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Fiddler and robins, nc1866.c5-124_00001.jpg (9K) Donkey and robins, nc1866.c5-159_00001.jpg (8K) Girl in winter scene, nc1866.c5-317_00001.jpg (8K) Children and young women in procession, green, nc1866.c5-185_00001.jpg (7K)   Young women in procession, full color, nc1866.c5-180_00001.jpg (7K)
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Charles Goodall & Son, London

The first appearance of the Victorian Christmas card is dated to 1843. It was a privately commissioned affair, and a number of years passed before holiday greeting cards were widely available to the consumer. Decorated stationery and visiting cards with holiday themes were common in the 1850's, but Charles Goodall & Son, a playing card manufacturer, issued the first substantial commercial edition of holiday greeting cards in 1862. The first cards were of a style similar to visiting cards, small with a simple greeting and decorated with die-stamped foliage or fauna.


 
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