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Events for the week :
October 21, 2012 - October 27, 2012
Sunday
October 21
Monday
October 22
  • The development of reading systems in the brain

    Time: 01:30pm - 02:30pm 

    Place: Psychology Room 128

     

    Karin James

    Although it is well known that the brain responds to text information in a predictable way in literate adults, the particular experiences that are required to result in this functional specialization are unknown. We address this issue by investigating experiences in pre- literate children (4 year-olds) that lead to functional specialization of the ventral occipital-temporal cortex. Previously we have demonstrated that adults recruit different regions of the left fusiform gyrus when perceiving words compared to single letters and that single letter perception also recruits motor regions of the brain. This work led us to hypothesize that motor experience in the form of handwriting, may significantly alter visual processing of individual letters. We tested this hypothesis by training pre- literate children to print, trace and type letters and found that only after printing experience did the stereotypical neural response pattern seen in adults emerge. These studies suggest that printing experience may be a crucial component in creating functional systems for processing letters - a necessary step in learning to read.

     

    In category: Child language acquisition

     

Tuesday
October 23
  • Domain adaptation for parsing

    Time: 12:00pm - 01:00pm 

    Place: Memorial Hall 401

     

    Eric Baucom and Levi King

     

    In computational linguistics, we often encounter the problem of domain adaptation-- the challenge of adapting our tools that are trained on one style of text or speech (the training domain) to adequately perform their tasks on text or speech in a different style (the target domain). In this presentation, we examine different approaches to domain adaptation for sentence parsing, both involving annotated Wall Street Journal training texts and unannotated target texts of spoken dialog transcripts. We will discuss two completed experiments. The first experiment takes a co-training based approach to dependency parsing in which confidence scores from automatically parsed target domain sentences are used to select the best parses to augment the training set and retrain the parsers to incrementally improve performance in the target domain. The second experiment uses an agreement based approach to constituency parsing in which the training set is augmented incrementally with automatically parsed target domain sentences or fragments that two or more parsers agree on. Finally, we will discuss plans to perform a co-training experiment with constituency parsing and an agreement based experiment with dependency parsing to compare the effectiveness of these approaches with different kinds of parsing.

     

    In category: Computational linguistics

     

Wednesday
October 24
Thursday
October 25
  • NWAV 41 Workshops

    Time: 01:00pm - 03:00pm 

    Place: IMU

     

    Walnut Room:
    Some foundational principles of cognitive psychology applied to the study of variation
    Cynthia Clopper & Terrin Tamati

    Oak Room
    Linguistic variation, Theory-building and Statistics: Toward an Integrated Perspective
    John Paolillo

    Dogwood Room
    Fieldwork and minority communities
    James Stanford, Carmen Fought, & Nacole Walker

    http://www.indiana.edu/~nwav41/program.shtml#thu

     

    In category: Sociolinguistics and pragmatics

     

  • A practical guide to generating and analyzing political event data

    Time: 02:00pm - 05:00pm 

    Place: Woodburn 101

     

    Philip Schrodt (Pennsylvania State University)

    Political event data – categorical data on who did what to whom – is now being coded in near real time using open source software. This talk will look at some of the data sets that have recently become available, then consider the practical issues involved in doing customized coding, with a focus on the TABARI coding system and other tools developed at Penn State. Topics will include text filtering and formatting, named-entity recognition, the TABARI verb phrase and noun phrase dictionaries, and the CAMEO event and actor coding schemes. The talk assumes a general familiarity with social science data but otherwise has no prerequisites. Background information on the Penn State event data project can be found at http://eventdata.psu.edu.

     

    In category: Computational linguistics

     

  • NWAV 41 Workshops

    Time: 03:15pm - 05:15pm 

    Place: IMU

     

    Oak Room:
    Towards best practices in sociophonetics
    Marianna Di Paolo, Matt Bauer, Tom Purnell, & Ryan Shosted

    Georgian Room:
    Discourse analysis methods for variation studies
    Scott Kiesling

    Dogwood Room:
    Longitudinal studies
    Walt Wolfram, Gillian Sankoff, John Rickford, Janneke Van Hofwegen, Mary Kohn, & Charlie Farrington

    http://www.indiana.edu/~nwav41/program.shtml#thu

     

    In category: Sociolinguistics and pragmatics

     

  • Where does the sociolinguistic variable start?

    Time: 05:45pm - 06:45pm 

    Place: Frangipani Room, IMU

     

    Norma Mendoza-Denton (University of Arizona)
    with Ashley Hesson (Michigan State University)

    In their seminal discussion, Lavandera (1978) and Labov (1978) consider the definition of a sociolinguistic variable and the implications of the extension of the concept of a sociolinguistic variable from phonology to syntax and (to some degree) to discourse. In the thirty-five years since these writings, the debate over what counts as a variable, how to identify variable meanings, and how to circumscribe the envelope of variation continues (Romaine 1981, Fasold 1991, Wolfram 1991, Macauley and Fought 2004, Cheshire, Kerswill and Williams 2005). In this talk we present two case studies, one in sociophonetics, and one in discourse-pragmatic variation. We tackle two core issues: 1) what happens when a variable’s social meaning shifts as a result of a reevaluation of the social dimensions of the community, 2) how do we treat nested layers of pragmatically constrained variation? Our case studies represent different communities of practice and have the potential to shed light on how clusters of relationships, speech events, and shifting social landscapes affect our evolving conception of the sociolinguistic variable.

    http://www.indiana.edu/~nwav41/program.shtml#thu

     

    In category: Sociolinguistics and pragmatics

     

  • Articulate While Black: Barack Obama, Language, and Race in the U.S.

    Time: 06:45pm - 07:10pm 

    Place: IMU

     

    H. Samy Alim and Geneva Smitherman

    http://www.indiana.edu/~nwav41/program.shtml#thu

     

    In category: Sociolinguistics and pragmatics

     

Friday
October 26
  • NWAV 41 Paper Sessions

    Time: 08:30am - 10:10am 

    Place: IMU

     

    Georgian Room: Sexuality
    Dogwood Room: Language Contact
    Whittenberger Auditorium: Frequency

    http://www.indiana.edu/~nwav41/program.shtml#fri

     

    In category: Sociolinguistics and pragmatics

     

  • NWAV 41 Paper Sessions

    Time: 10:30am - 12:10pm 

    Place: IMU

     

    Georgian Room: Ethnicity
    Dogwood Room: Subject pronouns
    Whittenberger Auditorium: Sound change and vowels

    http://www.indiana.edu/~nwav41/program.shtml#fri

     

    In category: Sociolinguistics and pragmatics

     

  • The elephant and the pendulum: Variationist perspectives 2012

    Time: 02:00pm - 03:00pm 

    Place: Whittenberger Auditorium, IMU

     

    Sali Tagliamonte (University of Toronto)

    Sociolinguistics as Language Variation and Change is just over 40 years old making it a relatively new discipline and one that has undergone a virtual revolution in the course of its short history — from inception to full blown development. Over the course of this history it has had its share of debates, rebellions, advances and setbacks. In this paper, I offer an analysis of a common and extensively studied linguistic variable — stative possession in English, (1), as a focal point to reflect on the state of the art in Language Variation and Change

    (1)
    a. He’s got bad breath; he has smelly feet. (Christy Biggs, age 33, England, 1997)
    b. In the winter we got all kinds of rinks around. I got one in my backyard in the winter. My buddies have theirs in their backyard. (Donald Donovan, age 18, Canada, 2011)

    The construction with ‘have’ has the deepest history. Earlier in time and in some dialects more than others, ‘have’/’has’ contracted, e.g. “I’ve a cat”, leading to ‘got’ being added in the late 16th century producing the composite form ‘have got’ (often rendered as “‘ve/’s got”). Later on the contraction elided leaving got alone, e.g. “I got a cat”. All these variants persist in contemporary English dialects providing a quintessential case of ‘layering’ of older and more recently evolved forms (Hopper 1991:23). More interestingly, the forms have not been neutral in social meaning. Use of ‘have got’ for possession was condemned in the 1700’s and 1800’s, then championed in the 1900’s, while ‘got’ alone has remained universally stigmatized especially in 3rd person singular, and often attributed education, class and/or ethnic connotations. Thus, this common linguistic variable comprises quintessential attributes for scrutiny: historical variegated development, multiple synchronic forms, dialectal differentiation and social situated meaning.

    The data I will examine, which come from long-term, cross-project, multi-dialectal studies, show that two major varieties of English (British vs. North American) exhibit antithetic trajectories of change. Yet some of the linguistic constraints on this variable remain steadfast over centuries and across oceans (‘have got’ is favoured with concrete complements, e.g. “I’ve got a cat”); others differ depending on region (‘have’ favoured for noun phrase subjects, e.g. “Cats have nine lives”). However, a key variant of this system is ‘got’ alone, which not only embodies the linguistic evolution of the system (favoured in particular linguistic contexts, e.g. 1st person, concrete) but also indexes emblematic identities (e.g. “Got no Cum blood in me!”). A ‘language variation and change’ perspective of these results offers a unified interpretation of how social meaning arises out of morpho-syntactic linguistic change.

    http://www.indiana.edu/~nwav41/program.shtml#fri

     

    In category: Sociolinguistics and pragmatics

     

  • NWAV 41 Paper Sessions

    Time: 03:20pm - 04:35pm 

    Place: IMU

     

    Georgian Room: Gender
    Dogwood Room: Codeswitching
    Whittenberger Auditorium: Discourse

    http://www.indiana.edu/~nwav41/program.shtml#fri

     

    In category: Sociolinguistics and pragmatics

     

  • NWAV 41 Paper Sessions

    Time: 04:45pm - 06:00pm 

    Place: IMU

     

    Georgian Room: Prestige
    Dogwood Room: African American English / Social aspects
    Whittenberger Auditorium: Computer mediated communication

    http://www.indiana.edu/~nwav41/program.shtml#fri

     

    In category: Sociolinguistics and pragmatics

     

  • NWAV 41 Poster Session

    Time: 06:00pm - 07:30pm 

    Place: Frangipani Room, IMU

     

    http://www.indiana.edu/~nwav41/program.shtml#fri

     

    In category: Sociolinguistics and pragmatics

     

Saturday
October 27
  • NWAV 41 Paper Sessions

    Time: 08:30am - 10:10am 

    Place: IMU

     

    Georgian Room: Ideology
    Dogwood Room: Pragmatics
    Whittenberger Auditorium: Phonology- Consonants

    http://www.indiana.edu/~nwav41/program.shtml#sat

     

    In category: Sociolinguistics and pragmatics

     

  • NWAV 41 Paper Sessions

    Time: 10:30am - 12:10pm 

    Place: IMU

     

    Georgian Room: African American English
    Dogwood Room: Morphosyntax-Pronouns
    Whittenberger Auditorium: Phonology-Consonants

    http://www.indiana.edu/~nwav41/program.shtml#sat

     

    In category: Sociolinguistics and pragmatics

     

  • NWAV 41 Panels

    Time: 02:00pm - 04:00pm 

    Place: IMU

     

    Dogwood Room: Computer-Mediated Communication and Language Variation
    Oak Room: Variation in Ex-Colonial Language
    Whittenberger Auditorium: Sociophonetics of Midwest English

    http://www.indiana.edu/~nwav41/program.shtml#sat

     

    In category: Sociolinguistics and pragmatics

     

  • NWAV 41 Paper Sessions

    Time: 04:10pm - 05:50pm 

    Place: IMU

     

    Georgian Room: Social Evaluation
    Dogwood Room: Morphosyntax
    Whittenberger Auditorium: Phonology-Vowels

    http://www.indiana.edu/~nwav41/program.shtml#sat

     

    In category: Sociolinguistics and pragmatics

     

  • An immodest proposal

    Time: 06:00pm - 07:00pm 

    Place: Ballantine Hall 013

     

    Dennis Preston (Oklahoma State University)

    Of the problems outlined in Weinreich, Labov, and Herzog (1968), it is that of evaluation that has received the least systematic attention. By systematic attention, I mean methodological, interpretive, and theoretical advances that involve the direct investigation of evaluation, not the practice that I will call inferential sociolinguistics. The inferential approach to the evaluation problem has by no means been unproductive; it relies on the principal data of sociolinguistics — the patterned variation of production — and uses the investigator’s intimate knowledge of the community to infer from the data evaluative characteristics or “norms.” More recently, however, as encouraged in Weinreich, Labov, and Herzog, independent measures to directly assess evaluation have taken a more central place in the study of variation and change. This presentation will address and illustrate from past and ongoing research two major aspects of this trend: 1) Such studies are more frequent and varied and make greater use of sophisticated
    techniques in the study of attitudes. 2) Newer studies have begun to address the challenge of systematic and careful linking of the evaluative data uncovered to the central questions of variation and change. The importance of systematically incorporating such direct approaches to the problem of evaluation in all sociolinguistic study and an integrated model for doing so is the immodest proposal of this presentation.

    http://www.indiana.edu/~nwav41/program.shtml#sat

     

    In category: Sociolinguistics and pragmatics

     




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