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Indiana
University Bloomington

Browse Items (6 total)

The catalogue for an exhibition held to dedicate the Mendel Room in the Lilly Library. The Bernardo Mendel collection is of source material relating primarily to the discovery of the New World, the Spanish conquest and the independence movements in Latin America. Materials include rare books, pamphlets, manuscripts, and published archival material. This exhibition features the portion of the…

This catalogue describes an exhibition of materials relating to the Pacific Northwest between 1542 and 1846. The exhibited books are contemporary, or near contemporary, records of participants whose narratives fixed world attention on this vast and hitherto unknown region, and include materials documenting the grand voyages of discovery, accounts of exploration by land, narratives of fur traders,…

This catalogue describes an exhibition held to mark the quincentennial of the first Columbus voyage through materials from the collections of J.K. Lilly, Jr., Bernardo Mendel and Charles R. Boxer. These collections contain many books about European voyages and America published in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries including Christopher Columbus’s first report on the Americas in 1493 and the…

This catalogue describes an exhibition of materials documenting European and American voyages of scientific discovery from 1700 until 1850. Presented in three sections, the exhibition comprised materials charting exploration of the Pacific Ocean (Polynesia and Antarcticas), exploration of the Americas, and scientific and literary representations of the voyages of discovery. Items include James…

The modern age begins with European 'discovery' of America, which enormously expanded the known world and encouraged exploration, colonization, navigation, the knowledge of a new flora and fauna, and of meteorology, quite apart from its political and economic consequences. The voyage was prepared with great scientific method, and during it the variation of the compass needle was first observed.…

The modern age begins with the 'discovery' of America, which enormously expanded the known world and encouraged exploration, colonization, navigation, the knowledge of a new flora and fauna, and of meteorology, quite apart from its political and economic consequences. The voyage was prepared with great scientific method, and during it the variation of the compass needle was first observed.…