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Indiana University Bloomington

February 26, 2009

Art imitates life: Georg Kaiser

Filed under: Books — Breon Mitchell @ 11:50 am

Kaiser, Der gerettete Alkibiades

Georg Kaiser (1878-1945), a major figure in German literary Expressionism (1910-1925), even signed his books in typical Expressionist “Telegrammstil” (telegram style). The copy of Der gerettete Alkibiades (1920) shown here, recently added to the Lilly’s growing collection of modern German literature, was inscribed for his friend Marthe Fröhlich only five days after he’d sent the following barely-veiled threat of suicide to his wife: “No one is even close to being my equal: I know that I’m the brother of Kleist, Büchner, and Goethe. I am one of the great wonders of the world. I’m the most extreme exponent of human kind… And if—growing weak—I make Kleist’s fate my own, you must carry on in my memory…”

Suicide was surely on his mind—the play ends with the death of Socrates. Ironically, the limited edition (one of 50 signed copies) is a touch of luxury totally at odds with Kaiser’s own desperate financial situation at the time. In October of that year, calling to mind the protagonist of his most famous play, From Morn to Midnight, he was arrested for embezzlement, and eventually put in prison. He died in Switzerland in 1945– of natural causes.

–Breon Mitchell, Director

View more images from Der gerettete Alkibiades.

February 23, 2009

Last week: Keith Erekson talk and an iconic cake

Filed under: Events,Exhibitions — Lilly Library @ 1:21 pm

Lincoln cake

Last Thursday’s lecture by Keith Erekson was a lively and humorous survey of the ways Abraham Lincoln has been commemorated and claimed by Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky and Washington, DC. Erekson is an Assistant Professor of History at the University of Texas at El Paso. His web site includes some examples of his interest in Lincoln, including a dissertation chapter about the “role of oral testimony in the field of Abraham Lincoln studies from 1865 through the 1930s” and a review of the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Museum published in the Indiana Magazine of History: http://faculty.utep.edu/Default.aspx?tabid=54953

The reception after Erekson’s talk featured tea, lemonade, delightful little sandwiches, and a show-stopper cake in the form of Lincoln’s iconic stovepipe hat. The cake was catered by Blu Boy Chocolate; the other food and drink by Cynthia Moriarty. The exhibition, Remembering Lincoln, is on display through May 9.

February 10, 2009

Celebrate Abraham Lincoln at February 12th reception

Filed under: Events,Exhibitions — Lilly Library @ 10:56 am

Lincoln

Please join us for the opening reception for the new Lilly Library exhibition, Remembering Lincoln. The reception will be held on the 200th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln’s birth, this Thursday, February 12, from 4:00 to 6:00 pm.

The exhibition was curated by Cinda May, Assistant Librarian, Indiana State University, and it features more than 100 books, documents, art, music, and photographs from the Library’s collections including the extensive Joseph Benjamin Oakleaf Collection of Lincolniana. The exhibit offers a glimpse into the Indiana frontier where Lincoln spent his boyhood from 1816-1830 and illustrates how Americans past and present honor his memory.

The exhibition and the reception are free and open to the public.

February 5, 2009

New Curator of Manuscripts arrives at the Lilly Library

Filed under: In the news — Breon Mitchell @ 2:36 pm

We’re pleased to announce that on January 26th, 2009, Cherry Williams joined us as our new Curator of Manuscripts. Ms. Williams received an M.L.I.S. degree from UCLA, and an M.A. in Humanities, with a concentration in Art History, from the University of Chicago. She comes to us from UCLA, where she was Special Collections Librarian for the Sciences at the Louise M. Darling Biomedical Library, and served as Special Projects Librarian and Archivist of the William H. Sweet, M.D., D.Sc. Collection. Cherry also worked at the Getty Research Institute and the University of Chicago Special Collections Research Center. She is particularly interested in Medieval manuscripts, and wrote her Master’s thesis at the University of Chicago on “Consuming Images in the Book of Hours of Catherine of Cleves.” We welcome her warmly, and express our gratitude once more to Saundra Taylor, who retired last May, for her 34 years of service in this important position.

–Breon Mitchell, Director

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