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Indiana University Bloomington

July 26, 2012

War of 1812 Captured Online through Lilly Library Collections

Filed under: Exhibitions,Online exhibitions,web site — Lilly Library @ 9:29 am

During the War of 1812, British troops set fire to the Library of Congress, destroying the collections within. Two hundred years later, however, a library has now captured the war: Indiana University’s Lilly Library, have digitized hundreds of manuscripts, books, maps, and prints that illuminate the history of the War of 1812.

A new website, The War of 1812 in the Collections of the Lilly Library, tells the story of this little-understood war through digitized primary source documents which have been made available for the first time thanks to technology and technical services staff at the IU Libraries. These items range from the official declaration of war to a receipt for canteen straps and include such resources as anti-war pamphlets, a letter describing the burning of Washington, D.C., and a satirical print of James Madison boxing King George III. Visitors to the site can access high-resolution images of the documents by following the timeline of events, browsing by tag (from Aaron Burr to Zachary Taylor), or searching by keyword.

“There aren’t many large digital projects on the War of 1812, especially not originating from the United States,” said Lilly Library Director Breon Mitchell. “This site makes a major contribution by providing not just the story of the war, but also a wealth of original books and documents that draw people into the history of the conflict in the way only primary sources can.”

The broadsides, books, and pamphlets in the project include early printings of the Star-Spangled Banner, government publications, sermons, reports, histories, and memoirs. Manuscript materials include correspondence, log books, legal documents, diaries, speeches, letter copybooks, and orderly books.

The digital archive precedes a major exhibition on the War of 1812 in the Main Gallery of the Lilly Library that will open September 2012 and run through December.

“Never before has the Lilly Library created an exhibition where every item on display is also digitized online,” said Brenda Johnson, Ruth Lilly Dean of University Libraries. “In this case, the online archive actually includes more fully digitized items than we can fit into the gallery exhibition. Our ability to share these documents with a broader audience makes this an especially exciting time to explore this period in American history.”

For media inquiries, contact Erika Dowell edowell@indiana.edu (812) 855-2452

About the Lilly Library

The Lilly Library is the principal rare books, manuscripts, and special collections repository of Indiana University. It is part of the Indiana University Libraries, Bloomington, under direction of the Ruth Lilly Dean of University Libraries. The IU Libraries support and strengthen teaching, learning, and research by providing the collections, services, and environments that lead to intellectual discovery.

July 19, 2012

New Film-Related Manuscripts Collections

Filed under: Uncategorized — Lilly Library @ 9:55 am

The papers of David Bradley and Carlo Lizzani, respectively, are newly processed additions to the Lilly Library’s film-related manuscripts collections.

The Bradley mss. include correspondence, screenplays, publicity materials, business records, writings, and biographical items pertaining to David Bradley (1920-1997), film director, collector and historian. At an early age Bradley became a pioneer in amateur filmmaking and went on to direct his friend Charlton Heston in Peer Gynt (1941) and Julius Caesar (1950). (The former film was Heston’s film debut; the latter got Heston a successful screen test with MGM.) Bradley also directed Macbeth (1947), Talk About a Stranger (1952), Dragstrip Riot (1958), 12 to the Moon (1960), and The Madmen of Mandoras (1963, and later re-released as They Saved Hitler’s Brain in 1968). The Bradley papers complement the film elements and photographs already in the collection, along with the nearly 4,000 reel-to-reel films he collected during his lifetime.

The Lizzani, Carlo mss. feature the writings, photographs, scripts, audio-visual materials, correspondence, awards, newspaper and periodical articles, and unpublished diary of Italian filmmaker Carlo Lizzani. Born in Rome in 1922, Lizzani began as a film critic and eventually collaborated with prominent directors in the Italian neorealism movement. He served as assistant director on Roberto Rossellini’s Germany Year Zero (1948) and earned an Oscar nomination for Best Original Story for Giuseppe De Santis’s Bitter Rice (1949). Lizzani’s own films include numerous spaghetti westerns and the internationally acclaimed crime thriller Banditi a Milano (Bandits in Milan), released in the United States as The Violent Four (1968). The Lizzani papers are mainly in Italian and were processed by Austin Alexander, a graduate student in the Department of French and Italian.

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