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Indiana
University Bloomington

Browse Items (6 total)

The Thiébault Family papers follow four generations of a Franco-British family living in 18th and 19th centuries. The collection contains correspondence, journals, sketches, legal documents, poems, songs, drafts, military papers, autographs, and other miscellaneous objects belonging to the family. A full description of the collection is available in the finding aid and digital version.

This catalogue, and the exhibit it describes, give the travel enthusiast a glimpse of tourism from the earliest preserved printed records to the present day. Included are narratives and accounts written by travellers and pilgrims, guidebooks, travellers’ aids (promotional literature), books and pamphlets showing evolution of transport throughout the human experience. Aiming to represent private…

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This catalogue describes an exhibition that seeks to display what it meant to live in Paris from 1650-1900. Eschewing the time-honored monuments sought by tourists, the exhibition features literature and images which portray the everyday. These materials demonstrate the drastic transformation between Paris in the seventeenth century and Paris by the early twentieth: the dramatic increase in…

This catalogue describes an exhibition of materials documenting European and American voyages of scientific discovery from 1700 until 1850. Presented in three sections, the exhibition comprised materials charting exploration of the Pacific Ocean (Polynesia and Antarcticas), exploration of the Americas, and scientific and literary representations of the voyages of discovery. Items include James…

The modern age begins with European 'discovery' of America, which enormously expanded the known world and encouraged exploration, colonization, navigation, the knowledge of a new flora and fauna, and of meteorology, quite apart from its political and economic consequences. The voyage was prepared with great scientific method, and during it the variation of the compass needle was first observed.…

The modern age begins with the 'discovery' of America, which enormously expanded the known world and encouraged exploration, colonization, navigation, the knowledge of a new flora and fauna, and of meteorology, quite apart from its political and economic consequences. The voyage was prepared with great scientific method, and during it the variation of the compass needle was first observed.…