Indiana University Bloomington

  RCCPB > Events > Colloquium Series    
 
For a downloadable version of the calendar of events, please click here.
     November 14, 2014 

Symposium: "New Trends in Corporate Political Activity in China"

The “Symposium on Government Affairs in China: New Developments in Practice and Research” will review the state of research and trends in the recent practice of industry's government affairs activities, which will serve as a basis for considering future research and collaboration. The event will bring together leading Chinese and international scholars of government-business relations in and veteran practitioners from industry to discuss a range of topics concerning various types of actors, government affairs strategies, and the measuring of results.

The symposium will be held in the primary event space at the IU China Office in Beijing.

Time: 9:00 am-5:30 pm

Location: IU China Office, Beijing, China

     November 7, 2014 

Colloquium: "A Long-Term Perspective on China's Past and Future Development"

Thomas Rawski, Professor of Economics and History at the University of Pittsburgh, will deliver a lecture on November 7, 2014 as part of the RCCPB Fall 2014 Colloquium Series. His lectured is titled "A Long-Term Perspective on China's Past and Future Development."

The talk will be held in the Room CG1014 of the Kelley School of Business from 4:00-5:30pm. The colloquium is free and open to the public, no RSVP is necessary.

Time: 4:00-5:30 pm

Location: Room CG1014, Godfrey Graduate and Executive Education Center, Kelley Schoo of Business

     October 16, 2014 

Event: China Town Hall: Local Connections, National Reflections

The Research Center for Chinese Politics and Business (RCCPB) and East Asian Studies Center (EASC) will co-host the 8th annual China Town Hall event. Sponsored and organized by the National Committee on United States-China Relations, a broadcasted address by Former President Jimmy Carter will be accompanied by a local talk from Nicholas Bequelin, Human Rights Watch and the China Center, Yale Law School. Gardner Bovingdon will give opening remarks and lead discussion on the evening’s telecast lecture.

This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served.

Time: 6:00-8:30pm

Location: State Room East, Mezzanine Level, Indiana Memorial Union

     October 3, 2014 

Colloquium: The Rise of Ethical Consumerism in China

Deng Xinming, Associate Professor at the Economics and Management School of Wuhan University and Visiting Scholar at the IU RCCPB, will deliver a lecture on October 3, 2014 as part of the RCCPB Fall 2014 Colloquium series. His lecture is titled "The Rise of Ethical Consumerism in China."

The talk will be held in Room PV276 of the School of Public & Environmental Affairs from 4:00-5:30pm. The colloquium is free and open to the public, no RSVP is necessary.

Time: 4:00-5:30pm

Location: Room PV276, School of Public & Environmental Affairs

     May 2, 2014 

Colloquium: Migration and the Well-Being of China’s Rural Families and Communities

John Giles, Senior Labor Economist in the Development Research Group at the World Bank, will deliver a lecture on May 2, 2014 as part of the RCCPB Spring 2014 Colloquium series. His lecture is titled "Migration and the Well-Being of China’s Rural Families and Communities."

The talk will be held in the Maple Room of the Indiana Memorial Union from 5:00-6:30pm. The colloquium is free and open to the public, no RSVP is necessary.

Time: 5:00-6:30pm

Location: Maple Room, Indiana Memorial Union

     April 25, 2014 

Colloquium: Building Blocs: Historical Contributions to CO2 emissions and the Coming Realignment

Edward Cunningham, assistant professor at Boston University’s Department of Geography and Environment and the director of the Harvard Kennedy School Ash Center’s Asia Energy and Sustainability Initiative, will deliver a lecture on April 25, 2014 as part of the RCCPB Spring 2014 Colloquium series. The title of his lecture will be “Building Blocs: Historical Contributions to CO2 emissions and the Coming Realignment”.

The lecture will be held in the SPEA building’s room PV277 from 4:00-5:30pm. The talk will be free and open to the public, no RSVP is necessary.

Time: 4:00-5:30pm

Location: PV277, SPEA Building, Bloomington

     April 11, 2014 

Colloquium: Open Government in a Closed System: Political Reform or Placebo for the PRC

Jamie Horsley, Senior Research Scholar in Law, Executive Director of the China Law Center, and Lecturer in Law at Yale Law School will deliver a lecture on April 11, 2014 as part of the RCCPB Spring 2014 Colloquium series. The title of her lecture will be “Open Government in a Closed System: Political Reform or Placebo for the PRC”.

The lecture will be held in Room 124 at the Maurer School of Law from 4:00-5:30pm. The talk will be free and open to the public, no RSVP is necessary.

Time: 4:00-5:30pm

Location: Room 124, Maurer School of Law

     Febuary 14, 2014 

Colloquium: Windfalls of Emperor’s Sojourns: Stock Market Reactions to Chinese Firms Hosting High Ranking Government Officials

Doug Schuler, associate professor of business and public policy at Rice University, will deliver a lecture on February 14, 2014 as part of the RCCPB Spring 2014 Colloquium series. The title of the talk will be “Windfalls of Emperor’s Sojourns: Stock Market Reactions to Chinese Firms Hosting High Ranking Government Officials”.

The lecture will be held in the Maple Room of the Indiana Memorial Union from 4:00-5:30pm. The talk will be free and open to the public, no RSVP is necessary.

Time: 4:00-5:30pm

Location: Maple room, Indiana Memorial Union

     January 17, 2014 

Colloquium: Where have the Good Old Days of Moderate China Gone? Foreign Policy Implications of Chinese Nationalism Revisited

On January 17, 2013, Suisheng Zhao will deliver a lecture titled “Where have the Good Old Days of Moderate China Gone? Foreign Policy Implications of Chinese Nationalism Revisited” as part of the RCCPB Spring 2014 Colloquium series. Suisheng Zhao is an editor of the Journal of Contemporary China and Director of the Center for China-US Cooperation at the University of Denver.

The lecture will be held in the Maple room of the Indiana Memorial Union from 4:00-5:30pm. The talk will be free and open to the public; no RSVP is necessary.

Time: 4:00-5:30pm

Location: Maple room, Indiana Memorial Union

     November 7, 2013 

Roundtable: Global Gridlock: Why Global Cooperation is Failing When We Need It Most

Why is global governance failing when we need it most? Dr. Thomas Hale’s new book Gridlock: Why Global Cooperation is Failing When We Need It Most argues that that problem is gridlock – a set of trends hampering multilateral cooperation across all areas of global politics.

At this roundtable Thomas Hale (Ph.D., Princeton, currently a postdoctoral fellow at Oxford University) will provide an overview of the book and explain how China's rise is affecting multilateralism. His presentation will be followed by commentary and open discussion. Commentators for this roundtable include Scott Kennedy (Director, RCCPB, Indiana University), and He Fan (Deputy Director, CASS Institute of World, Economics & Politics).

Copies of the book will be available at the event. You may also find related summaries here and here. The event, which will be in English, is free and open to the public.

Time: 9:30-11:30 am

Location: 15th Floor, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, 5 Jianguomennei Dajie, Beijing

     November 1, 2013 

Colloquium: Suing Dragons? Taking the Chinese State to Court

Every year, lawyers sue the Chinese government in tens of thousands of cases. Some, like Chen Guangcheng, have lost their careers and freedom and even endangered their families as a result.

This talk raises and answers the question: “Why do Chinese lawyers sue the state?” Based on almost two years of fieldwork in China, 178 interviews, and two surveys, Dr. Givens shows that radical lawyers like Chen who directly challenge the state are a tiny minority. Instead, those that most commonly sue the state are the same lawyers who will defend it in another case. These lawyers are insiders whose close connections to the state make them effective litigators and shield them from retribution, even as it moderates more radical opposition to the regime. Yet, a minority of other lawyers are unwillingly compelled to sue the state by friends, family, clients, and acquaintances. Dr. Givens provides a cogent picture not only of which lawyers litigate administrative cases and why, but of the political impact of China’s legal professionals on liberalization and democratization.

John Givens is a Post-Doctoral Research Associate at the Center for Asian Democracy at the University of Louisville. His research, based on two years of fieldwork and 175 interviews, is about lawyers who sue the Chinese state. He also consults for a non-profit organization that works with Chinese lawyers.

Time: 4:00-5:30 pm

Location: Persimmon Room, Tree Suites, Indiana Memorial Union

For this event's flyer, please click here

     October 28, 2013 

Event: China Town Hall: Local Connections, National Reflections

The Research Center for Chinese Politics and Business (RCCPB), East Asian Studies Center (EASC) and the Indiana University Chinese Flagship Center will co-host the 7th annual China Town Hall event. Sponsored and organized by the National Committee on United States-China Relations, a broadcasted address by Former Secretary of State Madeline Albright will be accompanied by speeches delivered by experts at locations across the United States.

At Indiana University, Director of the Chinese Flagship Center Yea-Fen Chen and RCCPB Director Scott Kennedy will preside over program. The evening will begin with a Chinese-language lecture delivered by Dr. Wenqi Dong titled “The Historical Development and Current Status of Chinese Non-Profit Organizations” as part of the Chinese Flagship Center’s China Tidings Lecture Series. Prof. Gardner Bovingdon will deliver the second lecture of the evening titled "China, the International Community, and the Problem of Borders". The Town Hall attendees will then view Former Secretary of State Madeline Albright’s broadcasted remarks. Following these remarks, closing commentary will be delivered by the hosts and presenters.

This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served.

Time: 5:30-8:00 pm

Location: State Room East, Mezzanine Level, Indiana Memorial Union

For this event's flyer, please click here

     October 7, 2013 

Colloquium: The Reporter in Life and Death in Early Republican China

Historian Timothy Weston (U. Colorado, Boulder) will present the lecture, "The Reporter in Life and Death in Early Republican China," on Monday, October 7, 4:00-5:30 pm, in the IMU's Persimmon Room.

Abstract: The concept of the reporter came into being in China in the early twentieth century. While China had "journalists" before that time, the idea that a journalist might gather news through his own industriousness was altogether new and quite consistent with the elevation of republican ideals following the overthrow of the imperial system in 1911. The rise of the reporter signaled, too, a novel understanding of what constituted news and of where news was made and located. Ideas about reporters as professionals who served society were discussed in academia and in the press itself, and the deaths of celebrity journalists in the late 1920s prompted commentary on the heavy responsibility of reporters and on their potential to be heroic champions of the people's interests. Though challenged by pervasive state power and corrosive public cynicism, conceptions of the ideal reporter remain present in contemporary China.

Timothy Weston is Associate Professor in the Department of History and Associate Director of the Center for Asian Studies at the University of Colorado, Boulder. He is author of The Power of Position: Beijing University, Intellectuals, and Chinese Political Culture, 1898-1929 (2004), and co-editor of China Beyond the Headlines (2000), China's Transformations: The Stories Beyond the Headlines (2007), China in and Beyond the Headlines (2012).

Time: 4:00-5:30 pm

Location: IMU's Persimmon Room

For a flyer, please click here

     March 25, 2013 

Colloquium: Doing Business in China, India and ASEAN

In "Doing Business in China, India and ASEAN", Kevin Thieneman will discuss his experience living and working in Asia, some of the key business challenges as well as critical success factors. The scope will cover product design, supplier development, manufacturing operations, distribution, marketing as well as government policy.

Speaker: Kevin Thieneman is President of Caterpillar Forest Products and based in LaGrange, Georgia. Caterpillar Inc. is the world's leading manufacturer of construction, mining and forestry equipment, diesel electric locomotives, diesel and natural gas engines, and industrial gas turbines. It is also a leading services provider through Caterpillar Financial Services, Caterpillar Remanufacturing, and Progress Rail Services. Prior to assuming his current position in January 2013, Kevin spent the last six years in Asia. While based in Singapore from 2007 to 2010, he had responsibility for Caterpillar's manufacturing operations in Indonesia and India as well as country management responsibility for India and ASEAN. Kevin was based in Beijing from 2011 to 2012 and served as Caterpillar's country manager for China, India and ASEAN.

Time: 4:00-5:15PM

Location: Room CG1014, Kelley School of Business, IU-Bloomington

For a flyer, please click here

     November 12, 2012 

Colloquium: A Case Study of China’s Administrative Law Crisis: The Unlawful Enforcement of Insider Trading Prohibitions

China’s securities regulator, the China Securities Regulatory Commission (CSRC), enforces insider trading prohibitions pursuant to non-legal and non-regulatory internal “guidance.”  Reported agency decisions indicate that enforcement against insider trading is often possible only pursuant to this guidance, as the behavior identified is far outside of the scope of insider trading liability provided for in statute or regulation.  In this presentation, Professor Howson will argue that the agency guidance is itself unlawful and unenforceable. He will outline potential Chinese law challenges to the norms and their enforcement by the CSRC, and analyze why there is such marked tolerance to plainly illegal rule-making and enforcement by what is commonly understood to be one of China’s best administrative agencies. Professor Howson will also show that the infirmity underlying the basis for well-governed and investor-attracting capital markets identified has implications not only for China’s securities regulation regime, but also for the entirety of China’s legal and administrative law system in the reform era.

Speaker: Nicholas Howson is a Professor of Law at the University of Michigan Law School, visiting at the Berkeley Law School Fall 2012.  He is a former partner of the New York-based international law firm, Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison, who practiced in New York, Beijing, London and Paris, and he has taught at the Columbia, Cornell and Harvard Law Schools.

Time: 12:00-1:30PM

Location: Room 335, Maurer School of Law, IU-Bloomington

For a flyer, please click here

For a downloadable version of Enforcement Without Foundation? - Insider Trading and China's Administrative Law Crisis please click here

 
     October 29, 2012 

Event: China Town Hall: Local Connections, National Reflections

Schedule and Speakers:

6:00-7:00 pm: Tidings Lecture, Zhao Shuang "China-US relations: Opportunities and Challenges"
7:15-8:00 pm: Lecture, Scott Kennedy; “US-China Relations: Viewed from an American in Beijing"
8:00-8:45 pm: National Speaker (via webcast) Ambassador Gary Locke
8:45-9:30 pm: Concluding remarks and Q&A

This event is sponsored by the National Committee on United States-China Relations, the East Asian Studies Center, the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures, the IU Chinese Flagship Center, and the Research Center for Chinese Politics and Business.

For additional information visit, please visit the official events webpage: Click here or visit IU East Asian student center webpage: Click here

Location: State Room East, Mezzanine Level, Indiana Memorial Union

Monday, October 29, 2012, 6:00-9:30 pm

 
     September 21, 2012 

Colloquium: China’s Emerging Role in the Global Governance of Food Security

China, which faces severe resource and environmental constraints, has now reached a critical juncture in its capacity to maintain self-sufficiency in basic foods. Despite abundant grain reserves, an estimated 10 percent of the population is still undernourished. China’s food security concerns have a significant impact on the broader effort to eliminate world hunger and ensure a reliable supply and fair distribution of food on a global scale. In recent years, Beijing has encouraged the outsourcing of agricultural production overseas, expanded agricultural development projects, and increased its role in providing emergency food relief. Now an active, albeit reluctant, stakeholder in the global governance of food security, the question arises of how China’s emerging role is likely to shape the future direction of the international food regime. This lecture will outline the major trends in food security governance at the global level, address the vexed question of what constitutes food security in the Chinese context, and assess the extent to which China’s current involvement in agricultural investments, food aid, and global policymaking is aligned with international norms and practices.

Speaker: Katherine Morton is Associate Dean for Research at the College of Asia and the Pacific and Senior Fellow in the Department of International Relations, The Australian National University. She is a specialist on China and International Relations with a particular focus on environmental and climate governance, non-traditional security, regional cooperation, and international norms. She is currently involved in a major collaborative research project on ‘Climate Change and Water Security across the Himalayan-Tibetan Plateau’ with the Chinese Academy of Sciences. 

Time: 4:00-5:30PM

Location: Oak Room, Mezzanine Level, Indiana Memorial Union, IU-Bloomington

For a flyer, please click here
 
     April 20, 2012 

Colloquium: Faiths on Display: Religion, Tourism, State in China

Siegfried Kracauer once said that “The hotel lobby is the inverted symbol of the House of God.”  But is tourism really a substitute for ‘secular modernity’?  The current global rise of ‘spiritual tourism’ would perhaps suggest not.  Indeed, at least one scholar has famously conceived of tourism as nothing less than a ‘sacred spiritual journey.’  But is tourism, then, a modern substitute for spirituality?  Again, anyone observing vacationers in Venice or gamblers in Las Vegas might be hard pressed to make such a connection.  This talk will focus on exploring the relationship between tourism and religion, and will do so in the context of the concurrent rise of tourism and religious practice over the past several decades in China.  I will argue that the conundrums found in the tourism-religion relationship mirror a deeper epistemological dualism inherent in modernist thought, and that paying more attention to tourism as a social process and project of social ordering helps us see more clearly what is going on in China, an officially atheist state that has nevertheless been busy promoting religious tourism, though not always promoting it on purpose.

Speaker: Tim Oakes is Professor of Geography at the University of Colorado at Boulder.  He is the author of Tourism and Modernity in China (1998), and has edited seven books, including Real Tourism: Practice, Care, and Politics in Contemporary Travel Culture (2011), Faiths on Display: Religion, Tourism, and the State in China (2010), and Translocal China: Linkages, Identities, and the Reimagining of Space (2006).  He is currently working on a book about heritage tourism in China.

Time: 4:00-5:30

Location: Room CG 1008, Kelley School of Business, IU-Bloomington campus

For a flyer, please click here

 
     April 13, 2012

Colloquium: Updating the China Model: New Challenges for New Leaders

With new leaders about to come to power in China, the ruling Communist Party is also making significant changes to its development model, such as encouraging more domestic consumption instead of relying on exports, and building "national champions" instead of relying on the private sector. What challenges does the party face in this transition? What will be the political implications of these changes?

Speaker: Bruce Dickson is Professor of Political Science and International Affairs at the George Washington University. His research and teaching focus on comparative politics, the political dynamics of authoritarian regimes, and the prospects for political change in China. His research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the Smith Richardson Foundation, and the U.S. Institute of Peace. He is the author of Wealth into Power: The Communist Party's Embrace of China's Private Sector (2008), and co-author of Allies of the State: China's Private Entrepreneurs and Democratic Change (2010).

Time: 4:00-5:30 pm

Location: Room CG 1008, Kelley School of Business, IU-Bloomington campus

For a flyer, please click here

 
     February 23, 2012

Colloquium: The Massification of Chinese Higher Education: Consequences for China's Youth

This talk analyzes the causes, consequences, and meanings of the sudden increase in the numbers of Chinese students receiving higher education. From a low of approximately 3% just two decades ago to almost 25% in 2006, higher education is no longer an elite and rare good, but is increasingly "massified." Such independent pursuit of limited opportunities has consequences for the nature of youth and the very meaning of childhood. Though the number of youth has been stabilizing because of China's birth policies, the competition for entry into the expanding programs of higher education remains fierce. Debates about education often reveal debates about human and social ideals. As Mao and others showed, the very nature of education has the effect of changing society. Chinese intellectuals knew this a century ago, as New Youth drove reform; the current situation is both similar and different in instructive ways. We find enduring centralization and increasing privatization; social and individual goals; and focus on international competition.

Speaker: Susan D. Blum is Professor and Chair in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Notre Dame, where she has also served as Director of the Center for Asian Studies. At Notre Dame she is also a Fellow of the Helen Kellogg Institute for International Studies and the Institute for Educational Initiatives. Among her writings are Portraits of “Primitives”: Ordering Human Kinds in the Chinese Nation (2001), Lies that Bind: Chinese Truth, Other Truths (2007), and most recently My Word! Plagiarism and College Culture (2009). She is currently engaged in two projects: one is a book titled Learning versus Schooling: A Professor’s Reeducation and the other is a comparative study of higher education.

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Time: 4:00-5:30 pm

Location: Room CG 1008, Kelley School of Business, IU-Bloomington campus

For a flyer, please click here.

 
     January 27, 2012

Colloquium: Friends with Benefits? Trends and Implications of Chinese Foreign Direct Investment in the United States

Developments in Chinese direct investment in the United States are poorly understood both by Americans and by Chinese. Even the simple rate of growth in these flows in not recognized. In the US, China's outward FDI is presumed to be an indication of government intentions, and a sign of strength. On the Chinese side, it is commonly believed that the US has the means and intention to keep Chinese investment out. Elsewhere in the world, it is suspected that Chinese firms will pass the US in preference for friendlier domiciles like Europe. All these assumptions are wrong and controvertible based on good arithmetic. While the quality of analysis on Chinese outbound investment is improving, the state of understanding of the implications remains primitive. A time of new insight and thinking lies just before us.

Speaker: Dan Rosen, Adjunct Associate Professor of International and Public Affairs, Columbia University, Founder and China Practice leader of the Rhodium Group (RHG), and Fellow with the Peterson Institute for International Economics in Washington, DC, and author of Behind the Open Door: Foreign Enterprises in the Chinese Marketplace (1998) and co-author of China's Energy Evolution: The Consequences of Powering Growth at Home and Abroad (forthcoming 2008, with Trevor Houser), Prospects for a US-Taiwan Free Trade Agreement (2004, with Nicholas Lardy), Roots of Competitiveness: China's Evolving Agriculture Interests (2004, with Scott Rozelle and Jikun Huang), and APEC and the New Economy (2002, with Catherine L. Mann).

Time: 4:00-5:30 pm

Location: State Room East, Indiana Memorial Union, 900 E. 7th St., Bloomington, IN 47408

For a flyer, please click here.

 
     November 29, 2011

Colloquium: Environmental, Economic, and Cultural Sustainability and China’s Ecological Migration Policy: Changing Society and Culture in Ejene District, Inner Mongolia

In China, there is an ongoing policy of forced migration based on the principle of environmental conservation. This is called “ecological migration” (生态移民, shengtai yimin in Chinese), and it has been roughly translated into English as the “forced relocation of people for preserving and/or restoring the ecological environment”. These policies also have the characteristic of being integrated conservation and development projects because they economically benefit local people who live in inconvenient circumstances on the grassland. The purpose is to relieve poverty due to desertification.

“Ecological migration” is directly rooted in the national interest and can be traced, in part, to the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games, awarded to that city in 2001. In 2000, 2001 and 2002 sandstorms frequently hit North China including Beijing. These sandstorms originated in Northwestern and Western China, mainly Inner Mongolia, where it is believed that severe desertification is in progress. This severe desertification of Inner Mongolia was identified as the origin of the sandstorms.

This talk will describe the reaction of the regional administration and the local people, and reveal the contradiction of ecological migration policies and the political structure using a case study of Ejene banner, Northwest China by first exploring the environmental problem and the ecological migration policy implemented in Ejene banner. The contradictions of the policy will then be discussed, focusing on the underlying attitude to pastoralism. Situations, problems, and reactions of the regional administration and the local people will be examined, followed by a consideration of the economic and political structure. In so doing, the changes to regional society and community will be considered as will, the importance of pastoralism for Mongolian culture and environmental conservation.

Speaker: Kanako Kodoma is Associate Professor at the Eurasian Languages and Cultures, Faculty of Letters, Chiba University, Japan. Her recent writings include the jointly edited An Oral History of Mothers in the Ejene Oasis, Inner Mongolia (Kyoto: SHOKADOH book sellers, forthcoming); “The groundwater resource crisis caused by ‘ecological migration’: Case studies of Mongolian pastoralists in Ejene Banner, Alasha League in the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region” in Masayoshi Nakawo, Yuki Konagaya and Shinjilt (eds.), Ecological Migration: Environmental Policy in China (Peter Lang Pub Inc, 2011); “Dissecting the ideology of tree-planting campaigns; case based reconsideration of Japanese green volunteers in Inner Mongolia,” (in Chinese), (primary author), in Japanese Studies of Contemporary China 2009; “Settled Mongolian pastoralist’s strategy to combat desertification: A case study of Uushin banner, Inner Mongolia, China,” (in Japanese), in Nobuhiro Kishigami (eds.), Development and Indigenous people (Tokyo; Akashi Shoten Co., Ltd., 2009).

For her full biography, please click here:

Time: 4:00-5:30

Location: State Room East, Indiana Memorial Union, 900 E. 7th St., Bloomington, IN 47408

For a flyer, please click here.

 
     November 16, 2011

5th Annual CHINA Town Hall

Speakers: Professor Andrew Kipnis, who received his PhD from North Carolina, Chapel Hill, is a Senior Fellow in the Department of Political and Social Change in the School of International, Political and Strategic Studies and School of Culture, History and Language in the College of Asia and the Pacific at the Australian National University.

Dr. Zbigniew Brzezinski, former national security advisor and current counselor and trustee of the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, D.C. 

China's rapid development and Sino-American relations have a direct impact on the lives of nearly everyone in the United States. CHINA Town Hall: Local Connections, National Reflections, is a national day of programming designed to provide Americans across the United States and beyond the opportunity to discuss these issues with leading experts.

Dr. Brzezinski’s remarks focusing on important issues in U.S.-Chinese relations will be delivered by webcast beginning at 7:00 p.m.  At 7:45, Professor Kipnis will deliver a talk entitled “Chinese Nation-Building as, instead of, and before Globalization” during which he will explore nation-building in China in an era of globalization.

This event is sponsored by the National Committee on United States-China Relations, the ANU-IU Pan Asia Institute, the IU East Asian Studies Center, and the Research Center for Chinese Politics and Business.

For additional information visit www.iub.edu/~panasia/events/cth  or http://www.ncuscr.org/programs/cth.

Time: 6:45-9:00 pm

Location: Georgian Room, Indiana Memorial Union, 900 E. 7th St., Bloomington, IN  47408

For a flyer, please click here.

  
 
     April 15, 2011

Colloquium: "New Challenges in Chinese Rural Governance"

Speaker: Dr. Jean Oi, William Haas Professor in Chinese Politics, Department of Political Science, Stanford University.

Time: 4:30-6:00 pm

Location: Georgian Room, 2nd Floor, Indiana Memorial Union 900 E. 7th Street, IU-Bloomington campus

For a flyer, please click here.

Notice: Dr. Oi will also participate in a roundtable discussion related to her current research, 2:00-3:30 pm, in Woodburn 218. The roundtable will discuss Dr. Oi's paper, "Shifting Fiscal Control to Limit Cadre Power in China's Towns and Villages," forthcoming in the China Quarterly (for a copy, please email Scott Kennedy at kennedys@indiana.edu). Students and faculty are welcome to attend this event.

 
 
     February 4, 2011

Colloquium: "China's Troubled Rise: Bumps on the Road to Becoming a Superpower"

Speaker: John Pomfret, Diplomatic Correspondent for Asia, The Washington Post.

Time: 10:30-12:00 pm

Location: Room 4095, Kelley School of Business 801 W. Michigan St., IUPUI Campus, Indianapolis

For a flyer, please click here.

  
 
     February 3, 2011

Colloquium: "China's Troubled Rise: Bumps on the Road to Becoming a Superpower"

Speaker: John Pomfret, Diplomatic Correspondent for Asia, The Washington Post.

Time: 5:00-6:30 pm

Location: Ernie Pyle Hall Room 220 940 E. 7th Street, IU‐Bloomington Campus

For a flyer, please click here.

  
 
     November 15, 2010

Colloquium: “Playing Our Game: China, Industrial Development, and Political Change”

Speaker: Edward Steinfeld, Associate Professor of Political Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, co-director of the MIT Industrial Performance Center’s China Energy Group, and author of Playing Our Game: Why China’s Rise Doesn’t Threaten the West (Oxford University Press, 2010).

Time: 4:00-5:30 pm

Location: Room CG 1034, Kelley School of Business, IU-Bloomington campus

For a flyer, please click here.

  
 
     November 8, 2010 (CANCELLED)   

Colloquium: “Chinese Experiences – Crisis & Soft Landing”

Speaker: Wen Tiejun, Professor and Executive Director, Institute of Advanced Studies for Sustainability, Renmin University of China

Time: 12:30-2:00 pm

Location: IMU Dogwood Room, 900 E. 7th Street, IU‐Bloomington campus

Flyer will be available soon.

No RSVP necessary.

  
 
     November 3, 2010   

Symposium: “The East Asian Developmental State: Separating Fact from Fiction”

Speakers: Rick Doner, Emory University; Jeffrey Hart, IU Political Science; Heon Joo Jung, IU EALC; Gregory Kasza, IU EALC and Political Science; and Scott Kennedy, IU RCCPB, EALC and Political Science.

Time: 5:00-7:00 pm

Location: IMU Oak Room, Indiana Memorial Union, 900 E. 7th St., IU-Bloomington campus

Co-sponsored with the East Asian Studies Center

For a flyer, please click here.

  
 
     October 20, 2010

Colloquium: “‘Ethnic Conflicts’ or ‘Mass Incidents’? How to Understand the Ethnic Relations from a Holistic Perspective”

Speaker: Yang Zhongdong, Associate Professor, Xinjiang University School of Humanities

Time: 1:30-3:00 pm

Location: IMU Sassafras Room, 900 E. 7th Street, IU‐Bloomington campus

For a flyer, please click here.

  
 
     September 23, 2010

Colloquium: “Is Rural China More Harmonious? Assessing Change in Five Counties, 2002-2010”

Speaker: Ethan Michelson, Associate Professor, Sociology, East Asian Languages and Cultures, and Law, Indiana University

Time: 12:00-1:30 pm

Location: Maurer School of Law, Room 335, 211 S. Indiana Ave., IU-Bloomington campus

For a flyer, please click here.

For more information and photos, please click here.

  
 
     September 16, 2010   

Colloquium: "Foreign Models and Institutional Change: A Study of China's Civil Service Reforms"

Speaker: Hongying Wang, Associate Professor of Political Science at the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, Syracuse University

Time: 4:00-5:30 pm

Location: Maple Room, Indiana Memorial Union, 900 E. 7th St., IU-Bloomington campus

For a flyer, please click here.

For more information and photos, please click here.
   

 
 
     March 31, 2010   

Symposium: “Chinese Workers: Under Threat or a Threat to American Workers?”

Speakers: Virginia Ho, Visiting Professor, IU Maurer School of Law; Zhang Lu, RCCPB Postdoctoral Fellow; and Liu Jialu, Doctoral Candidate, IU Economics Deparment

Time: 4:00-5:30 pm

Location: Oak Room, Indiana Memorial Union, 900 E. 7th St., IU-Bloomington campus

Free Refreshments. No RSVP necessary.

For a flyer, please click here.

   
   
     March 4, 2010   

Colloquium: “China’s Outward Foreign Direct Investment: New Trends and Opportunities”

Speakers: Presentation by Marjorie Lyles and Dan Li, IU Kelley School of Business, with commentary by Benjamin Shobert, Managing Director, Teleos, Inc.

Location: Oak Room, Indiana Memorial Union, 900 E. 7th St., IU-Bloomington campus

For a flyer, please click here.

 
 
     February 4, 2010   

Colloquium: “Political Development in China: The Role of Civil Society”

Speaker: Chu Songyan, Professor of China National School of Administration and guest researcher at the Center for Civil Society Studies at Peking University

Location: Maple Room, Indiana Memorial Union, 900 E. 7th Street, IU‐Bloomington Campus

For a flyer, please click here.

   
   
     November 21, 2008   

IU Research Center for Chinese Politics & Business
IU Center on Law, Society, and Culture

“The Chinese Worker after Socialism”
Professor William Hurst
University of Texas-Austin

Friday, November 21
4:00 p.m.
IU Law School Faculty Conference Room (#335)
(Light refreshments will be served.)

In this talk Professor Hurst provided an overview of his new book of the same title (available this coming March from Cambridge University Press). After three decades of reform, China acquired a commanding presence on the world stage. But there was another side to this great transformation. China's impressive gains brought significant social dislocation, in particular for groups that had been winners under socialism, but found themselves losers in the new post-socialist order. This talk, based on a forthcoming book, focused on one such group – laid-off state owned enterprise (SOE) workers – some of whom began to openly wonder, "with nothing to eat, can this still be called socialism?". Based on 21 months of field research in 9 Chinese cities and 300 in-depth interviews, the book explains: 1) how and why state sector lay-offs occurred; 2) what responses the state has taken and how they succeeded or failed in providing for workers' livelihoods and promoting re-employment; 3) the methods workers used to cope with their unemployment and their informal strategies for re-employment; and 4) patterns of workers' contention and state response.

Professor Hurst has been Assistant Professor of Government at the University of Texas-Austin since 2007, after completing his Ph.D. in Political Science at UC-Berkeley and a post-doctoral research fellowship at the University of Oxford. In addition to the book he introduced in this talk, Professor Hurst has also published several journal articles and an edited book on Chinese labor politics. He has a new research project on China's criminal justice system. Beyond his expertise on China, Professor Hurst also studies Indonesia.

For more information, visit the RCCPB's website: www.indiana.edu/~rccpb/ , or contact Ethan Michelson.

   
 
     September 18, 2008   

The RCCPB and the IU Center on Law, Society, and Culture co-hosted a talk by Professor Zhang Jing titled, "How Do People Define Justice in Transitional China?" Thursday, September 18, 4:00 p.m. in the IU Law School Faculty Conference Room (#335). How are popular definitions and perceptions of "justice" and "fairness" changing as China transforms from a planned economy to a market economy, and as the Chinese state abandons its ideological commitment to egalitarianism and legitimates inequality? In this talk, drawing from multiple sources of evidence, including in-depth interviews in six provinces, 53 basic-level court cases concerning civil property disputes, changing patterns of legal discourse in criminal court cases over the past thirty years, and the case of the liquidation of assets in a state-owned "collective" enterprise in Beijing, Professor Zhang summarized key findings from her ongoing research on rapidly changing popular conceptions of justice in China.

Professor Zhang is Professor of Sociology at Peking University, and a senior research fellow at the Peking University Center for Civil Society Studies. She is among a very small handful of social scientists in China conducting empirical sociolegal research. She received her Ph.D. from the Department of Sociology at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. Her research on civil society, legal mobilization, citizenship, and inequality in urban and rural China has been supported by the Ford Foundation and China's National Social Science Foundation. In 2003-4 she was a visiting scholar at Harvard University's Fairbank Center.For more information contact Ethan Michelson.

     
   
       November 6, 2007
 

Victor Yuan (袁岳), CEO and Chairman of the Board of Horizon Research Consultancy Group, China's most prestigious polling firm, gave a speech about trends in business and social science polling in China at IU on Tuesday, November 6.

    "Looking Over the Horizon: Surveying Business and Social Life in China."
    12:00-1:30 pm
    Dogwood Room, Indiana Memorial Union

Founded in 1992, Horizon is one of China's leading providers of market research and strategic consulting services for large multination and Chinese companies. Horizon also conducts survey-based studies about trends in Chinese society and politics. Victor Yuan is CEO and Chairman of Board of Horizon as well as vice president of the China Market Research Association. He has a Ph.D. in sociology from Peking University, a Masters in Public Administration from the Kennedy School at Harvard University, and a Masters degree in law from Xinan University of Law and Politics. He is currently a visiting scholar at Yale University. For photos of this event, click here.

 
 
       October 24, 2007
 

A roundtable discussion on the domestic and international aspects of Burma's ongoing political crisis. Jointly co-sponsored by RCCPB, the Burmese Students Association, the Center for Constitutional Democracies in Plural Societies, the Center on American and Global Security, and the India Studies Program. RCCPB Director Scott Kennedy will discuss China's relationship with Burma and the cost-benefit calculations shaping Chinese policy.

     Burma's Political Crisis: The Fate of the Saffron Revolution.
    12:00-1:30 pm
     Law School Faculty Conference Room
     Free and open to the public

For a program flyer, click here.

 
   
   
     
       September 7, 2007
 

Robert Kapp, former president of the US-China Business Council, gave two addresses on the Indianapolis and Bloomington campuses on Friday, September 7:

  "Will US-China Relations Survive an American Election Season?"
11:30 am -1:30 pm
Lucheon Speech
Ballroom, 1st Floor, University Place, 850 West Michigan Street, Indianapolis
   
 

"Then and Now: Some Longer-Term Perspectives on Politics and Business in China Today"
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Keynote Speech for RCCPB Inaugural Event
Persimmon Room, Indiana Memorial Union, IU-Bloomington campus
Free and open to the public

Robert Kapp is president of Robert A. Kapp & Associates, a consulting firm for companies pursuing business development with, and in, the People's Republic of China. From 1994-2004 he was president of the US-China Business Council, the leading business association representing American industry in China. Before his entry into the business community, Dr. Kapp (Ph.D., History, Yale University) taught Chinese history at Rice University and the University of Washington. Both events were co-sponsored by RCCPB and the IU Center for International Business Education and Research (CIBER).

     
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