Japanese Namban Screen. ca. 1550. In Portugal-Japão: 450 anos de memórias

About this item: Japanese Namban Screen. ca. 1550. In Portugal-Japão: 450 anos de memórias. Embaixada de Portugal no Japão, 1993.

Japanese Namban Screen

A detail from one of four large folding screens on display in the Museu de Arte Antiga in Lisbon. Namban was the word used to refer to Portuguese traders who, in this scene, are dressed in colorful pantaloons and accompanied by African slaves. Jesuits appear in black robes, while the Japanese observe the newcomers from inside their home. The screen materials included gold-covered copper and paper, tempera paint, silk, and lacquer.

As relações de Portugal com a Índia e o Extremo-Oriente : Arquivo Histórico de Macau de 22 a 31 de outubro

About this item: As relações de Portugal com a Índia e o Extremo-Oriente: Arquivo histórico de Macau de 22 a 31 outubro. Macau: Instituto Cultual de Macau, Arquivo histórico de Macau, 1991. [Relations between Portugal and India and the Far East: Historical Archive of Macau from the 22 to the 31 of October.]

João Baptista

This 1599 image of India by João Baptista, entitledDonzela casada, depicts a married Portuguese woman accompanied by other women and her Indian servant.

Relaçaõ da gloriosa morte de quatro embaixadores Portuguezes, da Cidade de Macao, com sincoenta, & sete Christaõs de sua companhia, degolàdos todos pella fee de Christo em Nangassaqui, Cidade de Iappaõ, a tres de Agosto de 1640 : com todas as circunstancias de sua embaixada

About this item: António Francisco Cardim. Relaçaõ da gloriosa morte de qvatro embaixadores Portuguezes, da Cidade de Macao, com sincoenta, & sete Christaõs de sua companhia, degolàdos todos pella fee de Christo em Nangassaqui, Cidade de Iappaõ, a tres de Agosto de 1640: com todas as circunstancias de sua Embaixada, tirada de informaçoes verdadeiras, & testemunhas de vista. 

 

Lisbon: Lourenço de Anueres, 1643. [Report on the glorious death of four Portuguese ambassadors, from the city of Macau, and accompanied by fifty-seven Christians, all of whom were decapitated for their Christian faith in Nagasaki, city of Japan, on the third of August 1640: With all the circumstances of their embassy, based on true information and eyewitnesses.]

António Francisco Cardim

Cardim was a Portuguese Jesuit who worked in missions in India, China and Japan and died in Macau. He was named Procurador-Geral (Attorney General) of the Province of Japan and attempted to normalize relations between the Portuguese and Japanese following the massacre described in this report.

Arte de navegar

About this item: Simão de Oliveira. Arte de navegar / composta por Simaõ de Oliueira natural da cidade de Lisboa. Dirigida a Dom Pedro de Castilho Bispo de Leiria, Inquisidor mòr, & visorey os Reynos de Portugal. Losboa [check: Lisboa]: por Pedro Crasbeeck, 1606. [Art of navigating, composed by Simão de Oliveira, born in the city of Lisbon. Addressed to Dom Pedro de Castilho, Bishop of Leiria, major inquisitor and viceroy in the Portuguese realms.]

Simão de Oliveira

Simão de Oliveira was a mathematician and cosmographer. His Arte de navegar is a primer on cosmography and maritime travel, consisting of explanations of technical terminology and the instruments used in navigation. Books three and four in the volume describe the construction and uses of the astrolabe, the quadrant, and other navigational devices that enabled the Portuguese to establish their empire.

Peregrinaçam de Fernam Mendez Pinto : em que da conta de muytas e muyto estranhas cousas que vio & ouuio no reyno da China, no da Tartaria, no do Sornau, que vulgarmente se chama Sião, no do Calaminhan, no de Pegù, no de Martauão, & em outros muytos reynos & senhorios das partes orientais, de que nestas nossas do Occidente ha muyto pouca ou nenhũa noticia. ... : e no fim della trata breuemente de alguãs cousas & da morte do santo padre mestre Francisco Xauier

About this item: Fernão Mendes Pinto. Peregrinaçam de Fernam Mendez Pinto : em que da conta de muytas e muyto estranhas cousas que vio & ouuio no reyno da China, no da Tartaria, no do Sornau, que vulgarmente se chama Sião, no do Calaminhan, no de Pegù, no de Martauão, & em outros muytos reynos & senhorios das partes Orientais, de que nestas nossas do Occidente ha muyto pouca ou nenhũa noticia....: E no fim della trata breuemente de alguãs cousas, & da morte do Santo Padre mestre Francisco Xauier, escrita pelo mesmo Fernão Mendez Pinto...Lisbon: Pedro Crasbeeck, 1614. [Pilgrimage of Fernão Mendes Pinto: in which he relates the many and very strange things that he saw and heard in the realms of China, Tartaria, Sornau, commonly known as Siam, and in those of Calaminhan, Pegú, Martavão and in many other realms and lands in parts of the Orient, of which there is very little or no news in our Western lands. . .  The last part briefly deals with a few things and the death of the saintly priest and teacher Francisco Xavier, written by the same Fernão Mendes Pinto.]

Fernão Mendes Pinto

Mendes Pinto’s account of his travels through the Middle and Far East have dazzled and drawn skepticism from centuries of readers. His is a marvelous story of a man who was shipwrecked and held captive countless times during his travels. He contends that he was among the first Westerners to visit Japan and was instrumental in initiating the period of Namban trade there. In Japan, he supported the founding of the first Christian church after forging a friendship with Francis Xavier, a Jesuit priest who was later canonized. Mendes Pinto entered the Jesuit order for a short period of time. He was critical of Portuguese imperialism and often described the Chinese as civilized compared to the Portuguese. This is one of the great pieces of historiography and travel literature written in the late 16th century.

Cartas do Japão

About this item: Wenceslau de Moraes. A vida japonesaTerceira serie de Cartas do Japão (1905-1906).Oporto : Livraria Chardon de Lello & Irmão, 1907. [Japanese Life. Third series of Letters from Japan.]

Vida Japonesa

Moraes’s love of Japan is evident in his multi-volume Cartas do Japão. His third and last volume covers numerous topics about daily life in the country and gives special attention to the customs of Japanese women. He also writes about Portugal’s centuries-long fascination with Japan.

O culto do chá

About this item: Wenceslau de Moraes.O culto do chá. Lisbon: Biblioteca Independente, 2008. [The Cult of Tea.]

Wenceslau de Moraes O culto do chá

Wenceslau de Moraes (1854-1929) was a Portuguese naval officer, teacher and writer who moved to Macau in 1895, where he married a Macanese and had two children. There he met the Portuguese poet Camilo Pessanha, who taught alongside him in a newly-created secondary school. Moraes abandoned his family in 1898 and moved to Japan, where he served as Consul of Kobe. He wrote numerous works about the country, including this detailed study of the history, culture and ritual of Japanese tea. He wrote: “Japanese tea, served invariably without milk or sugar, which ruin its aroma, is the most delicately agreeable beverage ever to be offered to our palates (not to everyone’s palate, mind you, but to a slightly dreamy, sentimental palate. . .).”  The first edition was printed on rice paper in Kobe in 1905. The 2008 edition retains the illustrations of Japanese painter, Yoshiaki.

Loaned from the library of Darlene J. Sadlier

A Portuguese embassy to Japan (1644-1647)

About this item: A Portuguese Embassy to Japan (1644-1647)Translated from an unpublished Portuguese ms., and other contemporary sources, with commentary and appendices, by C.R. Boxer. London: K. Paul, Trench, Trübner & Co., 1928.

A Portuguese Embassy to Japan 

Charles R. Boxer was a specialist on the Portuguese presence in Asia. His monumental work on China and Japan includes this first English translation of a little-known manuscript about one of many Portuguese diplomatic missions to Japan. This particular one was led by Captain Gonçalo de Siqueira de Souza. Boxer writes in his introduction: "It is not known who the author of the original [manuscript] was, but from several indications I infer that it was written or dictated by the Secretary of the Embassy, Duarte da Costa Homem, in 1648 or '49" (p. viii).