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Indiana University Bloomington

January 28, 2016

Welcome to the new Lilly Library Request System

Filed under: In the news,Programs and Services — Erika Dowell @ 1:02 am

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After six months of planning, the staff of the Lilly Library is happy to announce its new online request and workflow system. If you are planning to visit the Lilly Library Reading Room or order reproductions of Lilly Library materials, you may now register online and make requests through IUCAT and Archives Online.

The Lilly Library Request System debuts today, Thursday, January 28. The system is new to most of us at the Lilly Library, but it is in use at nearly 60 other special collections libraries and archives throughout the United States.

Visit this link or look for the big red button on the Lilly Library home page to sign up: https://iub.aeon.atlas-sys.com/

Once you create an account, you may:

  • search IUCAT and look for the “Lilly Library: Request This” button on Lilly Library records
  • find manuscript materials in IU’s Archives Online and look for the “Request” link in the side menu
  • make reservations to use materials in the Reading Room
  • place orders for digital images or photocopies
  • have access to all of your current, past, and saved requests
  • and if you are teaching a class at the Lilly Library, you can collaborate with a librarian to create an online list of materials to use in class!

Farewell to filling out cards by hand! Hello to requesting with a click!

January 21, 2016

Reading Room closed on Wednesday, January 27, 3:00-6:00

Filed under: Programs and Services — Rebecca Baumann @ 7:59 pm

The Reading Room will be closed on Wednesday, January 27th from 3:00-6:00. We will be conducting staff training sessions for our new Lilly Library Request System.

If you’ve used the Lilly Library Reading Room any time in our 55 year history, you probably remember filling out paper charge slips to request items; as of next week, those paper charge slips will be a thing of the past! We have been working hard to implement a new electronic request system which will allow patrons to register and request items online. Keep an eye on our website for more information about the Lilly Library Request System, debuting January 28.

September 8, 2014

Special Collections and Primary Sources Consulting Hours in Wells Library Scholars Commons

Filed under: Programs and Services — Rebecca Baumann @ 11:14 am

Would you like to discuss innovative ways to incorporate primary source research into your course curriculum? Are you curious about how primary sources on campus might enhance your own research projects? Would you like to know more about the resources of the Lilly Library?

Staff members from the Public Services Department of the Lilly Library will be available every Tuesday from 1:00-3:00 in Room K of Wells Library’s new Scholars Commons to discuss ways in which you can utilize the Lilly Library’s vast holdings in your own research or in your class and assignment design.  The Lilly Library’s Public Services Department conducts over 300 class sessions a year, and creative assignments arising from these sessions include digital exhibitions, graphic designs inspired by medieval manuscripts and comic books, tweets of recipes from our historical cookbook collection, and many other exciting projects.

Faculty, graduate students, and undergraduates are all welcome.  Of course you can also still contact us by phone (855-2452), email (liblilly@indiana.edu) or by stopping by the Lilly Library.

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July 23, 2014

Fantastic Fairy Tales: From the Archives to the Classroom

Filed under: Books,Programs and Services — Rebecca Baumann @ 9:19 am
An early 19th-century chapbook of Cinderella with hand-colored engraved illustrations.  Students were particularly interested in the ways that illustrations of Cinderella reflected changing fashions and standards of female beauty over time.

An early 19th-century chapbook of Cinderella with hand-colored engraved illustrations. Students were particularly interested in the ways that illustrations of Cinderella reflected changing fashions and standards of female beauty over time.

The Lilly Library Public Services Department conducts over 200 class sessions a year for diverse audiences, from elementary school children to retirees. Many class sessions for IU undergraduates focus on introducing students to primary sources and archival research. This summer, Laura Clapper, an Associate Instructor and PhD candidate in the Department of English, brought the students from her Introduction to Fiction class for a session to compare different versions of classic fairy tales.

Students had a class session at the library in which they learned about the history of publishing children’s literature and examined historical examples from the 18th through 20th centuries of the stories “Cinderella,” “Bluebeard,” and “Jack the Giant Killer.”  Students noted differences as the stories were published over time.  They examined not only changes in the plot and moral of the story but also differences in illustrations and the physical attributes of the books themselves, taking into consideration how the stories might be presented and marketed for different historical audiences.

After examining these fairy tales in the Lilly’s Reading Room, students completed projects in which they imagined themselves as library curators and created exhibitions for adults and children based on their research and presented them to their peers in class.  Creative responses ranged from colorful posters to an interactive digital walkthrough, and students made insightful deductions about how and why these tales have changed over time.

If you would like to schedule a class session at the Lilly Library, please fill out our online form (http://www.indiana.edu/~liblilly/form.php) or contact the Public Services Department at liblilly@indiana.edu or 812-855-2452.

Rebecca Baumann, Reference Associate

In this 1954 comic book retelling, Cinderella's stepmother and stepsisters are vampires.  Cinderella steals a magic book and helps herself rather than relying on a fairy godmother.  Students thought that the shocking twist ending (spoiler alert: the prince is a vampire too!) was to die for.

In this 1954 comic book retelling, Cinderella’s stepmother and stepsisters are vampires. Cinderella steals a magic book and helps herself rather than relying on a fairy godmother. Students thought that the shocking twist ending (spoiler alert: the prince is a vampire too!) was to die for.

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