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Indiana University Bloomington
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Hutton Honors College

 — Indiana University

Schools Honors Course Descriptions Fall 2013

HUTTON DEPARTMENTS SCHOOLS

Kelley School of Business

Go here for information about Kelley faculty listed for courses described below.

School of Education

Go here for information about Education faculty listed for courses described below.

School of Public Health

Go here for information about Public Health faculty listed for courses described below.

School of Informatics

Go here for information about Informatics faculty listed for courses described below.

Indiana University School of Journalism

Go here for information about Journalism faculty listed for courses described below.

Jacobs School of Music

Go here for information about Jacobs faculty listed for courses described below.

School of Social Work

Go here for information about Social Work faculty listed for courses described below.
You may earn honors credit only by special arrangements with the instructor.

School of Public and Environmental Affairs

Go here for information about SPEA faculty listed for courses described below.

School of Public Health

Kelley School of Business

BUS-A 207 12694 Introduction to Managerial Accounting, Honors
Geoffrey Sprinkle MW 8:00-9:15 a.m. BU 100

Theory and practice of management accounting; developing and using measurement systems to make decisions related to delivering products and services to customers; effective and efficient use of scarce resources; motivating, measuring, and evaluating performance; cost accumulation and reporting.

BUS-A 207 12698 Introduction to Managerial Accounting, Honors
Geoffrey Sprinkle MW 9:30-10:45 a.m. BU 100

Theory and practice of management accounting; developing and using measurement systems to make decisions related to delivering products and services to customers; effective and efficient use of scarce resources; motivating, measuring, and evaluating performance; cost accumulation and reporting.

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BUS-A 207 29740 Introduction to Managerial Accounting, Honors
Geoffrey Sprinkle MW 11:15 a.m.-12:30 p.m. BU 100

Theory and practice of management accounting; developing and using measurement systems to make decisions related to delivering products and services to customers; effective and efficient use of scarce resources; motivating, measuring, and evaluating performance; cost accumulation and reporting.

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BUS-C 106 6173 Business Presentations, Honors
Susan Vargo MW 9:30-10:45 a.m. BU 304

Students must be admitted to the Hutton Honors College or the Business Honors Program. Students are introduced to oral communication in business contexts. The course focus is on theory-based skill development that will enable students to deliver audience-centered messages, work in teams, and analyze and develop oral arguments. Students are given an additional opportunity to engage in an international or political communication exercise. Students cannot receive credit for both C106 and (BUS-C104 or CMCL-C 121).

Business Presentations--Honors is a theory-based, skill-building course. Lecture, readings, discussion and in-class exercises will introduce you to the concepts and practices of effective communication. Because communication skills develop over time, you will build proficiency through multiple oral assignments that increase in duration and complexity and include collaborative and individual business presentations.

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BUS-C 106 6173 Business Presentations, Honors
Susan Vargo MW 11:15 a.m.-12:30 p.m. BU 304

Students must be admitted to the Hutton Honors College or the Business Honors Program. Students are introduced to oral communication in business contexts. The course focus is on theory-based skill development that will enable students to deliver audience-centered messages, work in teams, and analyze and develop oral arguments. Students are given an additional opportunity to engage in an international or political communication exercise. Students cannot receive credit for both C106 and (BUS-C104 or CMCL-C 121).

Business Presentations--Honors is a theory-based, skill-building course. Lecture, readings, discussion and in-class exercises will introduce you to the concepts and practices of effective communication. Because communication skills develop over time, you will build proficiency through multiple oral assignments that increase in duration and complexity and include collaborative and individual business presentations.

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BUS-C 106 7299 Business Presentations, Honors
Brenda Bailey-Hughes Tu Th 11:15 a.m.-12:30 p.m. BU 421

Students must be admitted to the Hutton Honors College or the Business Honors Program. Students are introduced to oral communication in business contexts. The course focus is on theory-based skill development that will enable students to deliver audience-centered messages, work in teams, and analyze and develop oral arguments. Students are given an additional opportunity to engage in an international or political communication exercise. Students cannot receive credit for both X106 and (X104 or CMCL-C 121).

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BUS-C 106 7592 Business Presentations, Honors
Brenda Bailey-Hughes Tu Th 1:00-2:15 p.m. BU 421

Students must be admitted to the Hutton Honors College or the Business Honors Program. Students are introduced to oral communication in business contexts. The course focus is on theory-based skill development that will enable students to deliver audience-centered messages, work in teams, and analyze and develop oral arguments. Students are given an additional opportunity to engage in an international or political communication exercise. Students cannot receive credit for both X106 and (X104 or CMCL-C 121).

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F304 1295 Honors Financial Management
Wei Yang TuTh 10:10-11:25 a.m. BU 200

C: F304, I304, M304, and P304; students are administratively enrolled. Part of Honors I-Core. Strategic Management is concerned with the roles and tasks of firms' top managers (i.e., strategic decision makers). This course is designed to provide an appreciation for the total firm perspective and the means by which firms create and sustain competitive advantage in today increasingly challenging and complex business environment (domestic and global). Strategic management of a firm involves diagnosing the firm's current situation and developing realistic solutions to the strategic and organizational problems that confront top managers. A desired outcome of this course is an enhanced appreciation for the complexities of managing a formal organization. The primary objective of the course is to help develop analytical skills for identifying key strategic issues and formulating appropriate strategies given a firm situation. The course will provide exposure to the theories, concepts, and techniques of strategic management through the text, readings, illustrative cases, and video vignettes.

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F304 1295 Honors Financial Management
Wei Yang TuTh 10:10-11:25 a.m. BU 200

C: F304, I304, M304, and P304; students are administratively enrolled. Part of Honors I-Core. Strategic Management is concerned with the roles and tasks of firms' top managers (i.e., strategic decision makers). This course is designed to provide an appreciation for the total firm perspective and the means by which firms create and sustain competitive advantage in today increasingly challenging and complex business environment (domestic and global). Strategic management of a firm involves diagnosing the firm's current situation and developing realistic solutions to the strategic and organizational problems that confront top managers. A desired outcome of this course is an enhanced appreciation for the complexities of managing a formal organization. The primary objective of the course is to help develop analytical skills for identifying key strategic issues and formulating appropriate strategies given a firm situation. The course will provide exposure to the theories, concepts, and techniques of strategic management through the text, readings, illustrative cases, and video vignettes.

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F304 6963 Honors Financial Management
Wei Yang TuTh 4:00-5:15 p.m. BU 200

C: F304, I304, M304, and P304; students are administratively enrolled. Part of Honors I-Core. Strategic Management is concerned with the roles and tasks of firms' top managers (i.e., strategic decision makers). This course is designed to provide an appreciation for the total firm perspective and the means by which firms create and sustain competitive advantage in today increasingly challenging and complex business environment (domestic and global). Strategic management of a firm involves diagnosing the firm's current situation and developing realistic solutions to the strategic and organizational problems that confront top managers. A desired outcome of this course is an enhanced appreciation for the complexities of managing a formal organization. The primary objective of the course is to help develop analytical skills for identifying key strategic issues and formulating appropriate strategies given a firm situation. The course will provide exposure to the theories, concepts, and techniques of strategic management through the text, readings, illustrative cases, and video vignettes.

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BUS-J 304 1339 Honors Strategic Management
Toyah Miller TuTh 8:45-10:00 a.m. BU 200

P: A100, A201, A202, G202, K201, L201, X104, X204, X201, X220, ECON-E 201, ECON-E 370, ENG-W 131, MATH-M 118, MATH-M 119 (all with grades of C or better) and admission to the Business Honors Program. C: F304, I304, M304, and P304; students are administratively enrolled. Part of Honors I-Core. Strategic Management is concerned with the roles and tasks of firms' top managers (i.e., strategic decision makers). This course is designed to provide an appreciation for the total firm perspective and the means by which firms create and sustain competitive advantage in today's increasingly challenging and complex business environment (domestic and global). Strategic management of a firm involves diagnosing the firm current situation and developing realistic solutions to the strategic and organizational problems that confront top managers. A desired outcome of this course is an enhanced appreciation for the complexities of managing a formal organization. The primary objective of the course is to help develop analytical skills for identifying key strategic issues and formulating appropriate strategies given a firm's situation. The course will provide exposure to the theories, concepts, and techniques of strategic management through the text, readings, illustrative cases, and video vignettes.

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BUS-J 304 1340 Honors Strategic Management
Toyah Miller TuTh 11:40 a.m.-12:55 p.m. BU 200

P: A100, A201, A202, G202, K201, L201, X104, X204, X201, X220, ECON-E 201, ECON-E 370, ENG-W 131, MATH-M 118, MATH-M 119 (all with grades of C or better) and admission to the Business Honors Program. C: F304, I304, M304, and P304; students are administratively enrolled. Part of Honors I-Core. Strategic Management is concerned with the roles and tasks of firms' top managers (i.e., strategic decision makers). This course is designed to provide an appreciation for the total firm perspective and the means by which firms create and sustain competitive advantage in today's increasingly challenging and complex business environment (domestic and global). Strategic management of a firm involves diagnosing the firm current situation and developing realistic solutions to the strategic and organizational problems that confront top managers. A desired outcome of this course is an enhanced appreciation for the complexities of managing a formal organization. The primary objective of the course is to help develop analytical skills for identifying key strategic issues and formulating appropriate strategies given a firm's situation. The course will provide exposure to the theories, concepts, and techniques of strategic management through the text, readings, illustrative cases, and video vignettes.

BACK TO TOP

BUS-J 304 6964 Honors Strategic Management
Toyah Miller TuTh 2:35-3:50 p.m. BU 200

P: A100, A201, A202, G202, K201, L201, X104, X204, X201, X220, ECON-E 201, ECON-E 370, ENG-W 131, MATH-M 118, MATH-M 119 (all with grades of C or better) and admission to the Business Honors Program. C: F304, I304, M304, and P304; students are administratively enrolled. Part of Honors I-Core. Strategic Management is concerned with the roles and tasks of firms' top managers (i.e., strategic decision makers). This course is designed to provide an appreciation for the total firm perspective and the means by which firms create and sustain competitive advantage in today's increasingly challenging and complex business environment (domestic and global). Strategic management of a firm involves diagnosing the firm current situation and developing realistic solutions to the strategic and organizational problems that confront top managers. A desired outcome of this course is an enhanced appreciation for the complexities of managing a formal organization. The primary objective of the course is to help develop analytical skills for identifying key strategic issues and formulating appropriate strategies given a firm's situation. The course will provide exposure to the theories, concepts, and techniques of strategic management through the text, readings, illustrative cases, and video vignettes.

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BUS-K 204 7961 The Computer in Business, Honors
Nicole Evans Groth MW 8:00-9:15 a.m. Library 402

Must be a Business Honors Program student or Honors College student. This course provides an introduction to the role of computers and other information technologies in business. It provides instruction in both functional and conceptual computer literacy. Conceptual computer literacy is the focus of the weekly lecture. After introducing the basic concepts of computer use, these lectures devote special attention to current technological innovation in social and business environments. Topics include technology and organizational change, telecommunications, privacy in the information age, and business security on the Internet. Functional computer literacy is the focus of the weekly discussion section, which meets twice a week in a computer lab. This part of the course presents an introduction to two of the most widely used database and spreadsheet packages: Microsoft Access and Microsoft Excel. Students learn, via hands-on examples, many of the powerful tools contained in these two packages with emphasis on how to analyze a variety of business problems with Access and Excel. The goal is not to teach these packages in an abstract sense, but rather to show how they can be applied to real business problems to help make important decisions. K 204 is the honors version of K 201, and it shares the same basic course content as K 201. However, its in-class applications and its projects and exams are more challenging than those in K 201.

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BUS-K 204 7962 The Computer in Business, Honors
Nicole Evans Groth MW 9:30-10:45 a.m. Library 402

Must be a Business Honors Program student or Honors College student. This course provides an introduction to the role of computers and other information technologies in business. It provides instruction in both functional and conceptual computer literacy. Conceptual computer literacy is the focus of the weekly lecture. After introducing the basic concepts of computer use, these lectures devote special attention to current technological innovation in social and business environments. Topics include technology and organizational change, telecommunications, privacy in the information age, and business security on the Internet. Functional computer literacy is the focus of the weekly discussion section, which meets twice a week in a computer lab. This part of the course presents an introduction to two of the most widely used database and spreadsheet packages: Microsoft Access and Microsoft Excel. Students learn, via hands-on examples, many of the powerful tools contained in these two packages with emphasis on how to analyze a variety of business problems with Access and Excel. The goal is not to teach these packages in an abstract sense, but rather to show how they can be applied to real business problems to help make important decisions. K 204 is the honors version of K 201, and it shares the same basic course content as K 201. However, its in-class applications and its projects and exams are more challenging than those in K 201.

BACK TO TOP

BUS-K 204 7963 The Computer in Business, Honors
Nicole Evans Groth MW 11:15 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Library 402

Must be a Business Honors Program student or Honors College student. This course provides an introduction to the role of computers and other information technologies in business. It provides instruction in both functional and conceptual computer literacy. Conceptual computer literacy is the focus of the weekly lecture. After introducing the basic concepts of computer use, these lectures devote special attention to current technological innovation in social and business environments. Topics include technology and organizational change, telecommunications, privacy in the information age, and business security on the Internet. Functional computer literacy is the focus of the weekly discussion section, which meets twice a week in a computer lab. This part of the course presents an introduction to two of the most widely used database and spreadsheet packages: Microsoft Access and Microsoft Excel. Students learn, via hands-on examples, many of the powerful tools contained in these two packages with emphasis on how to analyze a variety of business problems with Access and Excel. The goal is not to teach these packages in an abstract sense, but rather to show how they can be applied to real business problems to help make important decisions. K 204 is the honors version of K 201, and it shares the same basic course content as K 201. However, its in-class applications and its projects and exams are more challenging than those in K 201.

BACK TO TOP

BUS-K 204 7964 The Computer in Business, Honors
April Heltsley TuTh 8:00-9:15 a.m. BU 415

Must be a Business Honors Program student or Honors College student. This course provides an introduction to the role of computers and other information technologies in business. It provides instruction in both functional and conceptual computer literacy. Conceptual computer literacy is the focus of the weekly lecture. After introducing the basic concepts of computer use, these lectures devote special attention to current technological innovation in social and business environments. Topics include technology and organizational change, telecommunications, privacy in the information age, and business security on the Internet. Functional computer literacy is the focus of the weekly discussion section, which meets twice a week in a computer lab. This part of the course presents an introduction to two of the most widely used database and spreadsheet packages: Microsoft Access and Microsoft Excel. Students learn, via hands-on examples, many of the powerful tools contained in these two packages with emphasis on how to analyze a variety of business problems with Access and Excel. The goal is not to teach these packages in an abstract sense, but rather to show how they can be applied to real business problems to help make important decisions. K 204 is the honors version of K 201, and it shares the same basic course content as K 201. However, its in-class applications and its projects and exams are more challenging than those in K 201.

BACK TO TOP

BUS-K 204 7965 The Computer in Business, Honors
April Heltsley TuTh 9:30-10:45 a.m. BU 415

Must be a Business Honors Program student or Honors College student. This course provides an introduction to the role of computers and other information technologies in business. It provides instruction in both functional and conceptual computer literacy. Conceptual computer literacy is the focus of the weekly lecture. After introducing the basic concepts of computer use, these lectures devote special attention to current technological innovation in social and business environments. Topics include technology and organizational change, telecommunications, privacy in the information age, and business security on the Internet. Functional computer literacy is the focus of the weekly discussion section, which meets twice a week in a computer lab. This part of the course presents an introduction to two of the most widely used database and spreadsheet packages: Microsoft Access and Microsoft Excel. Students learn, via hands-on examples, many of the powerful tools contained in these two packages with emphasis on how to analyze a variety of business problems with Access and Excel. The goal is not to teach these packages in an abstract sense, but rather to show how they can be applied to real business problems to help make important decisions. K 204 is the honors version of K 201, and it shares the same basic course content as K 201. However, its in-class applications and its projects and exams are more challenging than those in K 201.

BACK TO TOP

BUS-K 204 7966 The Computer in Business, Honors
April Heltsley TuTh 2:30-3:45 p.m. BU 415

Must be a Business Honors Program student or Honors College student. This course provides an introduction to the role of computers and other information technologies in business. It provides instruction in both functional and conceptual computer literacy. Conceptual computer literacy is the focus of the weekly lecture. After introducing the basic concepts of computer use, these lectures devote special attention to current technological innovation in social and business environments. Topics include technology and organizational change, telecommunications, privacy in the information age, and business security on the Internet. Functional computer literacy is the focus of the weekly discussion section, which meets twice a week in a computer lab. This part of the course presents an introduction to two of the most widely used database and spreadsheet packages: Microsoft Access and Microsoft Excel. Students learn, via hands-on examples, many of the powerful tools contained in these two packages with emphasis on how to analyze a variety of business problems with Access and Excel. The goal is not to teach these packages in an abstract sense, but rather to show how they can be applied to real business problems to help make important decisions. K 204 is the honors version of K 201, and it shares the same basic course content as K 201. However, its in-class applications and its projects and exams are more challenging than those in K 201.

BACK TO TOP

BUS-K 204 7966 The Computer in Business, Honors
April Heltsley TuTh 4:00-5:15 p.m. BU 415

Must be a Business Honors Program student or Honors College student. This course provides an introduction to the role of computers and other information technologies in business. It provides instruction in both functional and conceptual computer literacy. Conceptual computer literacy is the focus of the weekly lecture. After introducing the basic concepts of computer use, these lectures devote special attention to current technological innovation in social and business environments. Topics include technology and organizational change, telecommunications, privacy in the information age, and business security on the Internet. Functional computer literacy is the focus of the weekly discussion section, which meets twice a week in a computer lab. This part of the course presents an introduction to two of the most widely used database and spreadsheet packages: Microsoft Access and Microsoft Excel. Students learn, via hands-on examples, many of the powerful tools contained in these two packages with emphasis on how to analyze a variety of business problems with Access and Excel. The goal is not to teach these packages in an abstract sense, but rather to show how they can be applied to real business problems to help make important decisions. K 204 is the honors version of K 201, and it shares the same basic course content as K 201. However, its in-class applications and its projects and exams are more challenging than those in K 201.

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BUS-L 293 6147 Honors, Legal Environment of Business
Martin McCrory TuTh 11:15 a.m.-12:30 p.m. BU 406

Students must be admitted to the Hutton Honors College or the Business Honors Program with sophomore standing. L293 substitutes for L201, an I-Core prerequisite that is required of all business majors. Emphasis on understanding the nature of law through examining a few areas of general interest, such as the duty to avoid harming others (torts), the duty to keep promises (contracts), and government regulation of business. Credit not given for both L293 and L201.

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BUS-L 293 6147 Honors, Legal Environment of Business
Martin McCrory TuTh 1:00-2:15 p.m. BU 406

Students must be admitted to the Hutton Honors College or the Business Honors Program with sophomore standing. L293 substitutes for L201, an I-Core prerequisite that is required of all business majors. Emphasis on understanding the nature of law through examining a few areas of general interest, such as the duty to avoid harming others (torts), the duty to keep promises (contracts), and government regulation of business. Credit not given for both L293 and L201.

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BUS-M 304 1424 Honors Marketing Management
Hai Che MW 10:10-11:25 a.m. BU 200

P: A100, A201, A202, G202, K201, L201, X104, X204, X201, X220, ECON-E 201, ECON-E 370, ENG-W 131, MATH-M 118, MATH-M 119 (all with grades of C or better) and admission to the Business Honors Program. C: F304, J304, P304, and I304; students are administratively enrolled. Part of Honors I-Core. Examines marketing concepts, strategic planning, marketing research, and information systems. Covers consumer and organizational buying behavior, forecasting sales, and market segmentation and position. Also focuses on new product development process; product lines and brands; pricing strategies; distribution-channel management; advertising; personal selling; and organizing, evaluating, and controlling marketing.

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BUS-M 304 1425 Honors Marketing Management
Hai Che MW 1:05-2:20 p.m. BU 200

P: A100, A201, A202, G202, K201, L201, X104, X204, X201, X220, ECON-E 201, ECON-E 370, ENG-W 131, MATH-M 118, MATH-M 119 (all with grades of C or better) and admission to the Business Honors Program. C: F304, J304, P304, and I304; students are administratively enrolled. Part of Honors I-Core. Examines marketing concepts, strategic planning, marketing research, and information systems. Covers consumer and organizational buying behavior, forecasting sales, and market segmentation and position. Also focuses on new product development process; product lines and brands; pricing strategies; distribution-channel management; advertising; personal selling; and organizing, evaluating, and controlling marketing.

BACK TO TOP

BUS-M 304 6965 Honors Marketing Management
Hai Che MW 4:00-5:15 p.m. BU 200

P: A100, A201, A202, G202, K201, L201, X104, X204, X201, X220, ECON-E 201, ECON-E 370, ENG-W 131, MATH-M 118, MATH-M 119 (all with grades of C or better) and admission to the Business Honors Program. C: F304, J304, P304, and I304; students are administratively enrolled. Part of Honors I-Core. Examines marketing concepts, strategic planning, marketing research, and information systems. Covers consumer and organizational buying behavior, forecasting sales, and market segmentation and position. Also focuses on new product development process; product lines and brands; pricing strategies; distribution-channel management; advertising; personal selling; and organizing, evaluating, and controlling marketing.

BACK TO TOP

BUS-P 304 1458 Honors Operations Management
Robert Jacobs MW 8:45-10:10 a.m. BU 200

Understanding the role of the operations function and its impact on the competitiveness of the firm is an important part of any manager`s training. Operational issues include designing, acquiring, operating, and maintaining the facilities and processes; purchasing raw materials; controlling and maintaining inventories; and providing the proper labor needed to produce a good or service so that customers` expectations are met.

This course in operations management is intended to be a survey of operating practices and models in both manufacturing and service oriented firms. It is intended to provide managers in all functional areas with sufficient knowledge to make informed "total business decisions" and to introduce standard terms and concepts for communications with operating personnel. In such a course, it should be recognized that breadth of subject matter, not depth of topic, will be the goal.

Course Objectives:
Build an understanding of how the Operations Manager fits into the organization.
Provide a knowledge base for conversing with operations personnel.
Build both quantitative and qualitative analysis skills, especially those needed to understand systems implemented through Enterprise Resource Planning systems.
Show the similarities of operating problems in the Manufacturing and Service Sectors.

Learning Outcomes
1.Communicate major operations concepts in an intelligent manner at a level compatible with practitioners in the field.
2.Quantitatively analyze problems related to forecasting demand, projects, manufacturing and service processes, inventory supply and distribution, the location of warehouses, and basic quality control.
3.Think critically by understanding such trade-offs as low cost versus quick customer service.
4.See the importance of integrating the functions of the firm, particularly marketing and operations sales and production plans.
5.Appreciate the risks and ethical implications associated with the different operations strategies.

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BUS-P 304 1459 Honors Operations Management
Robert Jacobs MW 11:40 a.m.-12:55 p.m. BU 200

Understanding the role of the operations function and its impact on the competitiveness of the firm is an important part of any manager`s training. Operational issues include designing, acquiring, operating, and maintaining the facilities and processes; purchasing raw materials; controlling and maintaining inventories; and providing the proper labor needed to produce a good or service so that customers` expectations are met.

This course in operations management is intended to be a survey of operating practices and models in both manufacturing and service oriented firms. It is intended to provide managers in all functional areas with sufficient knowledge to make informed "total business decisions" and to introduce standard terms and concepts for communications with operating personnel. In such a course, it should be recognized that breadth of subject matter, not depth of topic, will be the goal.

Course Objectives:
Build an understanding of how the Operations Manager fits into the organization.
Provide a knowledge base for conversing with operations personnel.
Build both quantitative and qualitative analysis skills, especially those needed to understand systems implemented through Enterprise Resource Planning systems.
Show the similarities of operating problems in the Manufacturing and Service Sectors.

Learning Outcomes
1.Communicate major operations concepts in an intelligent manner at a level compatible with practitioners in the field.
2.Quantitatively analyze problems related to forecasting demand, projects, manufacturing and service processes, inventory supply and distribution, the location of warehouses, and basic quality control.
3.Think critically by understanding such trade-offs as low cost versus quick customer service.
4.See the importance of integrating the functions of the firm, particularly marketing and operations sales and production plans.
5.Appreciate the risks and ethical implications associated with the different operations strategies.

BACK TO TOP

BUS-P 304 6966 Honors Operations Management
Robert Jacobs MW 2:35-3:50 p.m. BU 200

Understanding the role of the operations function and its impact on the competitiveness of the firm is an important part of any manager`s training. Operational issues include designing, acquiring, operating, and maintaining the facilities and processes; purchasing raw materials; controlling and maintaining inventories; and providing the proper labor needed to produce a good or service so that customers` expectations are met.

This course in operations management is intended to be a survey of operating practices and models in both manufacturing and service oriented firms. It is intended to provide managers in all functional areas with sufficient knowledge to make informed "total business decisions" and to introduce standard terms and concepts for communications with operating personnel. In such a course, it should be recognized that breadth of subject matter, not depth of topic, will be the goal.

Course Objectives:
Build an understanding of how the Operations Manager fits into the organization.
Provide a knowledge base for conversing with operations personnel.
Build both quantitative and qualitative analysis skills, especially those needed to understand systems implemented through Enterprise Resource Planning systems.
Show the similarities of operating problems in the Manufacturing and Service Sectors.

Learning Outcomes
1.Communicate major operations concepts in an intelligent manner at a level compatible with practitioners in the field.
2.Quantitatively analyze problems related to forecasting demand, projects, manufacturing and service processes, inventory supply and distribution, the location of warehouses, and basic quality control.
3.Think critically by understanding such trade-offs as low cost versus quick customer service.
4.See the importance of integrating the functions of the firm, particularly marketing and operations sales and production plans.
5.Appreciate the risks and ethical implications associated with the different operations strategies.

BACK TO TOP

BUS-X 202 6272 Technology, Honors
Sarah Sherry MW 9:30-10:45 a.m. BU 415

P: K 201 or K204, direct admit freshman or honors student. BUS-X 202 consists of two components: a lab and a lecture. The lecture provides an introduction to a range of technologies currently used in organizations including a broad understanding of how technologies are deployed, their impact and potential, and their strategic importance. The labs focus on technologies that transform data into usable information to enhance decision making. They rely heavily upon Microsoft Excel and, to a lesser extent, Microsoft Access to develop sophisticated data analysis and modeling tools. X 202 is the honors version of X 201, and it shares the same basic course content as X 201. However, its in-class applications and its projects and exams are more challenging than those in X 201.

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BUS-X 202 6273 Technology, Honors
Sarah Sherry MW 11:15 a.m.-12:30 p.m. BU 415

P: K 201 or K204, direct admit freshman or honors student. BUS-X 202 consists of two components: a lab and a lecture. The lecture provides an introduction to a range of technologies currently used in organizations including a broad understanding of how technologies are deployed, their impact and potential, and their strategic importance. The labs focus on technologies that transform data into usable information to enhance decision making. They rely heavily upon Microsoft Excel and, to a lesser extent, Microsoft Access to develop sophisticated data analysis and modeling tools. X 202 is the honors version of X 201, and it shares the same basic course content as X 201. However, its in-class applications and its projects and exams are more challenging than those in X 201.

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BUS-X 202 7597 Technology, Honors
Paul Serex TuTh 1:00-2:15 p.m. BU 417

P: K 201 or K204, direct admit freshman or honors student. BUS-X 202 consists of two components: a lab and a lecture. The lecture provides an introduction to a range of technologies currently used in organizations including a broad understanding of how technologies are deployed, their impact and potential, and their strategic importance. The labs focus on technologies that transform data into usable information to enhance decision making. They rely heavily upon Microsoft Excel and, to a lesser extent, Microsoft Access to develop sophisticated data analysis and modeling tools. X 202 is the honors version of X 201, and it shares the same basic course content as X 201. However, its in-class applications and its projects and exams are more challenging than those in X 201.

BACK TO TOP

BUS-X 202 6274 Technology, Honors
Paul Serex TuTh 2:30-3:45 p.m. BU 417

P: K 201 or K204, direct admit freshman or honors student. BUS-X 202 consists of two components: a lab and a lecture. The lecture provides an introduction to a range of technologies currently used in organizations including a broad understanding of how technologies are deployed, their impact and potential, and their strategic importance. The labs focus on technologies that transform data into usable information to enhance decision making. They rely heavily upon Microsoft Excel and, to a lesser extent, Microsoft Access to develop sophisticated data analysis and modeling tools. X 202 is the honors version of X 201, and it shares the same basic course content as X 201. However, its in-class applications and its projects and exams are more challenging than those in X 201.

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BUS-X 202 7847 Technology, Honors
Paul Serex TuTh 4:00-5:15 p.m. BU 417

P: K 201 or K204, direct admit freshman or honors student. BUS-X 202 consists of two components: a lab and a lecture. The lecture provides an introduction to a range of technologies currently used in organizations including a broad understanding of how technologies are deployed, their impact and potential, and their strategic importance. The labs focus on technologies that transform data into usable information to enhance decision making. They rely heavily upon Microsoft Excel and, to a lesser extent, Microsoft Access to develop sophisticated data analysis and modeling tools. X 202 is the honors version of X 201, and it shares the same basic course content as X 201. However, its in-class applications and its projects and exams are more challenging than those in X 201.

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School of Education

A308 33848 Legal Issues for Teachers
Janet Decker

A308 offers an in depth examination of legal and ethical issues occurring in PK-12 schools. Students will 1) identify and understand legal principles and apply them to real life scenarios; 2) describe and analyze key principles of school/district policy as well as federal and state statutory and case law that impact teachers; 3) conduct legal research; and 4) advocate for legal rights of teachers and students. Topics addressed include tort liability, church/state relations, expression rights, children with disabilities, conditions of employment, discrimination and harassment, student testing, collective bargaining, teacher out-of-school conduct, copyright concerns, teacher contracts and dismissal, record-keeping practices, and student discipline.

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EDUC-W 200 8776 Using Computers in Education
Anne Leftwich M 11:15 a.m. - 12:15 p.m. ED 2025

Using Computers in Education (3 cr.) Develops proficiency in computer applications and classroom software; teaches principles and specific ideas about appropriate, responsible, and ethical use to make teaching and learning more effective; promotes critical abilities, skills, and self-confidence for ongoing professional development; collaboration with K-12 teachers to design authentic technology products that meet teacher needs; provides feedback on the electronic portfolio from practicing K-12 principals and teachers.

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School of Public Health

HPER-P 409 Basic Physiology of Exercise
Prof. Robert Chapman

Basic Physiology of Exercise is a survey course of human physiological parameters as related to physical exercise and work. Course includes in-depth examination of skeletal muscle, cardiovascular, and pulmonary physiology and the responses to acute exercise and chronic training. Additional specialty topics include environmental physiology (thermoregulation, altitude), nutritional ergogenics, elite performance physiology, body composition, obesity, and sex differences. Course includes 9 laboratory sessions designed to introduce common physiological measures completed in both research and clinical settings. For more information, contact Dr. Robert Chapman at rfchapma@indiana.edu.

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School of Informatics

INFO-H 101 7694 Introduction to Informatics, Honors
Nina Onesti TuTh 9:30-10:45 a.m.

Introduction to Informatics and Computing is an exciting class that gives students a hands-on approach to understanding and using technology. This course teaches basic concepts in the field of Informatics and Computer Science, focusing in particular on subjects that will prepare students for more advanced coursework with the School of Informatics and Computing. Specific lecture topics taught include problem solving techniques, information theory, career panels, and different research areas within the School of Informatics and Computing. A lab component teaches basic technology skills in the areas of web design, media computation, and a basic introduction to programming.

Lecture and laboratory work together to prepare students by providing a basic foundation and general knowledge within the realm of informatics and computer science.

By the end of the course, students will:
Demonstrate a general understanding and have the ability to recognize and be critical of technology and how it exists in their lives
Have the ability to evaluate, process, and create solutions to real world problems using different methods
Have the ability to understand how to use effective communication skills and work within a group
Specifically, students will have:
The ability to understand and transform "data" into meaning and actionable knowledge
The ability to identify and explain different parts of technology (key terms, basic theories, etc...)
The ability to identify, evaluate, and critique the impact of technology on society/culture, over time, and into the future
The ability to apply critical and logical thinking to solve real world problems
The ability to evaluate the nature of a given problem
The ability to use and apply computational tools to solve real world problems
To practice effective 21st Century Skills by doing group work, in class presentations, writing, etc...

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INFO-H 400 10592 Topics in Informatics, Honors
Selma Sabanovic MW 2:30-3:45 p.m. INFO 107

This course surveys the emerging field of human-robot interaction (HRI). In the near future, robots are expected to take part in our everyday lives as assistants, teammates, guides, caretakers, and companions. HRI research tackles the social and technical challenges involved in developing such technologies &emdash; understanding how people perceive and are affected by robots as well as creating robots that interact in ways that are natural and intuitive for human partners. This class focuses on how to design and evaluate interactive robots from a human-centered perspective. We will cover topics such as anthropomorphism, robot form and function, multi-modal communication, and real-world applications of robots (e.g. domestic, health and rehabilitation, urban search and rescue, education, entertainment), as well as cover methods commonly used in HRI research. As HRI is an interdisciplinary field, readings and assignments will include material from robotics, psychology, HCI, cognitive science, design, ethics, and other relevant disciplines. Classes will combine critical readings and in-class discussions with practical instruction on how to design a prototype human-robot interaction system. Students will have a chance to follow their interests in exploring HRI through a team-based project in interactive robot design and evaluation. If you have questions about the class, contact Prof. Selma Sabanovic at selmas@indiana.edu.

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INFO-H 400 Topics in Informatics, Honors
Luis Rocha TuTh 11:15 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. INFO 107

Biological organisms cope with the demands of their environments using solutions quite unlike the traditional human-engineered approaches to problem solving. Biological systems tend to be adaptive, reactive, and distributed. Bio-inspired computing is a field devoted to tackling complex problems using computational methods modeled after design principles encountered in nature. This course is strongly grounded on the foundations of complex systems and theoretical biology. It aims at a deep understanding of the distributed architectures of natural complex systems, and how those can be used to produce informatics tools with enhanced robustness, scalability, flexibility and which can interface more effectively with humans. It is a multi-disciplinary field strongly based on biology, complexity, computer science, informatics, cognitive science, robotics, and cybernetics.

Aims: Students will be introduced to fundamental topics in bio-inspired computing, and build up their proficiency in the application of various algorithms in real-world problems.

Pre-requisites: For I485/H485: INFO-I 211, or CSCI-C 212, or CSCI-H 212, or Instructor approval.

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INFO-H 400 12054 Topics in Informatics, Honors
Yong Ahn TuTh 2:30-3:45 p.m. INFO 107

From a dashboard in your car to cutting-edge scientific papers, we extensively use visual representation of data. Thanks to the increasing amount of valuable data in every corner of our society, the visualization industry is growing rapidly and the visual analytics is becoming a crucial skill for knowledge workers. Effective analysis of data through visualization will become more and more crucial because it is almost impossible to understand big, messy data without any visual aid. Why is visualization so powerful? Why some visualizations are more effective than others? What are the existing visualization methods? What are the current challenges in visualization?

In this course we will explore these questions by looking back the history of visualization, by analyzing and criticizing existing visualizations, and by creating visualization with data from our everyday life or your research problems. This course is both for the students who want to apply visualization techniques to their own work and for the students who want to develop better visualization algorithms and techniques.

Objectives:
- You will learn why visualization matters and how to construct effective, meaningful, correct visualization.
- You will understand a wide array of visualization methods and be able to apply the techniques to their own work and data.
- You will learn how to use a web-based visualization library D3.js and practice various visualization techniques with it.

Prerequisites:
This course is open to graduate students as well as advanced undergraduate students. It is required to have programming background (I210 & I211 or equivalent). I308: "Information Representation" is a recommended class before taking this class. Working knowledge of Javascript and scripting languages (e.g. Python) will be helpful. Passion to learn new languages and tools will be essential. Contact the instructor if you are uncertain about your background.

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INFO-H 400 10063 Topics in Informatics, Honors
Flilppo Menczer TuTh 2:30-3:45 p.m. INFO E 130

Networks pervade all aspects of our lives: networks of friends, communication, computers, the Web, and transportation are examples we experience, while our brain cells and the proteins in our body form networks that determine our survival and intelligence. The network is a general yet powerful way to represent and study simple and complex relationships. This course explores the study of networks and how they help us understand the complex patterns of connections and relationships that shape our lives. Once we acquire the basic tools needed to analyze and model networks through computers, we will explore increasingly complex social, infrastructure, information, and biological networks.

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INFO-H 494 8893 Design & Development of an Information System
Matthew Hottell LEC M 4:00-5:15 p.m. W 4:00-5:15 p.m.

Approval of the dean and completion of required core informatics courses. Students work on capstone projects in supervised teams. They select an appropriate project (preferably based on cognate) and then learn to develop a plan that leads to success. Teamwork, communication, and organizational skills are emphasized in a real-world &emdash; style environment.

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INFO-H 494 8895 Design & Development of an Information System
Matthew Hottell LEC M 4:00-5:15 p.m. W 4:00-5:15 p.m.

Approval of the dean and completion of required core informatics courses. Students work on capstone projects in supervised teams. They select an appropriate project (preferably based on cognate) and then learn to develop a plan that leads to success. Teamwork, communication, and organizational skills are emphasized in a real-world &emdash; style environment.

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INFO-H 494 8894 Design & Development of an Information System
Matthew Hottell LEC M 4:00-5:15 p.m. W 4:00-5:15 p.m.

Approval of the dean and completion of required core informatics courses. Students work on capstone projects in supervised teams. They select an appropriate project (preferably based on cognate) and then learn to develop a plan that leads to success. Teamwork, communication, and organizational skills are emphasized in a real-world &emdash; style environment.

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Jacobs School of Music

MUS T261 6480 Music Theory and Literature III
Frank Samarotto Daily 10:10-11:00 a.m. Mus Lib 242

Honors equivalent of T251. P: T151-T152 Music Theory and Literature I-II. Study of music from the late sixteenth through the eighteenth centuries, with an emphasis on counterpoint, harmony, and form.

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HON-H 299 32764 History of Rock 'n' Roll Music III
Andrew Hollinden MW 4:40-6:10 p.m. - GH 013 Tu 11:15 a.m.-12:05 p.m. - MAC 036

HON-H 299 is not a stand-alone course. To receive honors credit for this course, you MUST enroll in HON-BV 299 and MUS-Z 203, class number 32949. HON-BV 299 consists of MUS-Z 203 (3 cr.) and HON-H 299 (1 cr.). At the end of the first week of classes, students will be dropped from HON-BV 299 and placed automatically into MUS-Z 203 and HON-H 299. Please note that the 1-credit HON-H 299 discussion section does NOT fulfill the HON-H course requirement for the General Honors Notation (GHN). For more information about the GHN, please visit the HHC web site.

The course explores rock styles that came to the fore during the 1970s and 1980s. They include: Art Rock, Glam Rock, the Singer-Songwriter movement, Blues Rock, Heavy Metal, Hard Rock, Southern Rock, Country Rock, Heartland Rock, Power Pop, Jazz Fusion, Motown in the 70s, the Philadelphia Sound, R & B, Funk, Go-go, Disco, Electro-funk, Techno Pop, Krautrock, Ska, Rock Steady, Reggae, Hip-hop, Punk Rock, New Wave, Hardcore, Alternative Rock, Grunge and Industrial.

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MUS-Z 373 33244 The American Musical
Constance Glen TuTh 2:30-3:45 p.m. Mus Lib 015

Discover the excitement and spirit of the American musical through this course. Follow its development from minstrelsy, vaudeville, burlesque, and operetta, through the jazz era and "golden" age musicals, to the rock operas and "megamusicals" of today. Learn about creative teams and performers, and explore the contextual meaning of the musical and its relationship to American politics and culture.

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MUS-Z 415 9611 Connections: Music, Art, Literature
David Ward-Steinman W 5:30-8:15 p.m. Mus Lib 340

This class meets with another section of MUS-Z 415. This class explores interrelationships among the arts &emdash; music, literature, art, dance, and multimedia. By the end of the semester you should know and understand how the various arts influence each other, and are in turn influenced by the culture and temper of the times they reflect. Matters of style, deep structure, form, and texture are considered in the context of a historical survey from the Renaissance to the present, with emphasis on arts of the 20th and 21st centuries. An after-hours private tour of the IU Art Museum collection will be a feature of the course.

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School of Social Work

SWK-S 141 Various Introduction to Social Work
5555 Bruce McCallister TuTh 9:30 a.m.-10:45 a.m.
7881 Bruce McCallister TuTh 11:15 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
5556 Carlene Quinn TuTh 1 p.m.-2:15pm
10624 Chelsea Rood Online via Oncourse

This course is an introduction to the profession of social work and the philosophical, societal, and organizational contexts within which professional social work activities are conducted. This course provides the opportunity for students to explore their interest in and potential for a career in social work. It introduces the knowledge, skills and values of social work as a profession and explores the role of social workers within the broad area of social welfare and social services. Social work practice requires extensive knowledge about the human condition, problems in living, problem solving, the delivery of human services, and the institutions that comprise today's social welfare system. Cognitive and interaction skills necessary for competent practice are introduced in this course. This course emphasizes the value base of social work practice and its commitment to social and economic justice. It assists students in assessing the congruence between their own values and those of the profession.

The Council on Social Work Education (CSWE), the accrediting body for School's of Social Work, requires Social Work Programs to demonstrate how each course in the curriculum helps students develop competencies expected of all who seek entry into the profession. Programs must document a match between course content and CSWE competencies defined in Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards (EPAS). This course contributes to building knowledge and skills for students to demonstrate the following CSWE competencies: EPAS 2.1.1 (identify as a professional social worker and conduct oneself accordingly), EPAS 2.1.2 (values and ethics), EPAS 2.1.3 (critical thinking), EPAS 2.1.4 (engage diversity and difference in practice), EPAS 2.1.5 (advance human rights and social and economic justice), EPAS 2.1.6 (research informed practice) and EPAS 2.1.9 (respond to contexts that shape practice). Introduction to Social Work (S141) is one of seventeen social work courses required for the Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) degree. Students who seek admission to the BSW degree program must complete this course prior to applying to the Indiana University School of Social Work. As this course introduces students to knowledge pertaining to the characteristics, functions, and requirements of the social work profession, it prepares those formally admitted to the BSW degree program for further study in the knowledge, skills, and competencies necessary for effective generalist social work practice.

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School of Public and Environmental Affairs

SPEA-S 160 9531 Honors, National & International Policy
Evan Ringquist TuTh 8:00-9:15 a.m. PV 273

Examination of the great national and international issues of U.S. public affairs, including the major policy debates, the logic and process of public problem-solving, and the techniques of policy analysis applied to public action.

Discussions, readings, research, and debates are built around core reading that deals with: the democratic struggle over the current size and shape of American government as an instrument of public action, the policy choices embedded in U.S. fiscal policy, the problem of American dependence on petroleum importation, the changing nature of poverty and inequality in postindustrial societies, the American health security problem, the effects of globalization on American society and its economy, and the challenges and choices confronting American public schools.

Major assignments include short papers, a research project, independent reading, and debates on resolutions defined by the class.

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SPEA-S 161 9507 Honors, Urban Problems & Solutions
Orville Powell TuTh 9:30-10:45 a.m. PV 273

An introduction to urban policy issues. Topics include political, social, and economic foundations and development of cities and suburbs; urban planning; poverty; and other selected urban problems. Credit not given for both V 161 and V 264.

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S163 9490 Arts World: Management, Markets & Policy, Honors
Frank Lewis TuTh 2:30-3:45pm PV 276

This class meets with SPEA-A 163. This course provides students with a taste of the variety of topics they will encounter when pursuing the B.S. in Arts Management, including public policy in the arts, the economic structure of markets in various branches of the arts, and the issues facing administrators in the arts.

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SPEA-S 220 9522 Honors, Law & Public Affairs
Beth Cate MW 1:00-2:15 p.m. PV 275

S220 is designed to provide students with a thorough overview of the role of law, lawyers, and legal institutions in society, with an emphasis on law influence on public-sector operations. The course is designed to draw on and analyze current events and controversies as much as possible, and is highly interactive, with students completing numerous in-class exercises and engaging in rigorous discussions. Students will be expected to undertake substantial reading and preparation prior to class sessions. After successfully completing the course, students will be able to:
Explain and compare/contrast the distribution of powers of government within the US
Constitution, including legislative, regulatory and administrative, and judicial powers and processes
Explain and articulate major principles of key areas of substantive law
Evaluate the processes for resolving civil disputes and criminal charges in America
Create coherent and persuasive legal arguments by finding, interpreting and evaluating legal resources and correctly using legal terminology in communication
Apply basic elements of legal professional responsibility to factual situations in order to analyze ethical issues that arise in the application of the law
Connect what they learn in this course to their personal and professional lives

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SPEA-S 272 9492 Honors, Introduction to Environmental Science
Sara Powers TuTh 1:00-2:15 p.m. This class meets with SPEA-E 272.

Application of principles from life and physical sciences to the understanding and management of the environment. Emphasis will be placed on (1) the physical and biological restraints on resource availability and use, and (2) the technological and scientific options to solving environmental problems.

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SPEA-S 316 9502 Honors, Environmental Science & Health
Gregory Crouch TuTh 5:30-6:45 p.m. PV 169

This class meets with SPEA-H 316. This course is intended to provide students with a broad perspective on how the complex interactions of man and environment affect human health. Emphasis is placed on understanding the ways in which biological, chemical, and physical agents in the environment cause disease and the means by which such disease can be prevented or controlled. The first one-third of the course is devoted to a review of the essential framework and tools of environmental health practice including concepts of disease and its prevention, epidemiology, toxicology, and risk assessment. The remaining two-thirds of the course focuses on the application of these concepts and tools in a range of traditional environmental health sub- disciplines such as food safety, vector control, air and water quality and pollution control, radiological health, solid and hazardous waste management, and occupational health.

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SPEA-S 320 9503 Honors, Health Systems Administration
Mark Norrell MW 9:30-10:45 a.m.

This class meets with SPEA-H 320. An overview of the U.S. health care delivery system. It examines the organization, function, and role of the system; current system problems; and alternative systems or solutions.

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SPEA-S 353 9504 Honors, Advanced Health Finance and Budgeting
Terri Renner MW 5:30-6:45 p.m. PV 278

This class meets with SPEA-H 353. This course builds upon SPEA-H 352 Health Finance and Budgeting as well as examines the uses of contractual language and obligations. It uses a series of case studies to apply techniques and principles taught in SPEA-H 352.

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SPEA-S 362 9508 Honors, Non-Profit Management & Leadership
Beth Gazley TuTh 1:00-2:15 p.m. PV 273

This class meets with SPEA-V 362. Students in this course examine the management practices of nonprofit organizations. The course encourages students to take the perspectives of nonprofit managers, volunteers, board members, policy-makers, donors, and clients. Course projects expand understanding of the nonprofit sector and develop students? management skills, analytical tools, and knowledge.

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SPEA-S 363 9499 Honors, Environmental Management
Marc Lame TuTh 11:15 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. PV 169

This class meets with SPEA-E 363. Introductory course in environmental management. Subjects covered include current issues and trends, total quality environment management, managing scientific and technical personnel, managing contracts and grants, nontraditional approaches to regulation, environmental conflict resolution, working with the media, risk communication, and working with communities.

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SPEA-S 369 9510 Honors, Managing Information Technology
TuTh 4:00-5:15 p.m. PV 277

This class meets with SPEA-V 366. S366 addresses the way organizations function internally and the way they externally interact with other organizations. The class uses many real world examples from experience (all of our experiences) and current events cited in major newspapers and other serious media sources about how people behave in organizations and how organizations behave. The class addresses conceptual issues such as: how does organizational culture impact on employees, how people inside and outside the organization create organizational culture and what makes us love and hate organizations at the same time. Part of the class uses what we read and see every day to help students improve organizational life.

Students will review what is it in the basic human condition that makes us form organizations and how those organizations form us. Students will consider why some organizations flourish while others fail and how to translate organizational theory into specific management actions. In most cases the theory will be matched with a specific example from the ?real world?. The course will use business, government and nonprofit models to analyze organizational behavior. The class will use examples such as the recent credit crisis and the change in administration in Washington to analyze organizational behavior. One of the goals of the course is to have students to begin to think like a manager and use what they learn in class to improve very specific organizational skills. The class will deal not only with management issues but also how all employees help to construct a positive organization or help to destroy the organization. While organizational theory is very important it is more important that the student leave V366 with tools that will serve them when they enter their chosen work. Case studies will be from actual events that will teach practical skills while respecting the theoretical framework.

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SPEA-S 373 9512 Honors, Human Resource Management
Daniel Grundmann TuTh 2:30-3:45 p.m.

This class meets with SPEA-V 373. The organization and operation of public personnel management systems, with emphasis on concepts and techniques of job analysis, position classification, training, affirmative action, and motivation.

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SPEA-S 378 9520 Honors, Policy Processes in the U.S.
Donna McLean

This class meets with SPEA-V 378. This is an honors class only for students who have applied and been accepted into SPEA fall Washington Leadership Program (WLP). Any IU student may apply to the WLP Program which offers a semester in Washington, DC working at an internship (6 credits) and taking two classes (6 credits). The students may also take one of the classes for honors.

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SPEA-S 405 Public Law & Legislative Process
David Welch Tu 7:00-9:15 p.m. PV 163

This course focuses on Congress as a policy-making body in the U.S. public law system. It covers the constitutional framework for congressional operations, as well as technical aspects of the legislative process such as bill drafting and analysis, the role of leadership, and the prerogatives of individual members.

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SPEA-S 432 9514 Honors, Labor Relations in Public Sector
Richard Darko TuTh 2:30-3:45 p.m.

This class meets with SPEA-V 432. This course serves as an introduction and overview of labor-management relations (L-M) and collective bargaining in the public and private sectors. L-M "emphasizes skills that both managers and union leaders can use to minimize costly forms of conflict (such as strikes) and seek win-win solutions to disagreements." This course explores the development, practice, and extent of the collective bargaining process as well as the administration of the labor agreement within the context of public and private sector

organizations.

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SPEA-S 435 9517 Honors, Negotiation & Alternative Dispute
Nan Stager TuTh 2:30-3:34 p.m.

This class meets with SPEA-V 435. This course introduces students to the theories and techniques of alternative dispute resolution. The course covers interest-based negotiation, mediation, arbitration, fact-finding, early neutral evaluation, and other techniques used in business, labor relations, environmental disputes, family relations, and international affairs.

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SPEA-S 440 9521 Honors, Wetlands: Biology & Regulation
Ellen Herbert MWF 9:30-10:45 a.m. &emdash; PV 273 F 8:00 a.m.-noon &emdash; PV 275

This class meets with SPEA-E 440. This course focuses on structural and functional characteristics of wetlands, their importance as a natural resource and value to society. Topics include characteristics used to identify and classify wetlands, adaptations for living in wetlands, community structure and ecosystem processes, functions and values. Management of wetlands includes jurisdictional delineation and hydrogeomorphic assessment

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SPEA-S 441 9505 Honors, Legal Aspects of Health Care Administration
James Whitlatch TuTh 8:00-9:15 a.m. PV 169

This class meets with SPEA-H 441. An overview of the liability and legal responsibility, as well as legal recourse, that health care facilities may exercise. This course will discuss policies and standards relating to health facility administration. Also included is a discussion of financial aspects unique to the hospital/ health care facility environment, such as third-party payments and federal assistance.

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SPEA-S 456 9506 Honors, Managed Care
Mark Norell MW 4:00-5:15 p.m.

This class meets with SPEA-H 456. Course examines the organizational structures of managed care as used in the health industry. The strengths and weaknesses of managed care organizations are examined, as well as the performance of both public and private managed care organizations. Course also examines and discusses current issues surrounding managed care.

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SPEA-S 463 9519 Honors, Interpersonal Relations
Dick McGarvey TuTh 4:00-5:15 p.m.

This class meets with SPEA-V 463. Key interpersonal skills will be modeled through a variety of media and experiences. Students will practice these skills and receive feedback. Students will be expected to participate in structured experiences designed to give them insight into their behavior and how it will affect their ability to achieve personal and professional objectives.

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V450 7015 American Intelligence Community
Gene Coyle TuTh 11:15 a.m.-12:30 p.m. BH 209

This class meets with another section of SPEA-V 450. The aim of V450 is to provide students a basic knowledge of the functions of the organizations that make up the American Intelligence Community. The course will examine the role of the major players, particularly of the CIA, in helping the executive branch of the U.S.G. formulate and execute American foreign policy since 1947. V450 will look at the different component of "intelligence" work: clandestine collection, analysis, covert action and counterintelligence. We will look at the questions of how intelligence organizations should operate in a democratic society, the role of Congressional oversight and the ethics of espionage. There will be discussion of major intelligence events, beginning with Pearl Harbor, through the Cold War and ending with the Global War on Terrorism. The course is taught by a visiting CIA officer and will include guest speakers from the Washington DC Intelligence Community. In addition to the general aim, the course will introduce students to the following themes:

The spread of intelligence techniques to the business world, e.g. risk analysis of foreign markets and protection against foreign corporate espionage; The psychology of recruiting someone to commit espionage; A look at the ethical issues of espionage; The importance of looking at the hidden, intelligence component to many important international events in order to understand what really happened; and is good intelligence ever ignored by policymakers?

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SPH-K 409 30640 Basic Physiology of Exercise
Robert Chapman 11:15 a.m.-12:05 p.m.

Basic Physiology of Exercise is a survey course of human physiological parameters as related to physical exercise and work. Course includes in-depth examination of skeletal muscle, cardiovascular, and pulmonary physiology and the responses to acute exercise and chronic training. Additional specialty topics include environmental physiology (thermoregulation, altitude), nutritional ergogenics, elite performance physiology, body composition, obesity, and sex differences. Course includes 9 laboratory sessions designed to introduce skills related to common physiological measures completed in both research and clinical settings. For more information, contact Dr. Robert Chapman at rfchapma@indiana.edu.

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SPH-R 110 31019 Foundations of Recreation and Leisure Rasul Mowatt TuTh 4:00-5:15 p.m. FA 015

This class meets with another section of SPH-R 110. The human behavior of leisure is an important public health-related, social, cultural, and economic force that has a great influence on the quality of life and well-being of community residents. This course offers an introduction to leisure and public health as a significant force in contemporary life as well as a human behavior that has spanned across history and cultures. Course discussions, activities, and projects will delve into leisure relational importance to the public health of individuals, groups and communities by studying its social, behavioral, psychological, historical, philosophical, economic, anthropological, and geographical foundations. The course fulfills Social and Historical Studies general education requirements in all Indiana University majors and is a pre-requisite course for students choosing majors in the Department of Recreation, Park, and Tourism Studies of the School of Public Health ? Bloomington.

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