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INDIANA UNIVERSITY LIBRARY NEWS*****October 31, 2003, Vol. 30, Number 41

*LIBRARY
NEWS
*LIBRARY
EVENTS
*BLOOMINGTON
MASTER CALENDAR


LIBRARY NEWS


*Serials Cancellation Request, IUB

The following serials cancellation requests have been received. When a request has been made by a Collection Manager to cancel the print subscription but retain the electronic access, the electronic exemption will be noted.

Collection Managers who wish to assume any of the titles should contact Judy Grannan, Technical Services/Acquisitions (jgrannan@indiana.edu) within two weeks following the date of this newsletter.

1. LAST COPY HELD IN IUB
Fund 17 (Business)
-STANDARD & POOR'S MIDCAP 400 INDEXES OF THE SECURITIES MARKETS
-STANDARD & POOR'S 500 INDEXES OF THE SECURITIES MARKETS
Fund 43 (Geology)
GAEOCHRONIQUE
Fund 82 (SPEA)
-POLICY ANALYSIS (NOW FREE ON THE CATO INSTITUTE WEBSITE)

2. MULTI-COPY HELD IN IUB
****NONE TO REPORT****

Submitted by Judy Grannan, Technical Services Dept., IUB



*Library of Congress Adds Links for IU's Victorian Women Writers Project

Once again Indiana University Libraries has contributed to the Library of Congress' Web Access to Works in the Public Domain Initiative. This program, under the direction of the Cataloging Directorate's Bibliographic Enrichment Advisory Team (BEAT), was developed to add links to electronic versions available at other institutions to existing LC catalog records for the print works. These "BEAT-enriched" catalog records provide users enhanced access to free, full text electronic resources via the WWW and LC's Online Catalog.

In 2002, the first links to resources contributed to this new initiative were through cooperative agreements with Indiana University (653 URLs to materials digitized in our Wright American Fiction, 1851-1875 project) and the University of Michigan (its Making of America project). This year, IU once again partnered with LC to contribute URLs for electronic resources housed in our LETRS' Victorian Women Writers Project. Since 1995, Jackie Byrd and Laila Salibi-Cripe (Cataloging Division) have created and added to both IUCAT and OCLC original bibliographic records describing the electronic paper reproductions within this collection. Carlton Stokes (Technical Services Programmer/Analyst) was able to extract bibliographic information from IUCAT for these digitized works and prepare a special file that contained the URLs and select bibliographic information. LC was then able to take the file and programmatically add this information to their existing cataloged print records.

Beecher Wiggins, Acting Deputy Associate Librarian for Library Services at the Library of Congress, recently sent out the following announcement to the ALCTS Technical Services Directors of Large Research Libraries Group:

"The Library of Congress's Bibliographic Enrichments Advisory Team (BEAT) is pleased to announce that it has added links to bibliographic records for more than 35 titles from Indiana University's (IU) Victorian Women Writers Project. The Library of Congress gratefully acknowledges assistance of staff at the IU Library who provided the data necessary for LC to programmatically enhance records in its database. Of these, all records that are up to current standards (AACR2, LCSH) are being redistributed for the benefit of Cataloging Service Distribution subscribers."

For more information about the Victorian Women Writers Project, see: http:// www.indiana.edu/~letrs/vwwp/vwwp-about.html. For additional information on the BEAT Access to Works in the Public Domain Initiative (and other BEAT projects), see: http://lcweb.loc.gov/catdir/beat/.

Submitted by Mechael Charbonneau, Director of Technical Services, IUB


LIBRARY EVENTS


*History of the Book Seminar--November 3

The next session in the History of the Book Seminar will be led by PETER LINDENBAUM of our English Department this coming MONDAY, NOVEMBER 3, at 4 p.m. in the Lilly Library Lounge. His topic is HOW AND WHERE A NETWORK WORKS: THE ROLE OF THE BOOKSELLER IN RESTORATION ENGLAND (see Abstract below). Coffee, fruit juice, and cookies begin at the usual 3:30.

HOW AND WHERE A NETWORK WORKS:
THE ROLE OF THE BOOKSELLER IN RESTORATION ENGLAND
Peter Lindenbaum (Department of English)
Lilly Library Lounge--November 3, 4 p.m.

England in the Restoration period (1660-89) was a sharply divided nation, politically and religiously. The conflict between those promoting the conservative reaction after the Puritan Revolution of 1640-60 and the new Whig opposition to that conservative backlash culminated in yet another revolution (that of 1688) and a religious settlement that left a substantial minority of the population permanently outside the state-sponsored Church of England. Bookshops, quite understandably, both reflected and contributed to the social and religious fragmentation as well as to the sense of cohesiveness within specific groups amidst that fragmentation.

The London book trade of the late seventeenth century was made up of a large number of relatively small bookshops and publishing firms, many of them targeting a very specific and narrowly defined clientele. This paper will examine in detail the practices and careers of two of the booksellers of religious works of the period, the relatively unknown Brabazon Aylmer and the major trade presence Thomas Parkhurst, who, to judge from their lists of publications, seem to share moderate Non-Conformist religious views. Close examination of their respective lists suggests, however, meaningful differences between them, enough to explain why Parkhurst flourished in the trade and why Aylmer ultimately failed. Such an examination reveals as well how a bookshop could and would serve as a gathering place, akin to a coffee house or political club, where customers and authors might gather, pick up the latest books that fit their taste, and meet others of similar views. Booksellers thereby become significant players in the political and religious life of the nation.

* * * *

PETER LINDENBAUM, one of the founders of our History of the Book Seminar, has spent his whole academic career in the English Department at Indiana University. Only in the last dozen or so years, though, has he wandered into the discipline of the History of the Book, having started with an examination of the contract John Milton signed for the publication of _Paradise Lost_ (the earliest formal contract between an English author and his publisher to have come down to us). He is presently completing a book-length study of Milton's relations with members of the publishing trade generally and that author's role in the history of Authorship, to be entitled PUBLISHING MILTON: THE POET IN THE MARKETPLACE. He is continuing as well with a series of essays on the London book trade of the 17th century, of which the present talk is an example.



MASTER CALENDAR


*Calendar Week 11/03/03-11/07/03, IU-Bloomington


DATE EVENT TIME PLACE
November 3, 2003 DLP Administrative Meeting 9:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. Main Library E174, IUB
November 5, 2003 Technical Services Cluster Meeting 1:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. Main Library E174, IUB
November 6, 2003 Libraries Management Team 9:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. Library Administration Conf., IUB


*END OF ISSUE*



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