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Borderlands and Bloodlands

Rethinking the Mass Violence of the Twentieth Century in Eastern Europe

cosponsored lecture by

Eric D. Weitz, Dean of Humanities & Arts; Professor of History, City College of New York

Tuesday, September 17, 2013
4 pm
Chemistry, Room 122

Eric D. Weitz is Dean of Humanities and Arts and Professor of History at The City College of New York. He was previously on the faculty of the University of Minnesota, where he was Distinguished McKnight University Professor of History and the Arsham and Charlotte Ohanessian Chair in the College of Liberal Arts. Trained in modern European and German history, his work in recent years has extended to the history and politics of international human rights and crimes against humanity. He received his Ph.D. from Boston University in 1983.

Weitz has been the recipient of many fellowships and awards from the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD), the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Council for Soviet and East European Research, and the American Council of Learned Societies, among others.

His major publications include Weimar Germany: Promise and Tragedy (2007; second expanded edition 2013), A Century of Genocide: Utopias of Race and Nation (2003), and Creating German Communism, 1890-1990 (1997), all with Princeton University Press. Weimar Germany was named an "Editor's Choice" by The New York Times Book Review, and was included in the "Year in Books" of The Financial Times (London) and "The Best Books of 2007" of The Independent (London). It has been translated into Italian, Spanish, Swedish, Polish, and Chinese. Most recently, he co-edited with Omer Bartov, Shatterzone of Empires: Coexistence and Violence in the German, Habsburg, Russian, and Ottoman Borderlands (Indiana University Press, 2013), the result of a multi-year, international, and interdisciplinary project.

In 2006 Weitz initiated a book series with Princeton University Press, Human Rights and Crimes against Humanity. He is currently writing, A World Divided: A Global History of Nations and Human Rights from the Age of Revolution to the Present.

This talk is part of the IU SGIS Global Perspectives Speakers Series and is
cosponsored by the Polish Studies Center, the Department of History, and the Borns Jewish Studies Program.