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Undergrad Minor Ph.D. Minor Spring '15 Courses Cross-Listed Courses Why Latino Studies?

FALL 2013 COURSES
Course information will continue to be updated as needed.

LATS L101  Introduction to Latino Studies (3cr)
Class number: 6283
Time: 09:30A-10:45A TR
IUB GenEd S&H credit
COLL (CASE) Diversity in U.S. credit
COLL (CASE) S&H Breadth of Inquiry credit
Instructor: J. Anguiano

This course is intended to provide an introduction and overview on Latino issues. The course will begin with a brief overview of the histories of the major Latinos national origin groups in the U.S. The bulk of the course will examine a number of topics and issues that are key to understanding contemporary Latinos; e.g., immigration, language, education, employment, etc. The third and briefest part of the course will build upon the previous sections by asking how the history and current status of Latinos might influence their near-term future.

LATS L102 Introduction to Latino History (3cr)
Class number: 3615
Time: 09:30A-10:45A MW
IUB GenEd S&H credit
COLL (CASE) Diversity in U.S. credit
COLL (CASE) S&H Breadth of Inquiry credit
Instructor: J. Boles

Latino history is United States history. It focuses on the experiences and perspectives of the U.S. Latino population-one often overlooked in general U.S. History surveys. Latino/a is a specifically U.S. term that refers to peoples whose identity is constructed from the cultural consequences of Latin American colonial history and U.S. expansionism; economic, racial, and transnational politics also play a fundamental role in shaping this identity. This course introduces students to the major historical moments and attitudes that influenced Latino/a identity. We will particularly focus on events related to U.S. citizens of Mexican and Puerto Rican heritage, but we will discuss issues associated with peoples of other Caribbean, Central and South American heritages as well. Students will develop an understanding how Latino/as have contributed and participated in the formation and development of U.S. society. Carries culture studies and S&H credit.

LATS L103 Introduction to Latino Cultures (3cr)
Class number: 13358
Time: 04:00P-05:15P TR
IUB GenEd S&H credit
COLL (CASE) Diversity in U.S. credit
COLL (CASE) S&H Breadth of Inquiry credit
Instructor: R. Gonzalez

How do borders shape and impact our lives? Does everyone cross borders? Are borders open spaces? What constitute the American borderlands? This course examines the U.S.-Mexico border and its respective literature on cultural borderlands and crossings as a point of departure to analyze the historical, political, and cultural production of borders as sites of conflict - as political and physical spaces where wars are waged (e.g. war on drugs and the war on terror)- and where people's lives are impacted. The course has four goals: (1) provide knowledge about the social and cultural composition of the U.S.-Mexico border region as a setting to major public issues such as immigration, globalization, industrialization, transnationalism, poverty, and culture; (2) examine the human side of those issues by paying close attention to the lives and quotidian struggles of people in the borderlands; (3) place those individual lives in broader social and cultural frameworks that connect Mexico and the United States and beyond; and (4) analyze other forms of "border crossings" as experienced and conceptualized by Chicanas/os, Puerto Ricans, and other scholars of color. In the process, we will problematize the imagined crisis of the U.S.-Mexico border, as well as the linkages of the social constructions of gender, sexuality, race, class, and community.

LATS L103 Introduction to Latino Cultures (3cr)
Second Eight Weeks Course Class number: 34265
Time: 05:45P-07:45P TR
IUB GenEd S&H credit
COLL (CASE) Diversity in U.S. credit
COLL (CASE) S&H Breadth of Inquiry credit
Instructor: T. Mitchell

How do borders shape and impact our lives? Does everyone cross borders? Are borders open spaces? What constitute the American borderlands? This course examines the U.S.-Mexico border and its respective literature on cultural borderlands and crossings as a point of departure to analyze the historical, political, and cultural production of borders as sites of conflict - as political and physical spaces where wars are waged (e.g. war on drugs and the war on terror)- and where people's lives are impacted. The course has four goals: (1) provide knowledge about the social and cultural composition of the U.S.-Mexico border region as a setting to major public issues such as immigration, globalization, industrialization, transnationalism, poverty, and culture; (2) examine the human side of those issues by paying close attention to the lives and quotidian struggles of people in the borderlands; (3) place those individual lives in broader social and cultural frameworks that connect Mexico and the United States and beyond; and (4) analyze other forms of "border crossings" as experienced and conceptualized by Chicanas/os, Puerto Ricans, and other scholars of color. In the process, we will problematize the imagined crisis of the U.S.-Mexico border, as well as the linkages of the social constructions of gender, sexuality, race, class, and community.

LATS L105 Diversity by the Numbers (3cr)
Class number: 9500
Time: 01:00P-02:15P TR
IUB GenEd S&H credit
COLL (CASE) N&M Breadth of Inquiry credit
Instructor: S. Martinez

As our society gets more diverse, we constantly rely on numbers to make sense of our world. As we are bombarded with information often in the form of statistics, we often assume that these numbers are autonomous, come about on their own, and that they are true. We fail to challenge statistics because we lack the tools necessary to interpret them.  You will get this and much more out of this course. While the class will examine the experiences of various racial/ethnic groups in the U.S., we will focus on Latinos, the fastest growing ethnic group in our nation.  Because one out of every four U.S. residents will be a Latino in 2050, there is a pressing need for us to understand and produce knowledge about them.  By comparing the Latino population to other racial/ethnic groups, we will be able to understand them in relation to various social institutions such as education, the family, and the labor market.  At the same time, this will allow us to make better sense of the quantitative reasoning behind the numbers used in the production of social statistics.

During the first half of the course, you will learn the methods used by social scientists to produce statistics.  With these quantitative tools, you will use the General Social Survey to analyze, produce, and present your own projects.  Having a common database to work with for myriad projects, will help us build upon each other’s work to create a more nuanced and systematic analysis of the complexities of the U.S. population. 

LATS L220 Introduction to Latino Literature (3cr)
Class number: 29191
Time: 11:15A-12:30P TR
COLL (CASE) Diversity in U.S. credit
COLL (CASE) A&H Breadth of Inquiry credit
Above class meets with ENG
Instructor: A. Varon

More so than any time in recent memory, Latinos are a visible part of the national imaginary. Even a cursory glance at mainstream, English-language media shows Latinos occupying an increasingly central position in American life. And while such visibility is an encouraging sign of Latino social advancement, these representations suggests a group cohesion that is not always historically accurate. In fact, its heterogeneity is a defining, though often overlooked, feature of Latino identity. In this course, we will explore the culture and some of the origins of the varied groups who identify, collectively and nationally, as Latina/o. Focusing on cultural texts, traditions, and their development, this course will provide a background on the cultural production of Latina/os in the United States. Although Latino literary heritage can be traced at least into the 16th century, in this course we will focus our readings primarily on the late 20th and 21st centuries in order to emphasize the current state of Latino cultural studies. We will familiarize ourselves with many of the ethnic, racial, gendered, class, and national backgrounds that contribute to Latina/o identity, examine some key texts in Latino culture, as well as some of the central interpretive models in Latino cultural studies. 

Primary Texts Used in L220:
George Washington Gomez, Americo Paredes,
Down these Mean Streets, Piri Thomas,
How the Garcia Girls Lost their Accents, Julia Alvarez,
Selena, Gregory Nava ,director
Zoot Suit, Luis Valdez, director

In order to achieve a wide and representative picture of Latina/o cultural production, much of our readings will be short fiction. Texts and readings will also include several films, a few novels, and plays, with secondary readings in criticism from Latino Studies and cultural studies. Additional texts by various authors and genres (short stories, corridos, poems, selected critical pieces, etc.) will be available on Oncourse and may feature authors such as: Jose Marti, Jesus Colon, Ray Gonzalez, Christina Garcia, Junot Diaz, Manuel Munoz, Tomas Rivera, Ana Castillo, Helena Maria Viramontes, Francisco Goldman, and Daniel Alarcon; and films such as El Mariachi (1992), Sleep Dealer (2011), Come and Take it Day (2009).

LATS L301 Latino Immigrants - U.S. Society (3cr)
Class number: 29199
Time: 02:30P-03:45P TR
Joint-Listed - Above class meets with HIST-A352
COLL (CASE) Diversity in U.S. credit
COLL (CASE) S&H Breadth of Inquiry credit
Instructor: J. Nieto-Phillips

Examines Latino immigrants to the United States with a focus on the frequent conflict between these immigrants and various institutions and segments of United States society.

LATS L398 Latino Folklore (3cr)
Class number: 9747
Time: 02:30P-03:45P MW
Joint-Listed - Above class meets with FOLK-F 356
COLL (CASE) A&H Breadth of Inquiry credit
COLL (CASE) Diversity in U.S. credit
Instructor: M. Martinez-Rivera

Using a wide array of resources-movies, dancing workshops, visits to Museums-,in this course we will study a wide array of cultural manifestations-oral traditions, music, festivals, dance, material culture, healing and spirituality-practiced by the US Latino community, while also paying attention to wider debates concerning migration, gender, nationalism, and identity. The course will begin with an overview of the study of Folklore and of Latino Studies. The remainder of the course will be divided into four main areas of inquiry: Oral Narratives, Rituals and Festivals, Music and Performance, and Material Culture.  We will also pay attention to five main themes-migration, gender, nationalism, and identity and the interrelation between them-and how different cultural practices and traditional expressive forms help express, negotiate, transform, and maintain Latino communities in the United States.

LATS L398 The American Bildungsroman: Becoming American in the Multi-Ethnic United States (3cr)
Class number: 32860
Time: 02:30P-03:45P TR
Joint-Listed - Above class meets with ENG-L 374
COLL (CASE) A&H Breadth of Inquiry credit
COLL (CASE) Diversity in U.S. credit
Instructor: A. Varon

Nearly every school-age child in the United States learns of America as the great “melting pot,” a land of equal opportunity where different cultures combine into a national society.  That process became synonymous with Americanization and the dream of personal improvement.  But the realities of American society proved far more problematic and the stories of the American melting pot reveal a much more complicated social milieu. As different ethnic groups came in contact with each other and with U.S. society, the process of “Americanization” was as frequently marked by inequality, violence, and institutional racism as by hope and success. In this course, we will read stories by authors from multiple ethnic backgrounds to investigate what is the American bildungsroman?   

The bildungsroman, the “novel of education,” was a popular 18th and 19th century novel form detailing a young protagonist’s advent into maturity and was often tied to the rise of the nation state.  In a U.S. context, the American bildungsroman might best be understood as a coming of age novel more concerned with cultural contact than with national inclusion. That experience is often connected to movement or immigration, but equally resulted from the question of race. In this course, we tackle the question, “what does it mean to be American?” What is the relationship between Americanization and assimilation? How do novel’s view and portray the characters’ countries of origin? In what ways is American culture multilingual? How does gender affect the process of Americanization?  How has the American “melting pot” changed over time? Is the process of becoming American ever complete? The readings will help us explore the ways that American culture is and has always been an evolving process. 

LATS L400  Latin American & Latino Pop Culture (3cr)
Class number: 13361
Time: 06:30P-07:45P MW
Joint-Listed - Above class meets with MUS-M 413, Z 413 and M 513
Instructor: M. Quevedo

Historical and cultural aspects in the development of important popular music genres in Latin America and the Caribbean, and their impact in the United States. Issues of performance and instrumentation and the output of significant composers, arrangers, and performers. For non-music majors only. Activities outside of class may be scheduled.

LATS L400  Listening to America (3cr)
Class number: 33430
Time: 06:30P-07:45P MW
Joint-Listed - Above class meets with AMST-A 350
Instructor: J. Anguiano

This course explores social, historical and cultural constructions of America through sound and music. This course begins from the premise that listening engenders unique subjects and methods from which to analyze the American experience. As such music and sound are a powerful physical, social and affective force that create a site of dialogue (within and amongst different communities), a source of creative pleasure and arena of struggle that confronts large socio-political issues - especially amongst underrepresented and marginalized communities. Central to this perspective is the notion that the value and function of music is built and shared collectively by the communities that produce and listen to music.

The class will listen to (analyze) selected soundtracks of American life past and present as a sonic archive of American history and identity. The course is broken down into thematic categories central to American musical life such as: intercultural communication; the commodification of music; sonic stereotypes; gender ideology; and national identity. Ultimately, students will learn to listen deeply to music for the social, cultural and historical lessons embedded within the notes.

LATS L601 Sociology of Education (3cr)
Class number: 32861
Time: 01:00-03:45 PM W
Joint-listed - Above class meets with EDUC-H 540
Instructor: S. Martinez

This course will examine the relationships between education and society by reviewing a variety of theoretical perspectives and empirical studies. Topics include social mobility and stratification; social reproduction; the dynamics of race, class, and gender in education; social capital; the student teacher relationship; teaching as a profession; school choice; and higher education.

LATS L601 Revolution and the Cold War in Latino/a Literature (1959-present) (3cr)
Class number: 34721
Time: 09:30AM-10:45AM TR
Joint-listed - Above class mees with AMST-G 751 and HISP-S 688
Instructor: D. Cohn

In this course, we will explore the ripple effect of the Cold War and revolution in Latin America in works by Latino/a authors. The Cuban Revolution of 1959 sparked hope of establishing political autonomy throughout Spanish America. Much has been written about the cultural effervescence, including the Spanish American literary Boom, that sprung out of this moment, to say nothing of the activism and revolutionary activity that spread throughout the region in subsequent decades. This course looks at representations of revolution, counterinsurgency, and dictatorship in Latin America in texts written by Latino/a authors. We will study the fervor of these years as well as the violence and counterrevolutionary measures of the Spanish American states and U.S. Cold War policies alike in their efforts to stem the spread of Communism.

Our discussions will also examine the construction of the Latino/a as transnational subject, as well as his/her relationship with other minoritized subjects within the U.S. Accordingly, we will engage with questions of what constitutes Latino literature, and, for that matter, authorship, and study how this body of literature is promoted and marketed.

Readings will include works by Daniel Alarcón, Junot Díaz, Ariel Dorfman, Cristina García, Héctor Tobar, and others. Students will write a short paper and a seminar-length final paper, as well as leading discussion in class and other assignments.

FALL 2013 CROSSLISTED COURSES

Crosslisted courses are additional courses that are eligible to be included as a course within a given student's Latino Studies Minor course listing.

HISP-S 435 Literatura Chicana y Puertorriquena (3cr)
Class number: 29581
09:30A-10:45A   TR     BH 206    Guzman R
S 435: P - HISP-S 328; S 324 or S 326
One additional 300-level Spanish course
This class meets with HISP-S 498, Readings for Honors, 29111
COLL (CASE) A&H Breadth of Inquiry credit

 

 

 

 

 


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Latino Studies Program
814 East Third Street
Bloomington, Indiana 47405-3657
Phone: (812) 856-1795 - Fax: (812) 855-9997

Directions to the Latino Studies Program