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Course Descriptions

Spring 2004


Medieval Studies | Central Eurasian Studies | Classical Studies
Comparative Literature | College of Arts & Sciences
Early Music Institute | English | French and Italian
Germanic Studies | History | History of Art
Philosophy | Near Eastern Languages and Cultures
Religious Studies | Spanish & Portuguese


Medieval Studies Courses


M390 Literature by Women in the Middle Ages (3 cr.)

Instructor: R. McGerr
Time: 1:00 pm. - 2:15 pm. MW
Location: BH 148

This course explores the rich and diverse tradition of texts authored by women during the Middle Ages in Europe. We will examine a selection of these texts and address such issues as the position of women in relation to literary, civic, and theological authority; the relationship of literacy and authorship; and the treatment of gender within individual texts. Our primary readings will come from the ninth through fifteenth centuries and from France, Germany, Italy, Spain, the Netherlands, and England. These include secular and spiritual texts from a wide range of genres: lyrics, plays, letters, vision accounts, narrative fictions, and autobiographies. The list of authors includes "saints" and "heretics," members of royal courts and members of the merchant class, mothers and nuns.

Requirements:

Students will take one hour test, write one analytical essay (5-7 pages) on a topic relating to our primary texts, and take a final exam.

This section meets with CMLT C321.

M390 The Knight, the Lady, the Priest, and a few Others (3 cr.)

Instructor: J. Merceron
Time: 11:15 am. - 12:30 pm. TR
Location: WH 006

This course is an introduction to medieval cultures and societies as seen through the lenses of some of their main "actors": the warrior class, women of various social status, the clergy, peasants, as well as others. It will focus on the kinds of activities in which they engaged on a daily basis and on special occasions. These include: training to become a knight, preparing and waging war; marriage and childrearing; care of the estate; pilgrimages and relics; feeding and clothing the body; hunting and tournaments; feasting and banqueting, etc. We will also examine how these figures and activities are portrayed in works of fiction, such as Arthurian narratives, epic poetry, fabliaux, saints' lives, etc. We will work towards an understanding of the conflicting values and models of medieval society, as seen in fictional and historical documents. Although 11th-13th century French society will serve as the main reference, students will have opportunities to investigate and compare the cultures and societies of other Western European countries or regions.

Note: this section meets with FRIT F310.


Cross-Listed Courses

Central Eurasian Studies


U178/U520 Introductory Persian II (4 cr.)

Instructor: S. Daneshgar
Time: 10:10 am. - 11:00 am. D
Location: LI 1051

This is a continuation of the first semester of Introductory Persian I. We will work to develop greater fluency in pronunciation, reading and writing, as we continue our study of basic sentence structure.  We will aim for a working vocabulary of 500 words and begin to study compound verbs and other idiomatic expressions.

Required texts:

Windfuhr, Gernot and Bostanbakhsh, Shapour. Modern Persian: Intermediate Level I
Thackston, Wheeler M. An Introduction to Persian.
Aryanpur Kashani, Abbas and Manoochehr. The Combined New Persian-English and English-Persian Dictionary

U278/U520 Intermediate Persian II (3 cr.)

Instructor: S. Daneshgar
Time: 11:15 am. - 12:05 pm. MWF
Location: GB 333

This course is a continuation of Intermediate Persian 1. In this class, we will concentrate on the mastery of complex grammatical structures and vocabulary acquisition. Although the main emphasis will be on reading and writing skills, we will also devote time to gaining fluency in modern colloquial pronunciation (Tehran dialect). We will study texts in various styles of increasing complexity, drawn from both Windfuhr's and Thackston’s textbooks and from modern Iranian publications and authentic materials. In addition, we will also make use of internet resources to improve our knowledge of Modern Persian.

Required texts:

Windfuhr, Gernot and Bostanbakhsh, Shapour. Modern Persian: Intermediate Level I
Thackston, Wheeler M. An Introduction to Persian.
Aryanpur Kashani, Abbas and Manoochehr. The Combined New Persian-English and English-Persian Dictionary
Paul Losensky.  Intermediate Persian Readings.

U299/U577 Research in Classical Persian Texts (3 cr.)

Instructor: P. Losensky
Time: AR
Location: GB 207

A wealth of historical, literary, and religious writings gives the classical Persian tradition its distinguished place in the record of human thought and culture. In this course, students examine certain aspects of that rich legacy. Students will learn to recognize the grammatical and lexical differences that distinguish classical Persian from its modern counterpart, and will be introduced to some basic research tools and reference works. Readings this semester will be chosen by the instructor from the textbooks to reflect the range of classical Persian texts. Completion of intermediate Persian, its equivalent, or special permission of the instructor is a prerequisite.

Textbooks:

W. M. Thackston, An Introduction to Persian, rev. 3d ed. (Bethesda, Maryland: Iranbooks, 1993).
W. M. Thackston, A Millennium of Persian Poetry, (Bethesda, Maryland: Iranbooks, 1994).

U320/U520 State and Society in the Ottoman Empire: A Structural Approach to Ottoman History (3 cr.)

Instructor: G. Bayerle
Time: 2:30 pm. - 5:00 pm. R
Location: BH 228

Ottoman history can be conventionally presented as a story, a narrative structured chronologically; or in an anthropomorphic frame as the rise, expansion, culmination, and decline of the Ottoman Empire. Instead of the traditional approach this proseminar will offer a survey of the Ottoman Empire as a civilization reconstructed by the human mind as an abstract model -- its institutions as nodal structural points related and interacting with each other.

In the survey special attention will be given to the evolution of sultanic authority; the Topkapi Palace as his residence and seat of government; the Grand Vezir and his Imperial Council; the Harem; slavery; the armed forces; and the role of the sheyhülislam in legal theory and practice. The second half of the proseminar will focus on aspects of everyday life in the Empire: Islamic institutions; the coexistence of Islam, Christianity, and Judaism; the guilds controlling both preindustrial production and distribution; and the timar system that encompassed the rural regions.

EXAMS: In place of exams undergraduate students are expected to compose seven short (five to eight pages) position papers or book reports during the course and to participate in the discussion of the essays of their fellow students. Graduate students should expand one of these position papers to a term paper.

Recommended Reading:

i. Gustav Bayerle. Pashas, Begs, and Effendis: A Historical Dictionary of Titles and Terms on the Ottoman Empire. Istanbul: Isis, 1997.
ii. A xeroxed collection of articles available at the departmental office in Goodbody Hall.
iii. Books on open reserve at the I.U. library for book reports.

U320/520 Mongolia's Middle Ages (3 cr.)

Instructor: C. Atwood
Time: 1:25 pm. - 2:15 pm. MWF
Location: WH 108

Asked about Mongolia, the average person knows only about the world empire built by Genghis Khan. Recent visitors to Mongolia hear about the 1990 democratic transition, how the previous Communist regime had been installed by the Red Army in 1921, and how the Buddhist clergy which had ruled the country after independence from China in 1911 was destroyed in the 1930s. But what happened in between the fall of the Mongol empire in 1368 and the restoration of Mongolian independence in 1911? This class "fills in the gaps" in the common knowledge of Mongolia.

In fact traditional Mongolia was made in these "Middle Ages." The "Second Conversion" to Buddhism after 1575, the aristocratic society established under Batu-Möngke Dayan Khan (c. 1480-1518), and Manchu-Chinese rule in Mongolia formed the ancien regime against which twentieth-century revolutionaries revolted. Likewise, Buriats and Kalmyks were profoundly transformed by Russian rule from 1605 to 1771. Mongolia’s traditions of epics, oral poetry, and folk tales assumed their modern form from the sixteenth to eighteenth centuries. The great Oirat confederacies, first of Esen who captured the Chinese emperor in 1449, and then of the seventeenth-eighteenth century Zunghars, Kalmyks, and the Upper Mongols, first rose to dominate Inner Asia from Tibet to Crimea but then were virtually destroyed by foreign attacks and insurrections of their former Kazakh and Tibetan subjects. Mongolia’s Middle Ages treats all of these topics and more in a combination of lecture and discussion.

Classical Studies


L100 Elementary Latin I (4 cr.)

Instructor: Staff
Times and Locations: 10:10 am. - 11:00 am. MTWR BH 345
11:15 am. - 12:05 pm. MTWR BH 246
1:25 pm. - 2:15 pm. MTWR BH 139

Introduction to the fundamentals of classical Latin. Forms, syntax, and the nature of the language are emphasized in the first term, by the end of the second term students read selections from classical authors. There will be four tests, weekly quizzes, and written assignments which will be evaluated daily.

L150 Elementary Latin II (4 cr.)

Instructor: Staff
Times and Locations: 10:10 am. - 11:00 am. MTWR BH 149
11:15 am. - 12:05 pm. MTWR BH 319
4:40 pm. - 5:30 pm. MTWR BH 214

description forthcoming

L200 Second-Year Latin I (3 cr.)

Instructor: Staff
Times and Locations: 9:05 am. - 9:55 am. MWF BH 209
12:20 pm. - 1:10 pm. MWF BH 138

Reading from selected authors, emphasizing the variety of Latin prose. Examination of the concept of genre. Grammar review or prose composition.

Credit not given for both L200 and L400.

Prerequisite: L103, L150 or placement.

L250 Second-Year Latin II (3 cr.)

Instructor: Staff
Times and Locations: 9:05 am. - 9:55 am. MWF SW 103
2:30 pm. - 3:20 pm. MWF BH 221

Reading from Vergil's Aeneid with examination of the epic as a whole. Prosody of dactylic hexameter and study of poetic devices. Grammar review. Credit not given for both L250 and L400.

Prerequisite: L200 or placement.

College of Arts and Sciences


E103 Sacred Places (3 cr.)

Instructor: D. Deliyannis
Lecture: 4:40 pm. - 5:30 pm. MW FA 102
Discussion: 10:10 am. - 11:00 am. F FA 005
11:15 am. - 12:05 pm. F FA 005
12:20 pm. - 1:10 pm. F FA 010

This is both an interdisciplinary course treating architecture and religion and a multi-cultural course covering paganism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, and Hinduism. The course will investigate a representative sample of sacred sites and shrines of these faiths, with a focus on architecture. It will examine why these places became holy to certain religions, what the concept of "sacred" or "holy" meant to them, how the human and divine commingled, why the peoples of these faiths built shrines at given localities, how the shrines were designed to accommodate the faithful, how it is that some of the sites actually served or continue to serve different religions simultaneously, whether the original purposes and rituals marking these sites have changed over time, and how architectural forms were made to follow function. Slides and some clips from films will be shown, and there will be readings. Assignments include quizzes, short papers, group reports, and a written examination.

E103 Vikings and Sagas (3 cr.)

Instructor: K. Gade
Lecture: 1:25 pm. - 2:15 pm. MW JH A100
Discussion: 9:05 am. - 9:55 am. R BH 214
10:10 am. - 11:00 am. F BH 018
1:25 pm. - 2:15 pm. F BH 135

Vikings and Sagas is a course designed as an introduction to Old Norse history, culture, and literature, focusing on the Viking period (ca. 793-1066). In the course of the semester, we shall explore the nature and expansion of Viking activities during that period (e.g., on the Continent, in the Mediterranean, in the British Isles, Ireland, Greenland, North America, as well as within Scandinavia itself) and examine the validity of the source- material (archaeological evidence, place names, written records [annals, medieval histories]) and the different theories formulated to explain the onset of the Viking Age. The discussion of the cultural aspects will deal with such issues as law and legal systems, pagan religion, the conversion to Christianity, social customs, etc.

During the course we shall read three sagas that not only will serve as an introduction to Old Norse literature (prose and poetry), but also bring first-hand information about the socio-historical aspects of the Viking Age. The sagas have been chosen for their literary qualities and because they create a natural progression, both geographically and chronologically. These sagas will also provide the background for a broader discussion of Norse literature and the problems involved in using literature as historical sources. The pertinent sections in Roesdahl's The Vikings will be read in conjunction with the lectures and the sagas.

A series of 10 videotapes (BBC's The Vikings) has been incorporated into the courses and will be shown with regular intervals (approximately every 2 weeks). The grade will be based on two shorter position papers and a final, longer paper (7-10 pp.). Required Readings: The Vikings, Else Roesdahl; The Saga of the Jornsvikings, tr. Lee M. Hollander; Egill's Saga, tr. Hermann Palsson and Paul Edwards; The Vinland Sagas, tr. Magnus Magnusson and Hermann Palsson; King Harald's Saga, tr. Magnus Magnusson and Hermann Palsson.

S103 Monks, Nuns, and Medieval Art (3 cr.)

Instructor: D. Reilly
Time: 11:15 am. - 12:30 pm. TR
Location: FA 010

Since the foundation of the Christian Church, when men and women first sought to live apart from popular society and devote their lives entirely to religion, monks and nuns have influenced heavily the development of Medieval art and architecture. Early monks and nuns lived as hermits in the mountains, forests and deserts. From the second or third centuries C.E., however, they gathered together to live communally in organized monasteries. Like their predecessors, the hermits, these later monks and nuns claimed to live in abject poverty, but although they owned no personal possessions, they often lived in communal splendor inside wealthy and well-decorated houses. Supplied with lavish churches, gleaming metalwork, sumptuous tapestries and vestments and colorful manuscripts, monasteries became the treasure houses of Europe and the targets of condemnation, arson, and looting.

This course will explore the phenomenon of Christian monasticism from its earliest beginnings immediately after the death of Jesus through the modern era, concentrating especially on the pinnacle of the monasticism, the Middle Ages. We will read monastic rules in translation to understand the lifestyle of the monks and nuns, examine their artworks, including manuscripts in the Lilly Library and objects in the Indiana University Art Museum. We will investigate the legacy of their art and architecture, and visit monasteries in Indiana, including the Tibetan Cultural Center, in order to understand parallel, non-Christian traditions.

E104 Occult in Western Civilization (3 cr.)

Instructor: W. Newman
Lecture: 2:30 pm. - 3:20 pm. MW CH 033
Discussion: 10:10 - 11:00 am. F BH 219
10:10 - 11:00 am. F BH 232
11:15 am. - 12:05 pm. F BH 246
11:15 am. - 12:05 pm. F BH 305

Since the foundation of the Christian Church, when men and women first sought to live apart from popular society and devote their lives entirely to religion, monks and nuns have influenced heavily the development of Medieval art and architecture. Early monks and nuns lived as hermits in the mountains, forests and deserts. From the second or third centuries C.E., however, they gathered together to live communally in organized monasteries. Like their predecessors, the hermits, these later monks and nuns claimed to live in abject poverty, but although they owned no personal possessions, they often lived in communal splendor inside wealthy and well-decorated houses. Supplied with lavish churches, gleaming metalwork, sumptuous tapestries and vestments and colorful manuscripts, monasteries became the treasure houses of Europe and the targets of condemnation, arson, and looting.

This course will explore the phenomenon of Christian monasticism from its earliest beginnings immediately after the death of Jesus through the modern era, concentrating especially on the pinnacle of the monasticism, the Middle Ages. We will read monastic rules in translation to understand the lifestyle of the monks and nuns, examine their artworks, including manuscripts in the Lilly Library and objects in the Indiana University Art Museum. We will investigate the legacy of their art and architecture, and visit monasteries in Indiana, including the Tibetan Cultural Center, in order to understand parallel, non-Christian traditions.

Comparative Literature


C417/C611 Medieval Narrative (3 cr.)

Instructor: R. McGerr
Time: 1:00 pm. - 2:15 pm. TR
Location: BH 345

Stories about King Arthur and his court represent one of the richest traditions in Western literature, one that crosses boundaries of historical period, language, literary genre, and artistic medium. Though we may read Arthurian narratives without understanding the mythological, literary, and political forces that shaped them, our appreciation of these works deepens when we recognize the threads they borrow from the past and weave into new texts that address new issues.

This course will trace the development of Arthurian literature from its Celtic roots through its development in medieval European literatures and its reappearance in later literatures and films. Readings for the course will be in modern English and will include Welsh tales such as "Branwyn, Daughter of Lyr" and "How Culhwch Won Olwen," selections from Geoffrey of Monmouth's History of the Kings of Britain, Chrétien de Troyes' Knight of the Cart, Wolfram von Eschenbach's Parzival, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Sir Thomas Malory's Morte D'Arthur, selections from Tennyson's Idylls of the King, and Part I of White's Once and Future King. In addition, we will discuss the ways in which three modern films adapt Arthurian traditions to their own uses: Excalibur, Monty Python and the Holy Grail, and The Fisher King.

Written requirements:

Students in C417: one critical essay (6-8 pages) comparing aspects of two Arthurian texts (at least one of which should come from the Middle Ages), one hour test, and a final exam.

Students in C611: the hour test, one review of a recent critical essay on one of our readings (2-3 pages); a research paper (20-25 pages, including notes and bibliography) comparing aspects of two Arthurian texts (at least one of which should come from the Middle Ages); and a proposal for the research paper (2-3 pages, including tentative bibliography).

Early Music Institute


M435/M635 Performance Practicum Before 1750 (3 cr.)

Instructor: W. Gillespie
Time: 12:45 pm. - 2:15 pm. MW
Location: MU 205

description forthcoming

M518 Renaissance Lit. & Performance Practicum (3 cr.)

Instructor: W. Gillespie
Time: 9:05 am. - 10:35 am. MW
Location: MU 205

description forthcoming


English


Literatures in English to 1600 (3 cr.)

Instructor: K. Lochrie
Lecture: 1:25 pm. - 2:15 pm. MW WH 004
Discussion: 9:05 am. - 9:55 am. F BH 006
10:10 am. - 11:00 am. F BH 335
11:15 am. - 12:05 pm. F BH 018
8:00 am. - 8:50 am. F BH 138

Open to majors only. Declared minors obtain authorization from BH442.

This course is an introduction to major works of English literature from the beginnings of English culture to 1600. The focus of the course will be on cultural contact, including the ways in which the evolving English culture imagined itself in relation to the Other, its concepts of community and nation, and its attitudes towards the foreign. We will read a variety of texts from Beowulf to Chaucer's Canterbury Tales to Spenser's Faerie Queene, raising questions about the literary canon, concepts of literary influence and poetic genres, and the way the "medieval" is imagined in relation to the modern. The course will include two papers, a midterm, and a final exam.

L306 Medieval Women Writers (3 cr.)

Instructor: K. Lochrie
Time: 11:15 am. -12:05 pm. MWF
Location: WH 104

"If women had written stories," Chaucer's Wife of Bath laments, they could have exposed the evils of men, but what she did not know is that medieval women were writing and that they were far too busy to worry about the men. From nuns to mystics, to housewives to professional writers, there is a literary heritage to be found in the texts of medieval women spanning seven centuries. This course will introduce students to some of these women writers and to those gender constructs that framed the representations of women. Among the writers we will read are Marie de France, Christine de Pizan, Margery Kempe, Julian of Norwich, Joan of Arc, and Heloise. We will ask in the spirit of Michel Foucault, "What is a medieval author?" Other points of inquiry will be the engagement of women writers with religious and cultural conflicts of their time and with the masculine tradition of letters and authority within which they wrote. Course requirements will include a midterm and final and two papers.

L399 Allegory and Metaphor: Interpreting Texts and Making Meaning (3 cr.)

Instructor: J. Anderson
Time: 2:30 pm. - 3:45 pm. TR
Location: BH 137

For some theoretical readers of literature, all meaning is allegorical or metaphorical; for others, metaphor and allegory (a special kind of metaphor) are only a certain kind of meaning. What I'd like to do is to look at some of these ideas about meaning and at texts that test and modify them. My list is still tentative (and you are welcome to lobby for readings in my office hours this fall), but I'm thinking of Spenser, Shakespeare, Swift or Pope, Shaw, Ionesco or Beckett (twentieth-century absurdist drama), and probably our contemporary, Paul Auster. Short stories by Hawthorne, James, and Joyce are also a possibility, as is even a tale by Chaucer. Both in theory and in practice, the subject of this seminar is everywhere, and it might even be what defines us as civilized human beings.

L613/L713 Middle English Literature (4 cr.)

Instructor: P. Ingham
Time: 2:30 - 4:00 pm. TR
Location: WH 118

In his recent groundbreaking analysis of the colonial legacies and multicultural relations at the heart of the medieval making of Europe, Robert Bartlett argues that medieval categories of race and ethnicity were largely conceived in cultural, rather than biological, terms. He writes, while the language of race gens, natio, blood, stock, etc. is biological, its medieval reality was almost entirely cultural (197). There is a good deal of evidence -- much of which Bartlett himself supplies to support such a claim; medieval accounts of ethnic difference repeatedly emphasize the cultural practices of language, law, and custom, and not the physiological terms found in accounts of the nineteenth century. And cultural attributes, as Bartlett reminds us, are subject to change: [Customs, language and law] share a common characteristic: all three are malleable (197). We must be careful, however, not to exaggerate what such a distinction, and the malleability it implies, must have meant during the Middle Ages. Evidence culled from medieval descriptions of ethnic others does not necessarily suggest that the malleability of language, law, and custom provided for greater ease or tolerance about medieval boundaries between peoples.

Texts of medieval romance display a persistent interest in such boundaries. And they frequently elaborate identity as malleable, as for example in the transfiguration of the exotic Green Knight into the modest Sir Bertilak. As a genre interested in magical transformations, medieval romance has recently been linked to horrifyingly racist fantasies associated with the period of Crusade. This course will examine a range of Middle English romances from the 13th and 14th centuries so as to reconsider medieval scholarship of race and romance. Some of the questions we will pursue are as follows: What complicationsCeven contradictionsCemerge in medieval discourses of race and ethnicity? How does Romance encode, resolve, or otherwise manage those contradictions? How does the mix of race with gender complicate the question of ethnic malleability? Is medieval romance entirely invested in reactionary cultural politics, or can its magical transformations resonate with revolutionary hopes for the world as well?

Our primary texts will be a variety of Middle English Romances, and may include Floris and Blanchefleur, The Sultan of Babylon, The Siege of Jerusalem, the Wars of Alexander, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, The Turke and Sir Gawain, Richard Coeur de Lion, Chaucer’s The Man of Law’s Tale, the Alliterative Morte Arthure. Alongside our romance texts, we will read widely in contemporary criticism on race and on romance, as well as in postcolonial, gender, and psychoanalytic theory. The requirements for the course are as follows: students enrolled at the 600 level will be required to produce 1) a seminar presentation directing us to some interpretive issues raised by a given primary text, by way of a brief review of some recent literary criticism on it, OR some theoretical engagements with it; 2) a 10 page conference-style paper offering a critical interpretation of a primary text of medieval romance in light of issues raised by the course. Students enrolled at the 700-level will produce: 1) (by week 6) a prospectus for a research project engaging with issues raised by the course, 2) a seminar presentation concerning the cultural/material circumstances pertinent to their chosen text and topic, all of which will lead to 3) a 25-page research paper. Vigorous participation in seminar discussions (some may be on-line) is required by all. The course will meet with L713 Middle English Literature.

L711 Old English Literature

Instructor: R. Fulk
Time: 4:40 pm. - 7:40 pm. R
Location: BH 209

A reading knowledge of Old English is required, and so a prerequisite is G601 or an equivalent elementary Old English course. A good part of the semester will be devoted to intensive study of the Exeter Book, both the shorter lyrics and the longer narrative poems. We will also study a few poems from other sources, and also some prose selections, with the aim of illustrating the wide variety of textual types in Old English. In the earlier portion of the course there will be some attention to honing competence in the language of poetry, as most of those enrolled will not have taken L710 (Beowulf). Over the course of the semester we will devote individual class periods to exploring major critical issues, with a particular focus on those relevant to textual editing, but also, for example, the identification of genres, research in sources and analogues, authorship and date, metrics, theories of composition, stylistics, historical and comparative approaches, and the history of OE scholarship (historical, aesthetic, formalist, exegetical, poststructuralist). If the class size permits, each member will present a report on her/his research at the end of the semester. Since time will be limited, I'd like to make good use of every class session, and so members of the seminar should come to the first session prepared to translate and discuss Azarias in the Exeter Book.

Texts:

Krapp, G. P., and E. Van K. Dobbie, edd., The Exeter Book (Columbia Univ. Press).
Clark Hall, John R., A Concise Anglo-Saxon Dictionary, 4th ed. (Univ. of Toronto Press).

French and Italian


F502 Medieval French Literature 2 (3 cr.)

Instructor: E. Mickel
Time: 9:05 am. - 11:00 am. TR
Location: BH 016

In F502 students read a number of Old French texts representing different types of literature in the 12th and 13th centuries: Vie de saint Alexis, Jue d'Adam, Erec et Enide, Lancelot, Conqueste de Constantinople, selections of poetry, Roman de la Rose of Guillaume de Lorris, etc. Half the class is devoted to discussion of the text being read. The other half of the class is given to lecture and discussion of historical, theoretical, aesthetic, and literary issues pertaining to the genres and literature of the period. Students are asked to write a term paper (15-25 pages) and to take a comprehensive final examination.

M502 Dante II (3 cr.)

Instructor: W. Storey
Time: 3:35 pm. - 5:30 pm. T
Location: BH 236

Seminar on the cultural orientation, production and reception of Dante’s later works, produced mostly in exile in Verona, from the Monarchia and the political Epistolae to the Purgatorio, Paradiso and the Quaestio de aqua et terra. Topics include the traditions and experience of exile and patronage, Dante’s political ethics, the textual traditions of the Commedia, Dante’s changing notions of audience and language, then current debates in which Dante participated, and the poet’s concept of worldly and philosophical mission.

Note: This course will be taught in Italian

Germanic Studies


G636: Old Icelandic (3 cr.)

Instructor: K. Gade
Time: 4:00 pm. - 5:15 pm. MW
Location: BH 148

Medieval Icelandic poetic and prose literary texts: history of the literature. During the semester, we will focus on sagas and smaller stories that will be read/translated in class (including the accompanying skaldic and eddic stanzas). Special attention will be paid to linguistic peculiarities. The course will also contain an overview of the history of Old Norse literary scholarship in general. There will be no exams, but a final paper is required (topics to be discussed). Students will be expected to give oral presentations on the secondary sources on the reading list.

Prerequisite: G635 or the equivalent.

Book: Zoega, Geir. A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic. Oxford: Clarendon, 1910. Rpt. 1975.

History


B352 West Europe-High/Late Middle Age (3 cr.)

Instructor: L. Shopkow
Time: 2:30 pm. - 3:45 pm. TR
Location: MY 130

When this course begins, about 1100, western European society had just discovered the world outside its borders, which contained competitors that were certainly its economic and cultural equals, and in some ways were more developed. Contacts with this world were carried out alternately through peaceful means--trade and intellectual exchange--as well as violent means--war and crusade. At the end of the period, western Europe, no longer rural, but now an urbanized, economically complex, culturally sophisticated and highly politically organized society, had colonized much of eastern Europe, was facing a new challenge from the Ottoman Turks, and was beginning to move beyond its own boundaries. By 1500 it is possible to see the first contours of a world system dominated by Europe.

In this course we will examine both Europe's internal development between 1100 and roughly 1450 and its relations with its neighbors. The emphasis will be on western European developments, but we will talk about political, social, and economic developments within the Islamic world and the Byzantine Empire.

Format and goals: The class will be mostly lecture. However, we will take time in class to discuss readings or to practice working with primary sources. While one goal of the course is for you to become familiar with the history of the period, another is for you to develop your ability to read and interpret primary sources and to practice writing.

Requirements: two open-book term exams, a series of short (1-2 pp) paper, a source criticism paper (ca. 2500-3500 words), three map quizzes and an open-book final examination. H206, B351, or a knowledge of the early middle ages is strongly recommended, but not required.

C300 Three Cultures in the Medieval Mediterranean: Interactions between Muslims, Christians, and Jews (3 cr.)

Instructor: M. Lehmann
Time: 9:30 am. - 10:45 am. TR
Location: JH A100

The course will explore the relationships between the three major religions in the medieval Mediterranean, Muslims, Christians, and Jews. The course will focus on the cultural interaction between the different religions and will follow a broadly chronological outline, beginning with the position of the Arab tribes in the later Roman period and ending with the Ottoman conquest of the Near East. Particular attention will be paid to the Roman-Sassanian conflict and the pre-Islamic Arab world; the effect the Islamic conquest of the Near East upon Christian and Jewish populations; the Abbasid caliphate and its efforts to draw upon Jewish, Christian, and pagan expertise to create a new court culture; religious diversity, cooperation, and conflict in medieval Spain; the Crusades from Western, Byzantine, Muslim, and Jewish perspectives; and finally, the emergence of the Ottoman Empire. Grades will be based on a midterm and a final exam, two short papers, and class participation.

C393 State and Society in the Ottoman Empire: A Structural Approach to Ottoman History (3 cr.)

Instructor: G. Bayerle
Time: 2:30 pm. - 5:00 pm. R
Location: BH 228

Ottoman history can be conventionally presented as a story, a narrative structured chronologically; or in an anthropomorphic frame as the rise, expansion, culmination, and decline of the Ottoman Empire. Instead of the traditional approach this proseminar will offer a survey of the Ottoman Empire as a civilization reconstructed by the human mind as an abstract model -- its institutions as nodal structural points related and interacting with each other.

In the survey special attention will be given to the evolution of sultanic authority; the Topkapi Palace as his residence and seat of government; the Grand Vezir and his Imperial Council; the Harem; slavery; the armed forces; and the role of the sheyhülislam in legal theory and practice. The second half of the proseminar will focus on aspects of everyday life in the Empire: Islamic institutions; the coexistence of Islam, Christianity, and Judaism; the guilds controlling both preindustrial production and distribution; and the timar system that encompassed the rural regions.

EXAMS: In place of exams undergraduate students are expected to compose seven short (five to eight pages) position papers or book reports during the course and to participate in the discussion of the essays of their fellow students. Graduate students should expand one of these position papers to a term paper.

Recommended Reading:

i. Gustav Bayerle. Pashas, Begs, and Effendis: A Historical Dictionary of Titles and Terms on the Ottoman Empire. Istanbul: Isis, 1997.
ii. A xeroxed collection of articles available at the departmental office in Goodbody Hall.
iii. Books on open reserve at the I.U. library for book reports.

H206 Medieval Civilization (3 cr.)

Instructor: D. Deliyannis
Time: 4:00 pm. - 5:15 pm. TR
Location: BH 109

Above section carries culture studies credit.

What do we mean by "Medieval Civilization"? The European "Middle Ages" is a concept developed by scholars in the Renaissance and later to describe the historical period from the fall of the Roman empire to the "rediscovery" of classical thought and art in the fifteenth century. Chronologically, the Middle Ages spans more than a thousand years (from approximately 400 to 1500 AD), and covers the many different political, cultural, and ethnic communities of Europe. There was not one medieval civilization, but many medieval civilizations, related in some ways to each other, but distinct and constantly changing. This class will be an introduction to the history of the Middle Ages through its culture and ways of life.

Because the period to be covered is so vast, we will focus our attention on six moments in time and space that are representative of some of the communities of the Middle Ages. We will look at villages and cathedral towns, monasteries and manor houses, and for each, we will consider who lived in the community, what activities they took part in, what the community looked like physically, and what aspects of medieval life, politics, and culture are represented there.

Assignments: five short (2-3 page) papers, midterm, final exam.

H252 Jewish History: Crusades to Present (3 CR)

Instructor: M. Lehmann
Time: 4:00 pm. - 5:15 pm. TR
Location: BH 310

Above section carries culture studies credit

This course will present a survey of Jewish history from the Middle Ages to the twentieth century. The course will examine the relations between Jews and non-Jews and the maintenance and development of a Jewish identity in changing historical contexts. We will see how the traditional medieval order gave way to a new order in the early modern and modern periods, and we will examine how Jews responded to the new challenges. Topics will include Jewish-Christian relations in medieval and modern times, emancipation and Jewish responses to emancipation, assimilation, antisemitism, the Holocaust and the establishment of the modern State of Israel. Grades will be based on two quizzes, a final exam, and two brief papers.

H333 Epidemics in History (3 cr.)

Instructor: A. Carmichael
Time: 9:30 am. - 10:45 am. TR
Location: SE 105

This course introduces students to the historical study of infectious diseases. We survey the conditions of human health and disease in the past, and we examine the social and behavioral responses from human societies with epidemics. A good background in either history or the life sciences is necessary, because the readings are not at a simplified, introductory level. Student grading is based on performance and in objective quizzes and essay examinations.

H705/H780 (3 cr.) From Biography to Hagiography: Virtue Through Texts

Instructor: E. Watts
Time: 4:00 pm. - 6:00 pm. R
Location: BH 141

From Biography to Hagiography: Virtue through Texts will look at the presentation of virtue in biographic literature and the ways in which the evolving religious and cultural attitudes of the later Roman world changed the literary presentation of exemplary individuals. Students will handle a chronological range of materials (in translation) that begin with third century texts and end examples from the later fifth/early sixth century. Although each will work from the same basic organizational template, these texts will emphasize a diverse set of characteristics in their descriptions of ideal rhetoricians, philosophers, and Christian ascetics. Among the other themes the course will explore are: 1) the sources used by ancient biographers (with particular attention being paid to the role of oral materials in the texts); 2) the nature of the individual in biographic literature (with emphasis upon the question of how much change an ideal character is permitted to undergo in various biographic traditions); and 3) the manner in which external indications of virtue in one biographic tradition (like the ability to speak freely to emperors or resolve local disputes) impact other such traditions.

This course is by its nature interdisciplinary and is designed to take advantage of the diverse skills of cultural historians, classicists, medievalists, scholars of religion, scholars of literature, and philosophers to produce a nuanced understanding of these often underappreciated documents. For this reason, all interested graduate students are welcome and are encouraged to use the course as an opportunity to examine themes related to their own interests in a new historical or literary context.

History of Art


A101 Ancient and Medieval Art (3 cr.)

Instructor: D. Delyannis
Lecture: 1:25 pm. - 2:15 pm. TR FA 102
Discussion: 10:10 am. - 11:00 am. F FA 010
11:15 am. - 12:05 pm. F FA 010
12:20 pm. - 1:10 pm. F FA 005

The format of this course consists of two 50 minute lectures and one 50 minute discussion section per week. During the semester we will examine significant monuments and art objects dating from around 4000 B.C. to 1400 A.D. The primary objective of the course is to understand the civilizations of the important periods of antiquity and the Middle Ages by means of an examination of their visual material remains. For example, we will learn what the pyramids and colossal sphinx tell us about ancient Egyptian civilization, what the Acropolis and Parthenon of Athens tell us about the Greek civilization, and what Gothic cathedrals with their sculptures and stained glass windows tell us about the late Middle Ages and Christianity. We will be taking a look not only at actual works of art but also archaeology, religions, society, and literature and other salient remains of culture.

There is one paperback textbook for this course. Understanding the material will be enhanced through the availability of a digitized color image project available on the campus web or by local home computers. Course requirements include three 50 minute examinations, three 50 minute examinations, three quizzes and a grade in discussion section based on attendance, participation, and short quizzes.

A321 Early Medieval Art (3 cr.)

Instructor: E. Kleinbauer
Time: 11:15 am. - 12:30 pm. TR
Location: FA 102

This undergraduate course, which has no prerequisites, examines the various arts of western Europe after the fall of the Roman Empire - from the 5th Century to the 10th Century, from St. Patrick and the Vikings to the successors of Charlemagne. The buildings, stone sculpture, wall paintings, mosaics, illuminated manuscripts, metalwork, and ivory carvings of this period will be examined in the frame of a general historical and cultural context. One short paper, two exams, and a final.

This course fulfills both the Social and Historical and the Culture Studies requirement (list A) of the College.

A323 Illuminated Manuscripts in the Middle Ages: Form, Function, and Audience (3 cr.)

Instructor: D. Reilly
Time: 2:30 pm. - 3:45 pm. TR
Location: FA 010

From the fourth century A.D., artists created elaborate decorations and illustrations in manuscripts of sacred and secular texts. Meant to delight as well as instruct, these illustrations commented on the text at the same time that they enchanted the reader with visions and stories from the book itself. Starting with the invention of the codex in the first century, and continuing to the end of the Middle Ages, this course will investigate the tools, methods and inspiration behind the creation of the medieval manuscript. Lectures will survey the most important types of manuscripts, such as Psalters, Apocalypses and Books of Hours, and the most famous schools of manuscript illumination, such as the Hiberno-Saxon artists who produced works like the Book of Kells. The preferred audience of the manuscripts, from the embattled mozarabic Christians of Spain, to noble women of the later Middle Ages, will also be investigated.

A500 Historiography of Western Art (3 cr.)

Instructor: E. Kleinbauer
Time: 11:00 am. - 1:00 pm. R
Location: FA 007

Enrollment is open to only graduate students in art history and is limited. By action of the art history faculty in 1998, this course counts no longer as a seminar but as a graduate lecture course and represents an independent field of inquiry (historiography).

This course will examine the methods and assumptions of Western art history in the period from the Italian Renaissance to the current day. The range of approaches to the discipline is not unified or monolithic but quite varied, complicated, and even highly contradictory. It rests on the foundations of the discipline in the writings of Vasari, Winckelmann, and Hegel, and extends to the connoisseurship of Morelli and Berenson, the cultural history of Burckhardt, the formalism of Wölfflin, the Vienna School of Riegl and Max Dvorák, iconography and iconology; Freud and psychoanalysis: Jungian psychology, Marxist art history, the social history of art, semiotics, structuralism, post-structuralism, deconstruction, and feminism. The members of this course will read primary texts or actual examples of these points of view rather than commentaries about them.

Near Eastern Languages and Cultures


A100/A550 Elementary Arabic II (4 cr./2 cr.)

Instructor: Staff
Times and Locations: 5:30 pm. - 6:40 pm. MTWR BH 344
9:05 am. - 9:55 am. D BH 316
10:10 am. - 11:00 am. D BH 011
11:15 am. - 12:05 pm. D SY 022

This course is a continuation of A100. Using a communicative/proficiency oriented approach, we will speak, read, and write in Modern Standard Arabic. The course is designed for students who have completed one semester of Modern Standard Arabic.

Required Texts:

Brustad, Kristen, et al. Alif Baa: Introduction to Arabic Letters and Sounds.
Brustad, Kristen, et al. Al-Kitaab: A Textbook for Beginning Arabic, Part One.

Recommended Dictionary:

Wehr, Hans. A Dictionary of Modern Standard Arabic, ed. Milton Cowan (any edition).

N182/N552 Qur'anic Arabic II (5 cr./3 cr.)

Instructor: Z. Istrabadi
Time: 8:00 am. - 9:15 am. MTWR
Location: BH 221

An intensive introduction to Classical Arabic with an emphasis on the Qur’anic text and related Arab-Islamic source materials, such as Qur’anic commentary, the biography of the Prophet (Sirah), and the Traditions of the Prophet (Hadith). It aims to provide students in classical and medieval Islamic fields with the ability to accurately read and translate classical texts through a foundation in syntax and morphology. The course is intended for committed undergraduates who are prepared to undertake a rigorous fast-paced classical language course and for graduate students who want to master reading skills in Arabic for research in classical Arabic texts. The course is particularly suited to NELC graduate students beginning Arabic, and for graduate students in other Islamic of Middle Eastern languages and cultures (Hebrew, Persian, Turkish, Urdu, Swahili), and graduate students in the humanities (history, medieval studies, philosophy, history of religions).

A250/650 Intermediate Arabic II (3 cr.)

Instructor: B. Kaldhi
Times and Locations: 11:15 am. - 12:30 pm. TR KH 200
11:15 am. - 12:30 pm. F KH 200

Intermediate Arabic II is a continuation of A200/600. It will focus on the mastery of grammar, including more complex structures, acquisition and expansion of vocabulary, and the development of reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. These objectives are achieved through intensive oral/aural practice using audio and video materials. In addition to working on all language skills, special attention will be given to the morphology and syntax of Arabic. Classes will be conducted in Arabic as much as possible.

Required texts:
Brustad, K., al-Batal, M., and al-Tonsi, A.: Al-Kitaab fii Ta’allum al-‘Arabiyya, Part I & II
Cowan, David. Modern Literary Arabic
Wehr, Hans. A Dictionary of Modern Standard Arabic, ed. Milton Cowan (any edition).

N205/N701 Byzantine Women (3 cr.)

Instructor: M. Vinson
Time: 9:00 am. - 11:00 am. TR
Location: KH 203

In this course we will use translated texts by and about women to explore issues relating to the construction of gender in Byzantium. The sources we will study range from the age of Justinian to the fourteenth century and will include representative works of historiography, hagiography, and hymnography. Because Byzantine literature was deeply dependent on the classical tradition, we will begin our survey with a brief overview of representations of women in Greco-Roman antiquity. This background will help us to contextualize the literary portraits of women such as Theodora, the wife of the emperor Justinian, whose slanderous characterization in Procopius' Secret History relies on the same laundry list of female misconduct found in such authors as Juvenal and Suetonius. Althouh in many ways the "bad girls" of Byzantium are the most interesting, we will also devote our attention to more positive examples such as female saints, to see how the ideal of feminine behavior changed or evolved over time. Although our focus will be on women, the case of Matrona, a transvestite saint who entered religious life disguised as a eunuch, illustrates the need to include men and the "third gender" as well. The object of this course is to provide the student with a deeper understanding of both the reality and perceptions of the gender roles available to women in the medieval Greek East.

A350/A670 Advanced Arabic II (3 cr.)

Instructor: S. Stetkevych
Time: 9:30 - 10:45 am. TRF
Location: WH 108

A continuation of Advanced Arabic I.

Advanced Arabic is intended for students who are committed to mastering the Arabic language. It aims at providing students with a firm foundation in Arabic language and culture for students in both the Modern and Classical fields. It strives for a balanced approach to the full range of language skills: reading, writing, speaking and oral comprehension. Special attention is given to consolidating students’ mastery of syntax and morphology with a view to developing accuracy in reading, translation, expression and comprehension, and expanding vocabulary. The course combines modern materials on a range of subjects with an introduction to selected classical Arabic and Islamic texts.

Prerequisite:
Intermediate Arabic (A250/650) or Intensive Quranic Arabic (N182/N502) or through NELC placement test.

Requirements:
Attendance and participation; written and oral homework; written and oral quizzes; midterm and final examinations.

N305 Byzantine Hagiography (3 cr.)

Instructor: M. Vinson
Time: 4:00 pm. - 6:00 pm. TR
Location: SY 212

In this course, we will read in English translation a representative sample of saints' lives from the early and middle Byzantine periods. Among the saints that we will study are Daniel, who became a tourist attraction and imperial confidante by living on top of a tall pillar, and the cross-dressing Matrona who, with the help of her girlfriends, abandoned her husband and children to live as a male monk. Our primary focus will be on the texts themselves, but we will also explore critical issues such as questions of authorship and authenticity as well as more contemporary concerns involving gender and genre. Although Byzantine hagiography was designed first and foremost for the spiritual edification of its readers, the examples of Daniel and Matrona show that saints' lives could also be both fun and subversive. The goal of this course is to help students develop an appreciation for Byzantine hagiography as a form of literature and a valuable source of data for cultural and political history.

Philosophy


R257 Introduction to Islam (3 cr.)

Instructor: P. Spade
Time: 9:30 am. - 10:45 am. MW
Location: SY 001

A selective survey of some main metaphysical and epistemological themes in medieval philosophy. Major figures will include Augustine, Boethius, Anselm and Aquinas. Topics will include: the problem of skepticism, the relation of soul and body, the problem of evil, the theory of “illumination,” divine foreknowledge and human free will, and various traditional arguments for the existence of God. Required readings will be from:

  • Augustine, Confessions and On Free Choice of the Will (Hackett)
  • Boethius, The Consolation of Philosophy (Hackett)
  • Anselm, The Major Works (Oxford).
  • Anton Pegis, ed., Introduction to St. Thomas Aquinas (McGraw Hill), a collection mainly from his Summa theologiae).
  • Frederick Copleston, A History of Philosophy: Medieval Philosophy (Image Books). For background and continuity.

Students will write a series of short weekly quizzes (over factual points, terminology, and details), a mid-term and a final examination, and a term paper.

Religious Studies


R152 Religions of the West (3 cr.)

Instructor: R. Jaques
Lecture: 12:20 pm. - 1:10 pm. MW M 015
Discussion: 11:15 am. - 12:05 pm. R BH 142
12:20 pm. - 1:10 pm. R JH A105
1:25P - 2:15 pm. R BH 149
2:30P - 3:20 pm. R M 350
10:10 am. - 11:00 am. F ED O101
11:15 am. - 12:05 pm. F BH 146

The purpose of the course is for students to develop ways to understanding the religions of the West (Christianity, Judaism, and Islam) in the context of Western (American) society and culture. To do this, the course will focus on three aspects of Western religion: notions of God, scripture, and ritual. We will approach these phenomena from a comparative perspective, meaning that we will be interested in looking at both the similarities between the religions of the West as well as those differences that mark each as distinctive. A major component of our approach to religion will be examining how each tradition is treated in popular American culture, media, and literature. We will use various animated series, such as The Simpsons, Futurama, and King of the Hill as our guide to each of the topics covered in the course. We will also read three novels that will exemplify the aspects of Western religion discussed in class. Fiction is particularly important in helping us gain appreciations for religious meaning since it allows us to “walk in the shoes” of other people –to see the world through eyes different than our own. Requirements: Attendance is required. There will be weekly reaction papers to assigned readings, three exams, and a comparative final using the novels as a way to bring together the different themes of the course.

Required Texts:

Corrigan, Denney,et al. Jews, Christians, Muslims: A Comparative Introduction to Monotheistic Religions, eds.
Stephen R. Lawhead, City of Dreams (Hero!).
Umm Zakiyyah, If I Should Speak.
Chaim Potok, The Chosen.

R180 Introduction to Christianity (3 cr.)

Instructor: C. Furey
Lecture: 12:20 pm. - 1:10 pm. MW MO 007
Discussion: 10:10 am. - 11:00 am. R AR
11:15 am. - 12:05 pm. R AR
1:25 pm. - 2:15 pm. R AR
2:30 pm. - 3:20 pm. R AR
10:10 am. - 11:00 am. F ED 1004
11:15 am. - 12:05 pm. F BH 340

This course is a historical survey of two thousand years of Christian history. Throughout this history, certain questions have remained central: What is the significance of the story of Christ’s life and death? Given our belief in this story, how should we live in this world? And what is the relationship between humanity and God? Through our readings of a variety of Christian “classics”, we will examine how, in various times, places, and circumstances, Christians have created different answers to these questions. In particular, we will look at how divisions arose between Orthodox, Protestant, and Catholic understandings of Christianity, and at how Christians have been influenced by alternative worldviews, including Judaism and modern secular social movements such as feminism and anti-colonialism.

R245 Introduction to Judaism (3 cr.)

Instructor: J. Copulsky
Time: 11:15 am. - 12:30 pm. TR
Location: AR

This course offers a general introduction to Judaism, its beliefs and practices. Through an analysis of primary sources and reference to diverse secondary materials, we will encounter Judaism not as a fixed religious system, but rather as a dynamic tradition, in which innovation and change emerge through a relationship and dialogue with the past. Topics will include Scripture and commentary, ritual and liturgy, life cycles and festivals. We will also attend to the ways in which the Jewish tradition has responded to the challenges posed by modernity. Requirements: Two exams, a final, and periodic quizzes. This section carries a Culture Studies credit.

R300/R521 Early Christian Monasticism (3 cr.)

Instructor: D. Brakke
Time: 11:15 am. - 12:30 pm. TR
Location: BH 005

Between 300 and 450 C.E. thousands of Christians abandoned their ordinary lives of marriage, work, and family to live in the Egyptian desert or in communities devoted to God. There they renounced sex and money, ate very little, and spent nearly all of their time in work and prayer. So began Christian monasticism, one of the most important features of western religious history. This course will focus on the pioneers of the monastic life in late ancient Egypt: Antony the Great, the Pachomian monastic federation, Evagrius Ponticus and the desert fathers, Shenoute and the White Monastery. We will study how they disciplined their bodies, organized their communities, fought with demons, and prayed to God. We will also look at the backgrounds of monasticism in the New Testament and in Jewish and “pagan” cultures, and we will see how monasticism took root also in western Europe (John Cassian and St. Benedict) and Syria (Simeon the Stylite). Along the way we will discover the origins of the seven deadly sins.

Requirements:

Midterm, paper, final exam.

Textbooks:

Athanasius, The Life of Antony and The Letter to Marcellinus
Armand Veilleux, Pachomian Koinonia I: The Lives of St. Pachomius
Owen Chadwick, Western Asceticism
Benedicta Ward et al., The Lives of the Desert Fathers
Theodoret of Cyrrhus, A History of the Monks of Syria
Course Reader (containing works of Antony, Evagrius Ponticus, and Shenoute).

R456 Life & Legacy of Muhammed (3 cr.)

Instructor: R. Jaques
Time: 2:30 pm. - 3:45 pm. MW
Location: WH 002

This course will explore the ways in which sacred biography is used in various context to develop theories of authority and history. The course will begin by examining a number of different theories of religious authority and then move on to how biography is formative in developing “orthodox” methods of interpreting revelation as a means of understanding the relationship between humans and God. We will then focus specifically on the biographies of Muhammad (d.632 CE). We will explore the development of Muhammad biographical traditions in Islam and how particular forms of biography (legal and quasi-legal traditions that relate specific information thought to originate with Muhammad) are used by Muslims in various contexts and how changing cultural circumstances influence the evolution of popular understandings of Muhammad’s life. Specifically, we will focus on how Muhammad becomes a role model for Muslim living and what this indicates about changing views of revelation and legal duties. For instance, how does Muhammad’s life serve as a model for Muslims living in the modern world? How flexible is biography in allowing for changes in culture and technology? To what extent, and according to whom, is Muhammad’s biography still important as a source of knowing God’s will? We will also look at how non-Muslims, (Martin Luther, Abraham Geiger, Ignaz Goldziher, Franklin Graham, and others) have used the biography of Muhammad to develop views of religion and Islam for inner and inter-confessional dialogue.

Readings:

Ibn Sshaq, The Life of Munammad
Sigmund Freud, Moses and Monotheism
Anon., Guidance from the Messenger
Howard Federspiel, The Usage of Traditions of the Prophet in Contemporary Indonesia
course packet.

Requirements:

This will be an intensive reading and discussion class. Attendance and participation are required. There will be weekly reaction papers to the readings and a final extended research paper (10-15 pages).

R498/R521 Readings in Syriac (3 cr.)

Instructor: D. Brakke
Time: 2:30 pm. - 3:45 pm. TR
Location: SY 100

Readings in early Syriac literature for students who have completed in the fall semester R497, Syriac.

Spanish and Portuguese


S521 Early Spanish Literature I (3 cr.)

Instructor: O. Impey
Time: 9:30 am. - 10:45 am. TR
Location: BH 018

This course will offer an in-depth study of the most important Spanish literary works written between the twelfth and fourteenth centuries. It will also explore the cultural background that produced these works, the genres to which they belong (lyrical, narrative, dramatic) and the traditions inscribed in them (Latin, Arabic, Provençal, etc.). In addition, the course aims to:

  1. Provide students with a basic understanding of specific medieval concepts and literary conventions;
  2. Demonstrate that Spanish medieval literature is a vital link between Classical and Renaissance literatures;
  3. Develop interpretative skills that will allow students to:
    1. comment cogently and persuasively on given literary works;
    2. evaluate the critical reception these works enjoyed across the centuries.
    3. draw syntheses through pertinent associations with other works;

The reading list will include:

Poema de mío Cid (ed. Colin Smith, Cátedra)
Berceo, Milagros de Nuestra Señora (ed. Solalinde, Espasa Calpe, Clásicos Castellanos, 44)
Alfonso el Sabio, Antología (ed. Margarita Peña, Porrúa, 229)
Libro de Apolonio (ed. Dolores Corbella, Cátedra)
Arcipreste de Hita, Libro de buen amor (ed. Gybbon Monypenny, Castalia, 161)
B. Mujica, Antología de la literatura española

Class activities:

Lectures will alternate with seminar-type classes. In-depth reading and class discussion of each work and familiarization with the basic bibliography of Spanish medieval literature constitute the core of this course. Students will be evaluated on the basis of their participation in class, an annoted bibliography (15 articles) or a research paper (10-12 pp., in Spanish, typed, double spaced) and two written examinations. The topic of the paper will be chosen as early as possible in the semester, in consultation with the professor.

S521 will be taught in Spanish.