Madhusudan and Kiran C. Dhar India Studies Program

516 N. Fess Avenue, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47408-3842 812-855-5798 | india@indiana.edu

  • Undergraduate Courses

     

    The following courses can be used to satisfy major, minor, and certificate requirements in India studies.

     

    Core Course

     

    INST I100 Introduction to India (3 cr.) S&H, CSA The India Studies core course, team taught by the faculty of India Studies Program, is for any students interested in India and in exploring directions open to them in the Program. The course provides basic cultural literacy in India Studies through critical reading, lectures, film, and discussion.† Students will discover what makes India the world power it is today, and why we need to know about it, from its bloody birth in Partition with its roots in colonialism and before, returning for the bulk of the course to contemporary India.† Will be required for majors and minors in India Studies.

     

    I. Culture, Art, Religion

     

    INST I496 Individual Reading in Indic Studies (1-6 cr.)† R: reading knowledge of an Indic language.†Selected topics from ancient, medieval and modern texts about the civilization of India.† May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

    A. Literature

     

    INST I-305 Exploring Indian Languages and Literature through Film (3 cr.) CASE A&H, CASE GCC Explores the languages of India from genealogical, linguistic, typological, historical, and sociological perspectives. Provides an overview of literatures of several main South Asian languages with a focus on Hindi and Urdu literatures. No previous knowledge of Hindi or Urdu is required.

     

    INST I370 Ancient and Classical Literature of India (in translation) (3 cr.) AHLA, CSA† This course explores how ancient Indian intellectuals conceived the notion of "duty," in a variety of contexts, beginning with the role of the natural world and moving on to the role of social expectations in one's effort to determine the right course of action in any situation.† Students will read and discuss in detail a selection of early Indian literature from across the subcontinent.

     

    INST I371 Medieval Devotional Literatures of India (in translation) (3 cr.) AHLA CSA This course covers some of the earliest devotional Hindu literature, from South India; the northern poems of the Krishna-devotional traditions; and some Indian Sufi materials.† We explore the literary innovations of this material; the role of social class in the devotional traditions; and consider why seemingly transgressive material has become so widely accepted and loved.

     

    REL R375 Religion and Literature in Asia (3 cr.) A & H, CSA† The treatment of religious issues in Asian literature (Hinduism in the Epics) or the significance of the literary forms of religious texts (The Genre of Recorded Sayings), showing how the interplay of religious realities and literary forms reveals the dynamics of religious development in India, China, or Japan.

     

    ENG L383 Seminar: Studies in British or Commonwealth Culture (3 cr.) A&H† Study of a coherent period of British or Commonwealth culture (such as medieval, Elizabethan, or Victorian England, or modern India), with attention to the relations between literature, the other arts, and the intellectual milieu (with appropriate focus approved by director). †

     

    REL B420 Topics in Hindu Religious Traditions (3 cr.) A & H, CSA P: R255† Selected topics such as Upanishadic thought, the Bhagavadgita, Advaita Vedanta, Hindu ethics, monastic traditions, Hindu soteriology. May be repeated once for credit with a different topic.

     

    ENG L450 (English) Colonialism and Literature (3 cr.)

     

    B. Art and Performance

     

    FOLK F121 World Arts and Cultures (3 cr.) S&H Herman B Wells wanted the world to come to Indiana University, and this course does just that! Each week the class will take a virtual trip to some part of the world ñ including the United States ñ to explore a different manifestation of art and culture through festivals and celebrations, craft, dress, food, pottery, textiles, tattoos, henna, yard art, and much more. This course will explore traditional arts, looking at different mediums of artistic expression, and how people present themselves as members of groups and as individuals. Throughout the semester, we will seek to understand the myriad ways in which the arts are fundamental to human existence: used as a vehicle for the expression of faith, culture, aesthetics, community, and individuality. No passport required!

     

    FOLK F305 Art and Culture of India (3 cr.)

     

    REL B335 Mandir and Masjid at the Movies (3 cr.) A & H, CSA† A consideration of the nature and meaning of religion in South Asia using film as the lens to explore the South Asian continuum running from the sacred to the secular.

     

    CMCL C398 National Cinemas (3 cr.) A & H Historical survey of major national cinemas. Subject varies. Topics include Brazilian cinema, British cinema, Chinese cinema, French National cinema, German film culture, Indian cinema, and Italian cinema. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credits (with appropriate focus approved by director).

     

    CMCL C413 Global Villages (3 cr.) This course will introduce the key issues relating to media globalization, in particular, media texts, audiences, institutions and cultural contexts in South Asia and the South Asian diaspora around the world. Some of the themes that will be discussed include the role of South Asian television and film in a global context, the immensely successful and increasingly popular Bollywood film, the emergent diasporic film industry represented through films like Monsoon Wedding, American Desi and Bend it Like Beckham and the role of the Web and popular music in creating transnational South Asian cultures.

     

    CMCL C414 Topics in Performance and Culture (Topic: India, Lost and Found in Translation) (3 cr.) This course looks at the work of Indian diasporic filmmakers and authors, from the 1980s to the present, through whose lens India is harshly critiqued, fiercely loved, and invariably treated as a site in need of reform- and transform-ation. Drawing on their own and othersí experiences of displacement, the artists whose work we study create works of powerful political provocation as well as historical testimony, inviting culture critique and debate over the success of India as a modern and modernizing nation. Our approach to this material will be ethnographic, as we study the social and cultural context of the places, events, and personages that figure centrally in these films and stories. The focus of the films themselves spans colonial and postcolonial periods, and our readings will focus accordingly on the continuities between the cultural critiques made both from afar and from within India during these respective eras. As gender inequalities in both Hindu and Muslim culture in India continue to figure prominently in reformist critiques of Indian modernity, this course treats as its centerpiece the films of two prolific feminist filmmakers producing highly acclaimed and controversial films over the last two decades, Mira Nair and Deepa Mehta. Theirs will not, however, be the only films we view, as we aim to build our cultural literacy regarding the interventions these filmmakers are aiming at Indian cultural life more broadly.

     

    THTR T468 Non-Western Theatre and Drama (3 cr.) A&H, CSA Dramatic literature and theatre in one or more of the following areas: China, Japan, Korea, India, or Southeast Asia (with appropriate focus approved by director).

     

    C. Religion

     

    REL R153† Religions of the East (3 cr.)†A&H,†CSA†Modes of thinking; views of the world and the sacred; the human predicament and paths to freedom; human ideas and value systems in the religions of India, China, and Japan.

     

    REL B210† Introduction to Buddhism (3 cr.)† A&H,† CSA,†TFRIntroduction to the basic beliefs and practices of Buddhism from its beginnings to the present. Special attention to the life and teachings of the founder, significant developments in India, and the diffusion of the tradition to East Asia, Central Asia, and the West.

     

    REL B220† Introduction to Hinduism †(3 cr.)† A & H,† CSA† Beliefs, rites, and institutions of Hinduism from the Vedic (c. 1200 B.C.) to modern times: religion of the Vedas and the Upanishads; epics and the rise of devotional religion; philosophical systems (Yoga and Vedanta); sectarian theism; monasticism; socioreligious institutions; popular religion (temples and pilgrimages); modern Hindu syncretism.

     

    REL B320 Hindu Goddesses (3 cr.) A & H, CSA† Introduction to the goddesses in Hindu traditions, including Lakshmi, Saraswati, Sita, Radha, Parvati, Durga, Kali, Ganga, and Sitala. Focus on the mythology, iconography, cultic practices, embodied forms, and theology associated with these goddesses.

     

    REL B335 Mandir and Masjid at the Movies (3 cr.) A & H, CSA† A consideration of the nature and meaning of religion in South Asia using film as the lens to explore the South Asian continuum running from the sacred to the secular.

     

    INST I370 Ancient and Classical Literature of India (in translation) (3 cr.) AHLA, CSA† This course explores how ancient Indian intellectuals conceived the notion of "duty," in a variety of contexts, beginning with the role of the natural world and moving on to the role of social expectations in one's effort to determine the right course of action in any situation.† Students will read and discuss in detail a selection of early Indian literature from across the subcontinent.

     

    INST I371 Medieval Devotional Literatures of India (in translation) (3 cr.) AHLA CSA This course covers some of the earliest devotional Hindu literature, from South India; the northern poems of the Krishna-devotional traditions; and some Indian Sufi materials.† We explore the literary innovations of this material; the role of social class in the devotional traditions; and consider why seemingly transgressive material has become so widely accepted and loved.

     

    REL D375 Religion and Literature in Asia (3 cr.) A & H, CSA† The treatment of religious issues in Asian literature (Hinduism in the Epics) or the significance of the literary forms of religious texts (The Genre of Recorded Sayings), showing how the interplay of religious realities and literary forms reveals the dynamics of religious development in India, China, or Japan.

     

    INST I380 Women in South Asian Religious Traditions (3 cr.) A historical view of the officially sanctioned roles for women in several religious traditions in South Asia, and women's efforts to become agents and participants in the religious expressions of their own lives.

     

    REL B420 Topics in Hindu Religious Traditions (3 cr.) A & H, CSA P: R255† Selected topics such as Upanishadic thought, the Bhagavadgita, Advaita Vedanta, Hindu ethics, monastic traditions, Hindu soteriology. May be repeated once for credit with a different topic.

     

    II. Society, History, Politics

     

    INST I496 Individual Reading in Indic Studies (1-6 cr.)† R: reading knowledge an Indic language.†Selected topics from ancient, medieval and modern texts about the civilization of India.† May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

     

    A. History

     

    INST I211 (HIST G200) Intro to South Asian History (3 cr.) The region of South Asia today encompasses the countries of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Afghanistan, Nepal, Bhutan, and Sri Lanka. This course is intended to introduce students to some of the principal historical themes and cultural features of this diverse region from the Neolithic era to the present day.

     

    INST I212† The Civilization of Tibet (3 cr.) This course is designed to introduce the student to the diverse aspects of Tibetan Civilization. Making extensive use of slides and other audio-visual materials, it is intended to cover in a general and introductory manner areas that are dealt with individually and in depth in more specialized courses in the Tibetan Studies program of the Department of Central Eurasian Studies. Topics that will be treated in this course include Tibet's literature, art, religion, society, history, and language. The course is strongly recommended for undergraduates intending to take higher level courses in the department's Tibetan Studies program.

     

    HIST H238 Introduction to South Asian History and Civilization (3 cr.) S & H, CSA Survey course which examines some of the important problems and debates current in South Asian history. Topics covered range from the neolithic period to the present day, and include the nature of ancient South Asian society, medieval Islamic empires, and British imperialism in the region.

     

    HIST G300 Modern South Asia: 18th to 20th Century (3 cr.)

     

    HIST J300 The British Empire (Advanced undergraduate seminar) (3 cr.) This course will provide an opportunity for an in-depth discussion of some of the important features of the 'second' British empire in Asia and Africa from the late eighteenth to the twentieth century. Given the wide geographical and chronological range of the course, the principal aim will be to approach the study of the British empire through a re-evaluation of standard explanatory categories such as 'formal' and 'informal' empire, or the 'new imperialism' of the late nineteenth century.

     

    HIST G350 Modern South Asia: Eighteenth to Twentieth Century (3 cr.) S & H, CSA In-depth examination of the "making of modern South Asia" through this region's experience as an imperial territory of Great Britain. The focus of the course is upon social and cultural change, colonial governance, and forms of Indian nationalism.

     

    CEUS U489 Tibet and the West (3 cr.) This course examines Western perceptions of Tibet during the past 700 years. It presents Tibetan history and culture during this period and compares Tibetan civilization with the popular concepts about Tibet that prevailed in the West during this same period. The modern Western view of Tibet as "Shangrila," reflected in such novels and films as Lost Horizon will be examined, as will Tibetan perceptions of Westerners and Western civilization.

     

    B. Politics

     

    GEOG G463 Environmental Politics of South Asia (3 cr.) This course is designed for research-oriented undergraduates and graduate students in the social/environmental sciences and humanities. We will have seminar-based engagements with advanced theoretical texts from political ecology, political economy, environmental history, and South Asian political thought (including Subaltern Studies). Historical and contemporary case studies of political conflict around land (urban and rural), water, and forests in South Asia will ground our exploration of theoretical concepts. Students with interests in comparative politics, historiography, the South Asia region, development, or environmental and sustainability issues will find the course useful.

     

    HIST J300 The British Empire (Advanced undergraduate seminar) (3 cr.) This course will provide an opportunity for an in-depth discussion of some of the important features of the 'second' British empire in Asia and Africa from the late eighteenth to the twentieth century. Given the wide geographical and chronological range of the course, the principal aim will be to approach the study of the British empire through a re-evaluation of standard explanatory categories such as 'formal' and 'informal' empire, or the 'new imperialism' of the late nineteenth century.

     

    INST I320 Contemporary India: History, Politics and Society (3 cr.)†AHTI, CSA† Critical survey of social, economic, and political trends in modern India (1947-present) primarily through the study of relevant novels. Lectures and readings provide students with knowledge of modern Indian history and politics, caste and class relations, the evolution of India's political institutions since independence, and current debates in Indian society.

     

    HIST G350 Modern South Asia: Eighteenth to Twentieth Century (3 cr.) S & H, CSA In-depth examination of the "making of modern South Asia" through this region's experience as an imperial territory of Great Britain. The focus of the course is upon social and cultural change, colonial governance, and forms of Indian nationalism.

     

    POLS Y356 South Asian Politics (3 cr.) This course will introduce students to the government and politics of South Asia. To that end it will examine the legacies of British colonialism, the development and breakdown of political institutions, the role of political parties, the state of civil-military relations, the problems and prospects of economic growth and various issues of governance.

     

    POLS Y362 The International Relations of South Asia (3 cr.) The importance of South Asia to American foreign and security policy concerns is no longer at question. Questions of terrorism, nuclear proliferation, inter-state war and ethnic conflict all stalk this part of the world. This course will focus on all these topics. Apart from regular class lectures the students will benefit from the expertise a number of prominent individuals who will be visiting campus under the aegis of the India Studies Program. All students will be expected to take a mid-term and a final examination.

     

    C. Society and Culture

     

    INST I303 Issues in Indian Culture and Society (3 cr.)† Examination of the culture and society of India through the study and analysis of a specific issue or theme. Topic varies. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

     

    D. Criminal Justice

     

    III. Languages

     

    A. Bengali

     

    INST B100 Elementary Bengali I (5 cr.) Introduction to and brief history of language. Basic sound patterns and writing system with ideas about basic grammar. Ideas about simple sentence structure and basic grammar leading to reading and construction of short sentences. Learning essential vocabulary for everyday conversation. Practicing different expressions: apology, greeting etc. Classroom use of films, tapes, short conversation, stories, etc.

     

    INST B150 Elementary Bengali II (5 cr.) P: B100 or equivalent proficiency. This course will be an advanced level of the first semester. There will be more exercises on basic grammar and sentence structures. Emphasis will be on learning new words, composing short dialogues and using them in everyday conversation by developing basic reading skills and understanding main ideas from the texts. Increased writing skills will be expected with continuous drills in grammatical structures. Students will also be expected to write short personal letters, different expressions, descriptions etc. Classroom use of story telling on personal experience, music etc. will be encouraged.

     

    INST B200 Intermediate Bengali I (3 cr.) P: B150 or equivalent proficiency. This is a continuation of the first year Bengali course. The main focus of this course will be given on listening, speaking, reading and writing. Special emphasis will be given to Communicative approach to language learning.

     

    INST B250 Intermediate Bengali II (3 cr.) P: B200 or equivalent proficiency. This is a continuation of the first semester Bengali course. The main focus of this course will be given on listening, speaking, reading and writing. Special emphasis will be given to Communicative approach to language learning.

     

    B. Gujarati

     

    INST G100 Elementary Gujarati I (5 cr.) Introduction to and brief history of language. Basic sound patterns and writing system with ideas about basic grammar. Ideas about simple sentence structure and basic grammar leading to reading and construction of short sentences. Learning essential vocabulary for everyday conversation. Practicing different expressions: apology, greeting etc. Classroom use of films, tapes, short conversation, stories, etc.

     

    INST G150 Elementary Gujarati II (5 cr.) P: G100 or equivalent proficiency. This course will be an advanced level of the first semester. There will be more exercises on basic grammar and sentence structures. Emphasis will be on learning new words, composing short dialogues and using them in everyday conversation by developing basic reading skills and understanding main ideas from the texts. Increased writing skills will be expected with continuous drills in grammatical structures. Students will also be expected to write short personal letters, different expressions, descriptions etc. Classroom use of story telling on personal experience, music etc. will be encouraged.

     

    INST G200 Intermediate Gujarati I (3 cr.) P: G150 or equivalent proficiency. This is a continuation of the first year Gujarati course. The main focus of this course will be given on listening, speaking, reading and writing. Special emphasis will be given to Communicative approach to language learning.

     

    INST G250 Intermediate Gujarati II (3 cr.) P: G200 or equivalent proficiency. This is a continuation of the first semester Gujarati course. The main focus of this course will be given on listening, speaking, reading and writing. Special emphasis will be given to Communicative approach to language learning.

     

    C. Hindi

     

    INST H100 Beginning Hindi I (5 cr.)† Introduction to the Hindi language, the writing system and basic grammar. Graded exercises and readings leading to mastery of grammatical structures and essential vocabulary. Development of reading and writing competence and simple conversations based on personal information, courtesy expressions, greetings in contemporary Hindi. Classroom use of stories, tapes, films and songs.

     

    INST H150 Beginning Hindi II (5 cr.)† P: H100 or equivalent proficiency. Continuation of the first semester. Graded exercises and reading for mastery of grammatical structures and essential vocabulary.† †Composing short dialogues on everyday survival topics. Improve reading skill to understand main ideas from the simplest connected texts. Writing competence is increased to be able to write letters and journals, etc.

     

    INST H200 Second-Year Hindi I (3 cr.)† P: H150 or equivalent proficiency. Reading mythology, folklore, modern short stories, essays and poetry, including several examples from Hindi literature. Students compose and perform dialogues based on the material read and the usage of role playing cards.

     

    INST H250 Second-Year Hindi II (3 cr.) †P: H200 or equivalent proficiency.† Promotes rapid reading skills and vocabulary building. Study of grammar is based on Hindi reading material and includes regular grammar drills. Students sharpen composition skills by retelling stories and making brief synopsis from the reading material orally and in writing. Increase speaking skill to narrate and describe with short connected discourse.

     

    D. Persian

     

    E. Sanskrit

     

    INST I339-I340† Elementary Sanskrit I-II (5-5 cr.)†Introduction to Sanskrit, a classical language of ancient India.† Basic grammatical structure, vocabulary and conversation with increasingly difficult reading passages.† I340 includes reading selections of epic Sanskrit.

     

    INST I349-I350† Intermediate Sanskrit I-II (4-4 cr.) P: INST I339/I340 or permission of instructor. These courses build directly on the grammatical, lexicographical, and semantic foundation given in the elementary courses. Students read a range of epic Sanskrit materials including the Bhagavad Gita.† I350 includes an introduction to Vedic Sanskrit.

     

    F. Urdu

     

    INST U100 Beginning Urdu I (5 cr.)† Introduction to the Urdu language and basic grammar. Graded exercises and readings leading to mastery of grammatical structures and essential vocabulary. Simple conversations based on personal information, courtesy expressions, and greetings in contemporary Urdu. Classroom use of stories, tapes, films and songs.

     

    INST U150 Beginning Urdu II (5 cr.)† P: U100 or equivalent proficiency. Continuation of the first semester. The writing system of Urdu and development of reading and writing. Graded exercises and reading for mastery of grammatical structures and essential vocabulary.† Composing short dialogues on everyday survival topics.

     

    INST U200 Second-Year Urdu I (3 cr.)†P: U150 or equivalent proficiency. Urdu short stories, essays, poetry (gazals), dramas, newspapers and magazine articles, etc. will be utilized for reading. Initiate basic communicative tasks related to daily activities and various situations.

     

    INST U250 Second-Year Urdu II (3 cr.)† P: U200 or equivalent proficiency. Promotes rapid reading skills and vocabulary building. Study of grammar is based on Urdu reading material and includes regular grammar drills. Students sharpen composition skills by retelling stories from the reading material orally and in writing. Increase speaking skill to initiate, sustain and close a general conversation on a range of topics.

     

    G. Other

     

    INST L100 Elementary Indian Languages I (5 cr.) Various languages will be offered when available. May be retaken for credit, but only in a different language from that of the first enrollment. Introduction to and brief history of language. Basic sound patterns and writing system with ideas about basic grammar. Ideas about simple sentence structure and basic grammar leading to reading and construction of short sentences. Learning essential vocabulary for everyday conversation. Practicing different expressions: apology, greeting etc. Classroom use of films, tapes, short conversation, stories, etc.

     

    INST L150 Elementary Indian Languages II (5 cr.) P: L100 or equivalent proficiency in the same language. Various languages will be offered when available. May be retaken for credit, but only in a different language from that of the first enrollment. This course will be an advanced level of the first semester. There will be more exercises on basic grammar and sentence structures. Emphasis will be on learning new words, composing short dialogues and using them in everyday conversation by developing basic reading skills and understanding main ideas from the texts. Increased writing skills will be expected with continuous drills in grammatical structures. Students will also be expected to write short personal letters, different expressions, descriptions etc. Classroom use of story telling on personal experience, music etc. will be encouraged.

     

    INST L200 Intermediate Indian Languages I (3 cr.) P: L150 or equivalent proficiency in the same language. Various languages will be offered when available.May be retaken for credit, but only in a different language from that of the first enrollment. This is a continuation of the first year course. The main focus of this course will be given on listening, speaking, reading and writing. Special emphasis will be given to Communicative approach to language learning.

     

    INST L250 Intermediate Indian Languages I (3 cr.) P: L 200 or equivalent proficiency in the same language. Various languages will be offered when available. May be retaken for credit, but only in a different language from that of the first enrollment. This is a continuation of the first semester course. The main focus of this course will be given on listening, speaking, reading and writing. Special emphasis will be given to Communicative approach to language learning.

    By special arrangement, courses not listed above that substantially address India Studies may be included in the major or minor. The India Studies major and minor are currently under revision. Students interested in majoring or minoring in India Studies should contact the advisor, Will Smith. Please note that when you email, be certain to include your full name, and be as specific as possible. Let us know whether you are a current or prospective India Studies major or minor candidate, and if you are currently an IU student, your identification number is quite helpful--thank you!

     

     

     

     

    Back to Main

     

     

     

     

     

  • Graduate Courses

     

    The following courses can be used to satisfy major, minor, and certificate requirements in India studies.

     

    Core Course

     

    I501† Elementary Sanskrit I (4 cr.)†Introduction to Sanskrit, a classical language of ancient India. Basic grammatical structure and vocabulary in preparation for the reading of both secular and religious texts.

     

    I502† Elementary Sanskrit II (4 cr.) Continuing introduction to Sanskrit. Basic grammatical structure and vocabulary in preparation for the reading of both secular and religious texts. Students will read a short epic Sanskrit piece.

     

    I506 Beginning Hindi I (4 cr.)†Introduction to the Hindi language through its writing system and basic grammar. Graded exercises and readings leading to mastery of grammatical structures and essential vocabulary. Development of reading and writing competence and simple conversations in contemporary Hindi. Classroom use of story books, tapes, and Indian films in Hindi.

     

    I507 Beginning Hindi II (4 cr.)†Continuation of the first semester. Graded exercises and reading for mastery of grammatical structures and essential vocabulary.†Composing short dialogues from the studentsí own environment. Reading, writing, and conversational skills are sharpened.

     

    I508 Second-Year Hindi I (3 cr.)†Focuses on reading such literature as† mythology, folklore, and modern short stories and poetry, including several examples from Urdu literature. Students compose and perform their own dialogues based on the material read.

     

    I509 Second-Year Hindi II (3 cr.)†Promotes rapid reading skills and building vocabulary. Study of grammar is based on Hindi reading materials and includes regular grammar drills. Students sharpen composition skills by retelling stories from the reading material orally and in writing.

     

    I561† Intermediate Sanskrit I (3 cr.)

     

    I562† Intermediate Sanskrit II (3 cr.)

     

    I570 Ancient and Classical Literature of India (in translation) (3 cr.)† Survey of the ancient and classical Sanskrit literatures of India in translation, presented in cultural context.

     

    I571 Medieval Devotional Literatures of India (in translation) (3 cr.) This course covers some of the earliest devotional literature from South India; the northern poems of the Krishna-devotional traditions; and some Indian Sufi materials.†We explore the literary innovations of this material; the role of social class in the devotional traditions; and consider why seemingly transgressive material has become so widely accepted and loved.

     

    I580 Women in South Asian Religious Traditions (3 cr.) A historical view of the officially sanctioned roles for women in several religious traditions in South Asia, and women's efforts to become agents and participants in the religious expressions of their own lives.

     

    I597 Sanskrit Religious Literature (3 cr.)† P:INST I501-I502 Elementary Sanskrit or consent of instructor. Arranged tutorial readings from selected Indian religious texts in the original Sanskrit representing a variety of styles, periods, and religious traditions; includes selections from Hindu scriptures, religious epics, commentaries, religious law, hymns, philosophical texts, and Buddhist literature. May be repeated once for credit when topics vary.

     

    I605 Seminar on Indic Studies (3 cr.)† Advanced research seminar on selected topics in India Studies. Seminar may focus on specific texts, specific historical figures, basic themes, or issues in India Studies.

     

    I656 Graduate Readings in Indic Studies (1-6 cr.)† R: reading knowledge of Sanskrit and Hindi/Urdu.† Selected and substantive topics investigated† from ancient, medieval, and modern texts about the civilization of India.† May be repeated when topic varies for a maximum of six credit hours.

     

    L500 Elementary Indian Languages I (3 cr.) Various languages will be offered when available. Bengali and Gujarati are offered for Fall 2010. May be retaken for credit, but only in a different language from that of the first enrollment. Introduction to and brief history of language. Basic sound patterns and writing system with ideas about basic grammar. Ideas about simple sentence structure and basic grammar leading to reading and construction of short sentences. Learning essential vocabulary for everyday conversation. Practicing different expressions: apology, greeting etc. Classroom use of films, tapes, short conversation, stories, etc.

     

    L550 Elementary Indian Languages II (3cr.) P: L500 or equivalent proficiency in the same language. Various languages will be offered when available. Bengali and Gujarti are offered for Spring 2011. May be retaken for credit, but only in a different language from that of the first enrollment. This course will be an advanced level of the first semester. There will be more exercises on basic grammar and sentence structures. Emphasis will be on learning new words, composing short dialogues and using them in everyday conversation by developing basic reading skills and understanding main ideas from the texts. Increased writing skills will be expected with continuous drills in grammatical structures. Students will also be expected to write short personal letters, different expressions, descriptions etc. Classroom use of story telling on personal experience, music etc. will be encouraged.

     

    L560 Intermediate Indian Languages I (3 cr.) P: L 550 or equivalent proficiency in the same language. Various languages will be offered when available. Bengali and Gujarati are offered for Fall 2010. May be retaken for credit, but only in a different language from that of the first enrollment. This is a continuation of the first year Bengali course. The main focus of this course will be given on listening, speaking, reading and writing. Special emphasis will be given to Communicative approach to language learning.

     

    L570 Intermediate Indian Languages II (3 cr.) P: L 560 or equivalent proficiency in the same language. Various languages will be offered when available. Bengali and Gujarati are offered for Spring 2011. May be retaken for credit, but only in a different language from that of the first enrollment. This is a continuation of the first semester Bengali course. The main focus of this course will be given on listening, speaking, reading and writing. Special emphasis will be given to Communicative approach to language learning.

     

    U506 Beginning Urdu I (3 cr.)† Introduction to the Urdu language and basic grammar. Graded exercises and readings leading to mastery of grammatical structures and essential vocabulary. Simple conversations based on personal information, courtesy expressions, and greetings in contemporary Urdu. Classroom use of stories, tapes, films and songs.

     

    U507 Beginning Urdu II (3 cr.)† P: U506 or equivalent proficiency. Continuation of the first semester. The writing system of Urdu and development of reading and writing. Graded exercises and reading for mastery of grammatical structures and essential vocabulary.† Composing short dialogues on everyday survival topics.

     

    U508 Second-Year Urdu I (2 cr.)†P: U507 or equivalent proficiency. Urdu short stories, essays, poetry (gazals), dramas, newspapers and magazine articles, etc. will be utilized for reading. Initiate basic communicative tasks related to daily activities and various situations.

     

    U509 Second-Year Urdu II (2 cr.)† P: U508 or equivalent proficiency. Promotes rapid reading skills and vocabulary building. Study of grammar is based on Urdu reading material and includes regular grammar drills. Students sharpen composition skills by retelling stories from the reading material orally and in writing. Increase speaking skill to initiate, sustain and close a general conversation on a range of topics.

     

     

    Cross-Listed Graduate Courses


    Geography

    GEOG G563 Environmental Politics of South Asia (3 cr.) This course is designed for research-oriented undergraduates and graduate students in the social/environmental sciences and humanities. We will have seminar-based engagements with advanced theoretical texts from political ecology, political economy, environmental history, and South Asian political thought (including Subaltern Studies). Historical and contemporary case studies of political conflict around land (urban and rural), water, and forests in South Asia will ground our exploration of theoretical concepts. Students with interests in comparative politics, historiography, the South Asia region, development, or environmental and sustainability issues will find the course useful.

     

    Political Science

    Y657 Comparative Politics (Political Science) Topic:† Ethnicity, Politics and Violence in South Asia (3 cr.) Every conceivable form of ethnic conflict has wracked the states of South Asia. They stem from colonial legacies, from the breakdown of political institutions and from social tensions concomitant with dramatic economic changes. This course will survey a number of competing theoretical explanations for ethno-religious conflict and violence.† There are two components to the course. It will initially focus on a substantial corpus of literature from the fields of comparative politics and international relations on ethnicity and political violence. It will then turn to an application of this literature to the South Asian context. All students will be expected to write a substantial term paper on a particular case and also present the findings in a brief class presentation. The course does NOT assume any prior knowledge of South Asian politics.

     

    Religious Studies

    R547 Meditation Traditions of India (3 cr.) Survey and analysis of the practice of meditation in Hindu, Buddhist, and Jain traditions of India. Focus on the philosophical and structural basis of meditation and the relation of meditation to the monastic traditions of India. The role of the holy person and importance of the guru-student relationship.

    R551 Religions of South Asia (3 cr.) Study of the major religious traditions of India: Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

    R650 The Hindu Tradition (4 cr.) Selected topics in Hindu religious history: sects, institutions, texts, doctrines, periods. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

    R651 South Asian Buddhism (4 cr.) Selected topics in South and Southeast Asian Buddhism from the earliest to the modern period. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.

    Overseas Study

    We strongly encourage students in the program to consider the possibility of studying abroad in India, such as the Hyderabad-CIEE Semester Program, and to consult with the Director about opportunities.

    Overseas study is the most effective experience you can have to broaden your intercultural awareness. It enables you to enhance the knowledge of your major/minor in an international context, learn about a specific country/region, acquire language skills, and strengthen a range of personal skills.

    Students should contact the Office of Overseas Study, located in the Leo R. Dowling International Center at 111 S. Jordan Avenue, for more information about the study abroad programs available to IU students.

    Overseas Study Program Student Profile--Hyderabad, India

     

    Back to Main