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November 24, 2015

Sam Loyd, Puzzle King: Exhibition and Talk by Will Shortz

Filed under: Events,Exhibitions — Lilly Library @ 12:06 pm

Indiana University Libraries 2015Did you miss the talk by Puzzlemaster Will Shortz at the Lilly Library on November 5th? Don’t worry! Here’s your chance to be a virtual guest in our beautiful library. You can view and listen to the full presentation by Mr. Shortz here.

This fall in the Main Gallery we are proud to present an exhibition on the nineteenth-century puzzle designer Sam Loyd. This is our first puzzle exhibition in the Main Gallery and was made possible with the gracious help of co-curator Will Shortz, who, in addition to being the editor of the New York Times Crossword, is also a collector of and expert on Sam Loyd and his puzzles. A number of the items on display were loaned by Mr. Shortz for this exhibition.

The nineteenth century was a fertile time for the development of puzzles, as can be seen from the puzzles featured in our Slocum Room exhibition. By the end of the century, there had been two major international puzzle crazes, and in the last years of the century there were a few notable puzzle designers. The most prolific of these designers was the American puzzle designer Sam Loyd.

Sam Loyd began his career as a puzzle designer at sixteen when he became the chess problem editor for Chess Monthly after having designed his first puzzle at the age of fourteen. Soon he was expanding his designs into other types of puzzles. The first puzzle he designed in this new direction was The Trick Donkeys produced around 1868. This puzzle came on a card that was divided into three pieces, two with donkeys and one with two jockeys. The goal was to place the pieces so that it looks like the jockeys are riding the donkeys. It seems simple to figure out but rarely does anyone find the answer without seeing the solution. This puzzle was followed up by many other puzzles, including The Pony Puzzle, The Puzzled Neighbors, and The Wonderful 31 Game just to name a few. These puzzles were featured on an early form of advertising called trade cards, which were cards placed on store counters to advertise products. Many of these were printed by Loyd himself from his own print shop in his hometown of Elizabeth, New Jersey.

As the popularity of newspapers and magazines began to grow, Loyd started contributing to many publications. His puzzles appeared in puzzle columns for newspapers such as The Brooklyn Daily Eagle, The New York Journal, The Boston Herald, and The Chicago Record-Herald. One of his most well-known puzzle publications was his monthly column in Woman’s Home Companion which he published from 1904 to his death in 1911. The puzzles in these publications were gathered and published in 1914 in the collection titled Cyclopedia of 5,000 Puzzles, Tricks and Conundrums.

Come see the exhibition Sam Loyd: Puzzle King in the Main Gallery of the Lilly Library, which will be on display through December 20th. You can also pick up a free copy of The Trick Donkeys to test out your puzzle solving skills!

Andrew Rhoda

Curator of Puzzles

Jerry Slocum, donor of the Slocum Puzzle Collection (left); Will Shortz, New York Times Crossword Puzzle Editor (center); and Andrew Rhoda ,Lilly Library Curator of Puzzles (left)

Jerry Slocum, donor of the Slocum Puzzle Collection (left); Will Shortz, New York Times Crossword Puzzle Editor (center); and Andrew Rhoda ,Lilly Library Curator of Puzzles (left)

November 2, 2015

Will Shortz Lecture and Reception: Thursday, November 5

Filed under: Events,Exhibitions — Lilly Library @ 9:46 am

15PuzzleImageJoin us on Thursday, November 5 at 5:30 PM as we welcome Will Shortz to the Lilly Library! Mr. Shortz will be discussing “Puzzle King” Sam Loyd in conjunction with our spectacular fall exhibition. Come in to see the exhibition, hear the talk, and stay for a reception to follow. This event is free and open to the public; seating is limited and will be filled on a first come, first serve basis.

Also join us on Wednesday, November 4 at 8:00 PM in the Whittenberger Auditorium at the Indiana Memorial Union for “The Art of the Puzzle,” a Q&A with Will Shortz, followed by a live word puzzle competition.

Born in Crawfordsville, Indiana, Will Shortz began his career at a young age. By sixteen, he was a regular contributor to Dell puzzle publications. Shortz graduated from Indiana University’s Individualized Major Program with a degree in Enigmatology. After graduating with a law degree from the University of Virginia, he returned to puzzles, becoming NPR’s Puzzlemaster in 1987 and editor of the New York Times crossword in 1993. Shortz owns the world’s largest puzzle library, with more than 25,000 puzzle books and magazines dating back to 1533.

October 20, 2015

New Lecture Series Starts Monday, October 26

Filed under: Events,Exhibitions,Manuscripts — Cherry Williams @ 8:10 am

ricketts-97_00001Join us on Monday, October 26, 4:00-5:30 pm in the Slocum Room as we inaugurate “Monday Scholars’ Talks,” a new monthly discussion group focusing on various strengths of the Lilly Library’s collecting areas and featuring scholars from around the campus.

The first meeting will concentrate on the upcoming exhibition planned for the Lilly Library Main Gallery in spring of 2016, titled “The Performative Book: Agent of Creativity from Medieval Europe to the Americas.” The exhibition’s co-curators, Professor Hildegard Keller of Germanic Studies and Professor Rosemarie McGerr of Comparative Literature, will explore the focus and impetus of the exhibition. Also present will be Jim Canary, Head of the Lilly Library Conservation Department, who will provide insights into the behind-the-scenes activities involved in mounting an exhibition, and Lori Dekydtspotter, President of the Friends of the Lilly Library, who will introduce the speakers.

A reception will be provided courtesy of the Friends of the Lilly Library. Anyone with an interest in special collections, rare books, or medieval studies is welcome to attend!

October 13, 2015

Wednesday, October 14: Lecture on Charles Darwin

Filed under: Events — Rebecca Baumann @ 8:20 am

Come to the Lilly Library to enjoy an evening with Charles Darwin–or at least with books, letters, photographs, and other artifacts associated with him. This is your opportunity to hold in your hands a first edition of Origin of Species, signed by Charles Darwin himself. We will also encounter one of Darwin’s greatest foes, Louis Agassiz, the pre-eminent American scientist of his time, as well as other opponents of evolutionary thought. Among those was the anonymous creator of a very peculiar version of human descent featured in this illustration from 1874, who proposed that, if humans weren’t descended from apes, Charles Darwin certainly was!

Our expert guide to these highlights from the Lilly Library’s collection will be Christoph Irmscher, author of the most recent biography of Louis Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: Creator of American Science (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2013).

Date: Wednesday, October 14, 7:00-8:30 PM

Location: Lilly Library Slocum Room–seating is limited

This free lecture was organized by the Sassafras Audubon Society:


October 2, 2015

Happy Birthday, Lilly Library

Filed under: Events — Joel Silver @ 11:50 am
J. K. Lilly and Herman B Wells opening door to the newly-dedicated Lilly Library. October 3, 1960.

J. K. Lilly and Herman B Wells opening door to the newly-dedicated Lilly Library. October 3, 1960.

Fifty-five years ago, on October 3, 1960, Indiana University was the site of a momentous event. On that day, hundreds of people from Bloomington and from around the world gathered on campus to witness the dedication of the newly-completed Lilly Library, which was designed and constructed to preserve and make available the rare book and manuscript collections of Indiana University.

The dedication of this building to hold the University’s special collections was the culmination of decades of activity on the part of librarians and generous benefactors.  The University Library had begun collecting rare books in the early twentieth century, and in 1942, with the acquisition of Joseph B. Oakleaf’s Abraham Lincoln collection, there was enough significant material to warrant the creation of the Department of Rare Books and Special Collections, which was located in the building now known as Franklin Hall.  Other important collections of American history and literature soon followed, but it was the gift to IU in the mid-1950s of his collection of books and manuscripts by J. K. Lilly, Jr. that marked the turning point.  President Herman B Wells realized the importance of Mr. Lilly’s collection, and he felt that the University’s rare books and manuscripts should reside in a building better suited for their preservation and use, which should be situated at the center of campus in the “Fine Arts Plaza,” which was anchored by the Indiana University Auditorium, and which would soon include the Fine Arts Building and Showalter Fountain.

The Lilly Library was designed by the architectural firms of Eggers and Higgins of New York and A. M. Strauss of Fort Wayne.  The architects were inspired by other special collections libraries already existing on American college campuses, such as the William L. Clements Library at the University of Michigan and the Houghton Library at Harvard University, as well as by some of the other nearby limestone buildings on the IU campus.  The result was a building designed to serve both the research and museum functions of a special collections library, while maintaining views in the public areas of what has been called “the woodland campus of Indiana University.”  This attention to the variety of uses to which special collections libraries may be put, from curious visitors viewing the items on display, to senior researchers making detailed comparisons of books that can be found together only here in Bloomington, has remained a focus of the Lilly Library over the last fifty-five years, and the Library’s felicitous setting on IU’s woodland campus has helped to perpetuate the special feeling that permeated the dedication ceremonies of October 3, 1960.

Herman B Wells speaking at the dedication of The Lilly Library. October 3, 1960.

Herman B Wells speaking at the dedication of The Lilly Library. October 3, 1960.

The speakers on that day, from campus officials to visiting dignitaries, described the Lilly Library as a cultural treasure, as a place of wonder, and as a building in which the collected knowledge of the world would be preserved and disseminated.  This knowledge has grown exponentially since October 3, 1960, and the Lilly Library, as a part of the Indiana University Libraries, has continued to preserve and disseminate it.  We continue to expand our collections, which now include film scripts, mechanical puzzles, miniature books, artists’ books, as well as modern literary, historical, and scientific landmarks unknown to Mr. Lilly and the other collectors whose energy and generosity have helped to make the Lilly Library into a world-renowned research institution.  And we continue to expand the way that we disseminate this knowledge, from the photostatic copies of 1960 to electronically-published blog postings such as this.  On this day, we honor what our donors and predecessors have done for all of us, and we dedicate ourselves once again to the mission inscribed on the plaque just inside the Lilly Library’s front doorway, to preserve the “heritage of the best that has been thought and written through the ages.”

Joel Silver


Lilly Library, Indiana University

September 29, 2015

Free Guided Tour of Islamic Art Holdings at the Lilly Library

Filed under: Events,Manuscripts — Rebecca Baumann @ 10:16 am
allen-8_00001Discover the wonderful collections of Islamic art at Indiana University’s Lilly Library. On the tour you will see manuscripts, including rare Qur’ans, paintings and illustrations, miniature books, and early printed works.

Tours are free and open to the public
Expert guide
Each tour is approximately 1 hour long

Yasemin Gencer, Doctoral Candidate in Islamic Art, Department of the History of Art, Indiana University, Bloomington.

Send an email message to with your name and number of attendees. Space is limited so register today and guarantee your spot!

Friday, October 2: Lilly Library, 3:00-4:00pm
Please meet tour group in the lobby of the Lilly Library at 2:55pm

May 5, 2015

Christoph Irmscher on recovering Birds of America printer

Filed under: Books,Events — Lilly Library @ 3:06 pm

Audubon volume IV-402On the occasion of the first Rare Book School course to be taught at Indiana University, the Lilly Library invites you to a public lecture by IU Provost Professor Christoph Irmscher.

“Recovering Havell: A New Look at Birds of America

While we are used to referring to the magnificent Birds of America (1827-1838) as Audubon’s work, it is really also that of his printer, Robert Havell, Jr. His contribution to the finished product has been marginalized by generations of devoted Audubon admirers. This talk is a first attempt to recover Havell’s impact on individual plates (which ranged from supplying backgrounds to adding in entire specimens) as well as on the work as a whole. One underlying theme of these reflections will be the extent to which an Englishman who had never seen the United States shaped a work usually defined as quintessentially “American.”

Audubon scholar and IU Professor Christoph Irmscher will speak in the Lilly Library Slocum Room at 5:30 pm on May 12. A reception will follow the talk.

A Rare Book School Lecture sponsored by the Friends of the Lilly Library.

March 23, 2015

Novelist Nicholas Delbanco to Read at The Lilly Library

Filed under: Events — Lilly Library @ 4:02 pm

On April 2, at 5:30 p.m. novelist Nicholas Delbanco will read from his new novel The Years at the Lilly Library on the campus of Indiana University Bloomington. The event is sponsored by the Friends of the Lilly Library, with additional support from the College Arts and Humanities Institute. A reception will follow the event. Called by John Gardener “one of our greatest writers,” Nicholas Delbanco has published over two dozen acclaimed works of fiction and nonfiction.

His latest novel, The Years, published by Little A in January 2015, deals with the passage of time, from youth to middle age, from middle age to old. Four decades after their intense but doomed college romance, the novel’s protagonists, Lawrence and Hermia, meet again on Mediterranean cruise, falling more deeply in love now, and wondering whether or not to marry in their sixties. Moving across many years, the first part of the novel reports on their prior, separate lives and the steps toward a new life together. When Lawrence comes to visit Hermia’s home on Cape Cod she has one request: “Please stay.” What happens when he does fills the rest of this heartfelt, unforgettable novel. With enormous sympathy and keen insight, Delbanco follows Hermia and Lawrence through their final years together in Los Angeles and Cape Cod. Old scores are settled; old wounds heal. The Years is a unique book about first and final love, about the irrevocable end of things, and about what endures.

The Friends of Art Bookshop will offer copies of the novel for sale at the reading, and Mr. Delbanco has agreed to sign them.

About the Author:
Nicholas Delbanco is the Robert Frost Distinguished University Professor of English Language and Literature at the University of Michigan. His most recent book was The Art of Youth: Crane, Carrington, Gershwin, and the Nature of First Acts (Amazon Publishing/New Harvest), selected by Susan Stamberg for NPR’s Guide to 2013’s Great Reads. The long-term director of the MFA program as well as the Hopwood Awards Program at the University of Michigan, he has served as chair of the fiction panel for the National Book Awards and a judge for the Pulitzer Prize in fiction, received a Guggenheim Fellowship, and, twice, a National Endowment for the Arts Writing Fellowship.

The Years is available for sale at the Friends of Art Bookshop.

Questions? Contact The Lilly Library at (812) 855-2452.


February 2, 2015

Upcoming Lecture Featuring Research from the Papers of Max Eastman

Filed under: Events,Manuscripts — Rebecca Baumann @ 2:14 pm

weston_003Between 1919 and 1921, Margrethe Mather took a series of extraordinary photographs of her friend and lover, the actress Florence Deshon, a woman of extraordinary beauty and intelligence. Signature events in the history of portrait photography, these images played a central role in Deshon’s tempestuous relationship with the poet, editor, and socialist Max Eastman (who, too, was the subject of several iconic Mather photographs). Florence Deshon, who likely killed herself in 1922, is virtually forgotten today. This talk pays tribute to her and to Mather’s photographs, several of which are in the collections of the Lilly Library.

Christoph Irmscher, Provost Professor of English and Director of the Wells Scholars Program, has been working on a biography of Max Eastman, tentatively titled When Love Was Red, which makes extensive use of the Eastman papers at the Lilly Library. His most recent book is Louis Agassiz: Creator of American Science (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2013).

When: February 5, 4pm
Where: FA 102
Free and Open to the Public

January 22, 2015

Orson Welles exhibition buzz

Filed under: Events,Exhibitions — Lilly Library @ 2:35 pm

welles_01291Excitement is building for the Orson Welles exhibition at the Lilly Library! The exhibition, “100 Years of Orson Welles: Master of Stage, Sound, and Screen” opens this week, and later in the semester film screenings and an academic symposium will provide continued opportunities to explore the work of this master of many media on the 100th anniversary of his birth.

The Indianapolis publication NUVO just published a piece on the exhibition: 100 Years of Orson Welles. The IU Bloomington Newsroom press release has information on the film schedule and links to symposium information.

Craig Simpson, Manuscript Archivist at the Lilly Library and curator of the the exhibition, will give a talk on February 12 at 5:30 pm in the Lilly Library Lincoln Room.

August 25, 2014

August 28 Lecture and Reception: The Unseen World

Filed under: Events,Exhibitions — Rebecca Baumann @ 10:07 am

maguscropOurs is a haunted world. Belief in and fear of ghosts, demons, and unseen forces is an undeniable part of human experience. The Lilly Library’s summer exhibition, “Spiritualists, Sorcerers, and Stage Magicians” explores this fascination in items from the Lilly’s collections from the occult grimoires of Agrippa to stories of modern day ghost hunters stalking their spectral prey in the gaudy pages of 20th-century pulp magazines and comic books.
Please join us for a lecture and reception on August 28 at 5:00 to celebrate the closing of our summer exhibition.  Exhibition curators Rebecca Baumann and L. Anne Delgado will highlight some of the mesmerizing narratives that emerge from the pages of the items on display.  Rebecca Baumann, a Reference Associate at the Lilly Library and PhD candidate in the Department of English, will discuss the relationship between magic and the print culture as well as the history of the Lilly Library’s acquisitions in this collecting area.  L. Anne Delgado, a Lecturer in the Department of English who completed her PhD at IU and has written extensively on esoteric topics, will focus on spiritualism, science, and the curious emergence of ectoplasm in the 19th century.  She will introduce a cavalcade of historical figures both exalted and forgotten: lauded stage magicians jealously guarding their craft, scheming mediums who used the public’s hunger for ghosts to develop their own unique forms of performance, and psychical researchers who tried to reconcile science with spirits.

August 11, 2014

August 18: Egyptology and the Occult: The Enigmatic Friendship of Aleister Crowley and Battiscombe Gunn

Filed under: Events,Exhibitions — Lilly Library @ 10:30 am
Photograph of Aleister Crowley

Aleister Crowley

The late Victorian period was the time in which the modern world as we know it took shape. The industrial revolution was in full swing, scientific and technical discoveries were coming at dizzying pace, and the many scholarly disciplines that deal with the human cultures became recognizable in their modern forms: anthropology, archaeology, linguistics, and of course Egyptology, among others. But at the same period, particularly in Britain, there was also an explosion of interest in the occult, the paranormal, and the esoteric – interests that developed directly into what is now often described as “New Age” philosophy.

Ancient Egypt was one area in which modern scholarship and esotericism overlapped, and even converged. It is not often remembered today that in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, a number of mainstream scholars of antiquity were interested in esoteric or occult subjects. One very interesting case is that of Battiscombe Gunn (1883-1950), still remembered as one of the most insightful Egyptologists of his generation. What is less well known is that Gunn was associated, apparently in more than a casual way, with Aleister Crowley. Crowley, of course, was and remains the most notorious British occultist of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries — an individual who was known to his detractors as the “wickedest man in the world,” and who proudly proclaimed himself to be the “Beast 666.” We will first lay out the evidence for the “friendship” – if that is what it was – between Gunn and Crowley. We will go on to discuss how and why Gunn, and a number of his scholarly contemporaries, were interested in the esoteric and the occult. And we will discuss the reasons why esotericism and mainstream Egyptology eventually went their separate ways.

Steve Vinson
“Egyptology and the Occult: The Enigmatic Friendship of Aleister Crowley and Battiscombe Gunn”
August 18, 3:30 PM
Lilly Library Slocum Room

Steve Vinson is an associate professor of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures at Indiana University in Bloomington, who earned his doctorate in Egyptology at the Johns Hopkins University in 1995. He is currently working on a book on historical and critical approaches to ancient Egyptian literature.

July 10, 2014

Planting the Raintree: A Tribute to Ross Lockridge, Jr.

Filed under: Events,Manuscripts — Guest Blogger @ 12:33 pm
image of groundsmen Chuck Burleson (right) and Tony Albanese planting the raintree

IU groundsmen Chuck Burleson (right) and Tony Albanese planted the Lilly golden raintree on the morning of June 26, 2014.

Bloomington author Ross Lockridge Jr.’s 1948 book Raintree County has been touted by some contemporary critics as a candidate for that elusive goal, the Great American Novel. To honor Lockridge’s legacy, the Lilly Library has partnered with the IU Office of Landscape Architecture to plant a golden raintree at the historic Raintree House in Bloomington. The raintree was featured as part of the Lilly exhibition “Raintree County: A Celebration of the Life and Work of Ross Lockridge Jr.,” which went on display this spring in tribute to the author’s centennial.

Special thanks go to the Lockridge family for making the exhibition possible through their gift to the Lilly Library of thousands of the author’s personal belongings, including letters, mementos, unpublished writings, and a portion of the original manuscript for the famed novel. The Lockridge family has also been very generous in sharing their family story, which includes their father’s success, his suicide, and other details of his life and work.

Lockridge was familiar with raintrees through their prominent population in New Harmony, Indiana. In 1937 he wrote A Pageant of New Harmony, which was performed in the town as part of the second annual Golden Rain Tree Festival. Years later he employed the raintree as a symbol of knowledge, fertility, and life in his epic novel and appropriated its name for his title.

Native to eastern Asia, the raintree was introduced to the West in the 1700s and blooms in early summer with clusters of mildly-fragrant yellow flowers. In the fall, the leaves turn buttery yellow and the tree produces brown, papery seed capsules which somewhat resemble Chinese lanterns. The tree will be located on the west side of Raintree House, visible to visitors and passers-by.

Built in 1845, Raintree House is currently home to three young golden raintrees but was once home to one of the largest such trees in southern Indiana. In 1969 the IU Foundation purchased the property, and the Organization of American Historians moved into it the following year, occupying it ever since. Constructed from locally produced brick and virgin walnut timber, the house is designated an Indiana historic site and is on the National Register of Historic Places.

Given the role and sense of history in Raintree County, the ceremonial planting at Raintree House is a fitting coda to the Lilly’s recently-concluded Ross Lockridge Jr. centennial exhibition. “For Raintree County is not the country of the perishable fact,” the author stated in the novel’s epigraph. “It is the country of the enduring fiction. The clock in the Court House Tower on page five of the Raintree County Atlas is always fixed at nine o’clock, and it is summer and the days are long.” This tree serves as a reminder of the sturdy and renewable power and beauty of literary art that emerged from the rich imagination of one Indiana writer in the middle years of the 20th century.

David Brent Johnson, Guest Blogger

Built in 1845, Raintree House is part of Indiana University and is currently home to the Organization of American Historians.  It is also now home to three golden raintrees.

Built in 1845, Raintree House is part of Indiana University and is currently home to the Organization of American Historians.  It is also now home to three golden raintrees.

June 19, 2014

The Lilly Library engages in some paranormal activity

Filed under: Events,Exhibitions — Lilly Library @ 11:24 am

Excitement mounts for Saturday’s opening reception for Spiritualists, Sorcerers, and Stage Magicians: Magic and the Supernatural at the Lilly Library. We’ll have food and drink plus a magic show and remarks by the exhibition curators! IU Communications multimedia intern Milana Katic posted a short video on the Art at IU blog today featuring interviews with exhibition curators Rebecca Baumann and L. Anne Delgado and a sneak preview of magician Steve Bryant.

For the full post see: The Lilly Library engages in some paranormal activity. And please join us at 6:00 pm at the Lilly Library this Saturday, June 21, for a festive evening.

January 23, 2014

From Bonnie and Clyde to Jaws: Pauline Kael class at the Lilly Library

Filed under: Events — Lilly Library @ 6:00 am

Indiana University Lifelong Learning proudly presents ‘From Bonnie and Clyde to Jaws: Pauline Kael’s
“Critical Collection” at the Lilly Library’
. The Second Golden Age of Cinema (ca. 1967-1975) was an unprecedented era of creativity and risk in Hollywood moviemaking, and with that came new heights in film criticism. At the forefront was Pauline Kael, the controversial, insightful, wickedly funny film critic for The New Yorker from the late 1960s to the early 1990s. This course focuses primarily on Kael’s criticism during the Second Golden Age, where her influence helped launch the careers of filmmakers like Francis Coppola, Martin Scorsese, and Steven Spielberg. Additionally, we will watch selected scenes from classic films of this period (such as Bonnie and Clyde, The Godfather, Nashville, and Jaws) and assess them in the context of Kael’s reviews.

Class: ‘From Bonnie and Clyde to Jaws : Pauline Kael’s “Critical Collection” at the Lilly Library’
Instructor: Craig Simpson
Location: Lilly Library
Times: March 25 and April 1 (Tuesdays) 7:00pm-8:30pm
Fee: $40
Class size is limited to 25 students.

To register for this class, go to

November 12, 2013

Marchetto and Prosdocimo: A Musician and an Astronomer on Music in Medieval Padua

Filed under: Events — Lilly Library @ 5:20 pm

Please join us on Monday, November 18, 2013, at 5:00 pm in the Lilly Library for “Marchetto and Prosdocimo: A Musician and an Astronomer on Music in Medieval Padua,” the inaugural lecture in a new series from Indiana University Jacobs School of Music’s Center for the History of Music Theory and Literature (CHMTL) by the renowned medievalist and musicologist Jan Herlinger.

All are welcome. Refreshments will follow the talks. In order to prepare for the reception, we ask that you please fill out the small form available here if you are planning to attend.

Jan Herlinger is Derryl and Helen Haymon Professor of Music, emeritus, at Louisiana State University and an Adjunct Researcher at the University of Alabama School of Music. Professor Herlinger has edited, translated, and written widely on medieval music theory; he has contributed to the New Grove Dictionary of Music, the Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages, Medieval Italy: An Encyclopedia, the New Oxford History of Music, and the Cambridge History of Western Music Theory; and to the Journal of the American Musicological Society, Acta Musicologica, and Music Theory Spectrum. He served as Secretary of the American Musicological Society, 1996–2001, and, from its beginning, as a member of the Board of the Thesaurus Musicarum Latinarum, a project hosted by CHMTL.

Marchetto was a choirmaster in Padua in the early 14th century; Prosdocimo de Beldemandis an astronomer, physician, and professor of arts and medicine at the university in that city in the early 15th century. Both wrote extensively on music, covering many of the same topics (Prosdocimo wrote on arithmetic, geometry, and astronomy as well). Their music treatises are well known among students of medieval music and deemed essential for its understanding; but their experiences of music, their views of it, and their attitudes toward it were very different. The talk traces their differences—even conflicts—of opinion, and will include images of medieval manuscripts and audio clips of pieces each writer would have known.

For more information about this lecture, please refer to the Jacobs School of Music blog.

August 23, 2013

Meet author Robert K. Elder! Saturday September 7, 2013 1:00-3:00PM

Filed under: Events,Film — Cherry Williams @ 1:23 pm

“Ladies and gentlemen, by way of introduction, this is a film about trickery, fraud, about lies…almost any story is most certainly some kind of lie.” – Orson Welles, F for Fake


The Lilly Library is delighted to join with the IU Cinema in welcoming author, Robert K. Elder, whose archive the Lilly Library is proud to house. A meet-the-author reception will be hosted at the Lilly in the Main Gallery from 1:00-3:00PM prior to a double-screening of Orson Welles’ “F for Fake” and Lasse Hallström’s “The Hoax” which will be shown at the Indiana University cinema on Saturday, September 7 beginning at 3:00PM.

Rob’s new book “The Best Film You’ve Never Seen,” in which he interviews 35 directors about their favorite overlooked, forgotten or critically-savaged gems will be available for purchase and signing at the theater following the reception.

The Lilly is also honored to hold the archives of Orson Welles, as well as those of other film greats John Ford and Peter Bogdanovich.

Orson Welles:

John Ford:

Peter Bogdanovich:

— Cherry Williams, Curator of Manuscripts

July 8, 2013

Anthony Arnove: Dirty Wars

Filed under: Events — Cherry Williams @ 2:02 pm

We recently received notice that Anthony Arnove’s production of Dirty Wars, will be playing at the Indiana University Cinema for one night only: THURSDAY, August 8, at 7 pm, and that Mr. Arnove will be on hand for a question and answer session after the screening.

The Lilly Library is honored to be the repository of Anthony Arnove’s papers and the archive of Haymarket Books.

The film features independent journalist Jeremy Scahill, the New York Times bestselling author of Blackwater and now Dirty Wars (the book of the same title as the film).

Dirty Wars won the Cintematography Prize at Sundance. Variety says it is “astonishingly hard-hitting” and adds: “This jaw-dropping, persuasively researched pic has the power to pry open government lockboxes.” Below is a poster with some of the highlights of this and other write ups.

You can see the trailer here:

Details on the screening are here:

And details on ticketing are here:

Tickets are $3 students and $6 public. Tickets are required for all screenings. You can pick up tickets at the IU Auditorium Box Office, which is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday or — if they are not sold out — 30 minutes prior to any IU Cinema screening.

March 4, 2013

Mediaevalia at the Lilly

Filed under: Events,Exhibitions — Lilly Library @ 12:55 pm

As one of Indiana University’s greatest resources, The Lilly Library’s rich collection of materials bears witness to the development of the history of the book and of European media culture. The series Mediaevalia at the Lilly aims to better publicize our collection of medieval and renaissance manuscripts by bringing established scholars and experts for lectures and hands-on workshops for students and faculty. The series is organized under the auspices of the Medieval Studies Institute, and run by Hildegard Elisabeth Keller (Germanic Studies) in collaboration with Cherry Williams, Curator of Manuscripts at the Lilly Library. One seminar per year is conducted by a scholar from the field of manuscript study, the history of the book, or early printing. In seeking to combine lectures with workshops, our goal is to make abstract ideas, as presented in the classroom, concrete by confronting students with the intractable nature of sources and giving them some sense of just how much can be gleaned from handwriting, type, parchment, paper, watermarks, title pages, musical notation, format, decoration, in short, all material aspects of the book over the course of the period stretching from Late Antiquity to the Reformation.

This year, Mediævalia 2013, featured Dr. Roger S. Wieck, Curator of Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts at the Morgan Library & Museum. In addition, Dr. Wieck has held curatorial positions at the Walters Art Museum and the Houghton Library at Harvard. He is the author of The Prayer Book of Claude de France (2010), The Hours of Henry VIII: A Renaissance Masterpiece by Jean Poyet (2000), Painted Prayers: The Book of Hours in Medieval and Renaissance Art (1997), Time Sanctified: The Book of Hours in Medieval Art and Life (1988), and many other books and articles on medieval manuscripts. Prof. Keller’s interview with him can be seen on Youtube:

November 23, 2012

Faking the War of 1812

Filed under: Events,Exhibitions,Film,Online exhibitions — Lilly Library @ 9:00 am

Faking the War of 1812
A talk by Lawrence Hott, producer/director of the documentary film, The War of 1812
Tuesday, December 4, 2012
6:30 p.m., reception to follow
The Lilly Library

Lawrence Hott will discuss the problem of historical truth in documentary film, particularly in the context of the War of 1812, a period which presents a number of challenges to a documentary filmmaker. Hott is producer/director of the documentary film, The War of 1812, broadcast on PBS in October 2011. The War of 1812 film and bonus features can be viewed online, courtesy of PBS/WNED:

Lawrence Hott and his partner Diane Garey have been making documentary films since 1978 as part of Florentine Films, and later Hott Productions. Their productions are among the most-watched broadcasts on public television. Notable titles include John James Audubon: Drawn from Nature and Wild by Law, the story of the Wilderness Act of 1964 and three men responsible for its passage, which was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature.

Hott’s awards include an Emmy, two Academy Award nominations, the duPont-Columbia Journalism Award, the George Foster Peabody Award, five American Film Festival Blue Ribbons, and Fourteen CINE Golden Eagles. He received the Humanities Achievement Award from the Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities in 1995; a Massachusetts Cultural Council/Boston Film and Video Foundation Fellowship in 2001; and the Rosalynn Carter Fellowship for Mental Health Journalism in 2001. He has been on the board of non-fiction writers at Smith College and has served as a panelist for the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Massachusetts Cultural Commission, and the Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities. He is a member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

Hott is a former juvenile court investigator and a lawyer by training, who has said that the law and documentary filmmaking have more in common than one would think: “a lot of legal practice has to do with the presentation of arguments, working with people, and being clear in your correspondence. I can’t think of a better training for a filmmaker than three years of law school.”

The talk will be followed by a reception. Both the talk and the reception are sponsored by the Friends of the Lilly Library and take place in concert with the exhibition, The War of 1812 in the Collections of the Lilly Library, on view through December 15, 2012, in the Main Gallery of the Lilly Library. An expanded version of the exhibition is available online at:

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