Indiana University Bloomington

Neuroscience
Neuroscience

News & Events

Upcoming Seminars

Neuroscience Colloquium Series
Fall 2014 and Spring 2015

Program in Neuroscience
College of Arts and Sciences
Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana

 


Monday, August 25, 2014
Marco Bortolato, M.D., Ph.D.
.
University of Kansas, School of Pharmacy
https://pharmacy.ku.edu/marco-bortolato

Seminar will be held in Psychology, Room 101 at 4:00 pm

Title: Modeling Gene x Environment Interactions in Pathological Aggression: A Neurodevelopmental Perspective

Abstract: Pending


Monday, October 6, 2014
Samuel S. Wang, Ph.D.

Princeton University, Department of Molecular Biology and Princeton Neuroscience Institute
http://molbio.princeton.edu/faculty/molbio-faculty/139-wang

Seminar will be held in Psychology, Room 101 at 4:00 pm

Title: The Cerebellum, Sensitive Periods, and Autism

Abstract: Cerebellar research has focused principally on adult motor function. However, the cerebellum also maintains abundant connections with nonmotor brain regions throughout postnatal life, including neocortical substrates for social interaction. Existing evidence suggests that the cerebellum may guide the maturation of remote neural circuitry and influence cognitive development, with a focus on its relationship with autism. Current experiments range from genetic models to in vivo optical imaging, and are focused on the idea that sensitive-period disruption of internal long-distance brain communication can account for autism’s key features. 


Monday, October 13, 2014
Todd Braver, Ph.D.

Washington University in St. Louis, Department of Psychology
https://psychweb.wustl.edu/people/todd-braver

Seminar will be held in Psychology, Room 101 at 4:00 pm

Title: Pending

Abstract: Pending

Co-sponsored with the Cognitive Science Program


Monday, October 20, 2014
Norbert Fortin, Ph.D.

University of California at Irvine, Department of Neurobiology and Behavior and Center for Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
http://www.faculty.uci.edu/profile.cfm?faculty_id=5602

Seminar will be held in Psychology, Room 101 at 4:00 pm

Title: Pending

Abstract: Pending

Co-sponsored with the Gill Center


Monday, October 27, 2014
Peter Strick, Ph.D.

University of Pittsburgh, School of Medicine, Department of Neurobiology and Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition
http://www.neurobio.pitt.edu/faculty/strick.htm

Seminar will be held in Psychology, Room 101 at 4:00 pm

Title: Pending

Abstract: Pending

Co-sponsored with Psychological and Brain Sciences and the Clinical Science Program


Monday, November 3, 2014
Yael Niv, Ph.D.

Princeton University, Princeton Neuroscience Institite and Department of Psychology
http://www.princeton.edu/~yael/

Seminar will be held in Psychology, Room 101 at 4:00 pm

Title: Pending

Abstract: Pending

Co-sponsored with the Cognitive Science Program


Monday, November 10, 2014
Ralph Adolphs, Ph.D.

California Institite of Technology, Caltech Division of Biology and Biological Engineering
http://www.bbe.caltech.edu/content/ralph-adolphs

Seminar will be held in Psychology, Room 101 at 4:00 pm

Title: Pending

Abstract: Pending


Monday, January 26, 2015
Zuoxin Wang, Ph.D.

Florida State University, Department of Psychology
http://www.psy.fsu.edu/faculty/wang.dp.html

Seminar will be held in Psychology, Room 101 at 4:00 pm

Title: Pending

Abstract: Pending

Co-sponsored with the Gill Center


Monday, February 2, 2015
A. Vania Apkarian, Ph.D.

Northwestern University, School of Medicine, Northwestern Institute of Neuroscience
http://apkarianlab.northwestern.edu/aboutUs/vapkarian.php

Seminar will be held in Psychology, Room 101 at 4:00 pm

Title: Pending

Abstract: Pending

Co-sponsored with the Gill Center


Monday, February 23, 2015
Michael Bruchas, Ph.D.

Washington University in St. Louis, School of Medicine
Departments of Anesthesiology, Anatomy, and Neurobiology
http://www.bruchaslab.org/Home.html

Seminar will be held in Psychology, Room 101 at 4:00 pm

Title: Pending

Abstract: Pending

Co-sponsored with the Gill Center


Monday, February 30, 2015
Susan G. Amara, Ph.D.
National Institute of Mental Health, Division of Intramural Research Programs
https://intramural.nimh.nih.gov/od/od_amara_s.html

Seminar will be held in MSBII, Room 102 at 4:00 pm

Title: Pending

Abstract:  Pending

Co-sponsored with the Cognitive Science Program


Monday, March 2, 2015
Tony Movshon, Ph.D.

New York University, Center for Neuroscience

http://www.cns.nyu.edu/corefaculty/Movshon.php

Seminar will be held in Psychology, Room 101 at 4:00 pm

Title: Pending

Abstract: Pending

Co-sponsored with the Cognitive Science Program


Monday, March 9, 2015
Richard Ivry, Ph.D.

University of California, Berkeley, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience Institute

http://psychology.berkeley.edu/people/richard-ivry

Seminar will be held in Psychology, Room 101 at 4:00 pm

Title: Pending

Abstract: Pending

Co-sponsored with the Cognitive Science Program


Monday, April 6, 2015
Cheryl Conrad, Ph.D.

Arizona State University, Department of Psychology
https://psychology.clas.asu.edu/faculty/cheryl-conrad

Seminar will be held in Psychology, Room 101 at 4:00 pm

Title: Pending

Abstract: Pending

Co-sponsored with the Gill Center


Monday, April 13, 2015
Charles Schroeder, Ph.D.

Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research and Columbia University Medical Center
http://www.rfmh.org/nki/programs/cnnl.cfm

Seminar will be held in Psychology, Room 101 at 4:00 pm

Title: Pending

Abstract: Pending

Co-sponsored with the Gill Center




PAST COLLOQUIA

April 23, 2014
R. Grace Zhai, Ph.D.
University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine
Miami, FL 33136

Title: A balancing act: how to regulate the neuroprotective and NAD synthetic role of NMNAT

Abstract: Dr. Grace Zhai's research is focused on the mechanisms of neurodegeneration and protection, with an emphasis on the endogenous maintenance programs in the nervous system that can be enhanced to offer neuroprotection. Her group identified and characterized a novel neuronal maintenance and protective function of NMNAT (nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase), a highly conserved enzyme in the NAD synthesis pathway. NMNAT is an effective and versatile neuroprotective factor, and its overexpression protects against several neurodegenerative conditions in fly and mouse models, including excitotoxicity-, spinocerebellar ataxia 1 (SCA1)- and tau- induced neurodegeneration. In this talk, she will discuss how neurons partition NMNAT into two distinct functions, i.e. NAD synthesis and neuroprotection, and how such partitioning is regulated under normal and adverse conditions to achieve neuroprotection.


April 9, 2014
Matthew Hill, Ph.D.
University of Calgary

Title: Mechanisms of endocannabinoid regulation of anxiety

Abstract: Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that the endocannabinoid system is an important regulatory system over activation of the HPA axis in response to stress and emotional behaviour. The central locus of these effects has yet to be fully elucidated, but given the integral role of the amygdala in the processing of aversive stimuli and the generation of anxiety-like responses, it seems likely that this structure is involved. In response to acute stress, tissue levels of the endocannabinoid, anandamide, are found to rapidly decline within the amygdala; a phenomenon which appears to be due to a rapid induction of anandamide hydrolysis by the enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). Following chronic stress, this induction of FAAH and suppression of anandamide within the amygdala persists beyond the period of stress exposure, producing steady-state reductions in anandamide signaling within the amygdala. Under conditions of acute stress, local administration of a FAAH inhibitor into the basolateral amygdala attenuates activation of the HPA axis suggesting that this loss of anandamide signaling contributes to activation of the HPA axis. Furthermore, following exposure to chronic stress, mice deficient in FAAH do not develop the increased anxiety-like behavioural responses seen in wildtype mice, demonstrating that induction of FAAH by stress is a necessary step in the modulation of emotionality by stress. Collectively, these data indicate that stress produces a rapid and sustained suppression of anandamide signaling within the amygdala which contributes to both activation of the HPA axis and the generation of anxiety-like responses, possibly through a disinhibition of excitatory afferents to the basolateral amygdala and a consequential increase in the intrinsic excitability of the amygdala. These findings may help to provide a framework by which we may understand the central mechanism by which FAAH inhibitors exhibit anxiolytic actions.


April 4, 2014
Catherine Woolley, Ph.D.
Northwestern University

Title: Acute Estrogen Modulation of Synapses in the Hippocampus

Abstract: That steroids such as estrogens can modulate brain function within minutes has been known for decades, but the last ~40 years of research into mechanisms of steroid actions in the brain have been dominated by transcription-related genomic effects.  Recently, however, interest in acute nongenomic estrogen actions has grown, in parallel with recognition that estrogens may be produced as neurosteroids in the brains of both males and females.  I will discuss our recent work investigating how estrogens acutely modulate synaptic transmission in the hippocampus and how this modulation may be related to neurological disorders such as epilepsy.


March 5, 2014
Rebecca Craft, Ph.D.
Washington State University

Title: Sex Differences in Cannabinoid Analgesia

Abstract: Sex differences in various effects of cannabinoids – including analgesic, motoric, cognition-impairing, and reinforcing effects – have been reported in rodents, with females typically being more sensitive than males.   The Craft lab has focused on characterizing sex differences in cannabinoid-induced antinociception in rats.  THC and other cannabinoid agonists are more potent and in some cases more efficacious in females than in males against acute thermal and mechanical pain, and THC is more effective in females than in males in a model of persistent inflammatory pain.  Sex differences in cannabinoid-induced sedation likely contribute to sex differences in their antinociceptive effects, but do not fully explain them, as sex differences in antinociception persist when THC is administered peripherally.  Sex differences in THC-induced antinociception can be attributed largely to estradiol, which increases females’ sensitivity to THC.  Sex differences in THC’s behavioral effects (and perhaps estradiol enhancement of THC sensitivity) can be attributed to both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic mechanisms.  For example, females produce more 11-OH-THC – a potent active metabolite of THC -- than males do, and females may have more CB receptors than males do, in pain-related areas of brain and in the periphery.  Given that women suffer more types of chronic pain and more frequent and severe pain than do men, the greater pain-relieving potential of cannabinoids in females may offer a clinically important alternative to traditional analgesics.

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November 20, 2013
Melanie Kelly, Ph.D.
Dalhousie University

Title: The Ocular Endocannabinoid System: Therapeutic Prospects For Cannabinoid Drugs

Abstract: A number of well-described ocular effects are produced in humans following ingestion of Cannabis sativa or individual constituent phytocannabinoids, such as D9-THC (THC). These include: a reduction in intraocular pressure (IOP), and vasodilation (Green 1975, Hepler 1971). To-date, cumulative evidence  has determined that THC and other cannabinoids mediate these, and other actions locally via the ocular endocannabinoid system. The presence of endocannabinoids, including anandamide (N-arachidonoyl ethanolamine; AEA) and 2-arachidonoyl glycine (2-AG), along with their biosynthetic and metabolic enzymes and receptors, has now been demonstrated in anterior and posterior ocular tissues, including the retina. In addition, alterations in endocannabinoids have been detected in ocular tissue in human pathology.  Our work is using both in vitro cell models and in vivo animal models, including genetic models, to examine the elements of the endocannabinoid system that give rise to the ocular pharmacological effects of cannabinoids. Specifically, we are exploring the potential for the development of cannabinoid-based therapeutics for the treatment of blinding eye diseases, including glaucoma, uveitis and proliferative vitreoretinopathy.


October 30, 2013
Tatiana Foroud, Ph.D.
P. Michael Conneally Professor
Chancellor's Professor
Department of Medical and Molecular Genetics
Indiana University, School of Medicine, IUPUI
Indianapolis, Indiana
http://genetics.medicine.iu.edu/faculty/tatiana-foroud-ph-d/

Title: Genetics of Neurodegenerative Disorders


Monday, October 7, 2013
Jochen Triesch, Ph.D.
Johanna Quandt Research Professor
Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies
J. D. Goethe University
Frankfurt, Germany
http://fias.uni-frankfurt.de/~triesch/
Title:  "Self-organization and unsupervised learning in recurrent neural networks" Co-sponsored with the Cognitive Science Program.


October 2, 2013
Philip L. Johnson, Ph.D.<
Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology
Indiana University, School of Medicine, IUPUI
Indianapolis, Indiana
http://anatomy.iupui.edu/people/faculty/primary-faculty/johnson-philip-l-phd/
Seminar held in MSBII, Room 102 at 4:00 p.m.
Title: Hypothalamic Orexin System’s Role in Narcolepsy, and Emerging Role in Anxiety and Hot Flashes


September 25, 2013
Bruce L. McNaughton, Ph.D.
The University of Lethbridge
Indiana Memorial Union, Whittenberger Auditorium during the 2013 Gill Symposium.
Title:  Doughnuts in the Brain: A Toroidal Attractor Theory of the Cognitive Map


September 25, 2013
Loren M. Frank, Ph.D.
University of California, San Francisco
Indiana Memorial Union, Whittenberger Auditorium during the 2013 Gill Symposium.
Title: Neural Substrates of Memory and Decision-Making.


September 25, 2013
Ivan Soltesz, Ph.D.
University of California, Irvine
Indiana Memorial Union, Whittenberger Auditorium during the 2013 Gill Symposium.
Title: Organization and Control of Hippocampal Chronocircuits