Making the Grade

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Renovations "Make the Grade" at Lake Sylvia State Park

 
A paved path winding along the edge of the lake.

Located north of Montesano, Washington, Lake Sylvia State Park is a quiet, peaceful retreat surrounded by forest. The Park began as an old logging camp in a wooded area halfway between Olympia and the Pacific shore. The lake was formed by damming up Sylvia Creek for the purpose of log ponding and power production.

In 1936, the town of Montesano donated the land to the State parks Commission for conservation. Additional lands were added to the park by a trade in 1985.

Disney Introduces Handheld Captioning

How do you caption a moving amusement ride? Use technology. That’s what the folks at Walt Disney World Resorts did.

Effectively communicating the story and message of moving amusement rides has long been a challenge for the amusement park industry. In many moving narrative attractions, such as Peter Pan’s Flight, it’s a small world, Pirates of the Caribbean and Buzz Lightyear’s Space Ranger Spin, fixed captioning systems are not always effective as the ride is often moving too fast to read the captions. So the Disney engineers put wireless technology to work and developed a synchronized handheld captioning system.

The Susquehannock Case at the State Museum of Pennsylvania

The Susquehannock Case in the Archaeology Gallery at The State Museum of Pennsylvania, Harrisburg, PA, is a complex case. It contains approximately 100 artifacts, which are some of the best Native American artifacts in the museum’s collection. Only one artifact, the breastplate, could not be exhibited and was modeled because of its deteriorated state.

The exhibit tells the story of the Susquehannock, a lost people, from the 16th Century to the 18th Century spanning five historical periods. The Susquehannock migrated from northern Pennsylvania into the Lower Susquehanna Valley and subsequently traded with the newly arrived Europeans. Many of the objects on display show the various stages of their culture. The Susquehannock culture came to an end in 1763 when the Paxton Boys from Harrisburg became outraged by stories of native atrocities against white settlers, destroyed and killed the Native American residents in the settlement, Conestoga Indian Town.

Access at Mission San Luis

Mission San Luis, a National Historic Landmark site located in Tallahassee, Florida, was one of more than 100 mission settlements established in Spanish Florida between the 1560s and 1690s. Between 1656 and 1704, more than 1,400 Apalachee Indians and Spaniards lived at the mission. San Luis was a principal village of the Apalachee Indians and home of one of their most powerful leaders. San Luis was also the Spaniards' westernmost military, religious, and administrative headquarters. In 1983, the State of Florida purchased the property where the mission was located and began the research necessary to begin to present its story to the public. This story has been developed by painstaking archaeological excavations as well as through the translation of 17th- and 18th-century documents from Spanish archives. San Luis is the most thoroughly documented and archaeologically investigated mission in the Southeast.

Flowers, Floats, Auxiliary Aids and Services: Planning for Access at the Tournament of Roses

by Jennifer K. Skulski, National Center on Accessibility

Who doesn’t love a parade?  The floats.  The marching bands.  The pageantry.  From your hometown Fourth of July parade to the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade, there’s a festive spirit in the air.  And of course, who doesn’t love the granddaddy of them all…the parade that has brought in the new year for more than 100 years now…the Tournament of Roses Parade.

City of Detroit Sets Strict Specs to Ensure New Playground Surfaces are Safe and Accessible

by Jennifer K. Skulski, CPSI

Throughout the development of accessibility guidelines for playgrounds, there has been a discussion of dichotomy suggesting that a playground surface can not be both accessible to children with disabilities and resilient enough to reduce the likelihood of injury in the event of a fall. There are an estimated 205,850 playground equipment related injuries each year (NPPS, NPSI, CPSC, 2005). Falls from equipment account for 79% of those injuries. However the science of playground surfacing has evolved to prove that it is possible to install and maintain playground surfaces that are both accessible and impact attenuating, and playground owners are putting the various surfacing systems to the test before, during and after the initial purchase and installation.

The Star Spangled Banner Exhibit is "Making the Grade" at the American History Museum

The original flag that inspired Francis Scott Key.The patriotic significance of our nation's Star Spangled Banner can be felt in the hearts of Americans now more so than ever before. The flag that inspired Francis Scott Key's writing of the National Anthem is currently being restored in a temporary laboratory located in the Smithsonian American History Museum in Washington, D.C.