Museums

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Exhibit Design Relating to Low Vision and Blindness Summary Report

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January 2011

Introduction

Historically, museums have displayed their collections for the visiting public primarily through visual means. Most often the objects are located behind glass or other barriers; and if not, clearly the message is to “look and not touch”. While audio tours have been a recent addition to the museum scene, the absence of descriptive information about the objects or exhibits themselves have proved inaccessible to for persons with visual impairments and do not provide an equivalent experience that is available to the sighted public.

Tactile Mapping for Cultural and Entertainment Venues

Exhibit Design Relating to Low Vision and Blindness:

Tactile Mapping for Cultural and Entertainment Venues

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This paper has been supported by the National Center on Accessibility, the National Park Service and the U.S. Access Board through Task Agreement J2420070133 under Cooperative Agreement H0500000011.

by Steven Landau, President
Touch Graphics, Inc.

Research on Effective Use of Tactile Exhibits with Touch Activated Audio Description for the Blind and Low Vision Audience

Exhibit Design Relating to Low Vision and Blindness:

Research on Effective Use of Tactile Exhibits with Touch Activated Audio Description for the Blind and Low Vision Audience

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This paper has been supported by the National Center on Accessibility, the National Park Service and the U.S. Access Board through Task Agreement J2420070133 under Cooperative Agreement H0500000011.

by Rebecca Fuller and William R. Watkins, RAF Models, Inc. 

What Visitors with Vision Loss Want Museums and Parks to Know About Effective Communication

Exhibit Design Relating to Low Vision and Blindness:

What Visitors with Vision Loss Want Museums and Parks to Know about Effective Communication

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This paper has been supported by the National Center on Accessibility, the National Park Service and the U.S. Access Board through Task Agreement J2420070133 under Cooperative Agreement H0500000011.

By  Beth Ziebarth, Director
Smithsonian Institution Accessibility Program

Introduction

“ . . . our appreciation of our surroundings is multisensory, and . . . touch makes an important contribution to our well-being as well as our ability to understand and relate to the material world” (Pye 2007).

Current Media Technology, Appropriate Application of Technology, Future Research Needs

Exhibit Design Relating to Low Vision and Blindness:

Current Media Technology, Appropriate Application of Technology, Future Research Needs 

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By Larry Goldberg, Director
Media Access Group at WGBH

This paper has been supported by the National Center on Accessibility, the National Park Service and the U.S. Access Board through Task Agreement J2420070133 under Cooperative Agreement H0500000011.

The Star Spangled Banner Exhibit is "Making the Grade" at the American History Museum

The original flag that inspired Francis Scott Key.The patriotic significance of our nation's Star Spangled Banner can be felt in the hearts of Americans now more so than ever before. The flag that inspired Francis Scott Key's writing of the National Anthem is currently being restored in a temporary laboratory located in the Smithsonian American History Museum in Washington, D.C.