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Indiana University Bloomington
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Shaul Magid

The Jay and Jeanie Schottenstein Chair in Jewish Studies
Professor of Jewish Studies and Religious Studies

My teaching focuses primarily on Kabbala, Hasidism, religious fundamentalism, Israel/Palestine, and modern and American Jewish thought and culture. Areas of interest and research include sixteenth century Kabbala, Hasidism, American Judaism, comparative religion, and contemporary conceptions of Jewish religiosity. I am the editor of God's Voice from the Void: Old and New Essays on Rabbi Nahman of Bratslav (SUNY Press, 2001), co-editor of Beginning Again: Toward a Hermeneutic of Jewish Texts (Seven Bridges Press, 2002) and author of Hasidism on the Margin: Reconciliation, Antinomianism, and Messianism in Izbica and Radzin Hasidism (University of Wisconsin Press, 2003). From Metaphysics to Midrash: Myth, History, and the Interpretation of Scripture in Lurianic Kabbala (Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 2008) which was awarded the 2008 American Academy of Religion Award for best book in religion in the textual studies category, American Post-Judaism: Identity and Renewal in a Postethnic Society (Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 2013) and Hasidism Incarnate: Hasidism, Christianity, and the Construction of Modern Judaism (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2014). I am the series editor for “Post-Rabbinic Judaisms” for Academic Studies Press. I am also a regular contributor to Tikkun Magazine, Zeek Magazine, Open Zion, and Religion Dispatches.

Education

  • Ph.D. at Brandeis University, 1994

Research Interests

  • Kabbala
  • Medieval and modern Jewish philosophy
  • Hasidism
  • Gender and religion
  • Jewish ethics and contemporary Jewish religiosity
  • Renewal and fundamentalism

Courses Recently Taught

  • Introduction to Judaism
  • Contemporary Issues in Judaism
  • Religions of the West
  • Hasidism & Existentialism

Publication Highlights

Articles

"The Politics of (un) Conversion: The ’Mixed Multitude’ (erev rav) as Conversos in Rabbi Hayyim Vital’s Etz Ha-Da’at Tov, Jewish Quarterly Review (2005)

"Rainbow Hasidism in America-The Maturation of Jewish Renewal-A Review Essay," The Reconstructionist (Spring, 2004): 34-60

"Is Egalitarianism Heresy: Re-Thinking Gender on the Margins of Judaism" Nashim 8 (Fall, 2004); "Judaism and Reconciliation" Concilium: Reconciliation in a World of Conflicts, 2003-5 (forthcoming)

"Lurianic Kabbala and Original Sin," [Hebrew] Hafatzat Ha-Kabbalah (The Influence of Kabbala), Moseh Idel ed. Jerusalem, 2005

"Ethics Disentangled from the Law: Hasidism and Dispositional Ethics," A Companion to Religious Ethics, Charley Hallisey, William Schweiker eds., (Blackwell Press: England, 2004)