Innovation and Commitment Improve the Quality of Michigan DNR Accessible Programs and Facilities

by Anne Cornett

 

With a rich history dating back to the 1800’s, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources (DNR) has proven to be one of this century’s most dedicated advocates of accessible recreation. With the advent of ADA regulations in 1990 and the implementation of the Access to Recreation initiative in 2006 sponsored by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, the Michigan DNR has embraced the challenge of providing accessible opportunities to all individuals interested in participation. From accessible hunting blinds and trails, to an innovative water transfer system the Michigan DNR truly goes above and beyond to provide the best experience possible.

A2R Webinar Archives

The W.K. Kellogg Foundation Access to Recreation grant program provided $15 million in funding to 36 recreation projects in four Midwestern states from 2006 to 2009. Projects were selected based on their concepts for embracing universal design, opportunity to facilitate inclusion of people of all abilities and opportunity to serve as an exemplar of universal design to community planners, recreation practitioners and advocates.  Over the summer of 2009, the National Center on Accessibility hosted three free 90-minute sessions.  The webinars presented an overview of the project concepts, the planning process, design decisions, construction issues, and fundraising. This was an excellent opportunity for professionals seeking the latest information on universal design trends specific to parks and recreation. The series was sponsored by the Michigan Recreation and Park Association Foundation.
 
Playgrounds
 
Boating & Fishing
 
Interpretive Trails

A2R Webinar Archive: Playgrounds

The W.K. Kellogg Foundation Access to Recreation grant program provided $15 million in funding to 36 recreation projects in four Midwestern states from 2006 to 2009. Projects were selected based on their concepts for embracing universal design, opportunity to facilitate inclusion of people of all abilities and opportunity to serve as an exemplar of universal design to community planners, recreation practitioners and advocates.  Over the summer of 2009, the National Center on Accessibility hosted three free 90-minute sessions.  The webinars presented an overview of the project concepts, the planning process, design decisions, construction issues, and fundraising. This was an excellent opportunity for professionals seeking the latest information on universal design trends specific to parks and recreation.

Funding Accessibility Projects: In Search of the Money Tree

by Amy Shrake, National Center on Accessibility

In these times when resources are stretched, budgets are tight and agencies struggle with a laundry list of safety, accessibility, and maintenance projects, identifying funding for the projects can be one of the greatest challenges. Finding external funds can be a necessary component to many accessibility projects. Where internal funding may allow for the project to be completed at a minimum, external funds may bolster the project to provide optimal access for the widest spectrum of users through creative and innovative design. External funding may also allow for more projects to be completed in a more timely manner than waiting for each annual allocation where only the top priorities are scheduled. Securing funding sources can be a tedious task; however there are helpful resources that offer solutions to sometimes difficult to fund accessibility projects.

Planning for Inclusion: Implementing an Accessibility Management Program in a Parks and Recreation Business Model

by Jennifer K. Skulski 
 
Introduction
 
Headlines—Any Town U.S.A. Department of Environmental Conservation settles in access for the disabled lawsuit (July 10, 2001). Department of Parks and Recreation, agrees to purchase golf mobility devices to allow golfers with disabilities to play its courses (December 3, 2002). Justice Department signs agreement with nine communities to ensure civic access for people with disabilities (February 27, 2004). Disabled to get more park access: State settles landmark suit (July 13, 2005). Associate Director provides testimony to U.S. House subcommittee on disability access to national parks (May 11, 2006).  GGNRA and plaintiffs reach a stay in litigation concerning accessibility (December 17, 2008).
 

Best Practices of Accessibility in Parks and Recreation: A Delphi Survey of National Experts in Accessibility

Findings from a new NCA research study.  The investigation is a query of experts in our field and a concensus on what they believe are the best practices for accessibility in parks and recreation.  The Executive Summary follows below.  A complimentary free copy of the Final Report (PDF) is available online through the Indiana University Scholar Works Repository.