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The Great Law of Subordination consider'd; or, The Insolence and Unsufferable Behaviour of Servants in England duly enquir’d into. Illustrated with a great Variety of Examples, Historical Cases, and Remarkable Stories of the Behaviour of some particular Servants, suited to all the several Arguments made use of, as they go on. In Ten Familiar Letters. Together with a Conclusion, being an Earnest and Moving Remonstrance to the House-keepers and Heads of Families in Great-Britain, Pressing them not to Cease Using their Utmost Interest (especially at this Juncture) to obtain Sufficient Laws for the Effectual Regulation of the Manners and Behaviour of their Servants. As also a Proposal, containing such Heads or Constitutions, as wou’d effectually answer this great End, and bring Servants of every Class to a Just (and yet not a Grievous) Regulation. London: Sold by S. Harding, at the Post-House, in St. Martin’s-Lane; W Lewis, in Covent-Garden; T. Worrall, at the Judge’s-Head, against St. Dunstan’s-Church, Fleet-street; A. Bettesworth, in Pater-Noster-Row; W. Meadows, in Cornhill; and T. Edlin, at the Prince’s-Arms, against Exeter Exchange, in the Strand, 1724.


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