Skip to main content
Indiana University Bloomington

April 1, 2010

Lilly Library collections aid Middle Eastern poetry event at IU Art Museum

Filed under: Events,Manuscripts,Online exhibitions — Virginia Dearborn @ 4:55 pm

al-Bukhari cover small

The Department of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures, and the IU Art Museum, in association with the Near Eastern Language and Culture Student Organization and the Turkish Student Organization are presenting a series of events at the IU Art Museum entitled Intersections: Middle Eastern Poetries in/and the Arts, April 1, 8 and 15 from 7–9 p.m.

The striking image seen here, the cover of al-Bukhari’s Sahih, is part of the Allen Mss. collection and was used in creating the poster for this series of events.

Yasemin Gencer, IU Ph.D. student in Islamic Art, also drew on these collections to create a permanent online exhibition of Islamic materials entitled From Pen to Printing Press: Ten centuries of Islamic book arts in Indiana University Collections, which was launched earlier this year.

View a schedule for Intersections: Middle Eastern Poetries in/and the Arts and other images from the Allen Mss. collection.

Ensemble Lipzodes performs at the Lilly Library on April 6

Filed under: Events,Manuscripts,Music — Virginia Dearborn @ 2:20 pm

Ensemble Lipzodes CD

This coming Tuesday, April 6, 2010 at 7:00 p.m. in the Slocum Room at the Lilly Library, Ensemble Lipzodes, currently in Quito, Ecuador to perform at the Festival de Música Sacra, will give a concert and lecture celebrating the release of the group’s most recent CD, Oy Hasemos Fiesta.

“The ensemble’s unique name comes from a creative misinterpretation of the writing on the flyleaf of MS 1, Santa Eulalia, from the Guatemalan Music Manuscripts. What at first glance seems to say ‘Lipzodes,’ actually is the first part of a passage which continues further: ‘LibRodeSancta olaya Puyumatlan. Este libro de canto hize yo franc de Leon maestro deste pueblo de sancta olaya. hizelo En el año De mill y quinientos y ochenta y dos annos. Franc De Leon.’ In an orthographic transformation typical of the region, the letters ‘b’ and ‘p’ became exchanged, and the ‘R’ lost its vertical bar, to become what appeared to be a ‘Z.’” (From press release)

This flyleaf will be on display the evening of this concert; other items from the late 16th–early 17th century Guatemalan Music Manuscripts collection will be on display in this summer’s Main Gallery exhibition: Of Cabbages and Kings: Unexpected Treasures of the Lilly Library.

Come hear Juan Carlos Arango (shawms), C. Keith Collins (dulcians), Yonit Kosovske (organ), Anna Marsh (dulcians, recorder), Kelsey Schilling (dulcians, recorder), and Wolodymyr Smishkewych (voice, percussion) here at the Lilly Library next Tuesday, April 6.

February 17, 2010

A Pencil or a Meat Cleaver: Raymond Carver and His Editors, on March 31

Filed under: Books,Events,In the news,Manuscripts — Lilly Library @ 9:59 am

Raymond Carver book cover

Save the date! On March 31, 2010 at 5pm author Carol Sklenicka will deliver a talk at the Lilly Library entitled A Pencil or a Meat Cleaver: Raymond Carver and His Editors about her recently published biography of American short story writer Raymond Carver, Raymond Carver: A Writer’s Life (2009).

“When Raymond Carver died too young at age fifty in 1988, readers lost a distinctive American voice. Carver’s reputation as the ‘American Chekhov’ and his influence on a generation of writers and on the form of the short story itself is well documented. What is not widely known, however, is how he became a writer so widely revered, how he suffered mightily to achieve his art, and how others around him were affected by the arc of his remarkable life. Carol Sklenicka…devoted ten years to researching and writing this book, interviewing hundreds of people in Carver’s life, some of them key figures who have since passed away. She has crafted a…meticulous biography.” —From the Scribner press release

The Lilly Library has manuscript collections from two of Carver’s editors: Noel Young (Capra Press Mss.) and Gordon Lish (Lish Mss.). Ms. Sklenicka will talk about both of these editors and the development of Carver’s relationship to them in the period between 1968 and the 1980s.

A reception will follow the talk.

January 21, 2010

Peter Bogdanovich to visit IUB

Filed under: Books,Events,Film,Manuscripts — Virginia Dearborn @ 5:37 pm

Paper Moon movie poster

On Saturday, January 30, 2010 at 4pm, the Lilly Library will present “A Conversation with Peter Bogdanovich” in Room 251 of the Radio–TV Building on the campus of Indiana University, Bloomington.

Bogdanovich was born in 1939 in Kingston, New York. He attended Stella Adler’s Theatre Studio and has appeared on stage, screen and television. He was film critic for Esquire, The New York Times, Cahiers du Cinema among others, and has written numerous books on American cinema, most notably The Cinema of Alfred Hitchcock, John Ford, and This is Orson Welles. He also wrote The Killing of the Unicorn: Dorothy Stratten (1960–1980) based on his relationship with the Playboy centerfold who was murdered by her estranged husband.

He is the owner/founder of several production companies including: Saticoy Productions, Inc., Copa de Oro Productions and Moon Pictures. Bogdanovich directed his first feature film Targets, starring Boris Karloff in 1968. His breakthrough film, however, was The Last Picture Show (1971) based on the Larry McMurtry novel. Several successful and critically acclaimed films followed, notably his documentary Directed by John Ford (1971) and the comedies, What’s Up Doc? (1972) and Paper Moon (1973). Subsequent films include Daisy Miller (1974), They All Laughed (1981), Mask (1985), and The Thing Called Love (1993). He is also credited for the screenplays of The Last Picture Show, its sequel Texasville, What’s Up Doc?, and many others.

You can learn more about Peter Bogdanovich by exploring the Lilly Library’s Bogdanovich Manuscript Collection. An inventory and finding aid are also available for this collection.

And, of course, you can come to Room 251 in the Radio–TV building and meet Mr. Bogdanovich on Saturday, January 30, 2010 at 4pm!

The Gilder Manuscript Collection

Filed under: Manuscripts — Cherry Williams @ 2:31 pm

Richard Watson Gilder (small image file)Helena de Kay Gilder (small image file)

We are very pleased to report, that with the generous aid of John and Julie Lindsey, Trustees of the Chisholm Foundation, in honor of Page Knox, we have completed the processing of the Richard and Helena de Kay Gilder Manuscript Collection. The Gilder manuscript collection, 1781–1984, consists of approximately 23,000 items including the correspondence and papers of poet, editor Richard Watson Gilder and his wife, the artist Helena de Kay Gilder, and their family. Richard, 1844–1909, was born in Bordentown, New Jersey. Among his books of poetry are The New Day (1875), Poems and Inscriptions (1901), and A Book of Music (1906). With Newton Crane, he founded the Newark Register and he edited Scribner’s Monthly (later The Century Magazine), a post he held until his death. His wife, Helena, 1846–1916, was born in New York City. She was a painter, founder of the Art Students league and co–founder of the Society of American Artists. She studied with Winslow Homer and John La Farge, as well as at the Cooper Union Institute and the National Academy of Design. Together Richard and Helena had seven children. Their son Rodman was an author and married Comfort Tiffany, daughter of Louis Comfort Tiffany. Their daughter Dorothea had a brief stage career, while Rosamond, the youngest, also became a writer. She was the author of Enter the Actress: the First Woman in the Theatre and the editor of Letters of Richard Watson Gilder and an unpublished volume of letters between her mother and Mary Hallock Foote, tentatively titled Dialogue. A description, inventory and finding aid are all available online.

Gilder’s brother, William Henry Gilder, was managing editor of the Register, but is most well–known for his Arctic expeditions. He was second in command on the Eothen in search of Sir John Franklin’s lost expedition to discover the North Pole and wrote several books about the Arctic. In 1883 he was a war correspondent in Tonking during the French–Annamese War. Richard’s sister, Jeannette Leonard Gilder, was co–founder and joint editor with another brother Joseph Benson Gilder of The Critic, a literary magazine.

In addition to family members, the correspondence reflects the many friends and acquaintances who visited the Gilders at their Tyringham, Massachusetts home, as well as their private salon in New York. These include artists, musicians, writers, poets, scientists and politicians, such as August Saint–Gaudens, Winslow Homer, Mark Twain, and Nicola Tesla. There is extensive correspondence with Frances Folsom Cleveland (Mrs. Grover Cleveland), artist Cecilia Beaux and writer Mary Hallock Foote. An interesting joint diary of Helena and Richard, dated 1874–1888, may be found in the Diaries/Journals series.

Other items of interest include: a lock of Helena’s hair, dried flowers from John Keats’ grave picked in 1884, a pencil used by Walt Whitman, and dried leaves collected in 1863 from the Bull Run battlefield.

–Cherry Williams, Curator of Manuscripts

View more images from the collection here.

January 6, 2010

Lilly Library materials in Islamic Book Arts exhibit

Filed under: Books,Manuscripts,Online exhibitions — Virginia Dearborn @ 5:09 pm

Kufic Qur’an fragment

Yasemin Gencer, IU Ph.D. student in Islamic Art, has drawn on the collections of the Lilly Library, the IU Art Museum, and the Mathers Museum of World Cultures to create a permanent online exhibition of Islamic materials entitled From Pen to Printing Press: Ten centuries of Islamic book arts in Indiana University Collections.

This exhibition is an adaptation of an Indiana University Art Museum exhibit displayed last spring as “part of a larger project that aims to make the Islamic materials housed at IU better known to the general public.” It includes wonderful descriptions and images of Islamic manuscripts and rare books from the Lilly Library’s collections, such as an illustrated and abridged copy of Firdawsi’s Shahname, a miniature Qur’an, and one of the earliest recorded Mughal manuscripts.

View more images by visiting the exhibition.

December 3, 2009

Education Reformer Deborah Meier Visits the Lilly Library

Filed under: In the news,Manuscripts — Guest Blogger @ 4:05 pm

Meier

Deborah Meier, a leader in education reform and the founder of the modern small schools movement in America, paid a welcome visit to the Lilly Library on Thursday, November 12. Meier, who was visiting Bloomington for an education seminar, is nationally known for her work in the innovative Central Park East schools in New York, which she founded in 1974. Meier’s efforts were recognized in 1987, when she became the first public school teacher to receive a MacArthur Fellowship. She chronicled her experiences at Central Park East in The Power of Their Ideas (1995), which has become an influential work in the field of education.

Indiana University announced in November 2008 that Deborah Meier had donated her papers to the Lilly Library, and work on them began in June of this year. The papers include correspondence, writings and speeches by Meier, and materials related to Meier’s work with the Central Park East schools, the Mission Hill school in Boston, and school restructuring projects in New York City, among other things.

The Lilly Library has created a two–year, grant–funded position devoted to the arrangement, description, and digitization of this collection. Currently, the papers are in the process of being arranged and a finding aid is being created. Once the finding aid is complete, portions of the collection will be scanned and made available online, giving researchers all over the world access to this unique documentation of the beginnings of the small schools movement.

Meier and Steve Bonchek of the Harmony Education Center, a Bloomington school and education institute which assisted in procuring the funding needed to make this collection available, hope that the Meier papers will serve as the cornerstone of an ongoing effort to document schools. The Lilly Library is grateful to the Peck Stacpoole Foundation of New York, and to the Office of the Provost of IU Bloomington, for providing the financial support for this project.

–Valerie Higgins, Meier Papers Project Archivist

Accompanying picture, from left to right: Gerardo Gonzalez, Dean of the IU School of Education; Valerie Higgins, Meier Papers Project Archivist; Deborah Meier; John Ryan, IU President Emeritus; Steve Bonchek, Harmony Education Center Executive Director. Click here to see a larger image.

October 8, 2009

Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?

Filed under: Events,Exhibitions,In the news,Manuscripts,Online exhibitions — Virginia Dearborn @ 4:24 pm

WPA

October is Archives and Special Collections Month! This year’s event is entitled Brother, Can You Spare a Dime? Documenting the Great Depression, and not only is the Lilly Library hosting an exhibition and a musical performance this month – please visit the event website for details – but there are also related online resources available from the Lilly Library year–round.

One of the Lilly Library’s first online exhibitions is called The Works Projects Administration* in Indiana. Created in 1997 by Lilly Library intern Patrick Dawson, this exhibition draws upon Great Depression–era materials donated by John K. Jennings (WPA Administrator for Indiana 1935–1943), including video and audio clips, as well as many photographs from various WPA projects carried out in Indiana.

*Introduced in 1935 as the Works Progress Administration, the WPA became known as the Works Projects Administration in 1939.

–Virginia Dearborn, Reference/Technical Assistant

September 30, 2009

Lilly Library Materials on Loan

Filed under: Exhibitions,Manuscripts — Cherry Williams @ 2:44 pm

house from Delany mss.

The Lilly Library actively collaborates throughout the year with other cultural heritage institutions in the exchange of materials for exhibition purposes. Current loans include materials from the Delany manuscript collection, included in the exhibition Mrs. Delany and Her Circle (September 24, 2009 – January 2, 2010) on display at the Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, Connecticut in partnership with Sir John Soane’s Museum, London, England. Other ongoing exhibitions include Lincoln: The Man You Didn’t Know, at the Northern Indiana Historical Society, Inc. and the South Bend Center for History located in South Bend, Indiana.

A recently completed exhibition loan included a selection of correspondence to and from Thomas Mann seen at the Leo Baeck Institute, New York City in their exhibit: Publishing in Exile: German-Language Literature in the U.S. in the 1940s.

After returning from exhibitions, all of these materials are available for use in the newly renovated Lilly Library Reading Room by researchers and interested members of the general public.

— Cherry Williams, Curator of Manuscripts

View more images from the Delany mss. collection.

September 4, 2009

Lilly Philippine mss. II Testamentaria

Filed under: Manuscripts — Cherry Williams @ 1:51 pm

Philippine mss. leaf with seal

One of the many services the Lilly Library provides for researchers is that of “digitization on demand.” A recent successful and much appreciated example of this service was the digitization of the “Testamentaria,” a manuscript from the Lilly Philippine mss. II Collection.

Requested by Prof. Ted Bergman, Assistant Professor of Spanish, Department of Modern & Classical Languages at California State University Fresno, Prof. Bergman noted in his request:

The ‘testamentaria’ of Charles Connelly, an Irishman from Crosswell (near Glinsk in County Galway), contains much information on financial communications between Ireland, Spain and the Philippines. In the late eighteenth century, Connelly served in Mexico and the Philippines, where he participated in the Sociedad Económica del País by planting cash crops in an effort to increase the Spanish Crown’s profits. Connelly’s estate was being settled at the height of the Spanish Enlightenment. The communications include several mentions of Fr. Thomas Connelly and Fr. Thomas Higgins, co-authors of the monumental Diccionario nuevo de las dos lenguas espanõla é inglesa (1797-1798) as well as transactions carried out through the merchant banking house of Patricio Joyes e Hijos. In addition, the document contains a copy of a letter from Charles Connelly’s family members in Ireland certified by Leandro Fernández de Moratín, which made its way into the record in Manila.

Other scholars, when notified by Dr. Bergman about the completed project, agreed that “it sounds like an incredibly rich source, particularly for people working within our network of scholars on Ireland and the Spanish and Spanish American world.”

In addition, Professor Bergman provided us with links to other organizations and researchers working in this area of studies who would find the manuscript a valuable resource:

http://www.irishinspain.org

http://www.irishinspain.org/participantes.html

– Cherry Williams, Curator of Manuscripts

View more images from the Lilly Philippine mss. II Collection

August 6, 2009

The Broken-Hearted Sailor

Filed under: Manuscripts,New acquisitions — Cherry Williams @ 4:00 pm

Broken-hearted sailor

The Lilly Library recently acquired an extraordinary new addition to our collection of military manuscript diaries. In a series of illustrated letters to his fiancée, Miss Elise Buckingham of Zanesville, Ohio, Lt. Mason Abercrombie Shufeldt documents his voyage on the U.S.S. Enterprise from Cape Henry, Virgina to Capetown, South Africa, from December 27, 1882 to March 31, 1883. Describing his travels and his devotion to his “far-off sweetheart” in depth, Shufeldt decorated each of the three volumes with an elaborately hand-drawn and colored cover with nautical themes and incorporated a series of hand-drawn maps and views throughout. Included in the archive is a small envelope dramatically labeled “The Lash.” Enclosed in the envelope is a letter from Miss Buckingham ending their engagement.

A son of Robert Wilson Shufeldt, an important naval officer who played a major role in opening trade with Korea and China in the early 1880′s, Mason Shufeldt served as an officer under his father’s command aboard the Ticonderoga during its around-the-world voyage in the late 1870′s and became deeply interested in the largely uncharted island of Madagascar during an extended stop there. After receiving news of the end of his engagement, Shufeldt received permission to explore the Madagascar interior, leading a team of men of which only 153 survived to reach the waters of Mozambique Channel. At least fifty are said to have “perished in the battles which he fought with the Sakolava slave-dealers” according to a New York Times article published October 8, 1884. Shufeldt died in Capetown in 1892 at the age of thirty-nine.

– Cherry Williams, Curator of Manuscripts

View more images from The Broken-Hearted Sailor.

June 2, 2009

Targets: Karloff and Bogdanovich

Filed under: Film,Manuscripts — David Frasier @ 9:50 am

Boris Karloff mask

Boris Karloff (born William Henry Pratt on November 23, 1887 in Camberwell, London) was a 44-year-old journeyman actor when director James Whale, unable to convince Bela Lugosi to accept the role, cast the mild-mannered Englishman as “the Monster” in the 1931 Universal horror film, Frankenstein. The actor’s sensitive portrayal of Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley’s creature made him an immediate star, but forever typecast him in increasingly low-budget horror and science fiction films from the 1930s to the late 1960s. In 1966, the veteran actor who had made some of the most notable genre films in the history of motion pictures (Bride of Frankenstein, 1935; The Body Snatcher, 1945) had been reduced to appearing in cheapie productions like The Ghost in the Invisible Bikini, although that same year he had done the winning narration for the now-classic animated television production of Dr. Seuss’s “How the Grinch Stole Christmas.”

In 1968, 29-year-old film critic turned director Peter Bogdanovich gave Karloff his last memorable screen role as aging horror movie star, “Byron Orlok,” in Targets. Bogdanovich’s directorial debut (which he also produced, co-wrote, and edited) was inspired by ex-Marine Charles Whitman’s deadly 96 minute rampage on the campus of University of Texas-Austin on August 1, 1966. Hours after murdering his mother and wife in separate incidents, Whitman amassed a small arsenal of high-powered rifles, and positioning himself atop the university’s Tower, killed 13, and wounded 31 before being shot to death by a campus security guard. In a more sedate scene from Targets featured on YouTube (www.youtube.com/watch?v=SfXOx04d6m4) , Bogdanovich (seated on couch) convinces Karloff to retell W. Somerset Maugham’s short piece, “Appointment in Samarra” (1933). Karloff died on February 2, 1969, but not before footage taken of him in late 1968 was added to four low-budget films shot in Mexico: Cult of the Dead, Alien Terror, House of Evil, and The Fear Chamber.

The Bogdanovich mss, purchased from the filmmaker in 1995 and periodically supplemented, is housed in the Auxiliary Library Facility (ALF). Materials must be requested in advance for use in the Lilly Library by using the Bogdanovich mss. collection description and inventory in conjunction with IUCAT. Among the collection’s more than 100,000 items are production materials, research, related business correspondence, and scripts for his films including Targets (1968), The Last Picture Show (1971), Directed by John Ford (1971), Paper Moon (1973), Daisy Miller (1974), Saint Jack (1979), Mask (1985), et al. Also included are reel-to-reel audiotapes of interviews conducted by Bogdanovich with directors George Cukor, John Ford, Alfred Hitchcock, Fritz Lang, Sidney Lumet, Otto Preminger, Raoul Walsh, and Orson Welles. The accompanying photos feature a unique item from the collection: a 3-pound hand painted fiberglass casting of Karloff’s bust by veteran Hollywood make-up man and F/X sculptor Norman Bryn commercially available through Classic Creature Craft, LLC.

– David K. Frasier, Reference Librarian

May 6, 2009

New illustrated works with military themes

Filed under: Books,Illustration,Manuscripts,New acquisitions — Cherry Williams @ 1:47 pm

Odelette Guerriere, title page

The Lilly Library has recently received two new works charmingly illustrated with remarkable depictions of military themes. The first, Odelette Guerrière (1870), by Catulle Mendès, is a small ode characterized by an erotic or jovial theme with a predominately descriptive narrative. The Lilly Library’s copy is unique because it is illustrated with 5 original water colors signed by French artist/illustrator Albert Bligny interspersed throughout the text. In addition, the luxurious volume was bound by Marius Michel in full red Morocco with gilt decorations, green silk and marbled end papers.

The second, a folio collection of 115 drawings and water colors by A. Rochet and R.P. Germain, depicts daily life on the home front in Dijon, France during the First World War (1914-1918).

– Cherry Williams, Curator of Manuscripts

View additional images from Odelette Guerrière and the Rochet and Germain folio

April 6, 2009

A Writer Struggles: Necessity as the Mother of Invention

Filed under: Illustration,Manuscripts — David Frasier @ 2:00 pm

Cards on the table by Emmett Gowen

Not every American regional writer is destined to become a Mark Twain, a William Faulkner, or even a modest success. Such is the case of Emmett Gowen (1902-1973), an obscure Tennessee-born writer who published two forgettable novels in the early 1930s with Indianapolis publisher Bobbs-Merrill. Court-martialed from the Marine Corps, Gowen served three years in the Naval Prison at Parris Island, South Carolina before being dishonorably discharged in 1923. He taught himself the craft of writing as a reporter on several Memphis newspapers while churning out stories for pulp magazines.

In 1932, Bobbs-Merrill published Gowen’s first novel, Mountain Born, a chronicle of the lives and loves of Tennessee hill folk, to mild critical acclaim, but lackluster sales. Undeterred, Gowen pressed on with the writing of a second novel contracted by the publisher, but ran into a problem faced by many would-be professional scribes — lack of money to complete their work. On October 29, 1932, Bobbs-Merrill received “Cards on the Table,” Emmett Gowen’s clever and artistic plea for a life-saving advance against royalties that would enable him to finish a racy novel on the trials and tribulations of Southern tenant farmers. The ploy worked. The amused publisher advanced Gowen $200.00, but their relationship ended after Dark Moon of March (1933) generated fewer sales than his first book. Gowen persevered, becoming a regular contributor of articles featuring rugged men in the “great outdoors” to magazines like Field and Stream, Argosy, True, and Outdoor Life. In the late 1950s, he assumed the presidency of Emmett Gowen, Ltd., an outfitting and guide service for hunters and fisherman vacationing in Mexico and Central America. His most successful book, The Joy of Fishing, was published by Rand McNally in 1961.

Gowen is among the several hundred authors (Irvin S. Cobb, Ring Lardner, James Whitcomb Riley) represented in the Bobbs-Merrill mss. (1885-1957) housed at the Lilly Library. The papers of the Indianapolis publisher are arranged by author and include autobiographical questionnaires, correspondence, reader’s opinions, promotional material, and royalty records. The 131,056 items in the collection have been partially described in “Studies in the Bobbs-Merrill Papers,” edited by Edwin H. Cady, in The Indiana University Bookman, no. 8 (March, 1967), pp. 1-166. A dissertation in 1975 by Jack O’Bar entitled A History of the Bobbs-Merrill Company, 1850-1940: With a Postlude Through the Early 1960′s (LZ2 .O124) was derived largely from the Bobbs-Merrill mss.

– David Frasier, Reference Librarian

View larger images of Gowen’s letter

April 3, 2009

Dvorak in America

Filed under: Manuscripts,Music,New acquisitions — Cherry Williams @ 9:28 am

Jeanette Thurber portrait

The Lilly Library is pleased to announce the recent acquisition of the Dvořàk/Thurber mss., ca. 1885-1937, which consists of documents, correspondence and ephemera relating to Antonìn Dvořàk, Jeanette M. Thurber, and the history of the National Conservatory of Music in America (NCMA). These materials were a gift from Prof. Robert Aborn, whose dissertation “The Influence on American Musical Culture of Dvořàk’s Sojourn in America,” may be read in its entirety at: https://scholarworks.iu.edu/dspace/handle/2022/3462.

Jeanette M. Thurber founded the National Conservatory of Music in 1885, which was based on the Paris Conservatoire model. In addition to replicating the European Conservatories to which American students had been turning in order to obtain a first class musical education, she also hoped to train as yet untrained students, the handicapped, and blacks as well as to encourage an indigenous music culture in the United States. Initially tuition free, the Conservatory was originally located at 126-128 East 17th Street; however that building was demolished in 1911. Unsuccessful attempts to revive the school and relocate it in Washington DC persisted through the 1920′s. The staff included Victor Herbert, Rafael Joseffy and Henry Finch as well as the noted composer, Antonìn Dvořàk, who was the director from 1892-1895. It was at the Conservatory that Dvořàk met his pupil, Harry Burleigh, one of the earliest African-American composers. Burleigh introduced traditional American Spirituals to Dvořàk at the latter’s request.

Antonìn Leopold Dvořàk (September 8, 1841 – May 1, 1904) was a Czech composer of Romantic music. During his time in America, among other compositions, Dvořàk wrote Symphony No.9 “From the New World,” String Quartet in F (the “American”), and the String Quintet in E flat, as well as a Sonatina for violin and piano.

– Cherry Williams, Curator of Manuscripts

Image: Jeanette M. Thurber (photo)

View a copy of letter (copy made by Mrs. Thurber) from Dvořàk to Littleton discussing his initial contract with the NCMA.

March 26, 2009

Student scholar from Harvard reflects on Lilly Library visit

Filed under: In the news,Manuscripts — Lilly Library @ 5:12 pm

In the March/April 2009 issue of Harvard Magazine, Harvard senior Brittney Moraski writes about her visit to the Lilly Library to use the papers of poet Sylvia Plath. Moraski reflects on her experiences working in libraries and archives and concludes that “we have to be curators of our own lives”. Read the full article: http://harvardmagazine.com/2009/03/life-in-detail

The Lilly Library first acquired a small collection of Sylvia Plath’s poetry manuscripts in 1961. The extensive collection of Sylvia Plath letters, papers, and memorabilia that the Lilly Library acquired in 1977 came from her mother, Aurelia. Included in that collection are diaries, letters, poetry manuscripts, school papers, articles and prose pieces submitted for publication, scrapbooks, memorabilia, drawings and paintings, and more than 200 books from her library. To learn more about these materials, see the Guide to the Sylvia Plath Materials in the Lilly Library.

March 13, 2009

Islamic manuscripts on exhibition at the IU Art Museum

Filed under: Exhibitions,In the news,Manuscripts — Cherry Williams @ 9:02 am

Allen mss 10

Highlights from the Lilly Library’s collection of illuminated Islamic manuscripts and books were the focus of a Saturday morning symposium held on March 7, 2009, at the Hope School of Fine Arts. Papers presented by Prof. Christiane Gruber and her students, who have been studying the collection in detail, elaborated on previously unexamined aspects of the collection. The papers will be published by the Indiana University Press in December, 2009, with accompanying illustrations. The symposium complemented the on-going exhibit at the IU Art Museum:

From Pen to Printing Press: Ten Centuries of Islamic Book Arts
March 6–May 10, 2009
Special Exhibitions Gallery, first floor

The exhibition and related programs are made possible with support from Indiana University’s New Frontiers in the Arts and Humanities Program, funded by the Lilly Endowment, Inc., and administered by the Office of the Vice Provost for Research; the Thomas T. Solley Endowment for the Curator for Asian Art; and IU Art Museum’s Arc Fund. The exhibition was curated by: Judy Stubbs, The Pamela Buell Curator for Asian Art, organizing curator, and Professor Christiane Gruber, guest curator.

– Cherry Williams, Curator of Manuscripts

View a larger image of Allen mss 10.

March 5, 2009

Christmas Poems from the Madhouse

Filed under: Manuscripts,New acquisitions — Breon Mitchell @ 3:36 pm

Haringer woodcut

This Expressionist portrait of Jakob Haringer (1898-1948) at age 22, by Emil Betzler, may well be a rare survival. It reached the Lilly together with five small groups of poems in manuscript, written on the back of old letters and scraps of paper, and hand-bound by Haringer as Christmas greetings to a few friends. Each copy is unique. On the copy shown here, Haringer has noted “written in prison and the madhouse.”

Following his early discharge from the military in WWI on medical grounds, Haringer took up the life of a vagabond. Accused of various petty crimes, including insulting officials, falsifying papers, and blasphemy, he spent most of the rest of his life on the streets, in hospitals, and in mental institutions. He lived largely by begging from friends. In 1936 the Nazis revoked his citizenship and he fled to Switzerland. From 1939 on he lived for a time in Paris, then, illegally, in Switzerland, where he was interned in various refugee camps during WWII. He died during a visit to Zurich in 1948. Arnold Schönberg set three poems by Haringer to music in 1933.

– Breon Mitchell, Director

View more images of the Haringer manuscripts

December 1, 2008

Grand Tour exhibition at IU Art Museum features Lilly Library books and journals

Filed under: Books,Exhibitions,Illustration,Manuscripts — Guest Blogger @ 4:01 pm

Thiebault travel journal

Ten items from the Lilly Library collections are part of the current special exhibition at the IU Art Museum, The Grand Tour: Art and Travel, 1740–1914, on view through December 21, 2008. (For more information, see the IU Art Museum web site). This exhibition considers the role of art and visual representation in the history of tourism. One of the great pleasures of researching the exhibition were the many hours I spent at the Lilly Library paging through rare eighteenth-century travel guides and hand-written, hand-drawn travel journals, some of which are still uncatalogued. Drawing was an important component of middle- and upper-class education during the period examined in the Grand Tour exhibition, and it is wonderful to see how the average traveler was able to put their drawing skills to use while on the road.

One of my favorite Lilly books in the exhibition is a two-volume journal (only volume one is in the exhibition) recording a walking tour in the north of Wales in September 1827, Voyage à pied dans le nord du Pays de Galles (Thiebault Family mss., uncatalogued). The journal was compiled by a French traveler, Adolphe Thiebault (1797–1875?), and is filled with his beautiful, precisely delineated ink and wash drawings of the landscapes he encountered in Wales. Each drawing is carefully pasted into the journal, and is accompanied by a descriptive caption and date. The page on view in the exhibition is particularly interesting, depicting a view of the Menai Suspension Bridge, a modern technological wonder in Thiebault’s day. Completed in 1826, the bridge was one of the world’s first iron suspension bridges. Linking mainland Wales to the island of Anglesey (previously accessible only by ferry), the bridge reduced travel time between London and Dublin from thirty-six hours to just nine. Thiebault drew the bridge on September 16, and on the facing page pasted a newspaper clipping with a story about the bridge.

Another book that provides great insight into the values and interests of its time is the very useful Gentleman’s Guide on his Tour Through Italy of 1791. If you ever wondered how long it took a Grand Tourist to travel from Rome to Naples in the late eighteenth century, this book will tell you: twenty-five hours, during which it was necessary to change horses at eighteen designated post-stations. Aside from providing detailed practical information regarding money, itineraries, and lodgings, the guidebook puts a strong emphasis on the art that English tourists wanted to see when they traveled to Italy. Lists of paintings in both private and public collections are included in the book, as is information about architecture and archaeological sites such as Pompeii, which had only been discovered a few decades earlier. Although unillustrated, the book includes a beautiful fold-out, colored map of Italy next to the title page. This book, with its map on display, is the first object visitors see when they enter the Grand Tour exhibition.

– Jenny McComas, Curator of Western Art after 1800, Indiana University Art Museum

View a larger image of a page from Adolphe Thiebault’s journal

October 20, 2008

Bound for the bottom of the sea

Filed under: Books,Manuscripts — Elizabeth Johnson @ 11:51 am

Signals to be used by the squadron,.. (binding)

One of the books in this summer’s exhibition in the Lilly Library Main Gallery, Blue at the Mizzen: Patrick O’Brian and the 19th Century Naval World, was a slim, but heavy volume entitled: Signals to be used by the squadron under command of [blank space]. This book, printed in Brooklyn by Thomas Kirk for use by Commander John Rodgers’ flotilla during the War of 1812, has a very unusual binding – it’s encased in lead. The heavy lead binding insured rapid disposal in the event of an emergency. By throwing the book overboard, the Captain could make sure that the signal book didn’t fall into enemy hands. The first page of the book contains hand-drawn colored signal flags, and the key or indicator to each of the signals is added in manuscript. Commander Rodgers was clear in his orders concerning the signal book. “It is directed, that the commanding officers of the flotilla will never suffer their signal books to be exposed either to the possibility of being lost, or to the inspection of any persons who duty does not require that they should be made acquainted with the signals. On the receipt of this signal book, the officer to whom it is delivered is desired to furnish me with all signals appertaining in any degree to these. Signed, John Rodgers.”

– Elizabeth Johnson, Head of Technical Services

View another image from Signals to be used by the squadron under command of [blank space]

« Previous Page

Powered by WordPress