Linguistics | Spring 2014

 

A501 | 29867/34600 | Intro to African Linguistics | Ebarb

L103 | 18632 |  Intro to the Study of Language | Janda

L203 | 31000 |  Intro to Linguistic Analysis | Fowler

L210 | 27076 |  Language and Harry Potter | Richard Janda

L306 | 20566 |  Phonetics | Berkson

L307 | 25102 |  Phonology | Berkson

L310 | 20567 |  Syntax | Zanon

L432 | 20913 |  Advanced Field Methods | Botne

L441 | 29875 |  Field Methods in Sociolinguistics | Auger

L480 | 34599 |  Intro to African Linguistics | Ebarb

L490 | 24011 |  Linguistic Structures | Rottet & Janda

L520 | 21905 |  Sociolinguistics | Clements

L541 | 18639 |  Introductory Phonetics | de Jong

L544 | 29889 |  Morphological Analysis | Davis

L545 | 20568 |  Computational & Linguistic Analysis | Kuebler

L590 | 24012 |  Structure of Breton | Rottet

L642 | 18643 |  Adv Phonological Description | Berkson

L643 | 18644 |  Advanced Syntax | Vance

L654 | 20914 |  Field Methods in Linguistics | Botne

L670 | 34624 |  Language Typology | Lesourd

L700 | 29897 |  Loanword Phonology | Davis

L712 | 28431 |  Historical Phonology | Hall

L715 | 29909 |  Seminar in Computational Ling: Parsing Morphologically Rich Languages | Kuebler

 

 

Linguistics | Intro to African Linguistics
A501 | 29867/34600 | Ebarb


This course introduces the linguistic study of African languages. With an emphasis on sound patterns, word and sentence structure, the course will focus on the main properties that characterize the major language families and those properties that are rare outside of Africa. The course will additionally touch on issues in sociolinguistics, language contact, and typological and genetic classification.



Linguistics | Intro to the Study of Language
L103 | 18632 | Janda


Every language is a highly structured system that is nevertheless subject to constant variation and change, mainly because many of its parts reflect cultural conventions, rather than unchanging natural logic.  (The non-opposite meanings of English inlaw and outlaw, for example, are reflections of culture, not logic.)  L103 is an introduction to this combination of systematicity and conventionality (and even apparent arbitrariness) that characterizes Language in general.  The topics covered therefore include: (1) the parts of language (e.g., meanings, sentences, words, and sounds), (2) the uses of language (e.g., to facilitate conversation, to request information, to convey emotion, and the like), and (3) some of the ways in which languages are acquired by children, processed by adults (plus children), and varied or changed over time (by virtually everyone).  At the end of the course, students will have gained enough insight into how languages work to respond knowledgeably in addressing, say, the claim that gorillas can gain human-like language.  (Students will thus know, e.g., that more than 35 years of practice with American Sign Language have not brought even the most proficient sign-language-using gorilla [Koko] to an average of three words per utterance!) 



Linguistics | Intro to Linguistics Analysis
L203 | 3100 | Fowler


Each student must also sign up for one discussion section.

Section # 31006 for Honors Students only and needs on-line authorization.

This course introduces the tools of grammatical analysis as well as the theory and principles upon which these analyses are built.  Analytical methods will be applied to problems selected from phonetics, phonology, morphology, and syntax.  Basic concepts are laid out in lecture and expanded upon in the discussion section.  The discussion section is intended to develop skills of linguistic analysis and argumentation by working through data-based problems.



Linguistics | Language and Harry Potter
L210 | 27076 | Janda

Above class meets second eight weeks only

 

TBA



Linguistics | Phonetics
L306 | 20566 | Berkson

 

This course provides a basic introduction to the study of phonetics. Topics addressed include the anatomy and physiology of the speech production apparatus, the production and transcription of speech sounds, basic acoustics, computerized methods for speech analysis, acoustic characteristics of sounds, and phenomena such as stress and intonation. The course includes an emphasis on naturally occurring speech and understanding physical aspects of speech behavior.  Some laboratory work is included.



Linguistics | Phonology
L307 | 25102 | Berkson

 

This course is an introduction to phonology, the study of how sounds pattern in language.  The main goals of the course are to develop descriptive and analytical skills in phonology through problem solving and to become familiar with the range of phonological phenomena that occur in the languages of the world. We will learn about crucial phonological concepts such as underlying and surface representations, phoneme and allophone, contrast, alternation, neutralization, distinctive features, and syllable. It also provides you with basic skills for phonological analysis, including the selection of underlying representations, rule notation, rule ordering, identifying phonological universals, and how to make an informed decision when multiple analyses are viable. Finally, it gives you a taste of theory-building in phonology. We will discuss the external motivations for phonological grammar, how to lay out the predictions of a theoretical proposal, and how these predictions can potentially be tested.



Linguistics | Syntax
L310 | 20567 | Ksenia Zanon


This introductory course examines the syntax (sentence structure) of human language. We will explore the ways in which syntactic structure reflects a common human cognitive capacity, as well as how individual languages differ – in precise and limited ways – from each other.

During the course the students will be introduced to the basic concepts and terminology, exposed to the modes of argumentation and methods used in syntactic analysis within the framework of generative grammar, and develop some basic skills in solving syntactic puzzles. Emphasis will be made on promoting a critical understanding of the underlying assumptions of the generative framework as it has developed in recent work in syntactic theory, as well as on providing a hands-on experience of constructing and evaluating grammatical analyses.



Linguistics | Advanced Field Methods
L432 | 20913 | Botne

 

Meets with L654

This course is a continuation of the fieldwork begun in L431/L653. The language being studied is Chimpoto, a Bantu language spoken in southwestern Tanzania. Students will again meet with the language consultant individually once a week. During this semester of work, students are expected to identify and investigate in greater depth and detail particular areas of the language that are of interest to general linguistics. The goal is to produce a paper in a manner appropriate for publication in a journal and to prepare a talk appropriate for a conference. The semester ends with a LanguageFest, a mini-conferencelike setting at which students present their work in public.



Linguistics | Field Methods in Sociolinguistics
L441 | 29875 | Auger

This course is a practical introduction to sociolinguistic research, including methods of data collection and quantitative analysis. Students gain experience in all stages of sociolinguistic research and write an original research paper.  Possible topics for the class include: social variation among Bloomington natives, regional variation in the Midwest, gender differences among IU students, politeness strategies, register differences associated with different settings.



Linguistics | Intro to African Linguistics
L480 | 34599 | Ebarb

 

Meets with LING-A 501

 

This course introduces the linguistic study of African languages. With an emphasis on sound patterns, word and sentence structure, the course will focus on the main properties that characterize the major language families and those properties that are rare outside of Africa. The course will additionally touch on issues in sociolinguistics, language contact, and typological and genetic classification.



Linguistics | Linguistic Structures

Structure of Breton
L490 | 24011 | Rottet and Janda


Meets with Ling-L 590 and FRIT-F 581

 

Even though they belong to the Indo-European family, the Celtic languages stand well outside the Standard Average European (SAE) profile, displaying a number of typologically “exotic” features. Breton, the traditional language of Brittany (western France), is in the Brythonic branch of Celtic which includes Welsh and Cornish. Breton is the only extant Celtic language not in intense contact with English. It is characterized by significant dialect differences, leading some linguists to suggest the intriguing possibility that some Breton dialects are really continuations of Gaulish, the otherwise extinct continental Celtic language of pre-Roman Gaul. In this course we will survey the linguistic structure of modern Breton, including its morphophonology (e.g. a fairly elaborate system of initial consonant mutations), morphology (e.g. inflected prepositions, verbal nouns, luxuriant number marking in the noun phrase including singulatives and collectives, duals and double plurals), syntax (e.g. verb-initial word order with V2 effects in main clauses), and lexicon (e.g. a vigesimal counting system, no traditional verb “to have”, an interesting interplay between material of Celtic and of Romance material).



Linguistics | Sociolinguistics
L520 | 21905 | Clements


TBA



Linguistics | Introductory Phonetics
L541 | 18639 | Ken de Jong


3 credits

Students must also register for one discussion section.


Introductory Phonetics is designed to introduce students to the various facets of phonetic investigation.  It covers the basics of speech production and speech acoustics as they are relevant to the expression of linguistic structures.  Along the way, it develops the students basic skills for linguistic investigation of speech behavior.  The first part of the course focuses on the segmental analysis of speech, and on the ability to analyze speech by means of the IPA (International Phonetic Alphabet).  The later part of the course focuses on various quantitative aspects of speech.  Most important, it introduces a range of acoustic techniques for analyzing speech, and

initiates the student in a short experimental investigation of some linguistic phenomenon of the student's choice.



Linguistics | Morphological Analysis
L544 | 29889 | Davis


In the first part of the course we will overview the basic concepts and approaches to morphological analysis and description that will include different perspectives on word structure.  The course, however, will largely focus on issues related to the relationship between morphology and phonology that will especially include non-concatenative morphology, prosodic morphology, and lexical phonology.  Course requirements will include a term paper and its presentation.  Further, there may be homework assignments, a short paper, and/or article presentations required.



Linguistics | Computational & Linguistic Analysis
L545 | 20568 | Kuebler


L545 is a graduate course in natural language processing and computational linguistics. The course is concerned with concepts, models and algorithms to interpret, generate, and learn natural languages, as well as applications of NLP.


We will look at the different levels of linguistic analysis: morphology, morpho-syntax, syntax, and lexical semantics.  in that process, we will move from simple representations of language, such as finite-state techniques and n-gram analysis, to more advanced representations, such as those found in context-free parsing or anaphora resolution.  Emphasis will be placed on parsing techniques in this course.


No programming experience is assumed, computer experience presupposed.


The required textbook is Jurafsky and Martin (2008) "Speech and Language Processing", 2nd edition(!).




Linguistics | Linguistic Structure

Structure of Breton
L590 | 24012 | Rottet


Above class meets with LING-L 490 and FRIT-F 581


Even though they belong to the Indo-European family, the Celtic languages stand well outside the Standard Average European (SAE) profile, displaying a number of typologically “exotic” features. Breton, the traditional language of Brittany (western France), is in the Brythonic branch of Celtic which includes Welsh and Cornish. Breton is the only extant Celtic language not in intense contact with English. It is characterized by significant dialect differences, leading some linguists to suggest the intriguing possibility that some Breton dialects are really continuations of Gaulish, the otherwise extinct continental Celtic language of pre-Roman Gaul. In this course we will survey the linguistic structure of modern Breton, including its morphophonology (e.g. a fairly elaborate system of initial consonant mutations), morphology (e.g. inflected prepositions, verbal nouns, luxuriant number marking in the noun phrase including singulatives and collectives, duals and double plurals), syntax (e.g. verb-initial word order with V2 effects in main clauses), and lexicon (e.g. a vigesimal counting system, no traditional verb “to have”, an interesting interplay between material of Celtic and of Romance material). This course is colisted with F581.



Linguistics | Adv Phonological Description
L642 | 18643 | Berkson


This course introduces the principles and workings of Optimality Theory.  A broad range of phonological phenomena will be considered We start by reviewing the basic concepts of phonology, including phoneme, alternation, neutralization, feature, syllable, and phonological rules and their interaction, we then discuss the conspiracy and duplication problems in rule-based phonology and work our way to Optimality Theory (OT). We will discuss the basic architecture of OT, the nature of markedness constraints, how an OT-based correspondence theory handles various phenomena such as reduplication and cyclic effects in word formation processes. We will also discuss how variants of OT can potentially address tricky issues such as optionality and gradient phenomena.



Linguistics | Advanced Syntax
L643 | 18644 | Vance


p:  L543 or equivalent

This course offers a continuation of L543, providing intermediate and advanced study of the Principles & Parameters approach to syntactic theory. We will read some classic papers from the late Government & Binding era, then make a systematic transition to the Minimalist Program. Our study of clause structure includes comparison of the Minimalist and Cartographic approaches. Students will develop their own research project throughout the semester; assignments include presenting articles relevant to the project, writing drafts of the final paper, and a final presentation and paper.



Linguistics | Field Methods in Linguistics
L654 | 20914 | Botne


Meets with L432

This course is a continuation of the fieldwork begun in L431/L653. The language being studied is Chimpoto, a Bantu language spoken in southwestern Tanzania. Students will again meet with the language consultant individually once a week. During this semester of work, students are expected to identify and investigate in greater depth and detail particular areas of the language that are of interest to general linguistics. The goal is to produce a paper in a manner appropriate for publication in a journal and to prepare a talk appropriate for a conference. The semester ends with a LanguageFest, a mini-conferencelike setting at which students present their work in public.



Linguistics | Language Typology
L670 | 34624 | Lesourd


An introduction to linguistic typology, the study of how languages differ and how they are alike in terms of formal features. Focuses on a variety of syntactic and morphological features of languages including lexical classes; word order; case and agreement systems; animacy, definiteness, and gender; valence-changing devices; verbal categories; and subordination.



Linguistics | Loanword Phonology
L700 | 29897 | Davis


Topic Background: Over the past decade loanword phonology has become a controversial issue and a focus of study within phonology. This can be seen by the number of special volumes dealing with this topic. The issue of loanword phonology has become especially controversial with respect to its relation to the debate over the role of phonetics (including perception) in phonology. One reason for the controversy is the development of a finely articulated view of perceptual phonology, the aim of which is to explain much of productive phonology through perceptual factors. Under the perceptual view, the problem of loanword adaptation is seen as a problem of perceptual matching the words of one language into another. An alternative view is a phonological one that argues against any role of subphonemic variants and instead maintains that borrowing is phonological, often with bilinguals in the lead. On the latter view, loanword phonology is important because it can give evidence to the nature of representations as well as the rules or constraint rankings of the target language. In this seminar we will first go over this controversy exploring the evidence for and against both the perceptual view and the phonological view of loanword phonology. We will also examine the related question of whether loanword phonology is distinct from native phonology. Further we will examine some case studies of loanword adaptation in specific languages. One relatively unexplored area that we will focus on is the issue of loanword prosody. For example, how does pitch-accent get assigned when a word is borrowed from a stress-accent language to a pitch-accent language; or, how is tone assigned when a word is borrowed from a stress-accent or a pitch-accent language into a tone language? That is, what are the sources of loanword prosody? Course requirements will include regular presentation of articles and a term paper. One prior course in phonology is a prerequisite; some knowledge of optimality theory would be beneficial since a number of the readings will be assuming that framework.



Linguistics | Historical Phonology
L712 | 28431 | Hall


This seminar will explore a number of well-known sound changes (primarily in Germanic), including (but not limited to) Grimm's Law, Verner's Law, West Germanic Gemination, the High German Consonant Shift, and Umlaut in Old High German. A number of linguists have applied formal models of phonology to these sound shifts, e.g. feature geometry, syllable and moraic theory, preference laws, optimality theory. The goal of the course is to critically examine this recent literature. The course presupposes some background in phonology, including optimality theory. Each student will be required to present and lead the discussion on one article or book chapter and to write a research paper. The paper can either offer a re-analysis of one of the sound changes discussed in the course, or it can offer a new analysis of a sound change not discussed. The topic of the paper need not be restricted to Germanic. The course does not assume knowledge of German.



Linguistics | Seminar in Computational Linguistics: Parsing Morphologically Rich Languages
L715 | 29909 | Kuebler


Parsing until recently has mostly focused on the English Penn Treebank as training set. However, the parsing models that have been optimized for the Penn Treebank do not work well for other languages. Especially languages with a rich morphology, such as German, Arabic, Hungarian, have proven difficult to parse. More recently, there has been an increased interest in developing parsing models for such languages. In this seminar, we will have a closer look at parsing models such as the Collins, Stanford, and Berkeley parser and discuss their weaknesses in terms of parsing morphologically rich languages (MRLs). Then, we will discuss more recent approaches that focus on MRLS. Prerequisite: A course in CL/NLP.