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November 23, 2012

Faking the War of 1812

Filed under: Events,Exhibitions,Film,Online exhibitions — Lilly Library @ 9:00 am

Faking the War of 1812
A talk by Lawrence Hott, producer/director of the documentary film, The War of 1812
Tuesday, December 4, 2012
6:30 p.m., reception to follow
The Lilly Library

Lawrence Hott will discuss the problem of historical truth in documentary film, particularly in the context of the War of 1812, a period which presents a number of challenges to a documentary filmmaker. Hott is producer/director of the documentary film, The War of 1812, broadcast on PBS in October 2011. The War of 1812 film and bonus features can be viewed online, courtesy of PBS/WNED: http://www.pbs.org/wned/war-of-1812/the-film/watch-film-and-bonus-features/

Lawrence Hott and his partner Diane Garey have been making documentary films since 1978 as part of Florentine Films, and later Hott Productions. Their productions are among the most-watched broadcasts on public television. Notable titles include John James Audubon: Drawn from Nature and Wild by Law, the story of the Wilderness Act of 1964 and three men responsible for its passage, which was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature.

Hott’s awards include an Emmy, two Academy Award nominations, the duPont-Columbia Journalism Award, the George Foster Peabody Award, five American Film Festival Blue Ribbons, and Fourteen CINE Golden Eagles. He received the Humanities Achievement Award from the Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities in 1995; a Massachusetts Cultural Council/Boston Film and Video Foundation Fellowship in 2001; and the Rosalynn Carter Fellowship for Mental Health Journalism in 2001. He has been on the board of non-fiction writers at Smith College and has served as a panelist for the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Massachusetts Cultural Commission, and the Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities. He is a member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

Hott is a former juvenile court investigator and a lawyer by training, who has said that the law and documentary filmmaking have more in common than one would think: “a lot of legal practice has to do with the presentation of arguments, working with people, and being clear in your correspondence. I can’t think of a better training for a filmmaker than three years of law school.”

The talk will be followed by a reception. Both the talk and the reception are sponsored by the Friends of the Lilly Library and take place in concert with the exhibition, The War of 1812 in the Collections of the Lilly Library, on view through December 15, 2012, in the Main Gallery of the Lilly Library. An expanded version of the exhibition is available online at: http://collections.libraries.iub.edu/warof1812/

October 18, 2012

Verbi-Voco-Visual Explorations: Language in Art and Text

Filed under: Uncategorized — Lilly Library @ 2:44 pm

“Verbi-Voco-Visual Explorations: Language in Art and Text”
Oct 15-November 3, Lilly Library Foyer

In this exhibition, artists, designers and publishers explore the connections between text and form. These selections from the Lilly Library demonstrate the cutting-edge yet playful experimentation of Fluxus art and visual poetry, which pushed the boundaries of textual conventions and investigated the production of meaning in language and art. Many of the works featured in “Verbi-Voco-Visual Explorations” come from the personal collection of Mary Ellen Solt, 1920-2007, a concrete poet and former professor of creative writing at Indiana University. The title “Verbi-Voco-Visual Explorations” is borrowed from artist Marshall McLuhan, who in turn borrowed it from James Joyce’s Finnegan’s Wake–an example of not only the multidimensional iterations of meaning conveyed in the exhibition, but also how influences can be sampled creatively into new works.

The exhibition includes big names like John Cage, whose centennial is celebrated this year, and also lesser known but still influential writers and artists. Cage’s M: Writings ’67-’72, in which he explores words, names and concepts through textual visualization techniques such as mesostics, a form of poetry in which words are spelled horizontally using letters from the middle of lines. Another iteration of the complicated nature of textuality and reading is Bruno Munari’s thought-provoking Libro illeggibile or “Illegible Book.” The work’s absence of text and red string threaded through the pages makes the book more of a sculptural object than a learning tool; while the codex format engenders understanding through familiarity. Johanna Drucker, a highly influential scholar of artist’s books, visual poetry, digital humanities, also demonstrates her artistic ability through her artist’s book The Word Made Flesh, which celebrates the embodiment of text through rich all-over page design and consummate deployment of fonts and colors to enrich meaning. Lilly’s edition of Jorge Luis Borges’ Ficciones illustrated by Sol LeWitt presents an intriguing melding of two highly-regarded figures. A number of the works included were published by the German imprint Hansjörg Mayer, a major publisher of artist’s books and an early innovator of the use of computers in graphic design.

The exhibition was crafted to highlight the upcoming show “Buzz Spector: Off the Shelf,” opening October 19th at the Grunwald Gallery. “Off the Shelf” features both Spector’s large, sculptural installations of books and his Polaroid works. The installations, including “The Library of Babel” inspired by Borges’ short story of the same name, and a piece featuring books by Indiana University authors, are all borrowed from Indiana University’s libraries. These installations invite commentary on the logic and poetry of the arrangement of books, and ask the audience to consider the function of the book object. Spector’s oversized Polaroid prints further investigate the themes of meaning and form, authorship and ownership, and the physical experience of reading.

Spector is an eminent figure in the artists’ book and book arts communities and an internationally known artist and writer. He has published numerous artists’ books as well as editing the critical volume The Book Maker’s Desire: Writings on the Art of the Book.

Additionally, The Fine Arts Library is hosting a complementary exhibition “On the Page: Artists’ Take on the Book and Library” October 6-November 8 in the Fine Arts Library lobby, which gathers examples of thoughtful, artistic engagement with the materiality and symbolic functions of the book object, stacks of books, and entire libraries. For more information, visit the Fine Arts Library blog: https://blogs.libraries.iub.edu/FAL/

September 24, 2012

Opening reception this Friday for War of 1812 exhibition

Filed under: Uncategorized — Lilly Library @ 12:09 pm

Battle of New OrleansThe Friends of the Lilly Library will host an opening reception on Friday, September 28, 2012, from 5:00 to 7:00 p.m., for the exhibition, The War of 1812 in the Collections of the Lilly Library.

The War of 1812 is one of the least known wars in American memory, despite the fact that it was fought on United States territory. Yet the War of 1812 deserves closer attention. A generation of political leaders was forged in the war. It brought us the song that became the national anthem and delivered a death blow to Native American resistance to American expansion.

The exhibition provides an overview of these significant developments, as well as a glimpse of moments of high drama. Pro-war Baltimoreans tar-and-feather an anti-war newspaper publisher. Generals surrender and face court martial. Battles are fought on land and sea and lake. Washington burns!

Items on display range from the official declaration of war to a receipt for the sewing of signal flags, and include such resources as anti-war pamphlets, a letter describing the burning of Washington, D.C., and a satirical print of James Madison boxing King George III. The exhibition will be on view September 18 – December 15, 2012.

The reception will feature an historical miniature war game recreating the Battle of New Orleans, in which American forces led by Andrew Jackson defeated the British army on January 8, 1815.

Visitors can participate in the game again on Saturday, September 29, at 9:30 a.m. in the Lilly Library Slocum Room. The games are organized by the IU Conflict Simulations Club. Both the reception and the games are open to the public.

All the historic materials on display, and more, are also available in the online project of the same name: http://collections.libraries.iub.edu/warof1812/. Hundreds of manuscripts, books, maps, and prints are included online, digitized in full. Viewers of the exhibition can find a interesting book on display, and then have access to the entire volume online.

August 9, 2012

Jonathan Williams on fortifying New York

Filed under: Manuscripts — Lilly Library @ 12:32 pm

Plan of fortifications of the Narrows Though he had been commissioned as an officer for less than a year, Jonathan Williams was already an expert on military matters and fortification when President Thomas Jefferson appointed him inspector of fortifications and superintendent of the military post at West Point in December of 1801. Jefferson saw in Williams a like-minded gentleman-scientist, and his resume was top-notch for his time. Williams’ interest in scientific matters was nurtured under the influence of his great-uncle, Benjamin Franklin.

Williams quit his post at West Point in 1803, frustrated by a lack of funding for the academy and conflict with other officers who resisted reporting to an engineer. As conflict with Britain developed in the years preceding the War of 1812, Williams returned to West Point in 1805, this time with his authority, if not sufficient funding, assured. During his time at West Point, Williams was a key figure in developing a system of fortifications to protect New York.

Jonathan WilliamsThe Lilly Library holds one of two major collections of the papers of Jonathan Williams, which include a bounty of material on the design and construction of fortifications. The most famous of these fortifications is probably Castle Williams on Governor’s Island, designed by Williams and named in his honor. Men needed to staff Castle Williams Castle Williams was built between 1807 and 1811, as part of system of fortifications that discouraged the British navy from attempting any sort of attack during the War of 1812. Castle Williams was recently restored and is now open the public.

Williams hoped to command the Castle when war was declared, but the commission went to someone else. He resigned his position at West Point and took up a military commission as a brigadier general in the New York militia.

Shown here is a document from the collection dated July 2, 1812, which outlines the number of men needed to staff Castle Williams. It was made just a few weeks before he resigned. The portrait reproduces an 1815 painting by Thomas Sully. The illustration at the top of the post is a lovely depiction of defenses of the Narrows, the channel that connects Upper New York Bay and Lower New York Bay. It was made on August 8, 1812, exactly two hundred years ago.

The Lilly Library’s War of 1812 collection includes a short pamphlet, published in 1807, in which he advises New York leaders on appropriate defenses for the Bay and the Narrows. Read the pamphlet online in our new digital resource, The War of 1812 in the Collections of the Lilly Library.

July 26, 2012

War of 1812 Captured Online through Lilly Library Collections

Filed under: Exhibitions,Online exhibitions,web site — Lilly Library @ 9:29 am

During the War of 1812, British troops set fire to the Library of Congress, destroying the collections within. Two hundred years later, however, a library has now captured the war: Indiana University’s Lilly Library, have digitized hundreds of manuscripts, books, maps, and prints that illuminate the history of the War of 1812.

A new website, The War of 1812 in the Collections of the Lilly Library, tells the story of this little-understood war through digitized primary source documents which have been made available for the first time thanks to technology and technical services staff at the IU Libraries. These items range from the official declaration of war to a receipt for canteen straps and include such resources as anti-war pamphlets, a letter describing the burning of Washington, D.C., and a satirical print of James Madison boxing King George III. Visitors to the site can access high-resolution images of the documents by following the timeline of events, browsing by tag (from Aaron Burr to Zachary Taylor), or searching by keyword.

“There aren’t many large digital projects on the War of 1812, especially not originating from the United States,” said Lilly Library Director Breon Mitchell. “This site makes a major contribution by providing not just the story of the war, but also a wealth of original books and documents that draw people into the history of the conflict in the way only primary sources can.”

The broadsides, books, and pamphlets in the project include early printings of the Star-Spangled Banner, government publications, sermons, reports, histories, and memoirs. Manuscript materials include correspondence, log books, legal documents, diaries, speeches, letter copybooks, and orderly books.

The digital archive precedes a major exhibition on the War of 1812 in the Main Gallery of the Lilly Library that will open September 2012 and run through December.

“Never before has the Lilly Library created an exhibition where every item on display is also digitized online,” said Brenda Johnson, Ruth Lilly Dean of University Libraries. “In this case, the online archive actually includes more fully digitized items than we can fit into the gallery exhibition. Our ability to share these documents with a broader audience makes this an especially exciting time to explore this period in American history.”

For media inquiries, contact Erika Dowell edowell@indiana.edu (812) 855-2452

About the Lilly Library

The Lilly Library is the principal rare books, manuscripts, and special collections repository of Indiana University. It is part of the Indiana University Libraries, Bloomington, under direction of the Ruth Lilly Dean of University Libraries. The IU Libraries support and strengthen teaching, learning, and research by providing the collections, services, and environments that lead to intellectual discovery.

July 19, 2012

New Film-Related Manuscripts Collections

Filed under: Uncategorized — Lilly Library @ 9:55 am

The papers of David Bradley and Carlo Lizzani, respectively, are newly processed additions to the Lilly Library’s film-related manuscripts collections.

The Bradley mss. include correspondence, screenplays, publicity materials, business records, writings, and biographical items pertaining to David Bradley (1920-1997), film director, collector and historian. At an early age Bradley became a pioneer in amateur filmmaking and went on to direct his friend Charlton Heston in Peer Gynt (1941) and Julius Caesar (1950). (The former film was Heston’s film debut; the latter got Heston a successful screen test with MGM.) Bradley also directed Macbeth (1947), Talk About a Stranger (1952), Dragstrip Riot (1958), 12 to the Moon (1960), and The Madmen of Mandoras (1963, and later re-released as They Saved Hitler’s Brain in 1968). The Bradley papers complement the film elements and photographs already in the collection, along with the nearly 4,000 reel-to-reel films he collected during his lifetime.

The Lizzani, Carlo mss. feature the writings, photographs, scripts, audio-visual materials, correspondence, awards, newspaper and periodical articles, and unpublished diary of Italian filmmaker Carlo Lizzani. Born in Rome in 1922, Lizzani began as a film critic and eventually collaborated with prominent directors in the Italian neorealism movement. He served as assistant director on Roberto Rossellini’s Germany Year Zero (1948) and earned an Oscar nomination for Best Original Story for Giuseppe De Santis’s Bitter Rice (1949). Lizzani’s own films include numerous spaghetti westerns and the internationally acclaimed crime thriller Banditi a Milano (Bandits in Milan), released in the United States as The Violent Four (1968). The Lizzani papers are mainly in Italian and were processed by Austin Alexander, a graduate student in the Department of French and Italian.

February 24, 2012

The Incredible Shrinking Man Meets The Exorcist

Filed under: Film — Lilly Library @ 12:21 pm

While a great faceoff for a Midnite Movie feature, the above represents two titles from the Lilly Library’s sizeable and eclectic science fiction and horror film script collection. The Incredible Shrinking Man (1957), scripted by Richard Matheson from his 1956 novel, The Shrinking Man, is an acknowledged sci fi classic while The Exorcist (1973) is still considered by many to be the scariest motion picture ever made. Unlike the majority of the scripts in the collection which feature dialogue, The Incredible Shrinking Man is a “picturization,” the entire film story boarded in over 600 drawings (see Figs. 1 and 2). Like many scripts in the collection, The Exorcist is a revision and contains dialogue not included in the final version of the film (see Fig. 3). The scripts representing these genres run the gamut from classic films like The Picture of Dorian Gray (1945), The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951), Forbidden Planet (1956), Planet of the Apes (1968), to lesser known B movies like The Vampire’s Ghost (1945), Monster from the Ocean Floor (1954), The Brain Eaters (1958), and Blood Orgy of the She-Devils (1972). Hammer Films, the British studio which redefined horror in the late 1950s, is represented by The Quatermass Experiment (1955), The Mummy (1959), The Phantom of the Opera (1962), Quatermass and the Pit (1967), and Lust for a Vampire (1971). Scripts for the films of legendary independent producer/director Roger Corman include The Viking Women and the Sea Serpent (1957), and two films from his well-regarded Edgar Allan Poe cycle, The Pit and the Pendulum (1961) and The Masque of the Red Death (1964). Fans of serials should consult Flash Gordon Conquers the Universe (1940) and two Republic Studio chapter plays, Flying Disc Man from Mars (1950) and Canadian Mounties vs. Atomic Invaders (1953). To browse the collection (many are not listed in IUCAT), ask the Lilly’s Reading Room attendant for the Shelf List call number PN6120 .S42 for a complete alphabetical list of scripts with detailed descriptions. Copying of any kind is prohibited without prior permission of the studio and/or the script’s author.

David K. Frasier, Reference Librarian, Lilly Library

Fig. 1. Artist sketch of the spider fight sequence in The Incredible Shrinking Man (Universal-International Pictures, 1957).


Fig. 2. Closely corresponding scene from the film with actor Grant Williams.


Fig. 3. Sample page from The Exorcist script (PN6120 .S42 E97) written by William Peter Blatty from his 1971 novel featuring dialogue not used in the original 1973 Warner Bros. release.

February 8, 2012

History, Memory and Campus Protest during the Long 1960s

Filed under: In the news — Lilly Library @ 10:23 am

Craig Simpson, Lilly Library manuscripts archivist, and his colleague Gregory Wilson, University of Akron, History Department, discussed “Above the Shots: The Kent State Shootings and the Politics of Truth, Trauma and Reconciliation” at this year’s Oral History Association Annual Conference recently held in Denver. Craig and Gregory joined a panel of scholars who described how oral histories have been used to present a more complete picture of the protests on college campuses in the 1960s and 1970s. C-SPAN 3 recorded the presentation. You can view the session online.

January 26, 2012

New online home for Slocum Puzzles

Filed under: In the news,Online exhibitions — Lilly Library @ 2:47 pm

The Lilly Library and Indiana University’s Digital Library Program are thrilled to announce the debut of the new online presence for the Jerry Slocum Mechanical Puzzle Collection: http://www.dlib.indiana.edu/collections/slocum/ The collection is one of several featured in the Indiana University’s new Image Collections Online site.

The Jerry Slocum Collection of mechanical puzzles embodies a lifetime pursuit of the intriguing and the perplexing. The collection is one of the largest of its kind in the world, with over 34,000 puzzles. Unlike word or jigsaw puzzles, mechanical puzzles are hand-held objects that must be manipulated to achieve a specific goal. Popular examples include the Rubik’s cube and tangrams. The puzzles in the collection represent centuries of mathematical, social, and recreational history from across five continents.

The online database currently allows researchers and puzzle enthusiasts to search and browse over 23,000 items from the Slocum collection, and soon it will include the entire puzzle collection. Users will also be able to request delivery of some items to the Lilly Library’s Reading Room for hands-on use and research.

The images in the database may be used for non-commercial educational or research purposes. If you use or reproduce our materials in any format, we ask that the Lilly Library always be cited as the source of the material with the credit line: Courtesy, The Lilly Library, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana. For commercial uses, please contact the Lilly Library at 1200 East Seventh Street, Bloomington, Indiana, 47405-5500 or at http://www.indiana.edu/~liblilly/. For more information about the Slocum puzzle collection, please visit the Lilly Library web page: http://www.indiana.edu/~liblilly/collections/overview/puzzles.shtml

January 10, 2012

New exhibition on Charles Dickens

Filed under: Uncategorized — Lilly Library @ 12:24 pm

Portrait of Charles Dickens

“Conducted by Charles Dickens: An Exhibition to Commemorate the Bicentennial of His Birth”
January 23 through May 5, 2012

Charles Dickens is one of the most beloved and well-known authors in the English language. The stories of characters such as Scrooge, Tiny Tim, Oliver Twist, and David Copperfield have moved beyond the pages of fiction and into the realm of popular myth.

The Lilly Library will display an exhibition from January 23 to May 5, 2012 commemorating the bicentennial of Charles Dickens’s birth. The title of the exhibition refers to the way in which Dickens denoted his editorship of his periodicals Household Words and All the Year Round: “Conducted by Charles Dickens.” Like the conductor of a train or an orchestra, Dickens masterfully channeled the cultural currents of his age into works of literature that still resonate with readers today.

The exhibition showcases the Lilly Library’s eclectic holdings relating to Charles Dickens’s life, literature, and the Victorian world from which he drew inspiration. Highlights include first editions of Dickens classics such as The Christmas Carol, Oliver Twist, and Great Expectations as well as examples of Dickens novels issued in serial monthly parts. The exhibition also explores Dickens’s love of theatre, the novels and stories that inspired him as a child, the numerous illustrators with whom he worked, and practices of Victorian readership and publishing. One section is devoted to the colorful and chaotic world of Victorian London, featuring London “low life” and the social reform movements which were such an integral part of Dickens’s fiction.

November 30, 2011

Experimental film on female mysticism

Filed under: Events,Manuscripts — Lilly Library @ 4:15 pm

Hildegard Keller, professor of Germanic Studies and Medieval Studies, presents The Ocean in a Thimble, an experimental journey through the works of four extraordinary women who have a fictive encounter beyond time: Hildegard von Bingen (1098-1179), Mechthild von Magdeburg (1208-1282/94), Hadewijch (13th century), and Etty Hillesum (1914-1943).

The film will be presented in German, with no subtitles, at the IU Cinema, Friday, December 2nd, from 3:00 to 5:00 pm. This abbreviated film version of her audio book of the same title was specially produced for the IU Cinema and exploits the theater’s sound technology.

The audio play The Ocean in a Thimble (Der Ozean im Fingerhut) was written in 2011 by Keller, produced with a group of actors in Switzerland and enriched with music in the form of the oud played by Mahmoud Turkmani, performed for this production. The accompanying book includes essays by various authors and numerous images, including a large number from the Lilly Library of Indiana University.

More information on the event can be found in the College of Arts and Sciences News.

November 7, 2011

Emma Lazarus: Poet of Exiles

Filed under: Exhibitions,Manuscripts — Cherry Williams @ 1:58 pm

Opening Wednesday, October 26th at the Museum of Jewish Heritage in New York City, is an exhibition celebrating the life and work of poet and activist, Emma Lazarus, author of the poem affixed to the base of the Statue of Liberty: “Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free…”

This exhibition explores many of the facets of Lazarus’ life as a fourth generation Sephardic-American, her work as an early advocate for immigrants and a Jewish homeland as well as her life in the “gilded” intellectual and artistic circles in which she moved in turn of the century New York City. It is this aspect of her life in which the Lilly Manuscripts Department provides some insight and documentation.

The Lilly is home to the Gilder manuscript collection (1781–1984), which consists of the correspondence and papers of poet and editor Richard Watson Gilder and his wife, the artist Helena de Kay Gilder, and their family. Emma Lazarus was a part of the Gilder’s social and artistic milieu.

This exceptionally rich and interesting collection consists of 23,000 items and is open for use by researchers and the interested public.

November 1, 2011

Sanders and Thom manuscripts continue to build impressive Lilly collection

Filed under: Manuscripts — Lilly Library @ 1:48 pm

The Lilly Library continues to develop an impressive collection of Indiana authors’ manuscripts, most recently with the processing of the Sanders, Scott Russell mss. and the Thom, James Alexander mss.

Indiana University professor Scott Russell Sanders has enjoyed a long and successful writing career. His twenty books include novels, collections of short stories, collections of essays and personal nonfiction. His writing often explores the human place in nature, the character of community, the relation between culture and geography, and the search for a spiritual path. Sanders has won the Indiana Authors Award, the Mark Twain Award, and several other accolades for his literary achievements; his 2006 memoir, A Private History of Awe, was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize. The Sanders, Scott Russell mss. documents his writing career and provides insight into his writing, his editing, and his publishing history. In addition to an extensive series of correspondence written to Sanders, the collection also contains a letter written by Sanders to Joyce Carol Oates, as well as a letter of recommendation, written also by Sanders, for Barbara Kingsolver.

James Alexander Thom is a best-selling author who was born in Gosport, Indiana, began an early reporting career at the Indianapolis Star and later joined the faculty of the Indiana University School of Journalism. His major historical novels include From Sea to Shining Sea, Follow the River and Panther in the Sky, the last two of which were turned into television movies. The Thom, James Alexander mss. provides researchers access to the drafts and proofs of Thom’s works as well as insight into the extensive research that Thom is known for performing. The collection also contains Warrior Woman, the novel Thom co-wrote with his wife Dark Rain Thom. Another highlight is Thom’s correspondence with fellow Indiana authors Richard Cady, Scott Russell Sanders and Kurt Vonnegut. Other correspondents include former Indiana Governor Otis R. Bowen, politician and writer Ken Coates, and historian and author Howard Zinn. Drawings, clippings and biographical materials in the Thom, James Alexander mss. help to complete the picture of this significant Indiana author.

A manuscript subject guide is available for researchers to search for more collections of Indiana-related literature.

-Cassie Brand and Danielle Emerling, Lilly Library Manuscripts Interns, Summer 2011

October 26, 2011

Paper Dolls by Sylvia Plath

Filed under: Exhibitions,Manuscripts — Cherry Williams @ 10:59 am

Well-known as one of the Lilly Library’s manuscript treasures is the collection of the papers of poet Sylvia Plath. Perhaps less well-known, but very engaging are her works of juvenile art, particularly her paper dolls, currently the centerpiece of an exhibition at the Owens Art Gallery, in Sackville, New Brunswick. We were very pleased to participate in this exhibit, guest curated by Dr. Anne Koval, associate professor in the fine arts department at Mount Allison University in Sackville. Dr. Koval discovered the handmade paper dolls and doll’s clothes in the Plath Archive of juvenilia during a visit to the Lilly.

The exhibition also showcases the responses of several well-known contemporary artists to the paper dolls, including an early short film by Cindy Sherman, a new immersive installation by Ed Pien, exquisite miniatures by Cybèle Young, large scale steel-cut dresses by Barb Hunt, the colourful embroideries of Anna Torma, an installation of cutouts by Jeannie Thib and the ephemeral paper doll chains of Lynne Yamamoto.

The exhibition opened September 16th and is scheduled to run until November 6th 2011 at the Owens Art Gallery. It then will travel to the Mendel Gallery (Saskatoon, SK) in spring 2012 accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue, with an essay by the curator, produced with the support of the Canada Council for the Arts, artsnb and a CultureWorks Development Grant from Mount Allison University. We would also like to express our appreciation to the Sylvia Plath Estate for their support and kind permission to exhibit the paper dolls.

Paper Doll

[img src=http://www.indiana.edu/~liblilly/blog/wp-content/flagallery/paper-doll2/thumbs/thumbs_cindy.jpg]00Cindy Sherman
Cindy Sherman's untitled 1975 work of 11 black and white photographs mounted on board. The piece is a document from her Super-8 film, 'Doll Clothes.' Edition unique Courtesy of the Artist and Metro Pictures.
[img src=http://www.indiana.edu/~liblilly/blog/wp-content/flagallery/paper-doll2/thumbs/thumbs_dress.jpg]00Small Dresses
Barb Hunt's 1994 piece 'Small Dresses.' The multiple tiny dresses are plasma-cut into cold-rolled steel. The work was purchased by the Canada Council Art Bank.
[img src=http://www.indiana.edu/~liblilly/blog/wp-content/flagallery/paper-doll2/thumbs/thumbs_miniatures.jpg]00Miniatures
'Did you plan this?' one of Toronto-based artist Cybèle Young's exquisite miniatures made from Japanese paper.
[img src=http://www.indiana.edu/~liblilly/blog/wp-content/flagallery/paper-doll2/thumbs/thumbs_paper.jpg]00Sylvia's paper dolls
Some of Sylvia Plath's, 'Paper Doll Clothing,' circa 1945. Courtesy: The Lilly Library, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana
[img src=http://www.indiana.edu/~liblilly/blog/wp-content/flagallery/paper-doll2/thumbs/thumbs_pien.jpg]00Ed Pien
Toronto-based artist Ed Pien created his site-specific installation 'Revel,' shown partially installed above, made with intricately cut Mylar as a part of 'Paper Doll' at Owens Art Gallery this past week.
[img src=http://www.indiana.edu/~liblilly/blog/wp-content/flagallery/paper-doll2/thumbs/thumbs_torma.jpg]00Anna Torma
Two details of Baie Verte-based textile artist Anna Torma's large embroidered work 'Party with Dionysos.' The piece explores the passage from girlhood to womanhood through various incantations of paper dolls, puppet dolls and dancing dolls dressed in white.
[img src=http://www.indiana.edu/~liblilly/blog/wp-content/flagallery/paper-doll2/thumbs/thumbs_torma2.jpg]00Anna Torma

Images courtesy of Canada’s Telegraph-Journal. Read their article about the Owens’ exhibition here.

October 17, 2011

James I and the English Bible

Filed under: Exhibitions — Lilly Library @ 11:25 am

King James 1Starting today, the Main Gallery will be featuring the exhibition “James I and the English Bible.” “James I and the English Bible” showcases the Lilly Library’s collection of early English Bibles, from the Coverdale Bible of 1535 to the King James Bible of 1611. This exhibition, which commemorates the 400th anniversary of the publication of the King James Bible, also features a number of other important books related to James I and his reign, including the great Shakespeare First Folio of 1623. This exhibition will run through December 21.

To kick off this exhibition, Joel Silver, Associate Director and Curator of Books, will be giving a gallery talk on the subject. Silver has written numerous essays on rare books, book collecting, and the antiquarian book trade. The talk will start at 5:30pm with a reception sponsored by the Friends of the Lilly Library following.

October 14, 2011

Tell Me a Story

Filed under: Exhibitions — Lilly Library @ 9:15 am

The Brown Fairy Book front coverCurrently on display in the Lincoln Room, the exhibition Tell Me a Story: Folklore and Folkloristics at the Lilly Library highlights materials of interest to folklorists visiting Bloomington for the 2011 Annual Conference of the American Folklore Society, October 12-15. The exhibition includes selections from the manuscript collections of Indiana University folklore scholars Stith Thompson and Richard Dorson, as well as materials from the library of British folklorists Peter and Iona Opie, books and manuscripts by Andrew Lang, and examples of several different types of collections of tales including legends, ballads, fairy tales, and nursery rhymes.

front cover of The Brown Fairy Book, edited by Andrew Lang ; with eight coloured plates and numerous illustrations by H.J. Ford. London, New York and Bombay : Longmans, Green, and Co., 1904.

August 11, 2011

Critical Collections at the Lilly Library

Filed under: Books,Exhibitions,Film,Manuscripts — Craig Simpson @ 11:56 am

photograph of Pauline Kael, film critic A new exhibition highlighting
“Critical Collections” at the Lilly Library will be on display in the Lincoln Room through the month of August. The exhibition features the papers of some of the most significant, controversial writers of cultural criticism in the modern era. Noteworthy items include: American literary critic Anthony Boucher’s pioneering reviews of J. R. R. Tolkien and Ian Fleming; British literary critic Desmond MacCarthy’s correspondence with James Joyce and George Bernard Shaw; drama critic Kenneth Tynan’s original handwritten journals; and materials pertaining to the Orson Welles/Citizen Kane screenplay debate between film critics Peter Bogdanovich and Pauline Kael (pictured here).

—Craig Simpson, Lilly Library Manuscripts Archivist and exhibition curator

June 27, 2011

Repairs to Lilly Library building to be completed July 1

Filed under: Lilly Library building — Lilly Library @ 11:03 am

Lilly Library re-roof project

On May 9, 2011, contractors began working on a re-roofing project at the Lilly Library. The original copper roof sections were thinning in some areas so new roofs were needed to make sure water does not enter the building. Since ice in the gutters during the winter months can cause leaks, the gutters of the copper roofs will have new gutter melt devices installed.

In addition to replacing the three copper roof sections of the building, some mortar joint repair is also part of the project. The mortar joint repair is being done on part of the upper outside walls of the building. This should ensure that water does not enter those upper walls through cracks in the mortar joints of the stone. The installation of the new roofs has gone smoothly despite the bad weather. Wind and rain caused a few snags but the roofers have been very helpful and know the importance of keeping the building dry.

The projected is scheduled to be completed Friday, July 1.

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June 18, 2011

Many thanks to Marty Joachim

Filed under: Books — Lilly Library @ 4:18 pm

Marty Joachim, IU Librarian Emeritus

Seen here in a photo taken in the Lilly Library Reading Room using one of his favorite reference sources is Indiana University Librarian Emeritus Marty Joachim. Since his retirement from the IU libraries at the end of 2002, Marty has given valuable service to the Lilly Library, devoting thousands of hours adding records to IUCAT (IU’s online library catalog) for the Lilly Library’s early printed books. Marty’s own academic background in Classical Studies and his knowledge of Latin and Greek made him the perfect cataloger to do this work. He estimates that at least 75% of the incunabula are in Latin. The remainder are mostly in Italian, French, German, Greek, and Spanish with an occasional work in English. Marty notes that working with the Lilly’s incunabula was endlessly fascinating. He often marveled at working with items that were unique to the Lilly Library or existed in only a few known copies. He completed the project in early June 2011. During his second retirement, Marty plans to do a lot of traveling; so far this year he has already been to Israel and Austria and will be going to China in August.

Before Marty’s stellar accomplishment, most of the Lilly Library’s holdings in books printed before 1501 were found only in the manual card catalog in the Lilly Library Reading Room, and most of these records were brief with a minimum of description and entries. Now fully cataloged records with multiple access points for all titles are available in the online catalog. Since the time these materials were originally cataloged, scholarship has added greatly to what is known about the early years of printing in Europe. Major bibliographical tools such as the Incunabula Short Title Catalogue and the Bodleian Library incunabula catalogue have been developed or published. Marty was able to benefit from the work of other scholars and incorporate new information into the bibliographic records he created. Genre headings on each record provide access by the term Incunabula, further subdivided by place and date. Try searching IUCAT for the keyword phrase Incunabula Italy Venice.

A big thank you to Marty Joachim for bringing our 15th century books out into the 21st century.

May 31, 2011

Severe storms damage trees near Lilly Library

Filed under: In the news — Lilly Library @ 3:47 pm

Broken sidewalk and fallen tree

Last week’s storms in central Indiana hit the Bloomington campus twice: Monday night (May 23) and Wednesday night (May 25). Nearly 300 trees on the campus were affected. Several were downed in the area of the Lilly Library, but fortunately there was no damage to the building. Clean up continues this week with the sound of chain saws and shredders all around.

Read about the storms in the Indiana Daily Student or read the IU News Room press release.

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