts will help you craft your thesis. By the end of the seminar you will be able to articulate clearly your research argument in a well-written and orally presented project.

INTL-I 400 INTL STUDIES CAPSTONE SEMINAR (6043)

Instructor: Ibrahim, Nur Amali
Day & Time: T 9:30 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Student Building (Frances Morg 138
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: IW
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

P: I315. Demonstrate your accumulated training in International Studies in a single original project of your choice, subject to the instructor's approval and under the supervision of a faculty member. The completed thesis should bring together your academic preparation, your region, your foreign language expertise, and your overseas experience in an 8,000-word essay. Peer review and regular feedback through multiple drafts will help you craft your thesis. By the end of the seminar you will be able to articulate clearly your research argument in a well-written and orally presented project.

INTL-I 401 GLOBAL SERVICE CAPSTONE (12899)

Instructor: Kalentzidou, Olga
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 1.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

Project or two workshops that captures the student's accumulated knowledge of global service.

INTL-I 406 HONORS INTL STDS CAPSTONE SEM (6365)

Instructor: Gilligan, Emma L.
Day & Time: W 2:30 PM- 5:30 PM
Building & Room: Cedar Hall C107
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: IW
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

P: I315, application, and approval of department. Required for departmental honors credit and taught with I-400, for honors-track seniors who have completed all International Studies degree requirements. See I-400 for further information.

INTL-I 406 HONORS INTL STDS CAPSTONE SEM (10698)

Instructor: Ibrahim, Nur Amali
Day & Time: T 9:30 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Student Building (Frances Morg 138
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: IW
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

P: I315, application, and approval of department. Required for departmental honors credit and taught with I-400, for honors-track seniors who have completed all International Studies degree requirements. See I-400 for further information.

INTL-I 406 HONORS INTL STDS CAPSTONE SEM (36306)

Instructor: Nemes, Peter
Day & Time: F 9:00 AM- 12:00 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1023
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements: IW
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

P: I315, application, and approval of department. Required for departmental honors credit and taught with I-400, for honors-track seniors who have completed all International Studies degree requirements. See I-400 for further information.

INTL-I 420 GLOBAL SUSTAINABILITY STUDIES (11747)

Instructor: Macekura, Stephen
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0005
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

Topic: A GLOBAL HISTORY OF SUSTAINABILITY. Today, talk of "sustainability" is all the rage. Yet for most of human history, most practices were "un-sustainable." Why? What ideas and institutions gave rise to such destructive habits? How have those past experiences shaped the world of today? Why only in recent decades has talk of sustainability become so popular? In what ways has the concept of sustainability itself been challenged or reformed on ground of political, economic, and social justice? We'll explore these questions by investigating the history behind unsustainable and sustainable practices around the globe. We will examine long-term changes in both space and time to develop a keener understanding of how the human-nature relationship has evolved. We will pay particularly close attention to the relationship between "the West" and the rest of the globe, as well as the relationship between notions of "development" and "modernization" that led people to alter the natural world in many different ways.

INTL-I 422 CONTESTD TERR/CONFLCTD IDENT (11734)

Instructor: Dunn, Elizabeth Cullen
Day & Time: TR 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0005
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

Topic: INTERNATIONAL HUMANITARIAN AID. Does humanitarian aid actually help the people it claims to? In this course, we will take a critical look at the network of western donors, developing countries, UN organizations and international NGOs that provide aid. We will hear from the beneficiaries who must make a life in the humanitarian condition. You will also manage your own humanitarian camp in a class simulation.

INTL-I 424 WAR AND PEACE (33315)

Instructor: Lindberg, Tod
Day & Time: W 5:45 PM- 8:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0009
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

Topic: AFTER ATROCITIES. This is a class about political violence of the worst sort: killing on a scale that "shocks the conscience of mankind," what happens in the aftermath of genocide and mass atrocities, and what can be done to prevent such scarring episodes. We will undertake a brief survey of atrocities from classical times to the arrival of European settlers in the "New World." Our investigation will continue with examination in greater detail of the mass atrocities of the 20th Century, from the Armenian genocide through the Holocaust and Cambodia¿s "Killing Fields," to Rwanda, former Yugoslavia, and Darfur, on to today¿s headlines from Syria. We will examine efforts to hold perpetrators to account from Nuremberg to the Genocide Convention to the International Criminal Court, as well as other means of promoting healing and reconciliation, including truth commissions and consideration of reparations. Finally, we will assess the new 21st-Century effort to prevent atrocities internationally, from the development of the principle of the "responsibility to protect" to the tragic aftermath of intervention in Libya and the consequences of inaction in Syria. The course will be multidisciplinary in character, drawing on history, law, ethics and political theory and media including journalism, literature, and film.

INTL-I 426 ADVANCD TOPICS IN INTL STUDIES (33909)

Instructor: Martins Dias, Vitor
Day & Time: F 10:00 AM- 11:00 AM
Building & Room: Hodge Hall (Business School) 4055
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

INTL-I 426 ADVANCD TOPICS IN INTL STUDIES (33910)

Instructor: Martins Dias, Vitor
Day & Time: F 11:15 AM- 12:15 PM
Building & Room: Hodge Hall (Business School) 4055
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

INTL-I 426 ADVANCD TOPICS IN INTL STUDIES (31373)

Instructor: Allendorf, Keera
Day & Time: TR 11:15 AM- 12:30 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0003
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

Topic: NUMERIC LITERACY. In this course students will learn how to analyze data and interpret results. Commonly used descriptive and inferential statistics will be covered, including measures of centrality and variation, hypothesis testing, and ordinary least squares regression. In the lab, students will learn how to use Stata, a statistical software, to explore and analyze data. The approach will emphasize matching quantitative analyses appropriately to research and policy questions. Class examples and activities will also introduce students to widely used international measures, such as the infant mortality rate, human development index, and gross domestic product. No previous coursework in statistics is required.

INTL-I 426 ADVANCD TOPICS IN INTL STUDIES (31382)

Instructor: O'Reilly, Jessica Leigh
Day & Time: W 9:30 AM- 12:00 PM
Building & Room: Wendell W. Wright 1220
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

Topic: INTERNATIONAL CLIMATE GOVERNANCE: IU DELEGATION TO THE UNITED NATIONS FRAMEWORK CONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE. In this course, students will learn about climate issues, the Paris Agreement, and travel to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change 24th Conference of Parties in Poland.

INTL-I 426 ADVANCD TOPICS IN INTL STUDIES (14646)

Instructor: Scheuerman, William
Day & Time: TR 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 0005
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

Topic: DEMOCRACY IN A GLOBAL AGE. This course focuses on a series of fundamental political questions. What is democracy, and how should we make sense of its core elements? Since those core elements were typically intended to be realized within individual nation-states, does globalization perhaps require us to reevaluate them? Does democracy, in other words, have to be updated to suit our increasingly "global age," where globalization processes limit the state's ability, in far-reaching ways, to control its own affairs? With democracy facing a populist backlash against "global elites," such questions seem more urgent than ever before. The fate of democracy may hang on our ability to answer them effectively. The course starts with a systematic introduction to competing theoretical views of democracy, with special attention paid to the ways in which those views rest on some obsolescent political and social premises. After examining globalization's demands on democracy, we consider possibilities for updating and/or improving democracy. Finally, we consider the reemergence of authoritarian and populist movements as responses to globalization and its challenges to existing democracy. Primarily about democracy and its standard theoretical underpinnings, and how globalization threatens them, the course draws on readings and other materials from a variety of scholarly fields.

INTL-L 250 INTRO TO INTL LAW&LEGAL INST (31384)

Instructor: Bosco, David Lyndon
Day & Time: MW 2:30 PM- 3:45 PM
Building & Room: Ballantine Hall 204
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

For centuries, leaders, ethicists, lawyers, and philosophers have advocated and sought to design a system of law that can regulate relations between the world¿s different sovereign states. Law beyond the state, it has been argued, can control or at least mitigate the 'anarchy' of international relations and help states and other actors resolve many of the problems that plague international cooperation. This international law project has always faced significant obstacles. States do not relinquish sovereignty easily, and important critiques of international law have emerged, including from some observers who see it as little more than a mechanism for control by powerful states. But international law remains both a powerful aspiration and, in many areas, an important reality. The last several decades, in particular, have featured a remarkable expansion in the scope and ambition of international legal instruments. Understanding and being able to analyze legal instruments has therefore become essential in many areas of international relations. Accordingly, this introductory course will help students become familiar with international law's central instruments and methodological tools. Students will read excerpts from key international law cases, review and analyze elements of major treaties, and complete writing assignments designed to familiarize students with legal methods and analysis.

INTL-L 350 ORIGINS&EVOLUTION OF INTL LAW (31386)

Instructor: Rana, Shruti
Day & Time: TR 1:00 PM- 2:15 PM
Building & Room: Global & International Studies 1134
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

Where do the ideas, actors, and institutions that form the foundations of our contemporary system of international law come from? How are they influencing our present and future? To answer these questions, this course explores the history, central figures, and key debates in the development of international law. We will analyze the origins and evolution of core concepts, institutions, actors, and debates in international law, and critically examine the development of international legal thought and practice from the 15th century to the present. Course topics and exercises will focus on issues and concepts such as human rights, trade, business and the globalization of law, and the primary legal and political theories that have shaped our contemporary system of international law. We will work towards a deeper understanding of the origins and evolution of international law and practice, to facilitate and inform engagement with international law and policy.

INTL-L 356 INTERVENTION AND SOVEREIGNTY (36211)

Instructor: Istrabadi, Feisal Amin
Day & Time: MW 9:30 AM- 10:45 AM
Building & Room: Auditorium A151
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

As civilian casualties mount in Yemen, Syria, Myanmar, and other places in the world, many often wonder, "Where's the United Nations? Why doesn't it do something about this?" The UN Charter, along with the Four Geneva Conventions ratified shortly afterwards, does create the basis for the regulation of war and minimizing its devastating effects. Yet political considerations have almost always dominated over the more idealistic principles enunciated in the Charter. This course will explore and analyze the theoretical and practical considerations of the attempt to regulate the use of armed conflict through the United Nations Charter and other international instruments. Readings will examine how successful such attempts have been, including attention to such issues as the responsibility to protect, collective security, and the role of the Security Council and the great powers in armed conflict.

INTL-X 390 INDIV READINGS IN INTL STUDIES (11733)

Instructor: Ekbia, Hamid
Day & Time: 12:00 AM- 12:00 AM
Building & Room:
Credit Hours: 3.0
CASE Requirements:
Start Date: 2018-08-20 End Date: 2018-12-14

P: Major or minor in International Studies, application, and approval of department. Students conduct individual research projects on an international issue under the direction of a faculty member. Student and faculty member should develop a project and submit a "contract" to the department for approval.