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Thursday, October 25, 2012

12:00-5:00 Registration (and packet pick-up) - Frangipani Room, IMU

Time

Session A
Location: WALNUT

Session B
Location: OAK

Session C
Location: DOGWOOD

1:00-3:00
Workshops

Cynthia Clopper & Terrin Tamati:
Some foundational principles of cognitive psychology applied to the study of variation

John Paolillo:
Linguistic variation, Theory-building and Statistics: Toward an Integrated Perspective

James Stanford, Carmen Fought, & Nacole Walker:
Fieldwork and minority communities

3:00-3:15

REFRESHMENT BREAK – Frangipani Room

 

Session A  
Location: OAK

Session B
Location: GEORGIAN

Session C
Location: DOGWOOD

3:15-5:15
Workshops

Marianna Di Paolo, Matt Bauer, Tom Purnell, & Ryan Shosted:
Towards best practices in sociophonetics

Scott Kiesling:
Discourse analysis methods for variation studies

Walt Wolfram, Gillian Sankoff, John Rickford, Janneke Van Hofwegen, Mary Kohn, & Charlie Farrington:
Longitudinal studies

5:30-5:45

Opening Remarks, Frangipani Room, IMU
Larry Singell, Dean, College of Arts and Sciences
Robert Botne, Chair, Department of Linguistics

5:45-6:45

Keynote lecture: Where does the sociolinguistic variable start?
Norma Mendoza-Denton, University of Arizona
Ashley Hesson, Michigan State University
Frangipani Room, IMU

6:45-7:10

H. Samy Alim and Geneva Smitherman:  Book release presentation "Articulate
While Black:  Barack Obama, Language, and Race in the U.S." (Oxford University Press)

7:15-9:00 

Opening Reception – Tudor Room, IMU
Book signing by H. Samy Alim and Geneva Smitherman for their book: “Articulate While Black: Barack Obama, Language, and Race in the U.S." (Reception co-sponsored by Oxford University Press)

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Friday, October 26, 2012

7:30-5:00 Registration (and packet pick-up) – Frangipani Room, IMU
7:30-8:30 Continental breakfast (Frangipani and Tree Suite Lounge)
8:30-10:10 Concurrent Paper Sessions
Time

Session 1: Sexuality
Location: GEORGIAN
Chair: Kathryn Campbell-Kibler

Session 2: Language Contact
Location: DOGWOOD
Chair: Kevin Rottet

Session 3: Frequency
Location: WHITTENBERGER AUDITORIUM
Chair: Betty Phillips

8:30-8:55

Erez Levon, Queen Mary Univ.
Individual attitudes and listener stereotypes in the perception of gender and sexuality

Anne-José Villeneuve,
Univ. of Toronto.
Language contact and bilingualism effects in Vimeu French phonology

Robert Bayley, Corey Holland & Kristin Ware,
Univ. of California, Davis.
Lexical frequency and syntactic variation: A test of a linguistic hypothesis

8:55-9:20

Laurence Kenny & James Stanford, Dartmouth College.
Gender in a World Without Sex: An Agent-Based Simulation of Gender and Language Variation

Carina Bauman, New York Univ.
Social Evaluation of Asian Accented English

Robert Bedinghaus & Beatriz Sedó, Indiana Univ.
Intervocalic /d/ deletion in Málaga: Frequency effects and linguistic factors

9:20-9:45

Zachary De, Darmouth College.
Shared Experience:  A Sociophonetic Study of Gay-Sounding Speech

Morakinyo Ogunmodimu & Gregory Guy, Tulane Univ. & New York Univ.
Variable plural marking in Nigerian Pidgin English

Michael Gradoville, Indiana Univ.
Collocation frequency and the reduction of Carioca Portuguese 'para'

9:45-10:10

Viktória Papp & Bethany Townsend, New Zealand Inst. & Rice Univ.
Inhabiting acoustic spaces: The interaction of fundamental frequency and the gender/sexuality divide

Joseph Kern, Univ. of Arizona.
"Como" in commute: The travels of a discourse marker across languages

William Labov, Univ. of Pennsylvania.
The role of the lexicon in regular sound change

9:00-12:00 Office Hours, William Badecker, Program Director, Linguistics Program, NSF, Oak Room
10:10-10:30 Beverage Break, Frangipani Room and Whittenberger Lobby
10:30-12:10 Concurrent Paper Sessions
Time

Session 4: Ethnicity
Location: GEORGIAN
Chair: Gillian Sankoff

Session 5: Subject Pronouns
Location: DOGWOOD
Chair: J. Clancy Clements

Session 6: Sound Change and Vowels
Location: WHITTENBERGER
AUDITORIUM
Chair: Erin O’Rourke

10:30-10:55

Kara Becker & Kathleen Aston, Reed College.
(R) we there yet? The state of coda /r/ vocalization on the Lower East Side of Manhattan

Sara Zahler, Indiana Univ.
A sociolinguistic study of subject doubling in Parisian colloquial French

Jeff Mielke, Univ. of Ottawa.
Ultrasound and corpus study of a change from below: vowel rhoticity in Canadian French

10:55-11:20

Hélène Blondeau & Michael Friesner, Univ. of Florida & UQAM.
Multicultural Montreal: Examining ethnicity through cross-linguistic phonological contact effects

Lorena Sainzmaza Lecanda, The Ohio State Univ.
Rates and Constraints on Subject Expression in Basque Spanish

James Grama, M. Joelle Kirtley, Katie Drager, Sean Simpson & Rebecca Clifford, Univ. of Hawaii, Manoa. Language Change in Hawai?i: KIT, DRESS & TRAP in Motion

11:20-11:45

Roey Gafter, Stanford Univ.
Expanding the range of variables in the study of segmental variation in Hebrew

Rafael Orozco & Bailey Nunez, Louisiana State Univ.
¿Todos juntos o cada uno por separado?  ‘All (SPPs) together or each one separately?’: A pronominal expression study

Kyle Gorman, Univ. of Pennsylvania.
LOT/THOUGHT in a TRAP? Low vowel correlations in North American English

11:45-12:10

Rachel Burdin, The Ohio State Univ.
Variation in Jewish English intonation

Albert Valdman, Anne-José Villeneuve, & Jason Siegel, Indiana Univ. & Univ. of Toronto. Morphophonological variation in Haitian Creole: the case of 3SG

Manuel Díaz-Campos & Olga Scrivner, Indiana Univ.
A variationist investigation of vowel sequences: The raising of /e/ and /o/ in Spanish

12:10-2:00  Lunch 
12:15-1:00  Office hours - Michael Adams, Editor, American Speech, Frangipani Room 
12:30-1:45  NSF/MOSAIC Workshop: William Badecker, Program Director, Linguistics Program, NSF,
Oak Room 
2:00-3:00  Keynote Lecture: The elephant and the pendulum: Variationist perspectives 2012
Sali Tagliamonte, University of Toronto
Whittenberger Auditorium, IMU
2:00-5:30  Office Hours, William Badecker, Program Director, Linguistics Program, NSF, Oak Room 
3:00-3:20  Refreshment Break, Frangipani Room and Whittenberger Lobby 
3:20-4:35  Concurrent Paper Sessions 
Time

Session 7: Gender
Location: GEORGIAN
Chair: Rafael Orozco

Session 8: Codeswitching
Location: DOGWOOD
Chair: Laura Gurzynski-Weiss

Session 9: Discourse
WHITTENBERGER
AUDITORIUM
Chair: Ronald Macaulay

3:20-3:45

Ronald Mendes, Univ. de São Paolo.
Women in São Paulo: are they "like men"?

Nicole Benevento & Amelia Dietrich, Penn State Univ.
Variable position of 1sg subject pronoun in New Mexican Spanish-English code-switching

Michael Shepherd, Univ. of Southern California.
Discursive variation and discursive power in an institutional setting: A mixed-methods analysis

3:45-4:10

M. Joelle Kirtley, Univ. of Hawaii, Manoa.
The effects of Fundamental Frequency on the attractiveness of speakers

Colleen Balukas, Penn State Univ.
Effects of code-switching on VOT production: Evidence from a conversational Spanish-English corpus

Arika Dean, North Carolina State Univ.
Performing an Appalachian story:  A quantitative, qualitative, and metalinguistic analysis

4:10-4:35

Kyuwon Moon, Stanford Univ. Stylization of gender in young women’s speech in Seoul, Korea

Cecelia Cutler, CUNY.
“Mi hijo sera presidente de este pinche pais”: Chicano rap and the politics of language choice

Andrew Johns & César Félix-Brasdefer,  Indiana U.
Pragmatic Variation in French Requests in Dakar, Senegal

4:35-4:45              Break (no refreshments) 
4:45-6:00              Concurrent Paper Sessions

Time

Session 10: Prestige
Location: GEORGIAN
Chair: Ken de Jong

Session 11: African American English/Social Aspects
Location: DOGWOOD
Chair: Sonja Lanehart

Session 12: Computer Mediated Communication
WHITTENBERGER
AUDITORIUM
Chair: Lars Hinrichs

4:45-5:10

Nicholas Henriksen, Univ. of Michigan.
Covert and overt prestige in Manchego Spanish: Segmental and suprasegmental findings

Jessica Grieser, Georgetown Univ. [t]inking about Takoma: Race, Place, and Style at the Border of Washington, D.C.

Rebecca Maybaum, Univ. of Haifa.  Evolving Innovations: A real time study of changing slang in Twitter

5:10-5:35

Livia Oushiro & Ronald Mendes Univ. of São Paolo
Does "covert prestige" entail "covert stigma"? Variable (-r) in São Paulo Portuguese.

Maciej Baranowski, Univ. of Manchester.
Ethnicity and Sound Change: African American English in Charleston, S.C.

Tyler Schnoebelen, David Bamman, & Jacob Eisenstein, Stanford Univ., Carnegie Mellon Univ. & Georgia Tech.
Gender, styles, and social networks in Twitter.

5:35-6:00

Eirvind Thoegersen, Univ. of Copenhagen.
Changing pronunciation but stable social evaluation?

John Baugh, Washington Univ. in St. Louis.
SWB: (Speaking while Black or Speaking while Brown): Linguistic profiling and discrimination based on speech as a surrogate for race in international perspective

Earl Brown, Kansas State Univ.
"Cuando gustes, me envías un DM": Experiential gustar in tweets in the capital cities of Spanish-speaking countries in Latin America and in Spain

6:00-7:30 Poster Session
Location: Frangipani Room, IMU
(Refreshments and cash bar will be available)

 

Name(s)

Institution(s)

Poster Title

1

Aguilar-Sánchez, Jorge

University of Wisconsin-La Crosse

Methodological Issues and the Replicability of Variation Studies

2

Aloshycheva, Yuliia 

The Ohio State University

The Sociolinguistics of (o) in Ukraine: a Perceptual Approach

3

Bakos, Jon
McBride, Justin

Oklahoma State University

How Oklahomans Adjust their Local Dialect for Context, and How They Imitate Themselves

4

Balasch, Sonia 

University of Montana

The structural integrity of direct object marking in the Spanish of New Mexican bilinguals

5

Barnes, Sonia

The Ohio State University

Language contact and regional identity: variation in final back vowels in urban Asturian Spanish

6

Beaton, Mary
Washington, Hannah

The Ohio State University

Lexical Indexicality and Reappropriation: The case of favelado in Brazilian Portuguese

7

Bongiovanni, Silvina 

Indiana University 

“¿Tomas [pepsi], [peksi] o [pesi]?”: A sociolinguistic analysis of Spanish syllable coda stops 

8

Bowie, David 
Bushnell, Tracy 
Collins, Alison 
Kubitskey, Katie
Kudenov, Peter
Meisner, Stacie
Ray, Melissa
Scotland, Brennan
Valentine, Noelle

University of Alaska Anchorage 

A very northern California shift? The vowel system of south-central Alaska 

Driscoll, Becky 

Indiana University of Pennsylvania

Joehnk, Jessa 

Middlebury College

9

Callier, Patrick

Georgetown University

Variation in phonation type: Distributions and meanings in a mass-mediated context

 

Name(s)

Institution(s)

Poster Title

10

Chang, Yufen

Borough of Manhattan Community College

Variation in the Taiwanese Tone Sandhi Circle: Language Change in Progress

11

Delgado-Díaz, Gibran

Indiana University

Theory vs. usage: An analysis of the Spanish preterit and imperfect

12

Eberhardt, Maeve 

University of Vermont

A department store study for the 21st century: Post-vocalic /r/ on TLC’s Say Yes to the Dress

13

Eddington, David 
Savage, Matthew

Brigham Young University

Where are the Mountains in Utah? 

14

Fruehwald, Josef 

University of Pennsylvania 

Phonologically Conditioned Phonetic Changes 

15

Garcia, Christina

The Ohio State University

Implicit vs. Explicit Linguistic Awareness and Attitudes in Buenos Aires

16

Ginsberg, Daniel

Georgetown University

A Computational Approach to Conversational Style

17

Kiefte, Michael
Kay-Raining Bird, Elizabeth 

School of Human Communication Disorders, Dalhousie Univesity

Dialect Variation in Vowel-Inherent Spectral Change in Spontaneous and Elicited Speech

Nearey, Terrance

Department of Linguistics, University of Alberta

18

Kiesling, Scott
Onuffer, Spencer Hardware, Alexander             

University of Pittsburgh

Operationalizing Stance as an Independent Variable

19

King, Ed

Stanford University

Effects of Contact on Vowel Production in Latvian-English Bilinguals

20

LaFave, Nathan

New York University

A more experimental investigation of English adjective gradation

21

LeBlanc, Carmen L. 

Carleton University

The art of disruption: the periphrastic future in the verbal system of French.

22

Long, Avizia 
Baldwin, Lisa 

Indiana University 

Structural implications of voiced stop weakening: A sociolinguistic analysis of intervocalic /b/ 

23

Martin, Sean

New York University

Variation in agreement in Princeville African American English

 

Name(s)

Institution(s)

Poster Title

24

McCarthy, Corrine

George Mason University

Towards a mechanistic account of chain shifting: An agent-based model of the NCS

Swarup, Samarth

Virginia Tech

25

Meyerhoff, Miriam 
Brown, Jason 

University of Auckland 

More on the nature of (ing): Non-native speaker insights into possible typological constraints 

Strycharz, Anna 

Meertens Institute

26

Mitsch, Jane
Clopper, Cynthia

Ohio State University

Stylistic variation for perceived listener need: Social variation in clear and plain lab speech

27

Montgomery, Michael
Reed, Paul

University of South Carolina

Zero Copula in Appalachian English: Evidence from a Kentucky Biracial Enclave

28

Moon, Kyuwon

Stanford University

Anglicized Korean and the construction of authenticity in Korean popular hip hop

Starr, Rebecca

Carnegie Mellon University

Lee, Jinsok

Georgetown University

29

Newall, Gregory 

Indiana University 

Mapping dialects and expressing attitudes:
Prestige and stigma in Colombian Spanish 

30

Newlin-Lukowicz, Luiza 

New York University

TH-stopping in New York City: substrate effect turned ethnic marker?

31

Niedzielski, Nancy

Georgetown University

Implicational variables in intra-variety style: ethnicity versus gender

32

Potowski, Kim

The University of Illinois at Chicago

Phonetic outcomes of dialect contact: Variation among Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, and "MexiRicans"

33

Ravindranath, Maya 

University of New Hampshire

Shifting styles: style and language shift

34

Reed, Paul

University of South Carolina

Monophthongization and Southern Appalachian Identity - Change over a lifetime

35

Shaw Points, Kathleen

University of Texas, Austin

F2 Variation in GOOSE and GOAT in East Austin

36

Stuart-Smith, Jane
 Rathcke, Tamara 
José, Brian

English Language, University of Glasgow

Trying on a new BOOT: Acoustic analyses of real-time change in Scottish English /u/

37

Tamati, Terrin
Pisoni, David

Indiana University

Nonnative Speech Recognition Under High-Variability Listening Conditions

 

Name(s)

Institution(s)

Poster Title

38

Tan, Jingjing 
Yang, Charles 

Department of Linguistics, University of Pennsylvania

Predicting the /n~l/ merger in Hong Kong Cantonese

39

Vieira, Marília

USP

Rhotacization in rural Brazilian Portuguese: the role of women

40

Wiener, Seth 
Shih, Ya-ting 

The Ohio State University

[ʋan.shaŋ.xao]: The growing exposure of /w/ as [ʋ] in spoken Mandarin

41

Zimman, Lal

University of Colorado, Boulder

The somatechnics of the voice: Testosterone and pitch change among female-to-male transgender speakers

8:00-10:00Student Mixer, Location: Root Cellar - Farm Bloomington, 108 E. Kirkwood Ave.
(within walking distance).

Find Franklin Hall on the Campus Map on Page 9.  This is to the west of the Indiana Memorial Union.
Kirkwood Avenue runs into Indiana Avenue, on which Franklin Hall is situated.
Walk west down Kirkwood Avenue for 6 blocks. 
After you cross Washington Street, Farm Bloomington will be on the left, before you arrive at Walnut Street.
(You can enter through the restaurant or through the door at the back of the building)

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Saturday, October 27, 2012

7:30-11:00 Registration (and packet pick-up) - Frangipani Room, IMU
7:30-8:30 Continental breakfast (Frangipani Room and Tree Room Suite Lounge)
8:30-10:10 Concurrent Paper Sessions

Time

Session 13: Ideology
Location: GEORGIAN
Chair: Carmen Le Blanc

Session 14: Pragmatics
Location: DOGWOOD
Chair: Inmaculada Navarro

Session 15: Phonology-Consonants
Location: WHITTENBERGER
AUDITORIUM
Chair: John Singler

8:30-8:55

Kodi Weatherholz, Kathryn Campbell-Kibler, & Florian Jaeger, The Ohio State Univ. & Univ. of Rochester.
Liberals, compromisers, and accented speakers: Social influences on syntactic alignment

César Félix-Brasdefer, Indiana Univ.
Intra-lingual Pragmatic Variation in US Midwest English Service Encounters

James Walker, York Univ.
Velar Nasals in Toronto English

8:55-9:20

Brian Brubaker, Univ. of Pittsburgh.
The Normative Standard of Mandarin in Taiwan: An Analysis of Language Ideologies and Variation in Metapragmatic Speech in Taiwan

Isla Flores-Bayer, Stanford Univ.  Tsk, yeah right!: Negative affect and the social meaning of clicks in Chicano English

Jon Forrest, North Carolina State Univ.
Old Variant in a New Perspective: The Urbanization of IN'/ING Variation in Raleigh, NC

9:20-9:45

Rania Habib, Syracuse Univ. Identity, ideology, and attitude in child and adolescent speech

Elizabeth Peterson & Johanna Vaattovaara, Univ. of Helsinki. Native vs borrowed politeness markers in Finnish: competing or complementary?

Christina Schwaller, North Carolina State Univ.
The Sociolinguistic Significance of /ð/ Assimilation

9:45-10:10

Marta Pereira Scherre & Anthony Julius Naro, Univ. Federal do Espírito Santo & Univ. Federal do Rio de Janeiro. 
Sociolinguistic correlates of negative evaluation: Variable concord in Rio de Janeiro.

Kelly Farmer, Indiana Univ. 
"De quoi tu parles?": A diachronic study of interrogative variation in French films

Hanna Ruch, Institute for Phonetics and Speech Processing, LMU Munich.
Investigating a gradual metathesis: Production and perception of /s/aspiration in Andalusian Spanish

10:10-10:30         Beverage Break – Frangipani Room and Whittenberger Lobby
10:30-12:10         Concurrent Paper Sessions

Time

Session 16: African American English
Location: GEORGIAN
Chair: Ceil Lucas

Session 17: Morphosyntax-Pronouns
Location: DOGWOOD

Chair: Barbara Vance

Session 18: Phonology-Consonants
Location: WHITTENBERGER
AUDITORIUM
Chair: Brian José

10:30-10:55

Sonya Fix, CCAD.
Age of Second Dialect Acquisition and Linguistic Practice Across Ethno-racial Boundaries the Urban Midwest

Hannah Washington, The Ohio State Univ.
Shifting Tendencies: Variable Object Clitic Placement in European Portuguese

Tanya Flores, Indiana Univ.
Variation of the /tr/ cluster in Chilean public speech

10:55-11:20

Mary Kohn & Charlie Farrington, Univ. of North Carolina-Chapel Hill & Univ. of Oregon. 
A Tale of Two Cities: Community Density and African American English Vowels

Ana María Díaz Collazos, Univ. of Florida.
Variation and Change of Second Person Pronouns in Colombian Spanish

Erin O'Rourke & Stephen Fafulas, Univ. of Alabama & Indiana Univ. Lenition of intervocalic stops in Amazonian Spanish bilinguals

11:20-11:45

Walt Wolfram & Janneke Van Hofwegen , North Carolina State Univ. & Stanford Univ.
Composite Dialect Indexes Confront Variationism: The Case of AAE

Xiaoshi Li, Michigan State Univ. Subject Pronominal Expression by Chinese L2 Learners

Laura Kastronic, Univ. of Ottawa.  Liaison in French Spoken in the Capital Region of Canada

11:45-12:10

Charlie Farrington, Univ. of Oregon.
The social distribution of devoicing in urban Southern African American English

Kimberly Geeslin, Bret Linford & Stephen Fafulas, Indiana Univ.
The development of second language variation: The case of subject expression in Spanish

James Smith, Univ. of Toronto.
It's a bik deal: Sociophonetic Variation of Word-Final Stop Voicing in Toronto English

12:10-2:00 Lunch
12:30-1:45 Tribute to Gillian Sankoff, Georgian Room
Organized by Michael Friesner, Maya Ravindranath, & Suzanne Evans Wagner
2:00-4:00 Concurrent Panels
Panel 1 -  Computer-Mediated Communication and Language Variation
Organizer: Susan Herring   
Location: DOGWOOD

Panel 2 – Variation in Ex-Colonial Language
Organizer: Clancy Clements
Location: OAK

Panel 3 – Sociophonetics of Midwest English
Organizers: Brian José and Stuart Davis
Location: WHITTENBERGER
AUDITORIUM

4:00-4:10              Beverage Break, Frangipani Room and Whittenberger Lobby
4:10-5:50              Concurrent Paper Sessions

Time

Session 19: Social Evaluation
Location: GEORGIAN
Chair: Greg Newall

Session 20: Morphosyntax
Location: DOGWOOD
Chair: Natsuko Tsujimura

Session 21: Phonology-Vowels
Location: WHITTENBERGER
AUDITORIUM
Chair: Allen Davis

4:10-4:35

Erica Benson & Megan Risdal, Univ. of Wisconsin & North Carolina State Univ.
Variation in Language Attitudes: Sociolinguistic Receptivity and Acceptability of Linguistic Forms

Anton Karl Ingason & Julie Anne Legate, Univ. of Pennsylvania.
The Evolutionary Trajectory of the Icelandic New Passive

Lars Hinrichs & Axel Bohmann, Univ. of Texas-Austin.
Degree of fronting and F2 trajectory type in the Central Texas GOOSE vowel

4:35-5:00

Anita Szakay, Molly Babel, & Jeanette King, U. of British Columbia & NZILBB / Univ. of Canterbury.
Social context trumps superficial similarity in long-term priming

Laurel Mackenzie & CharlesYang, Univ. of Manchester & Univ. of Pennsylvania. 
English auxiliary realization and the independence of morphology and phonetics

Hayley Heaton, North Carolina State Univ.
As Seen on TV: An Acoustic Analysis of American Southern Dialect in Fictional Television Programs

5:00-5:25

Marie Maegaard, Nicolai Pharao, Janus Spindler Møller & Tore Kristiansen, Univ. of Copenhagen.
Indexical meanings of [s+] among Copenhagen youth: Social perception of a phonetic variant in different linguistic contexts

Nicholas Roberts, Univ. of Newcastle.
A Caribbean Perspective on Global Linguistic Trends: The Future of Martinique French

Aaron Dinkin, Swarthmore College. 
Cooperstown, New York as a site of new-dialect formation

5:25-5:50

Tyler Kendall, William Rivers & Robin Dodsworth, Univ. of Oregon, JNCL-NCLIS & North Carolina State Univ.
Grouping speakers and assessing speaker groups: A case study of Chinese Americans in New York City

Alexandra D'Arcy & Sali Tagliamonte, Univ. of Victoria & U. of Toronto.
Vernacular repercussions of adaptive change

Hilary Prichard, Univ. of Pennsylvania.
Northern dialect evidence for the chronology of the Great Vowel Shift

6:00-7:00 Keynote Lecture: An Immodest Proposal
Dennis Preston, Oklahoma State University
Ballantine Hall 013
7:00-8:30 Dinner (on your own)
8:30-11:00 Party at Grand Hall, Neal-Marshall Black Culture Center

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Sunday, October 28, 2012

8:00-9:00 Continental Breakfast, Frangipani Room
8:00-9:00 Business Meeting, Distinguished Alumni Room
9:00-10:40 Concurrent Paper Sessions
Time

Session 22: Gender
Location: DOGWOOD
Chair: Richard Cameron

Session 23: Morphosyntax
Location: OAK
Chair: Kelly Sax

Session 24: Phonology-Vowels
Location: GEORGIAN
Chair: Michael Becker

9:00-9:25

José Ignacio Hualde, Marianna Nadeu, & Oihanna Lujanbio, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.
Lenition of plosives in Goizueta Basque: Phonetics, phonology and gender 

Corinne Etienne, Univ. of Massachusetts–Boston.
Exploring French native speakers' attitudes toward ne-deletion by non-native speakers of French

Rebecca Roeder & Matt Hunt Gardner, Univ. of North Carolina-Charlotte & Univ. of Toronto.
The Phonology of the Canadian Shift Revisited: Thunder Bay and Cape Breton

9:25-9:50

Marta Pereira Scherre, Lilian Coutinho Yacovenco & Daisy Bárbara Borges Cardoso, Univ. Federal do Espírito Santo & Secretaria de Estado de Educação do Distrito Federal.
Rethinking the Gender Paradox: The notion of markedness

Ruth King, York Univ.
Auxiliary Selection in North American French: The Case of Pronominal Verbs

David Durian, The Ohio State Univ.
Inception and Development of the Canadian Shift in the US Midland

9:50-10:15

Evan Hazenberg, Memorial Univ.
Identity, privilege, and linguistic choice: covariation in gender-marked forms

Carmel O’Shannessy, Univ. of Michigan. 
Development of an innovative auxiliary paradigm in Light Warlpiri, a new mixed code in northern Australia

Michael Fox, North Carolina State Univ.
The Role of Undershoot and Transition in the Low Back Vowel Merger

10:15-10:40

Erez Levon & Sophie Holmes-Elliott, Queen Mary Univ. of London & Univ. of Glasgow. 
East end boys and west end girls: /s/-fronting in southeast England

Kirk Hazen, Madeline Vandevender, & Kevin Walden, West Virginia Univ.
Variables in the Mist: Multiple Variable Analysis for English in Appalachia

Vincent Hughes, William Haddican, & Paul Foulkes, Univ. of York & Queens College, CUNY.
The dynamics of variation and change in Manchester English back vowels

10:40-11:00         Beverage Break, Frangipani Room
11:00-12:40         Concurrent Paper Sessions

Time

Session 25: Methodology & Pedagogy
Location: DOGWOOD
Chair:  Walt Wolfram

Session 26: Tense, Aspect, Mood
Location: OAK
Chair: Miriam Meyerhoff

Session 27: Phonology-Vowels
Location: GEORGIAN
Chair: Tessa Bent

11:00-11:25

Chris Montgomery, Patricia Cukor-Avila, Betsy Evans,  Dennis Preston, Danny Long & Philipp Stoeckle, Univ. of Sheffield, Univ. of North Texas, Univ. of Washington, Oklahoma State Univ., Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. & Univ. of Frieburg.
A Geographical Information Systems (GIS) approach to Perceptual Dialectology data

Philip Comeau, Univ. of Ottawa.
Future Temporal Reference in Acadian French: Evidence from a Conservative Variety

Bill Kretzschmar, Univ. of Georgia.
Small Sample Sizes in Variationist Research

11:25-11:50

Christopher Stewart & Jared Kenworthy, Univ. of Texas- Arlington.
Social Cognition and Sociolinguistic Processing - Automatic Vigilance and Ingroup Identification

Gerard Van Herk, Memorial Univ.
Using the past to explain the past: Aspect and past temporal reference in urbanizing Newfoundland English

Rajind Mesthrie & Alida Chevalier, Univ. of Capetown.
Towards a regional and social dialectology of South African Englishes: a study of the BATH vowel

11:50-12:15

Jill Hallett, Univ. of Illinois.
Perspectives on dialect variation in the urban classroom

Laurel MacKenzie & Meredith Tamminga, Univ. of Manchester & U. of Pennsylvania.
Non-local conditioning of variation: Evidence and implications

Lucas Annear, Sarah Saenz, Libby Siebrecht, Trini Stickle, Nicholas Williams, Thomas Purnell, Eric Raimy & Joe Salmons, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison.
Coherence of phonological environment classes in a dialect transition area

12:15-12:40

Ann Olivo & Nancy Niedzielski, Rice Univ.
Teaching English Variation in the Classroom: A Linguistic Approach to Language Variation in a Houston

Sara Zahler & Meagan Day, Indiana Univ. & Univ. of Florida.
Tener + past participle: Towards a new present perfect form in modern Peninsular Spanish?

Robin Dodsworth, North Carolina State Univ.
The inception of dialect contact: Social factors in an urban setting

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