Indiana University Bloomington

Neuroscience
Neuroscience

News & Events

Upcoming Seminars

Neuroscience Colloquium Series
Spring 2015

Program in Neuroscience
College of Arts and Sciences
Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana




Monday, March 30, 2015
Susan G. Amara, Ph.D.
Director of the Division of Intramural Research Programs, National Institute of Mental Health
https://intramural.nimh.nih.gov/od/od_amara_s.html

Seminar will be held in Psychology, Room 101 at 4:00 pm

Title: "Dynamic regulation of signaling pathways in dopamine neurons: the intracellular actions of amphetamines"

Abstract:  Neurotransmitter transporters present at the plasma membrane contribute to the clearance and recycling of neurotransmitters and have a profound impact on the extent of receptor activation during neuronal signaling. These carriers also are the primary targets for psychostimulant drugs of abuse, antidepressant medications, and drugs such as methylphenidate and amphetamines, which are used to treat attention deficit disorders. This lecture will highlight several of the major signaling pathways that regulate dopamine transporter function, and will also consider recent work showing that amphetamine-like drugs can directly activate intracellular signaling pathways in dopamine neurons to trigger changes in membrane protein trafficking and other cellular activities. Although several steps in the process remain undefined, the intracellular actions of amphetamine modulate both dopaminergic and glutamatergic signaling and can contribute to the acute behavioral effects of amphetamine-like drugs.

Co-sponsored with the Gill Center


Monday, April 6, 2015
Cheryl Conrad, Ph.D.

Arizona State University, Department of Psychology
https://psychology.clas.asu.edu/faculty/cheryl-conrad

Seminar will be held in Psychology, Room 101 at 4:00 pm

Title: Consequences of chronic stress on the brain and behavior: Mechanisms for resilience

Abstract: Chronic or persistent stress is a known risk factor for a multitude of neuropsychiatric conditions that include, but not limited to, post-traumatic stress disorder, major depression, anxiety disorders, and drug addiction/relapse. Moreover, the neurocircuitries and mediators underlying the stress system overlap with brain regions involved in many neuro-psychiatric conditions. Consequently, work using chronic stress in rodent models can provide insight into understanding mechanisms that underlie the vulnerabilities and resilience for brain health. I will describe some of my team's past research on chronic stress effects on the hippocampus, a brain region that displays great sensitivity and functional plasticity in response to chronic stress. This is the same brain structure that has received attention for its role in guiding navigation, or spatial ability, with Drs. O'Keefe, Moser, and Moser receiving the 2014 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine on their work in this structure. My team's work has centered on how chronic stress disrupts this navigational (or "spatial") memory and produces hippocampal dendritic retraction, which compromises neuronal communication. A novel feature of these chronic stress-induced alterations in spatial memory and dendritic morphology is that they can recover in the following weeks after the chronic stress paradigm has ended. I will discuss some new research that unveils some of the mechanisms underlying the recovery process following the termination of chronic stress. Time permitting, additional findings will be discussed that reveal sex differences in how hronic stress influences the brain and behavior, as well as some other work investigating the prefrontal cortex and amygdalar brain regions.

Co-sponsored with the Gill Center


Monday, April 13, 2015
Charles Schroeder, Ph.D.

Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research and Columbia University Medical Center
http://www.rfmh.org/nki/programs/cnnl.cfm

Seminar will be held in Psychology, Room 101 at 4:00 pm

Title: Neuronal mechanisms of temporal prediction in active sensing

Abstract: Neuronal oscillations reflecting synchronous, rhythmic fluctuation of neuron ensembles between high and low excitability states, dominate ambient activity in the sensory pathways. Because excitability determines the probability that neurons will respond to input, a top-down process like attention can use oscillations as "instruments" to amplify or suppress the brain's representation of external events. That is, by tuning the frequency and phase of its rhythms to those of behaviorally and/or cognitively-relevant event streams, the brain can use its rhythms to parse event streams and to form internal representations of them. In doing this, the brain is making temporal predictions. I will discuss findings from parallel experiments in humans and non-human primates that outline specific structural and functional components of this temporal prediction mechanism. I will also discuss its possible generalization across temporal scales, as well as motor system contributions to sensory systems' dynamics.

Co-sponsored with the Gill Center


Friday, May 1, 2015
Barnett Schlinger, Ph.D.

Department of Physiological Science
Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology and Avian Biology
Brain Research Institute
University of California, Los Angeles
https://www.ibp.ucla.edu/physcifacultyindiv.php?FacultyKey=356

Seminar will be held in Myers Hall, Room 130 at 4:00 pm

Title: Pending

Abstract: Pending

Co-sponsored with the Department of Biology's Evolution, Ecology & Behavior Graduate Program



PAST COLLOQUIA



Monday, March 9, 2015
Richard Ivry, Ph.D.

University of California, Berkeley, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience Institute

http://psychology.berkeley.edu/people/richard-ivry

Seminar will be held in Psychology, Room 101 at 4:00 pm

Title: Embodied Decision Making:  System interactions in sensorimotor adaptation and reinforcement learning

Co-sponsored with the Cognitive Science Program


Monday, March 2, 2015
Tony Movshon, Ph.D.

New York University, Center for Neuroscience

http://www.cns.nyu.edu/corefaculty/Movshon.php

Seminar will be held in Psychology, Room 101 at 4:00 pm

Title: “Cortical and Perceptual Processing of Visual Form”

Co-sponsored with the Cognitive Science Program


Monday, February 23, 2015
Michael Bruchas, Ph.D.

Washington University in St. Louis, School of Medicine
Departments of Anesthesiology, Anatomy, and Neurobiology
http://www.bruchaslab.org/Home.html

Title: Dissecting Neural Circuits and GPCR Signaling in Stress Behavior

Co-sponsored with the Gill Center


Cancelled due to inclement weather, will reschedule.

Monday, February 2, 2015
A. Vania Apkarian, Ph.D.

Northwestern University, School of Medicine, Northwestern Institute of Neuroscience
http://apkarianlab.northwestern.edu/aboutUs/vapkarian.php

Title: Transition to chronic pain: Predictors and consequences

Co-sponsored with the Gill Center



Monday, January 26, 2015
Zuoxin Wang, Ph.D.

Florida State University, Department of Psychology
http://www.psy.fsu.edu/faculty/wang.dp.html

Seminar will be held in Psychology, Room 101 at 4:00 pm

Title: The Monogamous Brain

Co-sponsored with the Gill Center


Monday, November 3, 2014
Yael Niv, Ph.D.

Princeton University, Princeton Neuroscience Institute and Department of Psychology
http://www.princeton.edu/~yael/

Seminar will be held in Psychology, Room 101 at 4:00 pm

Title: Task Representations, Why They Matter, and How We Learn Them

Co-sponsored with the Cognitive Science Program


Monday, October 27, 2014
Peter Strick, Ph.D.

University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine, Department of Neurobiology and Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition
http://www.neurobio.pitt.edu/faculty/strick.htm

Seminar will be held in Psychology, Room 101 at 4:00 pm

Title: Basal Ganglia Loops with the Cerebral Cortex and Cerebellum: Circuits for Movement, Cognition and Affect

Co-sponsored with Psychological and Brain Sciences and the Clinical Science Program


Monday, October 20, 2014
Norbert Fortin, Ph.D.

Department of Neurobiology & Behavior and Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
University of California at Irvine
http://www.faculty.uci.edu/profile.cfm?faculty_id=5602

Title: The Neurobiology of the Memory for Sequences of Events: A Synergistic Approach in Rats and Humans 

Co-sponsored with the Gill Center


Monday, October 13, 2014
Todd Braver, Ph.D.

Washington University in St. Louis, Department of Psychology
https://psychweb.wustl.edu/people/todd-braver

Title: Flexible Neural Mechanisms of Cognitive Control

Co-sponsored with the Cognitive Science Program


Monday, October 6, 2014
Samuel S. Wang, Ph.D.

Princeton University, Department of Molecular Biology and Princeton Neuroscience Institute
http://molbio.princeton.edu/faculty/molbio-faculty/139-wang

Title: The Cerebellum, Sensitive Periods, and Autism 


Monday, August 25, 2014
Marco Bortolato, M.D., Ph.D.
.
University of Kansas, School of Pharmacy
https://pharmacy.ku.edu/marco-bortolato

Title: Modeling Gene x Environment Interactions in Pathological Aggression: A Neurodevelopmental Perspective


April 23, 2014
R. Grace Zhai, Ph.D.
University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine
Miami, FL 33136

Title: A balancing act: how to regulate the neuroprotective and NAD synthetic role of NMNAT


April 4, 2014
Catherine Woolley, Ph.D.
Northwestern University

Title: Acute Estrogen Modulation of Synapses in the Hippocampus


November 20, 2013
Melanie Kelly, Ph.D.
Dalhousie University

Title: The Ocular Endocannabinoid System: Therapeutic Prospects For Cannabinoid Drugs


October 30, 2013
Tatiana Foroud, Ph.D.
P. Michael Conneally Professor
Chancellor's Professor
Department of Medical and Molecular Genetics
Indiana University, School of Medicine, IUPUI
http://genetics.medicine.iu.edu/faculty/tatiana-foroud-ph-d/
Title: Genetics of Neurodegenerative Disorders


Monday, October 7, 2013
Jochen Triesch, Ph.D.
Johanna Quandt Research Professor
Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies
J. D. Goethe University, Frankfurt, Germany
http://fias.uni-frankfurt.de/~triesch/
Title:  Self-organization and unsupervised learning in recurrent neural networks
Co-sponsored with the Cognitive Science Program.


October 2, 2013
Philip L. Johnson, Ph.D.
Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology
Indiana University, School of Medicine, IUPUI
Indianapolis, Indiana
http://anatomy.iupui.edu/people/faculty/primary-faculty/johnson-philip-l-phd/
Title: Hypothalamic Orexin System’s Role in Narcolepsy, and Emerging Role in Anxiety and Hot Flashes


September 25, 2013
Bruce L. McNaughton, Ph.D.
The University of Lethbridge
Indiana Memorial Union, Whittenberger Auditorium during the 2013 Gill Symposium.
Title:  Doughnuts in the Brain: A Toroidal Attractor Theory of the Cognitive Map


September 25, 2013
Loren M. Frank, Ph.D.
University of California, San Francisco
Indiana Memorial Union, Whittenberger Auditorium during the 2013 Gill Symposium.
Title: Neural Substrates of Memory and Decision-Making.


September 25, 2013
Ivan Soltesz, Ph.D.
University of California, Irvine
Indiana Memorial Union, Whittenberger Auditorium during the 2013 Gill Symposium.
Title: Organization and Control of Hippocampal Chronocircuits