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Indiana University Bloomington

August 23, 2013

Meet author Robert K. Elder! Saturday September 7, 2013 1:00-3:00PM

Filed under: Events,Film — Cherry Williams @ 1:23 pm

“Ladies and gentlemen, by way of introduction, this is a film about trickery, fraud, about lies…almost any story is most certainly some kind of lie.” - Orson Welles, F for Fake

ElderRob

The Lilly Library is delighted to join with the IU Cinema in welcoming author, Robert K. Elder, whose archive the Lilly Library is proud to house. A meet-the-author reception will be hosted at the Lilly in the Main Gallery from 1:00-3:00PM prior to a double-screening of Orson Welles’ “F for Fake” and Lasse Hallström’s “The Hoax” which will be shown at the Indiana University cinema on Saturday, September 7 beginning at 3:00PM. http://www.cinema.indiana.edu/?post_type=series&p=4864

Rob’s new book “The Best Film You’ve Never Seen,” in which he interviews 35 directors about their favorite overlooked, forgotten or critically-savaged gems will be available for purchase and signing at the theater following the reception. http://robertkelder.com/

The Lilly is also honored to hold the archives of Orson Welles, as well as those of other film greats John Ford and Peter Bogdanovich.

Orson Welles: http://www.indiana.edu/~liblilly/lilly/mss/index.php?p=welles

John Ford: http://www.indiana.edu/~liblilly/lilly/mss/index.php?p=fordj

Peter Bogdanovich: http://www.indiana.edu/~liblilly/lilly/mss/index.php?p=bogdanovich

– Cherry Williams, Curator of Manuscripts

November 23, 2012

Faking the War of 1812

Filed under: Events,Exhibitions,Film,Online exhibitions — Lilly Library @ 9:00 am

Faking the War of 1812
A talk by Lawrence Hott, producer/director of the documentary film, The War of 1812
Tuesday, December 4, 2012
6:30 p.m., reception to follow
The Lilly Library

Lawrence Hott will discuss the problem of historical truth in documentary film, particularly in the context of the War of 1812, a period which presents a number of challenges to a documentary filmmaker. Hott is producer/director of the documentary film, The War of 1812, broadcast on PBS in October 2011. The War of 1812 film and bonus features can be viewed online, courtesy of PBS/WNED: http://www.pbs.org/wned/war-of-1812/the-film/watch-film-and-bonus-features/

Lawrence Hott and his partner Diane Garey have been making documentary films since 1978 as part of Florentine Films, and later Hott Productions. Their productions are among the most-watched broadcasts on public television. Notable titles include John James Audubon: Drawn from Nature and Wild by Law, the story of the Wilderness Act of 1964 and three men responsible for its passage, which was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature.

Hott’s awards include an Emmy, two Academy Award nominations, the duPont-Columbia Journalism Award, the George Foster Peabody Award, five American Film Festival Blue Ribbons, and Fourteen CINE Golden Eagles. He received the Humanities Achievement Award from the Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities in 1995; a Massachusetts Cultural Council/Boston Film and Video Foundation Fellowship in 2001; and the Rosalynn Carter Fellowship for Mental Health Journalism in 2001. He has been on the board of non-fiction writers at Smith College and has served as a panelist for the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Massachusetts Cultural Commission, and the Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities. He is a member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

Hott is a former juvenile court investigator and a lawyer by training, who has said that the law and documentary filmmaking have more in common than one would think: “a lot of legal practice has to do with the presentation of arguments, working with people, and being clear in your correspondence. I can’t think of a better training for a filmmaker than three years of law school.”

The talk will be followed by a reception. Both the talk and the reception are sponsored by the Friends of the Lilly Library and take place in concert with the exhibition, The War of 1812 in the Collections of the Lilly Library, on view through December 15, 2012, in the Main Gallery of the Lilly Library. An expanded version of the exhibition is available online at: http://collections.libraries.iub.edu/warof1812/

February 24, 2012

The Incredible Shrinking Man Meets The Exorcist

Filed under: Film — Lilly Library @ 12:21 pm

While a great faceoff for a Midnite Movie feature, the above represents two titles from the Lilly Library’s sizeable and eclectic science fiction and horror film script collection. The Incredible Shrinking Man (1957), scripted by Richard Matheson from his 1956 novel, The Shrinking Man, is an acknowledged sci fi classic while The Exorcist (1973) is still considered by many to be the scariest motion picture ever made. Unlike the majority of the scripts in the collection which feature dialogue, The Incredible Shrinking Man is a “picturization,” the entire film story boarded in over 600 drawings (see Figs. 1 and 2). Like many scripts in the collection, The Exorcist is a revision and contains dialogue not included in the final version of the film (see Fig. 3). The scripts representing these genres run the gamut from classic films like The Picture of Dorian Gray (1945), The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951), Forbidden Planet (1956), Planet of the Apes (1968), to lesser known B movies like The Vampire’s Ghost (1945), Monster from the Ocean Floor (1954), The Brain Eaters (1958), and Blood Orgy of the She-Devils (1972). Hammer Films, the British studio which redefined horror in the late 1950s, is represented by The Quatermass Experiment (1955), The Mummy (1959), The Phantom of the Opera (1962), Quatermass and the Pit (1967), and Lust for a Vampire (1971). Scripts for the films of legendary independent producer/director Roger Corman include The Viking Women and the Sea Serpent (1957), and two films from his well-regarded Edgar Allan Poe cycle, The Pit and the Pendulum (1961) and The Masque of the Red Death (1964). Fans of serials should consult Flash Gordon Conquers the Universe (1940) and two Republic Studio chapter plays, Flying Disc Man from Mars (1950) and Canadian Mounties vs. Atomic Invaders (1953). To browse the collection (many are not listed in IUCAT), ask the Lilly’s Reading Room attendant for the Shelf List call number PN6120 .S42 for a complete alphabetical list of scripts with detailed descriptions. Copying of any kind is prohibited without prior permission of the studio and/or the script’s author.

David K. Frasier, Reference Librarian, Lilly Library

Fig. 1. Artist sketch of the spider fight sequence in The Incredible Shrinking Man (Universal-International Pictures, 1957).


Fig. 2. Closely corresponding scene from the film with actor Grant Williams.


Fig. 3. Sample page from The Exorcist script (PN6120 .S42 E97) written by William Peter Blatty from his 1971 novel featuring dialogue not used in the original 1973 Warner Bros. release.

August 11, 2011

Critical Collections at the Lilly Library

Filed under: Books,Exhibitions,Film,Manuscripts — Craig Simpson @ 11:56 am

photograph of Pauline Kael, film critic A new exhibition highlighting
“Critical Collections” at the Lilly Library will be on display in the Lincoln Room through the month of August. The exhibition features the papers of some of the most significant, controversial writers of cultural criticism in the modern era. Noteworthy items include: American literary critic Anthony Boucher’s pioneering reviews of J. R. R. Tolkien and Ian Fleming; British literary critic Desmond MacCarthy’s correspondence with James Joyce and George Bernard Shaw; drama critic Kenneth Tynan’s original handwritten journals; and materials pertaining to the Orson Welles/Citizen Kane screenplay debate between film critics Peter Bogdanovich and Pauline Kael (pictured here).

—Craig Simpson, Lilly Library Manuscripts Archivist and exhibition curator

May 18, 2011

IU Cinema explores the Lilly Library

Filed under: Film,Manuscripts — Lilly Library @ 4:23 pm

Craig Simpson, Lilly Library Manuscripts Archivist

For a recent (May 9, 2011) IU Cinema podcast entitled “Exploring The Lilly Library”, Craig Simpson, Lilly Library Manuscripts Archivist, spoke with Andy Hunsucker and Jason Thompson about some of the film manuscripts at the Lilly Library. Andy and Jason examine pieces from the Orson Welles, the John Ford, the Pauline Kael, the David Bradley, and the Willis Pyle manuscript collections with genuine relish.

Listen to the entire “Exploring the Lilly Library” podcast, or explore IU Cinema’s A Place for Film – The IU Cinema Podcast.

January 21, 2010

Peter Bogdanovich to visit IUB

Filed under: Books,Events,Film,Manuscripts — Virginia Dearborn @ 5:37 pm

Paper Moon movie poster

On Saturday, January 30, 2010 at 4pm, the Lilly Library will present “A Conversation with Peter Bogdanovich” in Room 251 of the Radio–TV Building on the campus of Indiana University, Bloomington.

Bogdanovich was born in 1939 in Kingston, New York. He attended Stella Adler’s Theatre Studio and has appeared on stage, screen and television. He was film critic for Esquire, The New York Times, Cahiers du Cinema among others, and has written numerous books on American cinema, most notably The Cinema of Alfred Hitchcock, John Ford, and This is Orson Welles. He also wrote The Killing of the Unicorn: Dorothy Stratten (1960–1980) based on his relationship with the Playboy centerfold who was murdered by her estranged husband.

He is the owner/founder of several production companies including: Saticoy Productions, Inc., Copa de Oro Productions and Moon Pictures. Bogdanovich directed his first feature film Targets, starring Boris Karloff in 1968. His breakthrough film, however, was The Last Picture Show (1971) based on the Larry McMurtry novel. Several successful and critically acclaimed films followed, notably his documentary Directed by John Ford (1971) and the comedies, What’s Up Doc? (1972) and Paper Moon (1973). Subsequent films include Daisy Miller (1974), They All Laughed (1981), Mask (1985), and The Thing Called Love (1993). He is also credited for the screenplays of The Last Picture Show, its sequel Texasville, What’s Up Doc?, and many others.

You can learn more about Peter Bogdanovich by exploring the Lilly Library’s Bogdanovich Manuscript Collection. An inventory and finding aid are also available for this collection.

And, of course, you can come to Room 251 in the Radio–TV building and meet Mr. Bogdanovich on Saturday, January 30, 2010 at 4pm!

June 2, 2009

Targets: Karloff and Bogdanovich

Filed under: Film,Manuscripts — David Frasier @ 9:50 am

Boris Karloff mask

Boris Karloff (born William Henry Pratt on November 23, 1887 in Camberwell, London) was a 44-year-old journeyman actor when director James Whale, unable to convince Bela Lugosi to accept the role, cast the mild-mannered Englishman as “the Monster” in the 1931 Universal horror film, Frankenstein. The actor’s sensitive portrayal of Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley’s creature made him an immediate star, but forever typecast him in increasingly low-budget horror and science fiction films from the 1930s to the late 1960s. In 1966, the veteran actor who had made some of the most notable genre films in the history of motion pictures (Bride of Frankenstein, 1935; The Body Snatcher, 1945) had been reduced to appearing in cheapie productions like The Ghost in the Invisible Bikini, although that same year he had done the winning narration for the now-classic animated television production of Dr. Seuss’s “How the Grinch Stole Christmas.”

In 1968, 29-year-old film critic turned director Peter Bogdanovich gave Karloff his last memorable screen role as aging horror movie star, “Byron Orlok,” in Targets. Bogdanovich’s directorial debut (which he also produced, co-wrote, and edited) was inspired by ex-Marine Charles Whitman’s deadly 96 minute rampage on the campus of University of Texas-Austin on August 1, 1966. Hours after murdering his mother and wife in separate incidents, Whitman amassed a small arsenal of high-powered rifles, and positioning himself atop the university’s Tower, killed 13, and wounded 31 before being shot to death by a campus security guard. In a more sedate scene from Targets featured on YouTube (www.youtube.com/watch?v=SfXOx04d6m4) , Bogdanovich (seated on couch) convinces Karloff to retell W. Somerset Maugham’s short piece, “Appointment in Samarra” (1933). Karloff died on February 2, 1969, but not before footage taken of him in late 1968 was added to four low-budget films shot in Mexico: Cult of the Dead, Alien Terror, House of Evil, and The Fear Chamber.

The Bogdanovich mss, purchased from the filmmaker in 1995 and periodically supplemented, is housed in the Auxiliary Library Facility (ALF). Materials must be requested in advance for use in the Lilly Library by using the Bogdanovich mss. collection description and inventory in conjunction with IUCAT. Among the collection’s more than 100,000 items are production materials, research, related business correspondence, and scripts for his films including Targets (1968), The Last Picture Show (1971), Directed by John Ford (1971), Paper Moon (1973), Daisy Miller (1974), Saint Jack (1979), Mask (1985), et al. Also included are reel-to-reel audiotapes of interviews conducted by Bogdanovich with directors George Cukor, John Ford, Alfred Hitchcock, Fritz Lang, Sidney Lumet, Otto Preminger, Raoul Walsh, and Orson Welles. The accompanying photos feature a unique item from the collection: a 3-pound hand painted fiberglass casting of Karloff’s bust by veteran Hollywood make-up man and F/X sculptor Norman Bryn commercially available through Classic Creature Craft, LLC.

— David K. Frasier, Reference Librarian

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