Indiana University

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Genetics

Contents of this Section

The Validity of Using Hair Color in Animals to Understand Hair Color in Humans

If we examine the hair colors in mammals, we tend to find the same colors we see in humans. There are brown, black, blonde, red, much the same as in humans. We often see colors in patterns in animals, which is rare in humans, but the colors themselves are still the same ones. The fact that the colors are the same in animals and in humans suggests that we can gain insight into the inheritance of hair color by studying animals as well as studying humans.


Black Hair

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Brown Hair

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Blonde Hair

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Red Hair

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Colors in Patterns

 

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Labrador Retrievers as a Model System to Study the Inheritance of Hair Color