Indiana University Research & Creative Activity

Democracy

Volume XXVIII Number 1
Fall 2005

Table of Contents

Editor's Notes

Abstracts

The Last Page


Looking for Extracts? Our round-up of new faculty works has moved. Please visit www.research.iu.edu, and click on News and Publications.

by Michael Wilkerson

After 34 years of service, more than 16,000 votes cast, and a stint as vice chairman of the 9/11 Commission, Lee Hamilton reflects on what is wrong with Congress and how to fix it.

by Lauren J. Bryant

The American Democracy Project inspires faculty and students alike to make a difference in their communities.

by Jeremy Shere

What would Alexis de Tocqueville say if he visited America today?

by Ryan Piurek

Are we brainwashed by images and words that dictate the meanings of democracy? Two cultural critics say yes.

by Ryan Piurek

The lines between red and blue may be sharply drawn, but that doesn't mean we're clear on what we stand for.

by Jennifer Piurek

Despite information overload, voter apathy, and manipulation of the news, online media may offer us meaningful politics again.

by Elizabeth Rosdeitcher

Are we as globalized as we think?

by Debra Kent

A former director of the Indiana Civil Liberties Union and Republican candidate for Congress considers the state of today's civil liberties.

by Debra Kent

In the wake of the Orange Revolution, the real work of reforming Ukraine is in progress, and IU's Parliamentary Development Project is on hand to help.

by Lauren J. Bryant

Far from the world of cases and moot courts, a law professor helps Burmese revolutionaries create a just society.

by Daniel Comiskey

Now a research scholar, a former president of Liberia continues his work to bring peace to his war-weary people.

by Michael Wilkerson

The key to improving democracy today, says pioneering civil rights lawyer Alvin Chambliss, is reforming America's historically discriminatory higher education system.

by David Bricker

Worms, spam, and 'phishing' abound, but still, we shop, play, and pay online in growing numbers. What's the fate of our privacy?