Welcome to the National Center on Accessibility.  This is our logo.  It consists of a white background, with green lettering that reads Recreation, Parks, and Tourism.  Choose this image link if you would like to skip the navigation links and go directly to the page content.

Learn about the National Center on Accessibility, including the services we provide, our mission, our partners, our staff, as well as our contact information.Learn about upcoming NCA training as well as how to obtain training tailored to your organization.Read NCA research articles, learn about NCA research projects, and volunteer to participate in a NCA research project.Learn about NCA technical assistance.Read NCA's many Publications and Videos, including Access Today, Making the Grade, and NCA news.Familiarize yourself with a wide variety of accessible products.

Font Size: This is the icon for the smallest font setting. | This is the icon for the medium font setting. | This is the icon for the large font setting. | This is the icon for the extra-large font setting.
NCA Home | Site Map | Contact Us
 
  Publications & Videos
Access Today
Making the Grade
NCA Monographs
NCA News
Online Order Form
Publications & Videos

  The Susquehannock Case


The Susquehannock Case


Native American artifacts on display.
The Susquehannock Case in the Archaeology Gallery at The State Museum of Pennsylvania, Harrisburg, PA.
The Susquehannock Case in the Archaeology Gallery at The State Museum of Pennsylvania, Harrisburg, PA, is a complex case. It contains approximately 100 artifacts, which are some of the best Native American artifacts in the museum’s collection. Only one artifact, the breastplate, could not be exhibited and was modeled because of its deteriorated state.

Interpretive panel with etched stainless steel text accompanied by Braille text.
(Top) Interpretive panel with etched stainless steel text accompanied by Braille text.
Close up of interpretive panel.
(Bottom) Close up of interpretive panel.
The exhibit tells the story of the Susquehannock, a lost people, from the 16th Century to the 18th Century spanning five historical periods. The Susquehannock migrated from northern Pennsylvania into the Lower Susquehanna Valley and subsequently traded with the newly arrived Europeans. Many of the objects on display show the various stages of their culture. The Susquehannock culture came to an end in 1763 when the Paxton Boys from Harrisburg became outraged by stories of native atrocities against white settlers, destroyed and killed the Native American residents in the settlement, Conestoga Indian Town.

Hearphones at side of case provide audio presentation about 'A Lost People.'
Hearphones at side of case provide audio presentation about “A Lost People.”
The case was designed to be universally accessible. An audio presentation tells the story of “A Lost People” using focused speakers hanging above the main label panel and hearphones, which enhance the same audio presentation for visitors who are hearing impaired or for visitors who cannot hear because of other groups in the gallery. A version of the audio is printed above the hearphones for people who are deaf. The main label is slanted so children or people who use wheelchairs can look at the photographs to identify objects in the case, some of which are described in the audio, read the text, and feel the two models. Visitors who are blind can access the same story not only through the audio presentation, but through surface mounted panels that contain the locations of the Native American sites and the accompanying Braille text. The panels are made of etched stainless steel—the lower parts are blackened out while the high points reflect light for sighted visitors visiting this area the gallery, which is low lighted for ease of viewing the diorama and to minimize reflections from adjacent walls and exhibits.

A museum visitor uses the hearphones.
A museum visitor uses the hearphones.
The exhibit, which is the first exhibit in the museum to contain labels in Braille as well as other accessible features, was curated by Stephen Warfel, senior curator of archaeology, and designed by Robert Bullock, Chief of Exhibits, who also painted and built the diorama. Our disability consultant was Londa Hauser from the Tri-County Association of the Blind, and case fabrication was done by the museum’s fabrication section while the Braille and graphic panels were produced by USA Models, Loch Haven, PA. The complex wiring for the audio and light show was developed and engineered by The Magic Lantern, an audio-visual firm in Pittsburgh, PA.

For more information on the Susquehannock Case contact:

Robert Bullock, Chief
Exhibition Management
The State Museum of Pennsylvania
300 North Street
Harrisburg, PA 17120-0024
(717)787-4980
rbullock@state.pa.us


 

 
About NCA | Training & Education | Research | Technical Assistance | Publications & Videos | Products
Yellow Bar
National Center on Accessibility
501 North Morton Street - Suite 109
Bloomington, IN 47404-3732
Voice: (812) 856-4422
TTY: (812) 856-4421
Fax: (812) 856-4480
Comments: nca@indiana.edu
2001-03, The Trustees of Indiana University