Graduate Course Offerings

Fall 2015

Linguistics Courses

L503 Survey of Linguistics

Instructor: Kitagawa

This course introduces the basic tools of grammatical analysis (of sounds, words, sentences and meanings) for graduate students who have no or little background in formal linguistics. It is suitable for students interested in linguistics, computer science/informatics, foreign languages, speech and hearing sciences, second language studies, elementary or secondary English education, psychology or cognitive science, among others. Prerequisite: none

This course:

  • can be counted toward minor in linguistics including computational linguistics (with the minor advisor’s approval).
  • can be counted toward major in linguistics as an elective course for both MA and Ph. D. students.

L506 Tutorial Instruction Foreign Language

Instructor: Omar

1 to 4 credits.

Pre-requisite: Grade of C or better in 502 level or equivalent proficiency.

The course will be completely oriented to the needs of the students enrolled in the relevant African language. Students will be able to link their language study with their majors, write reviews of articles, term papers, and do presentations in the target language. They will be exposed to more advanced studies of oral and written texts, advanced listening comprehension, translation of complex texts, and language specific internet resources.


L530 Intro to Historical Linguistics

Instructor: Clements

P: L542

This course surveys some of the principal areas of research in historical linguistics, including language change at the lexical, phonological, morphological, and syntactic levels of grammar, the relationship between languages, the comparative method and internal reconstruction, innovation and propagation of language change, and language contact and the birth and death of languages. The goals for the course are threefold: that students become knowledgeable of the basic areas of historical linguistics, the basic questions asked and discussed in the field, and the general methodologies employed in carrying out research in historical linguistics; that they develop a sense of what kinds of thinking are necessary to frame a question from the perspective of historical linguistics and learn the skills to be able to come up with and assess possible responses to the question; and that they become aware of their own intellectual development as they learn more about different aspects of historical linguistics and develop the skills to critically examine and research different historical linguistic questions.

A more general goal is that students develop an understanding of how other areas of linguistics (phonology, morphology, syntax, lexical semantics, sociolinguistics, contact linguistics) relate to historical linguistics and to broader areas of language change and linguistic theory.


L542 Phonological Analysis

Instructor: Davis

An introduction to the principles of contemporary phonological theory and tools of phonological analysis and description. The formal of the course is oriented toward data-based problems from a wide variety of languages.


L543 Syntactic Analysis

Instructor: Franks

This course offers an introduction to generative grammar for graduate students. The fundamentals of “Principles and Parameters” syntax are examined, with emphasis placed upon argumentation and syntactic reasoning. Areas of inquiry include topics such as: phrase structure, thematic roles and compositionality, X-bar syntax and functional categories, movement and locality, binding and anaphora, and empty categories. Minimalism will be introduced during the latter part of the course, time permitting. Requirements for the course include regular reading and homework assignments, a midterm exam, and a final.


L555 Programming for Computational Linguistics

Instructor: Kuebler

Meets with L435.

This course is geared towards students in Computational Linguistics and Linguistics, with little or no experience in programming. It will introduce the fundamentals of programming and computer science, aiming at attaining practical skills for text processing. While we will work with Python, the main focus is more on introducing basic concepts in programming such as loops or functions. In contrast to similar courses in Computer Science, we will concentrate on problems in Computational Linguistics, which generally involve managing text, searching in text, and extracting information from text. For this reason, one part of the course will concentrate on regular expression search.

Through lectures, lab sessions, and (bi-)weekly assignments, students will learn the essentials of Python and how to apply these skills to natural language data.

By the end of the course, you should be able to:

  • Feel comfortable using a unix/linux/mac command line
  • Understand key programming concepts such as conditionals, iteration, recursion, functions, and objects
  • Be able to write your own programs which can help you to answer linguistic questions and solve everyday problems.

We will work with the following textbook:

Magnus Lie Hetland (2009) Beginning Python: From Novice to Professional. APress. 2nd edition


L590 Linguistics Structure

Instructor: Grano

Meets with L490.

Topic: Structure of Mandarin

This course investigates the structure of Mandarin Chinese from the perspective of generative grammar. We will focus primarily on dimensions of Mandarin syntax and semantics that are typologically interesting, with the broader goal of using Mandarin as a window into better understanding how the languages of the world can and cannot vary from each other and what implications this (non-)variation has for linguistic theory. Topics will likely include at least the following: parts-of-speech classification, word order, classifiers and the nominal system, reflexive binding, gradability and comparison, temporal interpretation, aspect, and aktionsart. No prior knowledge of Mandarin is required, but some background in linguistics is recommended.


L590 Linguistics Structure

Instructor: Ozcelik

Meets with L490; CEUS R389/R589.

Topic: Structure of Turkish

This course introduces students to the linguistic features of Turkish (phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax  and semantics) within the framework of recent linguistic models. Our main focus will be on phonology and syntax, though we will also investigate topics in the morphology and semantics of Turkish, as well as some language acquisition data. In doing so, students will also learn to ‘read’ in Turkish with the help of a dictionary.

Each topic will be discussed within the context of linguistic typology and language universals. We will investigate whether linguistic theories based mainly on languages like English can successfully account for data from Turkish, and explore ways in which such data could, in turn, contribute to our understanding of the human language faculty in general.

No prior knowledge of Turkish is required. However, students with no formal linguistics background should receive instructor’s  permission.

Throughout the semester, each student will investigate a linguistic phenomenon of their choice in Turkish, and compare it with related phenomena in other languages. Students will write a conference abstract/proposal on the topic, as well as giving a class presentation and writing a short final paper on it. (The purpose is that, by the end of the semester, each student will be able to have enough material to later submit to a linguistics conference, present it, as well as publish it in the proceedings of the conference.) Undergraduates will be given the option of choosing between a final paper and a final exam, and will not be expected to find solutions to the linguistic problems they identify.


L615 Corpus Linguistics

Instructor: Dickinson

Meets with L415.

Advances in computer technology have revolutionized the ways linguists can approach their data. By using computers, we can access large bodies of text (corpora) and search for the phenomena in which we are interested. In this way, we can uncover complexities in naturally-occurring data and explore issues related to frequency of usage.

In this course, we will investigate some of the following questions, among others: What is a corpus, and what corpora exist? How are corpora developed? How does one search for specific phenomena in corpora? What is a concordancer? Do we need syntactic annotation? Are there programs that do the annotation automatically? Are there tools that help search linguistically annotated corpora?

No programming experience is assumed, though computer familiarity is presupposed.


L620 Bilingualism/Language Contact

Instructor: Auger

The topic for this year’s course is variation.  For over 30 years now, we have known that linguis­tic variation is not really “free”, but rather influenced in very systematic ways by social and linguistic factors. While these findings have convinced many sociolinguists that theories of gram­mar should take into account such variable patterns in developing rules and models, others still attri­bute variation patterns to dialect mixing and performance and exclude such ques­tions from their research.

In this course, we will examine and discuss the methodology and theory which underlie variation studies, as well as the main questions and controversies which divide sociologuists among themselves and oppose them to so-called theoretical linguists.  We will also put into practice the methodology and theory of variation studies in a research paper in which each student will design their own study, analyze the data, and interpret them.

No required texts.


L625 Bilingualism and Language Contact

Instructor: Rottet

Meets with FRIT F680.

This course will focus on the linguistic and social phenomena surrounding language contact. We will examine the typology of contact situations and a broad range of outcomes including language maintenance, shift and death; diglossia; koineization; pidginization and creolization; language intertwining or the creation of mixed languages such as Michif, Ma’a, and Media Lengua; Sprachbunds and language areas such as the Balkans; codeswitching, lexical borrowing, and grammatical borrowing including calquing and replication. We will also examine some of the basic findings on bilingualism: definitions, typologies of bilingualism, and issues of bilingual or multilingual speech communities. The course meets with FREN F 680, and therefore some of the material examined will be drawn from situations where French is one of the languages in contact, whether in North America, Africa, Europe or the South Pacific; knowledge of French is not required for students in L625, and they may work on whatever language contact setting they wish.


L641 Advanced Phonetics

Instructor: Berkson

P: L541 or equivalent.

Experimental analysis of the speech signal; speech articulation and the structure of phonetic space. A survey of current theories of speech production and perception with experience designing and conducting experiments, and some consideration of phonetic factors that determine the choice of particular sound contrasts in languages.


L645 Advanced Natural Language Processing

Instructor: Dickinson

Meets with CSCI-B659.

In recent years, statistical methods have become the standard in the field of Natural Language Processing (NLP).  This course gives an introduction to statistical models and machine learning paradigms in NLP.  Such methods are helpful for reaching wide coverage, reducing ambiguity, automatic learning, increasing robustness, etc.

In this course, we will cover basic notions in probability and information theory, focusing on the concepts needed for NLP.  Then we will discuss (Hidden) Markov Models, exemplified by an approach to POS tagging.  The following sessions will be dedicated to probabilistic approaches to parsing, focusing on probabilistic context-free grammars.

Additionally, we will cover topics such as word sense disambiguation, text categorization, and statistical alignment methods and their use in machine translation.  What we cover in the last third of the class will depend in part upon student interest.  We will be focusing on statistical methods in the context of particular tasks, but all of the methods we will use are applicable to a range of tasks in NLP.  Thus, this course provides an essential platform for further work in NLP.


L653 Field Methods in Linguistics

Instructor: Botne

Meets with L431.

This course introduces students to techniques of data collection and analysis through direct work with a speaker of an under-documented African language. During the first semester of the two-semester sequence, the focus is on techniques for eliciting, gathering, and transcribing data accurately, entering it into a database, analyzing and organizing it into an accessible format—entries in a field dictionary and a grammatical sketch. The course will also address various non-linguistic aspects of fieldwork: ethical issues in field research, health problems in the field, and some of the social and psychological problems associated with living alone in a foreign culture for an extended period of time.

In addition to the usual classroom activity, students meet separately with the language consultant each week for 45 minutes outside of class to gather data. Students are expected to maintain a field notebook, enter data into a database, share their findings with the class, and contribute to the understanding of this language. By the end of the semester, they are expected to have a good grasp of the basic features of the phonology, morphology, and syntax of the language under investigation.


L700 Discourse Analysis

Instructor: Franks

Meets with SLAV L601.

This seminar surveys a range of topics very broadly related to the morphology, syntax, and semantics of case. Topics treated will depend on the particular interests of registered students; modules unrelated to case will also be included if students so decide. The first part of the course will likely be typological in orientation, surveying different types of morphological case systems as well as the syntactic and semantic functions of case. In the second part, we will examine specific case related issues such as the following: ergativity, partitivity, nominative objects, the notion of default case, the evolution of case systems, so-called null case, as well as more general problems such as the relationships between case and clitics, case and agreement, case and movement, case and adjuncts, case and DP structure, case and expletives, abstract case and morphological case, etc.


L715 Seminar in Computational Linguistics

Instructor: Kuebler

Meets with CSCI-B659.

Machine Translation has been one of the main applications of computational linguistics. It is also one of the most difficult problems that we face. Modern machine translation uses statistical models based on parallel corpora and word alignment. In this course, we will start out by looking at traditional, transfer-based MT systems. The, we will look at the different statistical models that have been proposal for machine translation. We will also investigate more recent approaches to include syntactic and semantic analysis into the translation process. We will use the freely available platform Moses for practical experiments.

Prerequisite: A course in CL/NLP.

Textbook: Philipp Koehn (2010) Statistical Machine Translation. Cambridge University Press.


Fall 2014

Linguistics Courses

L503 Survey of Linguistics (CANCELLED)

This course introduces the basic tools of grammatical analysis (of sounds, words, sentences and meanings) for graduate students who have no or little background in formal linguistics. It is suitable for students interested in linguistics, foreign languages, speech and hearing sciences, second language studies, elementary or secondary English education, or cognitive science, among others.      Prerequisite:    none

This course

  1. can be counted toward minor in linguistics (with the minor advisor’s approval).
  2. can be counted as an elective course for MA students in CL.
  3. cannot be counted toward major in linguistics (even as an elective course) for MA or Ph.D. students in general linguistics and Ph.D. students in CL.

L530 Intro to Historical Ling

As can be observed from the variation (geographical, social, stylistic) in the speech we hear and produce every day, language is constantly changing. In this course we will be especially interested in the kinds of insights into language change that can be gained from looking at both the present and at the evolution of languages over many centuries. We will investigate sound change, morphological change, syntactic change, and semantic change, from both traditional and contemporary points of view. The course takes a problem-solving approach to developing the skills of diachronic analysis.

L542 Phonological Analysis

This course offers an introduction to the principles of phonological analysis by examining a wide variety of phonological processes in the world’s languages. Students will develop descriptive and analytical skills. Optimality Theory will be introduced during the latter part of the course, time permitting.  Requirements for the course will include regular reading assignments, homework assignments, a midterm, and a course paper.

L543 Syntactic Analysis

Prerequisite: Background in introductory linguistics will be assumed.

Introduction to generative syntax designed for graduate students. We will closely examine the “Principles and Parameters” approach. After discussing the goals of theoretical linguistics and introducing a particular model of grammar, we will examine linguistic facts in English and other languages and their explanation offered in the literature. Emphasis will be placed upon argumentation and logical thinking rather than memorization of the facts or “rules.” The major areas of inquiry are: thematic interpretation, Case marking, phrase structures, anaphoric relations, movement and empty categories. The class will proceed mainly with the instructor’s lectures (often based upon the materials relevant but not covered by the textbook) followed by or mixed with class discussion and exercises.

L555 Programming for Computational Ling

This course is geared towards students in Computational Linguistics and Linguistics, with little or no experience in programming. It will introduce the fundamentals of programming and computer science, aiming at attaining practical skills for text processing. While we will work with Python, the main focus is more on introducing basic concepts in programming such as loops or functions. In contrast to similar courses in Computer Science, we will concentrate on problems in Computational Linguistics, which generally involve managing text, searching in text, and extracting information from text. For this reason, one part of the course will concentrate on regular expression search.

Through lectures, lab sessions, and (bi-)weekly assignments, students will learn the essentials of Python and how to apply these skills to natural language data.

By the end of the course, you should be able to:

* Feel comfortable using a unix/linux/mac command line
* Understand key programming concepts such as conditionals, iteration, recursion, functions, and objects
* Be able to write your own programs which can help you to answer linguistic questions and solve everyday problems.
* Work with the Natural Language Toolkit (NLTK)

L590 Structure of Estonian

Estonian belongs to the Baltic Finnic branch of the Uralic (Finno-Ugric) family. While typologically agglutinative, it is more fusional and analytic than other languages in the group. The course will provide an overview of Estonian morphology, phonology & phonetics, (morpho)syntax and lexical semantics. Topics from acquisition, pragmatics and sociolinguistics will be briefly introduced. Other Finno-Ugric languages will be discussed as needed for comparative purposes.

We will study and de-mystify some of the well-known features of Estonian and/or Finnic, such as the “three degrees of phonemic length,” the rich case morphology (14 cases), the split between nominal and verbal systems in terms of their agglutinative vs. inflectional characteristics, grammatical aspect as object case alternation and the combination of V2 and discourse-configurational word order.

The readings will include research articles in several fields of linguistic inquiry, including typology and universals as well as cognitive linguistics.

The students will be encouraged to pursue a selected topic of interest for class presentation and final paper. Graduate students will write a longer research paper, undergraduates will have a choice between the final exam and paper. The course will provide hands-on practice in transcription and morphological glossing.

L590 Structure of Central Eurasian Languages

This course examines the structure of the major modern Central Eurasian languages and recent linguistic work on them. The languages selected for coverage belong to the Finno-Ugric, Iranic, Serbi-Mongolic, Japanese-Koguryoic, Tibeto-Burman, Tungusic, and Turkic families. When relevant, the treatment focuses on linguistic topics that are of special interest to the instructor and students, e.g., classifiers, evidentials, mimetics or ‘ideophones’, ‘vowel harmony’, etc. Students will acquire a basic knowledge of each selected language, which is examined in some detail using a hands-on approach to actual linguistic materials via “accessible” publications. Typological features common to Central Eurasian languages are noted and discussed. The major relationship theories, including divergent or ‘genetic’ theories and convergent theories, are also examined, as is the recent ‘sudden diachronic change by creolization’ theory of Johanna Nichols et al., which is based explicitly on Central Eurasian linguistic history.

No prior knowledge of Central Eurasian languages is assumed or required, but some background in linguistics is necessary.

L615 Corpus Linguistics

Advances in computer technology have revolutionized the ways linguists can approach their data. By using computers, we can access large bodies of text (corpora) and search for the phenomena in which we are interested. Corpora give us a chance to uncover complexities in naturally-occurring data and explore issues related to frequency of usage.

In this course, we will approach the following questions such as the following: What exactly is a corpus, and what isn’t? What corpora exist? How are corpora developed? What is XML, and why do we need it? How do we find a specific phenomenon in a large corpus? What is a concordancer? Do we need part-of-speech, syntactic, or semantic annotation? Are there programs that do the annotation for me? Are there tools that help me search in linguistically annotated corpora?

No programming experience is assumed, familiarity with computers is presupposed.

L630 Lexicology

From the marginal glosses of medieval manuscripts penned in dreary monasteries to the bilingual lexicons of the Renaissance classicists, and on to the electronic dictionaries of today’s hi-tech publishing houses, dictionaries have been essential repositories and even shapers of language. This course will survey major issues and techniques in lexicology (the scientific study of words), and lexicography (the art of dictionary making). Looking first at lexicology, we will consider topics such as componential analysis; semantic primitives (do all languages have a common semantic core?); prototype theory (why are some birds more “birdy” than others?); semantic relations including problems of homonymy and polysemy, metonymy and metaphor (in English, time is money; in French, money is food) and how these are deployed creatively throughout the lexicon of a language. Turning our attention to lexicography, we will examine, inter alia, definition, sense distinctions (do words really have separate enumerable definitions or is this a convenient fiction?), and problems of etymology. We will examine how data are gathered for a dictionary, from Murray’s thousand volunteer readers for the OED (including at least one madman jotting citations on slips of paper from the comfort of his asylum) to the exhaustive electronic concordancing of multi-million word corpora. Issues in the compilation of bilingual dictionaries, dictionaries of collocations, learners’ dictionaries, and research on the dictionary user will also be examined. Interest in a wide variety of languages is welcome. The course is taught in English, but reading ability in French or another Romance language is strongly encouraged since we draw frequent examples both from English and from Romance. The course meets with F677.

L645 Advanced Natural Language Processing

In recent years, statistical methods have become the standard in the field of Natural Language Processing (NLP). This course gives an introduction to statistical models and machine learning paradigms in NLP. Such methods are helpful for the following goals: reaching wide coverage, reducing ambiguity, automatic learning, increasing robustness, etc.

In this course, we will cover basic notions in statistics, focused on the concepts needed for NLP. Then we will discuss (Hidden) Markov Models, exemplified by an approach to POS tagging. The following sessions will be dedicated to probabilistic approaches to parsing. In the second half of the course, we will cover semantic and discourse annotation, and in the final part, we will look at applications, such as machine translation, sentiment analysis, and dialogue systems.

L653 Field Methods in Linguistics

Techniques of data collection and analysis based on work with a native speaker of a language unknown to the students.

L700 Discourse Analysis

Discourse Analysis is interdisciplinary study of texts. In this seminar we focus on qualitative study of face to face interaction–its intellectual history as well as its practice. We examine approaches to discourse analysis from earlier symbolic interactionalism and Conversational Analysis to Critical Discourse Analysis. The emphasis will be on linguistic and anthropological perspectives, and on doing transcription.

In particular we study feature analysis of repetition, discourse markers, non-verbal interaction, interruption, miscommunication, and narrative, and within the socio-interactive context, how these relate to larger questions of identity, difference, and power in both American and British practice. We explore discourse studies in medical, institutional, legal, spiritual, familial, and scientific contexts. We also include related hybrid studies of written and oral discourse. Students will become adept at transcription of interactive oral texts; student research projects are an integral part of the seminar.

L712 Seminar in Phonology

Research and reports on selected problems of generative phonology. May be repeated for credit when topic changes.

L715 Seminar in Computational Linguistics

Topic: Detecting Latent User Properties in Text

This seminar will discuss methods for uncovering hidden user properties in data on the basis of language use. That is, how can we discover properties about the writer based (solely) on the way they use language? There are a number of areas within natural language processing where this has been explored – impacting tasks such as information retrieval, sentiment analysis, and automated essay scoring – and we will try to unpack both the commonalities and the differences, in terms of features and (machine learning) techniques. Topics to be covered may include (but are not limited to): native language identification, gender identification, language proficiency classification, dialect identification, and authorship attribution & plagiarism detection. We will likely be exploring effects of confounding variables, such as genre and text type (e.g., social media vs. essays), as well as interacting effects of the topics listed above. The exact topics will vary to some extent depending upon student interest.

Students will be expected to complete a project combining research insight and implementation, as well as to lead the class discussion for some of the readings.

A course in computational linguistics or related area is recommended before taking this course.


 Spring 2014

http://registrar.indiana.edu/browser/soc4142/LING/index.shtml

Linguistics Courses

L506 Tutorial Instruction Foreign Language

Description missing.

L520 Sociolinguistics

This course surveys the various areas of research in sociolinguistics: multilingualism in its various forms (e.g., language choice, diglossia, and code-switching), language planning, language death, geographical and social variation, language change, politeness, language and gender, pidgins & creoles, African-American Vernacular English, and language & education. Examples drawn both from “exotic” and familiar communities are discussed.

L544 Morphological Analysis

Introduction to the basic concepts and approaches to morphological analysis and description, to different theories of word structure, and to issues in the relation between morphology and phonology and between morphology and syntax. Data-based problem solving from a wide variety of languages.

L545 Computation and Linguistic Analysis

This course will introduce students to computational linguistics (CL) and natural language processing (NLP), a field combining insights from linguistics and computer science. The course is concerned with concepts, models, and algorithms to interpret, generate, and learn
natural languages, as well as applications of NLP.

We will look at these different levels of linguistic analysis: morphology, morpho-syntax, syntax, lexical semantics, and to some extent compositional semantics. In so doing, we will move from simple representations of language, such as finite-state techniques and n-gram analysis, to more advanced representations, such as those found in context-free and unification-based parsing. Some emphasis will be placed on parsing techniques in this course.

L555 or a programming equivalent is recommended for this course.

The required textbook is Jurafsky and Martin (2008), “Speech and Language Processing” (2nd edition).

L590 Linguistic Structures

General description: Analysis of particular aspects of the structure of a language or of a group of closely related languages. Methods used may include text analysis, informant work, study of secondary sources, lectures, reports. LANGUAGE VARIES BY SEMESTER.

L642 Advanced Phonological Description

This course introduces the principles and workings of Optimality Theory. A broad range of phonological phenomena will be considered, including restrictions on phonetic inventories, allophonic processes, neutralization processes, conspiracies, markedness, emergence of the unmarked, learnability issues, opacity effects, reduplication, output-to-output correspondence, ranking arguments, harmonic scales (stringency versus fixed rankings), metrical and syllable-based processes, and positional restrictions on constraints. Readings will be drawn from two textbooks and the current research literature.

Requirements include a series of homework assignments and exams and two short papers on an approved topic of interest to the student. One of the papers is to be formulated within a derivational rule-based framework, and the other within the framework of Optimality Theory. These papers and associated feedback are intended to develop writing and argumentation skills in the different theoretical frameworks. Students are also expected to give a professional-style oral presentation to the class of their final paper.

L643 Advanced Syntax

The class will try to fill the gap between “text-book” syntax and “real-world” syntax.
We will critically review and discuss the development and refinement of generative syntax since late 1980s including the Minimalist Program. Emphasis will be placed on the theories of movement, binding, phrase structure and especially LF.
The students will: (i) read and present some journal/book articles, (ii) have occasional assignments, and (iii) develop and present a small term project in consultation with the instructor. (Prerequisite: L543 or equivalent).

L654 Field Methods in Linguistics II

This course is a continuation of the fieldwork begun in L431/L653. The language being studied is Zarma, a Nilo-Saharan (Southern Songhai) language, spoken in Niger, Nigeria, Benin, Burkina Faso and Mali in West Africa. Students will meet with the language consultant individually once a week. During this semester of work, students are expected to identify and investigate in greater depth and detail particular areas of the language that are of interest to general linguistics (phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, etc.). The goal is to produce a paper in a manner appropriate for publication in a journal and to prepare a talk appropriate for a conference. The semester ends with a mini-conference-like setting at which students present their work in public.

L690 Advanced Readings in Linguistics

1-4 credits. S/F grading.

L695 M.A. Thesis Research

1-4 credits. This course is eligible for a deferred grade.

L700 Seminar on Current Issues: Loanword Phonology

1-4 credits. This seminar will deal with major books and articles that have defined important areas of debate in the current development of linguistic theory. The specific title will be announced well in advance of each semester. Course may be retaken for up to 12 credit hours.

L712 Seminar in Phonology: German Historical Phonology

Research and reports on selected problems of generative phonology. May be repeated for credit when topic changes.

L715 Seminar in Computational Linguistics: Parsing Morphologically Rich Languages

The seminar will introduce students to current research in the field of Computational Linguistics. May be repeated for up to 15 credits.

L800 Research

This course is eligible for a deferred grade.

African Languages and Linguistics

A501 Intro to African Linguistics

Introduction to the linguistic study of African languages; questions of language distribution, typological and genetic classification, comparative reconstruction, and structural aspects of individual languages.

B502 Elementary Bamana II

Introduction to Bamana, a Mande language of West Africa, and aspects of Bamana culture. Basic grammatical structures and vocabulary. Emphasis on the spoken language.

B602 Intermediate Bamana II

Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in B102 or equivalent proficiency. Study of more complex grammatical structures, with emphasis on active skills: speaking and writing. Reading of elementary texts.

B702 Advanced Bamana II

Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in B202 or equivalent proficiency. Examination of subtle nuances in grammatical structures. Advanced readings of traditional and modern literature. Composition. Oriented to the needs of students enrolled.

K502 Elementary Akan II

3 credits. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in LING K501 or equivalent proficiency. Introduction to Akan, major language in Ghana. Basic grammatical structures, vocabulary, emphasis on the spoken language, oral, listening comprehension, language use in specific social settings. Graduate students will have individual projects to submit. Important cultural points like food, clothing, marriage, etc. Videos and Internet resources will be used.

K602 Intermediate Akan II

3 credits. The second part of a two-semester sequence. P: Grade of C or better in LING K601 or equivalent proficiency. Study of more complex grammatical structures, with emphasis on active skills: speaking, writing and reading texts. Attention will be on oral and written composition, reading and listening comprehension, translation from English to Twi and from Twi to English. Description of cultural events shown on Video or CD-ROM.

K702 Advanced Akan II

3 credits. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in LING K701 or equivalent proficiency. Study of complex grammatical structures and of more complex contextual discourse patterns. Advanced readings of traditional and modern literature. Advanced oral and written compositions, advanced reading and listening comprehension and translation of complex texts from English to Twi. The course will be completely oriented to the needs of the students enrolled.

S502 Elementary Swahili II

3 credits. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in LING S501 or equivalent proficiency. Introduction to Swahili, a Bantu language spoken in East Africa, and aspects of Swahili culture. Basic grammatical structures and vocabulary. Emphasis on spoken language-oral and listening comprehension, language use in specific social settings like the market, school, hospital, doctor’s office, among others. Important cultural points like food, clothing, marriage, etc.

S602 Intermediate Swahili II

3 credits. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in LING S601 or equivalent proficiency. This course is the second part of a two-semester course. Study of more complex grammatical structures, emphasis on active skills: speaking, writing, reading texts, oral and written composition, reading, listening comprehension, text translation. Extra project(s).

S702 Advanced Swahili II

3 credits. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in LING S701 or equivalent proficiency. This course is the second part of a two-semester course. Requires permission of instructor. Study of complex grammatical structures, advanced readings of traditional, modern literature. Advanced oral and written compositions, advanced reading and listening comprehension and translation of complex texts from English to Swahili.

X502 Elementary Wolof

3 credits. Prerequisite: X501. Course provides a deeper knowledge of the Wolof language, culture. Second part of a two-semester sequence. Focused on communication, cultures, connections, comparisons, and communities of the foreign language. This will enable each student to acquire greater understanding and use the Wolof language to convey feelings, express ideas in language.

X602 Intermediate Wolof

3 credits. This is an intermediate Wolof class, a continuation of X501 and X502. Students will deepen basic skills acquired in previous Wolof courses such as pronunciation, reading, speaking, listening and writing.

Y502 Elementary Yoruba II

Description missing.

Z502 Elementary Zulu II

3 credits. The second part of a two-semester sequence. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in LING Z501 or equivalent proficiency. Basic grammatical structures and vocabulary. Emphasis is on the spoken language—oral and listening comprehension, language use in specific social settings. Videos and internet resources will be used.

Z602 Intermediate Zulu II

3 credits. The second part of a two-semester sequence. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in LING Z601 or equivalent proficiency. Study of more complex grammatical structures, with emphasis on active skills: speaking, writing, and reading texts. Attention will be on oral and written compositions, reading and listening comprehension, and translation of texts. Descriptions of cultural events through the use of videos and the Internet.

Z702 Advanced Zulu II

3 credits. The second part of a two-semester sequence. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in LING Z701 or equivalent proficiency. Study of more complex grammatical structures and of more complex contentual discourse patterns. Advanced readings of traditional and modern literature. Advanced oral written compositions, advanced listening comprehension and translation of complex texts. Use of internet resources. The course will be completely oriented to the needs of the students enrolled.


Fall 2013

http://registrar.indiana.edu/browser/soc4138/LING/index.shtml

Linguistics Courses

L503 Survey of Linguistics (syllabus)

This course introduces the basic tools of grammatical analysis (of sounds, words, sentences and meanings) for graduate students who have no or little background in formal linguistics. It is suitable for students interested in linguistics, foreign languages, speech and hearing sciences, second language studies, elementary or secondary English education, or cognitive science, among others. (Prerequisite: none)

This course

  1. can be counted toward minor in linguistics (with the minor advisor’s approval).
  2. can be counted as an elective course for M.A. students in CL.
  3. cannot be counted toward major in linguistics (even as an elective course) for M.A. or Ph.D. students in general linguistics and Ph.D. students in CL.

L530 Intro to Historical Linguistics (syllabus)

This course surveys some of the principal areas of research in historical linguistics, including language change at the lexical, phonological, morphological, and syntactic levels of grammar, the relationship between languages, the comparative method and internal reconstruction, innovation and propagation of language change, and language contact and the birth and death of languages. The goals for the course are threefold: that students become knowledgeable of the basic areas of historical linguistics, the basic questions asked and discussed in the field, and the general methodologies employed in carrying out research in historical linguistics; that they develop a sense of what kinds of thinking are necessary to frame a question from the perspective of historical linguistics and learn the skills to be able to come up with and assess possible responses to the question; and that they become aware of their own intellectual development as they learn more about different aspects of historical linguistics and develop the skills to critically examine and research different historical linguistic questions.

A more general goal is that students develop an understanding of how other areas of linguistics (phonology, morphology, syntax, lexical semantics, sociolinguistics, contact linguistics) relate to historical linguistics and to broader areas of language change and linguistic theory.

L542 Phonological Analysis (syllabus)

This course offers an introduction to the principles of phonological analysis examining a wide variety of phonological processes in the world’s languages. Students will be introduced to Optimality Theory during the second half of the course. Requirements for the course will include regular reading assignments, quizzes, homework assignments, a midterm, and a course paper.

L543 Syntactic Analysis (syllabus)

Introduction to generative syntax designed for graduate students. We will closely examine the “Principles and Parameters” approach. After discussing the goals of theoretical linguistics and introducing a particular model of grammar, we will examine linguistic facts in English and other languages and their explanation offered in the literature. Emphasis will be placed upon argumentation and logical thinking rather than memorization of the facts or “rules.” The major areas of inquiry are: thematic interpretation, Case marking, phrase structures, anaphoric relations, movement and empty categories. The class will proceed mainly with the instructor’s lectures (often based upon the materials relevant but not covered by the textbook) followed by or mixed with class discussion and exercises.

Prerequisite: Background in introductory linguistics will be assumed.

L555 Programming for Computational Linguistics (syllabus)

This course is geared towards students in Computational Linguistics and Linguistics, with little or no experience in programming. It will introduce the fundamentals of programming and computer science, aiming at attaining practical skills for text processing. While we will work with Python, the main focus is more on introducing basic concepts in programming such as loops or functions. In contrast to similar courses in Computer Science, we will concentrate on problems in Computational Linguistics, which generally involve managing text, searching in text, and extracting information from text. For this reason, one part of the course will concentrate on regular expression search.

Through lectures, lab sessions, and (bi-)weekly assignments, students will learn the essentials of Python and how to apply these skills to natural language data.

By the end of the course, you should be able to:

  • Feel comfortable using a unix/linux/mac command line
  • Understand key programming concepts such as conditionals, iteration, recursion, functions, and objects
  • Be able to write your own programs which can help you to answer linguistic questions and solve everyday problems.

We will work with the following textbook:

Magnus Lie Hetland (2005) Beginning Python: From Novice to Professional. APress.

L590 Structure of Turkish

General description: Analysis of particular aspects of the structure of a language or of a group of closely related languages. Methods used may include text analysis, informant work, study of secondary sources, lectures, reports. LANGUAGE VARIES BY SEMESTER.

L620 Advanced Sociolinguistics (syllabus)

Fall 2013 topic: Language and Gender

This course is about language and gender: how women and men use language and how language reflects the status of women and men in society. Many people have specific ideas about the way women speak: e.g., women are more polite than men and they speak better than them, they talk and gossip more than men, they use expressions like kind of and seek approval for what they say by making their statements sound like questions or by adding tag questions: It’s a nice day, isn’t it?. In this course, we will ask ourselves whether any of the stereotypes about women’s language are true. We will try to determine how differently women and men really speak and understand why this should be the case. We will examine gender differences in various cultures and ask how much of a role genetic and social factors play in the linguistic behaviors of women and men. Finally, we will consider claims that English and many other languages are sexist and that they deny women a level of recognition equal to that granted to men.

L641 Advanced Phonetics (syllabus)

Advanced Phonetics is intended to provide a foundation for students who have had basic training in phonetics to pursue the quantitative study of phonology in the context of human interaction, and of speech and perception in the context of language. This course will aid your understanding of the relationship between speech and language, and prepare you to do your own independent experimental research into a topic of your choice. Prerequisite: background in phonetics equivalent to an introductory course. No textbook.

L645 Advanced Natural Language Processing (syllabus)

In recent years, statistical methods have become the standard in the field of Natural Language Processing (NLP). This course gives an introduction to statistical models and machine learning paradigms in NLP. Such methods are helpful for the following goals: reaching wide coverage, reducing ambiguity, automatic learning, increasing robustness, etc. In this course, we will cover basic notions in statistics, focused on the concepts needed for NLP. Then we will discuss (Hidden) Markov Models, exemplified by an approach to POS tagging. The following sessions will be dedicated to probabilistic approaches to parsing. Here, we will start with an introduction to parsing in general, and then focus on probabilistic context-free grammars. In the last part of the course, we will cover statistical alignment methods and their use in statistical machine translation.

L653 Field Methods in Linguistics (syllabus)

Techniques of data collection and analysis based on work with a native speaker of a language unknown to the students.

African Languages and Linguistics Courses

B501 Elementary Bamana I (syllabus)

Introduction to Bamana, a Mande language of West Africa, and aspects of Bamana culture. Basic grammatical structures and vocabulary. Emphasis on the spoken language.

B601 Intermediate Bamana I (syllabus)

Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in B102 or equivalent proficiency. Study of more complex grammatical structures, with emphasis on active skills: speaking and writing. Reading of elementary texts.

B701 Advanced Bamana I (syllabus)

Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in B202 or equivalent proficiency. Examination of subtle nuances in grammatical structures. Advanced readings of traditional and modern literature. Composition. Oriented to the needs of students enrolled.

K502 Elementary Akan II

3 credits. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in LING K501 or equivalent proficiency. Introduction to Akan, major language in Ghana. Basic grammatical structures, vocabulary, emphasis on the spoken language, oral, listening comprehension, language use in specific social settings. Graduate students will have individual projects to submit. Important cultural points like food, clothing, marriage, etc. Videos and Internet resources will be used.

K602 Intermediate Akan II

3 credits. The second part of a two-semester sequence. P: Grade of C or better in LING K601 or equivalent proficiency. Study of more complex grammatical structures, with emphasis on active skills: speaking, writing and reading texts. Attention will be on oral and written composition, reading and listening comprehension, translation from English to Twi and from Twi to English. Description of cultural events shown on Video or CD-ROM.

K702 Advanced Akan II

3 credits. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in LING K701 or equivalent proficiency. Study of complex grammatical structures and of more complex contextual discourse patterns. Advanced readings of traditional and modern literature. Advanced oral and written compositions, advanced reading and listening comprehension and translation of complex texts from English to Twi. The course will be completely oriented to the needs of the students enrolled.

S502 Elementary Swahili II

3 credits. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in LING S501 or equivalent proficiency. Introduction to Swahili, a Bantu language spoken in East Africa, and aspects of Swahili culture. Basic grammatical structures and vocabulary. Emphasis on spoken language-oral and listening comprehension, language use in specific social settings like the market, school, hospital, doctor’s office, among others. Important cultural points like food, clothing, marriage, etc.

S602 Intermediate Swahili II

3 credits. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in LING S601 or equivalent proficiency. This course is the second part of a two-semester course. Study of more complex grammatical structures, emphasis on active skills: speaking, writing, reading texts, oral and written composition, reading, listening comprehension, text translation. Extra project(s).

S702 Advanced Swahili II

3 credits. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in LING S701 or equivalent proficiency. This course is the second part of a two-semester course. Requires permission of instructor. Study of complex grammatical structures, advanced readings of traditional, modern literature. Advanced oral and written compositions, advanced reading and listening comprehension and translation of complex texts from English to Swahili.

Z502 Elementary Zulu II

3 credits. The second part of a two-semester sequence. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in LING Z501 or equivalent proficiency. Basic grammatical structures and vocabulary. Emphasis is on the spoken language—oral and listening comprehension, language use in specific social settings. Videos and internet resources will be used.

Z602 Intermediate Zulu II

3 credits. The second part of a two-semester sequence. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in LING Z601 or equivalent proficiency. Study of more complex grammatical structures, with emphasis on active skills: speaking, writing, and reading texts. Attention will be on oral and written compositions, reading and listening comprehension, and translation of texts. Descriptions of cultural events through the use of videos and the Internet.

Z702 Advanced Zulu II

3 credits. The second part of a two-semester sequence. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in LING Z701 or equivalent proficiency. Study of more complex grammatical structures and of more complex contentual discourse patterns. Advanced readings of traditional and modern literature. Advanced oral written compositions, advanced listening comprehension and translation of complex texts. Use of internet resources. The course will be completely oriented to the needs of the students enrolled.