Indiana University

Previous month Previous week Next week Next month
See by year See by month See by week See Today Search Jump to month
Events for the week :
April 20, 2014 - April 26, 2014
Sunday
April 20
Monday
April 21
  • PraatR: An architecture for controlling the phonetics software 'Praat' with the R programming language

    Time: 11:30am - 01:00pm 

    Place: Memorial Hall 317a (Seminar Room)

     

    Aaron Albin

    An increasing number of researchers are using the R programming language (http://www.r-project.org/) for the visualization and statistical modeling of acoustic-phonetic data. However, R's digital signal processing capabilities are still limited compared to free-standing phonetics software such as Praat (http://www.fon.hum.uva.nl/praat/). As such, it is typical to extract the acoustic measurements in Praat, export the data to a textfile, and then import this file into R for analysis. This process of manually shuttling data from one program to the other slows down and complicates the analysis workflow. The present work reports on a software architecture ('PraatR') designed to overcome this inefficiency. Each of its R functions sends a shell command to the operating system that invokes the command-line form of Praat with an associated Praat script that imports a file, applies a Praat command to it, and then either brings the output directly into R or exports the output as a textfile. Since all arguments are passed from R to Praat, the full functionality of the original Praat command is available inside R, making it possible to conduct the entire analysis within a single environment. Moreover, with the combined power of these two programs, many new analyses become possible.

     

    In category: Phonetics and phonology

     

  • Individual differences as a crucible for testing embodied theories of language comprehension

    Time: 04:00pm - 05:00pm 

    Place: Psychology Room 101

     

    Arthur Glenberg (Arizona State University)

    I will present the results from two projects that examine individual differences in the embodiment of language comprehension. Both projects test the claim that language comprehension is a simulation process that uses neural and bodily systems of perception, action, and emotion. But, are embodied effects found only when reading special texts designed to elicit them, or is simulation the basis for comprehension of all types of texts? If the latter is correct, then people who best simulate should best understand. This prediction was tested in the first project. We first measured reading comprehension skill using the Gates-McGinite standardized reading test, and then the same participants read a passage using Zwaan & Taylor's reading by rotation paradigm that provides a measure of embodiment. The embodiment prediction is for a positive correlation between the two measures, whereas non-embodied positions predict either a negative correlation (simulation is a waste of resources) or a zero correlation (simulation is epiphenomenal). The second project takes seriously the claim that bodily resources contribute to simulation. In this case, large (tall/heavy) people should find it relatively easier to understand sentences such as, "You pushed the SUV to the gas station for a fill-up" compared to sentences such as "You entered the house by crawling through the doggie door." And, smaller people should show the reverse.


     

    In category: Morphosyntax and semantics

     

Tuesday
April 22
Wednesday
April 23
Thursday
April 24
  • [Oral presentations]

    Time: 10:00am - 12:00pm 

    Place: IMU Oak Room and Walnut Room

     

    Pragmatics and Language Learning
    For details, see http://www.indiana.edu/~pll/home/

     

    In category: Sociolinguistics and pragmatics

     

  • Ultrasound imaging of tongue surface behavior

    Time: 11:00am - 12:00pm 

    Place: Speech & Hearing Building, Room C141

     

    Maureen Stone (University of Maryland)

    This talk will present applications of ultrasound methodology to the understanding of tongue behavior during speech and swallowing. Methodological issues include finding a vocal tract reference, measuring the palate, visualizing and capturing tongue features and comparing data sets. Applications include analysis of midsagittal motion patterns during swallowing and 3D coarticulation during speech.

     

    In category: Phonetics and phonology

     

  • [Oral presentations]

    Time: 01:30pm - 03:30pm 

    Place: IMU Oak Room and Walnut Room

     

    Pragmatics and Language Learning
    For details, see http://www.indiana.edu/~pll/home/

     

    In category: Sociolinguistics and pragmatics

     

  • [Colloquium] Pragmatic research in study abroad settings

    Time: 04:00pm - 06:00pm 

    Place: IMU Oak Room

     

    Pragmatics and Language Learning
    For details, see http://www.indiana.edu/~pll/home/

     

    In category: Sociolinguistics and pragmatics

     

Friday
April 25
  • [Oral presentations]

    Time: 09:00am - 10:00am 

    Place: IMU Oak Room, Maple Room, and Walnut Room

     

    Pragmatics and Language Learning
    For details, see http://www.indiana.edu/~pll/home/

     

    In category: Sociolinguistics and pragmatics

     

  • [Colloquium] Interlanguage pragmatics and digital technologies for research and practice

    Time: 10:00am - 12:00pm 

    Place: IMU Oak Room

     

    Pragmatics and Language Learning
    For details, see http://www.indiana.edu/~pll/home/

     

    In category: Sociolinguistics and pragmatics

     

  • Effects of literacy on children’s productions of complex sentences

    Time: 11:15am - 12:15pm 

    Place: Speech and Hearing Building, Room C141

     

    Jessica Montag

    When people speak, they have many choices about how to say what they want to say. This largely unconscious process – of choosing words and sentence structures – is poorly understood. I will argue that we can begin to understand these production choices by understanding what is easy or difficult for speakers to produce. One aspect of this difficulty is the frequency with which a speaker has encountered or produced an utterance in the past. In my talk, I will be discussing a set of corpus analyses and production experiments with children and adults. I investigated how amount of language experience and emerging literacy affect production choices. These studies show how children gradually learn to identify alternative language forms from their linguistic environment, how the linguistic environment changes over time as children grow, and how children’s control over complex sentence structures continues to develop well after early stages of language learning.

     

    In category: Child language acquisition

     

  • [Poster session]

    Time: 12:15pm - 01:30pm 

    Place: IMU Garden (weather permitting) / Oak Room

     

    Pragmatics and Language Learning
    For details, see http://www.indiana.edu/~pll/home/

     

    In category: Sociolinguistics and pragmatics

     

  • The surprisingly lexical behavior of lexical episodes

    Time: 01:30pm - 02:30pm 

    Place: Psychology 128

     

    Stephen Goldinger (Arizona State University)

    For years, it has been known that human memory has massive capacity to retain detailed traces of visual objects (e.g., Shepard, 1967; Standing et al., 1970), findings that have recently been extended (Brady et al., 2008). Such results led to the development of powerful exemplar models in the visual domain (e.g., Shi, Griffiths, Feldman & Sanborn, 2010). Similar models have been suggested in the auditory domain (e.g., Goldinger, 1998; Johnson, 2007; Walsh et al., 2010), proposing that lexical access can often proceed by memory-based classification, rather than segment-based signal analysis. Although exemplar models are powerful, they are often considered poor candidates in our quest to understand language use, due to a combination of implausible assumptions and hypothetical dissociations between neural systems for episodic memory and language.

    In this talk, I will emphasize that both perception and memory for spoken words show hallmark findings of exemplar processing (e.g., Shepard's Law, relating generalization to distance in psychological space; Shepard, 1987). I will review new findings showing that "truly lexical" processing can be driven by recent memorial episodes. For example, recently heard words affect eye-movements very early in perception (despite claims about late-arising episodic effects; McLennan & Luce, 2005). Moreover, degrees of spontaneous imitation of spoken words are powerfully affected by changing the encoding demands during word perception in the visual world paradigm, showing deep connections between attention, memory, and speech production. Finally, voice-specific neighborhood effects suggest an interplay of segmental knowledge with episodic traces. I will close by suggesting that exemplar-based views of lexical access are entirely compatible with segmental representations; a persistent false dichotomy that has hindered understanding of the episodic approach.

     

    In category: Phonetics and phonology

     

  • [Oral presentations]

    Time: 02:00pm - 03:00pm 

    Place: IMU Oak Room, Maple Room, and Walnut Room

     

    Pragmatics and Language Learning
    For details, see http://www.indiana.edu/~pll/home/

     

    In category: Sociolinguistics and pragmatics

     

  • [Oral presentations]

    Time: 03:20pm - 04:50pm 

    Place: IMU Oak Room, Maple Room, and Walnut Room

     

    Pragmatics and Language Learning
    For details, see http://www.indiana.edu/~pll/home/

     

    In category: Sociolinguistics and pragmatics

     

  • What is grammatical variation in French?

    Time: 03:30pm - 04:30pm 

    Place: Sassafras Room, Indiana Memorial Union

     

    Aidan Coveney (University of Exeter)

    In this talk, I will survey some of the “big issues” regarding grammatical variation in French, such as: What is meant by “variation”? What varies, in French? What are the major characteristics of social differentiation and of style-shifting in French grammatical variation? What types of linguistic/pragmatic constraints are there on French grammatical variables? I will explore the answers to these questions and related issues in this talk, which will be followed by a question and answer period.

     

    In category: Sociolinguistics and pragmatics

     

  • [Plenary] How formulaic is pragmatics?

    Time: 05:00pm - 06:15pm 

    Place: Chemistry 122

     

    Kathleen Bardovi-Harlig

    Interest in formulaic language in pragmatics has increased in the last 10 years. Formulaic language, and in particular, conventional expressions, are one type of pragmalinguistic resource. In this talk, I explore what it means for a string to be a formula in the context of pragmatics (for both native and second language use) and how native speaker use might influence the use of L2 speakers. I will consider the learning challenges from the perspectives of input, sociopragmatics, and pragmalinguistic (and grammatical) development.

    Pragmatics and Language Learning
    For details, see http://www.indiana.edu/~pll/home/

     

    In category: Sociolinguistics and pragmatics

     

Saturday
April 26
  • [Oral presentations]

    Time: 09:00am - 10:00am 

    Place: IMU Oak Room, Maple Room, and Walnut Room

     

    Pragmatics and Language Learning
    For details, see http://www.indiana.edu/~pll/home/

     

    In category: Sociolinguistics and pragmatics

     

  • [Colloquium] The whys and hows of assessing L2 pragmatic knowledge: Towards improved L2 pragmatics testing practices

    Time: 10:00am - 12:00pm 

    Place: IMU Oak Room

     

    Pragmatics and Language Learning
    For details, see http://www.indiana.edu/~pll/home/

     

    In category: Sociolinguistics and pragmatics

     

  • [Oral Presentations]

    Time: 01:30pm - 02:30pm 

    Place: IMU Oak Room, Maple Room, and Walnut Room

     

    Pragmatics and Language Learning
    For details, see http://www.indiana.edu/~pll/home/

     

    In category: Sociolinguistics and pragmatics

     

  • [Oral Presentations]

    Time: 02:50pm - 04:50pm 

    Place: IMU Oak Room, Maple Room, and Walnut Room

     

    Pragmatics and Language Learning
    For details, see http://www.indiana.edu/~pll/home/

     

    In category: Sociolinguistics and pragmatics

     

  • [Plenary] Pragmatic instruction: Insights from the classroom and beyond

    Time: 05:00pm - 06:15pm 

    Place: IMU Oak Room

     

    Eva Alcón (James I University)

    An increasing number of studies in the area of interlanguage pragmatics have focused on the effect of instruction on pragmatic learning. Following this line of research, I will start addressing the question of whether the English as a foreign language (EFL) classroom provides the theoretical conditions for pragmatic learning. I will focus on three aspects: a) the opportunities for developing pragmatic ability in EFL classrooms; b) whether or not pragmatic ability develops in classroom settings without instruction; c) and the effect of various instructional approaches. Then, I will refer to the research conducted by the LAELA research on the role of pragmatic learning in instructional settings to evaluate to what the extent pragmatic learning is constrained by the nature of intervention, learners’ individual variables, or the learning context. Empirical evidence will be used to suggest a more ecologically-oriented approach to analyze whether sociocultural behaviors and conventions of language used, previously taught in the classroom, are applied in real life interaction. This approach allows us to explore how gains from instruction are shaped when the target language is used in authentic communicative contexts. Finally, by moving from the classroom to the real world, I encourage language teachers to consider opportunities and challenges involved in new language learning environments.

    Pragmatics and Language Learning
    For details, see http://www.indiana.edu/~pll/home/

     

    In category: Sociolinguistics and pragmatics

     




JEvents v3.0.9 Stable   Copyright © 2006-2013