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Some Definitions of Emotions

From introductory psychology texts

Sternberg, R. In Search of the Human Mind, 2nd Ed.Harcourt, Brace, 1998 p 542 "An emotion is a feeling comprising physiological and behavioral (and possibly cognitive) reactions to internal and external events."

Nairne, J. S. Psychology: The Adaptive Mind. 2nd Ed. Wadsworth, 2000. p. 444 " . . . an emotion is a complex psychological event that involves a mixture of reactions: (1) a physiological response (usually arousal), (2) an expressive reaction (distinctive facial expression, body posture, or vocalization), and (3) some kind of subjective experience (internal thoughts and feelings)."



From a book in which many researchers in the field of emotion discuss their views of some basic issues in the study of emotion. (Ekman, P., & Davidson, R. J. The Nature of Emotions: Fundamental Questions. Oxford, 1994)

Panksepp, Jaak p 86. .Compared to moods, "emotions reflect the intense arousal of brain systems that strongly encourage the organism to act impulsively."

Clore, Jerald L p 184. ". . . emotion tems refer to internal mental states that are primarily focused on affect (where "affect" simply refers to the perceived goodness or badness of something). [see Clore & Ortony (1988) in V. Hamilton et al. Cognitive Science Perspectives on Emotion and Motivation. 367-398]

Clore, Jerald L p 285-6. "If there are necessary features of emotions, feeling is a good candidate. Of all the features that emotions have in common, feeling seems the least dispensable. It is perfectly reasonable to say about ones anger, for example,'I was angry, but I didn't do anything,' but it would be odd to say 'I was angry, but I didn't feel anything.' "

Ellsworth, Phoebe p 192. ". . . the process of emotion . . . is initiated when one's attention is captured by some discrepancy or change. When this happens , one's state is different, physiologically and psychologically, from what it was before. This might be called a "state of preparedness" for an emotion . . . The process almost always begins before the name [of the emotion is known] and almost always continues after it.

Averill, James R. p 265-6. "The concept of emotion . . . refer[s] to (1) emotional syndromes, (2) emotional states, and (3) emotional reactions. An emotional syndrome is what we mean when we speak of anger, grief, fear, love and so on in the abstract. . . . For example, the syndrome of anger both describes and prescribes what a person may (or should) do when angry. An emotional state is a relatively short term, reversible (episodic) disposition to respond in a manner representative of the corresponding emotional syndrome. . . . Finally, and emotional reaction is the actual (and highly variable) set of responses manifested by an individual when in an emotional state: . . . facial expressions, physiological changes, overt behavior and subjective experience."

LeDoux, Joseph E. p 291. "In my view, "emotions" are affectively charged, sujectively experienced states of awareness."