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weekly calendar upcoming events

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Please note that all entries listed are abridged and that full descriptions can be found in the links.

August 2016

  • The Teaching Russian Conference
    August 24-25, 2016 | University of Victoria (Canada)

    Please join us August 25-26, 2016 for the 5th biennial Teaching Russian conference on the beautiful, leafy campus of the University of Victoria (Canada).

    Notification of the Program Committee’s decisions will be sent out by June 10, 2016. The Program Committee of the Teaching Russian Conference invites paper proposals on all topics relating to sustaining healthy Russian programs, innovative curriculum development and language technologies, creating field schools and travel abroad programs, teaching Russian at the secondary level, community outreach, and more. Please see the more detailed Call for Papers on our website: http://web.uvic.ca/~russconf. (CV, Individual paper proposal and Roundtable proposal forms are available on the website.)

    For all questions, please contact Megan Swift (maswift@uvic.ca -or- 250.721.7504).

  • Call for Proposals: Fifth International Conference on Language Documentation & Conservation, "Vital Voices: Linking Language & Wellbeing"
    Deadline for NSF-Supported Workshops and Roundtables: June 30, 2016
    Deadline for General Submissions: August 31, 2016

    "Wellbeing" is a state of the body and mind that encompasses the presence of positive moods and emotions, life satisfaction, fulfillment and positive functioning, and the absence of negative emotions like anxiety. Public health experts, policymakers and economists are coming to recognize the implications of wellbeing for society as a whole, as well as individuals, thanks to a growing set of results from cross-sectional, longitudinal and experimental studies.

    Increasingly, researchers in several fields have noted a positive correlation between language maintenance and wellbeing in endangered language communities. While the nature of the connection between language and wellbeing remains the subject of much debate, the existence of a connection is not entirely unexpected, given the range of outcomes associated with wellbeing. In addition, languages encode knowledge systems, so language loss represents not only the loss of a communicative system, but also the loss of traditional knowledge systems. Importantly, traditional knowledge systems encode cultural practices related to well-being. Understanding the connections between language and wellbeing will potentially have implications for public health and policy and beyond, but also for language researchers, since traditional knowledge systems are among the most threatened domains of endangered language. Knowledge of esoteric domains such as botanical classification and traditional medicines is forgotten well before basic vocabulary and language structure. Hence, these areas of traditional knowledge are precisely the areas which need to be prioritized by language documenters.

    Exploring the connections between language and wellbeing is potentially transformational for language documentation and conservation, and thus it will be the theme for the 5th ICLDC.

    Please see the website for complete details.

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September 2016

    Soyuz Article Prize Competition
    September 1, 2016

    The Soyuz Research Network for Postsocialist Cultural Studies announces the opening of its first *Article Prize competition* for the best article related to the culture, history, politics of postsocialism by a junior scholar. This prize recognizes significant contributions to the advancement of scholarly understandings of postsocialism, broadly defined. Articles published in 2015 and 2016 by a scholar who has earned a PhD within the past six years (2010 or later) are eligible. Scholars from any discipline with any geographic area of interest are encouraged to apply. Submissions should be sent electronically to Jennifer Carroll at jennifer_carroll@brown.edu no later than *September 1*.

      Call for Papers: AATSEEL-Wisconsin Conference
      September 15, 2016

      Abstracts for 20-minute papers on any aspect of Slavic literatures, cultures (including film, music, and the visual arts), linguistics, and history are invited for the annual conference of the Wisconsin chapter of AATSEEL (The American Association of Teachers of Slavic and East European Languages). Comparative topics and interdisciplinary approaches are welcome and encouraged. The conference will be held at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on Friday and Saturday, October 7 and 8, 2016.

      Recent conference programs are available on the AATSEEL-WI website at http://slavic.lss.wisc.edu/new_web/?q=node/7

      This year's keynote lecture will be delivered by Professor Olga Maiorova (University of Michigan.

      To present a paper at the AATSEEL-WI conference, please submit a proposal by August 31, 2016.

      A complete proposal consists of:
      1. Author's contact information (name, affiliation, postal address, telephone, and email).
      2. Paper title
      3. 300-500 word abstract
      4. Equipment request (if necessary)

      Please send proposals by email to: Melissa Warner, mmwarner@wisc.edu

      Please include “AATSEEL-WI” in the subject line of your email. All submissions will be acknowledged and considered, and all applicants will be informed of the status of their proposals no later than September 15.

    • Call for Papers: Central Slavic Conference
      September 1, 2016

      The Central Slavic Conference is pleased to invite scholars of all disciplines working in Slavic, Eurasian, and East European studies to submit proposals for panels, individual papers, and roundtables at its annual meeting to be held in St. Louis, Missouri, USA, October 21-23, 2016.
      Founded in 1962 as the Bi-State Slavic Conference, the Central Slavic Conference now encompasses seven states and is the oldest of the regional affiliates of ASEEES (Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies). Scholars from outside the region and from around the world are welcome.
      A section of the conference will be devoted to marking the 60th anniversary of the 1956 Hungarian Revolution, and we are pleased to announce the conference keynote address:
      “Hungary,1956: Revolution or Counterrevolution? The Continuing Relevance of the Debate” Nyirkos Tamas, Pazmany Peter Catholic University, Budapest

      Proposals for papers, panels, and roundtables should be submitted by email to CSC President Dr. David Borgmeyer at CentralSlavic@outlook.com no later than September 1, 2016. Early proposals are encouraged. All proposals should include:

       Participant name, affiliation, and email contact information;
       For individual paper presentation: title and brief description (limit 50 words);
       For panels: panel title + above information for each participant and discussant (if applicable);
       For roundtables: roundtable title and participant information.

      For the first time ever, the CSC will dedicate a separate portion of the conference to undergraduate research presentations. Faculty are encouraged to support conference proposals from undergraduate students for this new section of the conference. Limited funding is available to provide graduate and undergraduate students with travel stipends.

      Charles Timberlake Memorial Symposium
      Now a regular part of the CSC program, the symposium is dedicated to the memory and scholarly interests of longtime CSC member Charles Timberlake. Those interested in participating should contact symposium coordinator Dr. Nicole Monnier at CentralSlavic@outlook.com.

      Timberlake Memorial Graduate Paper Prize
      Students who present at the CSC Annual Meeting are invited to participate in the Charles Timberlake Graduate Paper Prize competition. Dedicated to the memory of Professor Timberlake as a teacher and mentor, the prize carries a cash award.

      CSC registration and hotel reservation information will be available on the CSC website: http://www.slu.edu/international-studies-program/central-slavic-conference.

    • Deadline for Nominations: Association for Women in Slavic Studies Mary Zirin Prize
      Deadline: September 1, 2016

      The Association for Women in Slavic Studies (AWSS) is pleased to announce a call for nominations for the Mary Zirin Prize in recognition of an independent scholar in the field of Slavic Studies. The award of $500 is named for Mary Zirin, the founder of Women East-West.

      Working as an independent scholar, Zirin produced and encouraged fundamental works in Slavic/East European Women's Studies and has been instrumental in the development of the AWSS. The Prize aims to recognize the achievements of independent scholars and to encourage their continued scholarship and service in the fields of Slavic or Central and Eastern European Women's Studies.

      The Committee encourages the nomination of candidates at all career stages. For the purpose of this award, an independent scholar is defined as a scholar who is not employed at an institution of higher learning, or an employee of a university or college who is not eligible to compete for institutional support for research (for example, those teaching under short-term contracts or working in administrative posts). We welcome nominations from CIS and Central and Eastern Europe.

      The Zirin Prize Committee will accept nominations (including self-nominations) until September 1, 2016. Nominations must include: (1) a nomination letter of be no more than two-pages double-spaced; (2) the nominee's current curriculum vitae; and (3) a sample publication (e.g., article or book chapter). The nomination letter must describe the scholar's contribution to the field, as well as work in progress.<

      Nominations should be sent to Marilyn Smith at msmith@fivecolleges.edu, or by postal mail to Marilyn Schwinn Smith, 14 Allen Street, Amherst, MA 01002.

    • Call for Proposals: The Soviet Home: Domestic Ideology And Practice
      Deadline: September 1, 2016 | The Inaugural Fisher Forum Workshop at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, June 23-24, 2017

      Co-Conveners: Deirdre Ruscitti Harshman (UIUC) and Rebecca Friedman (FIU) FisherWorkshop@gmail.com"

      "Home" is a universal but diffuse category, one that suggests a common sense of belonging and even nostalgia, while simultaneously dependent on individual or group subjectivities. Within Russian and Soviet studies, the concept of home has played a critical role in many fields, including the study of political culture, everyday life, gender and sexualities, work and labor, consumer patterns, and childhood. The concept of the home—and its sometimes adjunct "homelessness"—also invokes questions about the meanings of modernity, the categories of public and private life, and of Russian-then-Soviet development vis a vis the image of the West.

      This conference will begin to address these questions head on. How did normative understandings of the home–whether as an ideology, a built environment, a set of materialities, or the space of memory–emerge or transform after 1917 and throughout the period of Soviet rule? How were these ideas manifest in practice and theory differently across the empire, both near and abroad?  How have ordinary Russians, or elites such as officials, artists, architects, writers (whether literary or popular), understood the meaning of domestic ideology and practice, the space of the home and emotions of home life? How have planners, architects, and others created familial spaces and how have those who lived in them reacted to them? How have these ideals and realities changed over time?

      We welcome contributions from scholars from a multitude of disciplines to engage with us in a pre-circulated paper workshop on topics that might include, but are not limited to:
      SPACE: How did individuals and collectives imagine the home and how did they create domestic spaces, whether the domestic interiors or the buildings themselves? How did the expectations of domestic space shift across the multi-ethnic and multi-cultural Soviet Union?
      LABOR & WORK: How was domestic labor understood by the new Soviet regime? How was it gendered? What did domestic labor look like in the Soviet context? What differences existed between domestic work done by residents, and that done by domestic workers (domashnie rabotnitsy)?
      MATERIAL & VISUAL CULTURE: Transformations of the home are, at their base, a transformation of material culture. How was the transformation of material culture used to create a form of Soviet domesticity? What role do the related issues of material culture, such as shortages, play in this narrative?
      REPRESENTATIONS OF THE HOME: Because the home is such a diffuse topic, it can be difficult to trace as an object of study.  How has the Soviet home been imagined and represented throughout the Soviet era?  How do these representations transform across time and space?
      EMOTION(S): The idea of the "home" has, for many, an intense emotional resonance. How have ideas of the home operated as emotional signifiers? How have they functioned within the Soviet context
      GENDER & SEXUALITY: The home became a major site of contention for those interested in the "women's question." In what ways were conceptions of gender and the home co-constituted? How did the gendering of the home change over time? How do the gender expectations of elites differ from the experiences of women in their everyday lives?
      EMPIRE: How did ideas of the home differ across the wide and varied space that was the Soviet Union? Were there attempts to unify the idea of what the home should be?
      POLITICS & POLITICAL CULTURE: How did narratives of domesticity and the home inform the political landscape in revolutionary Russia (a la Richard Wortman)? Did the state/party serve as an alternative, even imaginary, "home" for some? To what degree were home and home life on the political agenda of politicians, state actors and ordinary citizens?

      Information for Applicants<
      The papers from this workshop, on the above themes and more, will form the basis of an edited volume to be organized with the workshop participants following the event.  Please send a 300-500 word abstract and a short CV by September 1, 2016 to fisherworkshop@gmail.com. Grad students, early career and established scholars from all relevant disciplines welcome.

      All applicants who are also interested in the University of Illinois' Summer Research Lab (http://www.reeec.illinois.edu/srl/) are strongly encouraged to also apply to the SRL, as SRL participants are eligible to apply for additional travel and housing funding, which can be used to attend the workshop. We will also have limited funds available to defray the costs for other participants. Please note in your application if you would like to apply for travel and/or housing funding.

    • Call for Submissions: Association for Women in Slavic Studies 2016 Graduate Essay Prize
      Deadline: September 1, 2016

      AWSS invites submissions for the 2016 Graduate Essay Prize. The prize is awarded to the author of a chapter or article-length essay on any topic in any field or area of Slavic/East European/Central Asian Studies written by a woman, or on a topic in Slavic/East European/Central Asian Women's/Gender Studies written by a woman or a man. This competition is open to current doctoral students and to those who defended a doctoral dissertation in 2015-2016. If the essay is a seminar paper, it must have been written during the academic year 2015-2016. If the essay is a dissertation chapter, it should be accompanied by the dissertation abstract and table of contents. Previous submissions and published materials are ineligible. Essays should be no longer than 50 double-spaced pages, including reference matter, and in English (quoted text in any other language should be translated). Completed submissions must be received by September 1, 2016. Please send a copy of the essay and an updated CV to each of the three members of the Prize Committee as email attachments. Please address any questions to the chair of the prize committee. (Professor Karen Petrone [Chair], petrone@uky.edu | Professor Adrienne Harris, Adrienne_Harris@baylor.edu | Professor Amy Randall, arandall@scu.edu)

      Please see the website for more details.

    • Application deadline: Fulbright Competition
      Campus deadline: September 7, 2016

      Indiana University campus deadline for the Fulbright Competition.

      Undergraduate students at Indiana University seeking guidance in applying for a Fulbright can contact Paul Fogleman of Competitive Awards and Research (IUCARE):
    • Graduate students can contact the staff at the Grad Grads Center:

      The campus deadline for the 2016/2017 Fulbright application is September 7, 2015. Campus reviews will take place ahead of the October 14, 2015 national deadline.

      http://www.iu.edu/~iucare/Award%20Pages/Fulbright%20Scholarship.html


    • Deadline for Abstracts and Registration: The 8th International Media Readings in Moscow, "Expanding Media Frontiers in the XXI Century: The Impact of Digitalization upon Media Environment"
      Deadline: September 10, 2016

      Today media systems of different countries tend to acquire similar features due to a variety of reasons, including the processes of globalization and the change in national media cultures, encompassing professional values and traditions, level and type of commercialization, government regulations, organizational dynamics, technologies, audiences, etc.

      Although many countries in the world still retain their national specifics determined by their unique social, cultural and political landscapes, we cannot but notice that this specifics is oftentimes replaced by the tendencies of the global character, which have significant influence on media systems of these countries. These tendencies include but are by no means limited to the active use of new digital technologies and social media by journalists; an attempt of media outlets to reach out to a broader audience instead of focusing on particular political or social groupings; the spread of user generated content and the subsequent re-consideration of professional journalists’ mission; a shift to common business models and common media platforms, which is particularly acute for traditional print media creating online versions today, and much more.

      The conference aims to discuss current transformations of media systems across the world, identify factors, which may lead to these transformations, outline possible outcomes of this ‘homogenization’ trend for national cultures and identities, and to discuss best ways to classify media systems in the current context, relying on fundamental works of Siebert, Peterson & Schramm (1956), McQuail (2000), Hallin & Mancini (2004) and other scholars.

      Please see the announcement for complete details.

    • Call for Applications: Transregional Research Junior Scholar Fellowship: InterAsian Contexts and Connections & Global Summer Semester Residency at the University of Gottingen
      Applications due September 19, 2016

      The Social Science Research Council is pleased to invite preliminary applications for its recently expanded and enhanced Transregional Research Junior Scholar Fellowship, funded with generous support from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Following on three successful grants cycles, through which more than fifty individual fellowships totaling nearly 2 million USD have been awarded, the SSRC is continuing its transregional grants program, offering a 2016 Junior Scholar grants competition and awarding approximately twenty grants of up to $45,000 to researchers in any world region.

      In addition, working closely with the CETREN Transregional Research Network at the University of Göttingen in Germany, the SSRC is pleased to offer a new category of fellowship in 2016 – the SSRC Global Summer Semester Residency at the University of Göttingen (residency dates April 15, 2017–July 15, 2017). Note: this award is subject to final grant approval from the German Ministry of Education and Research.

      These fellowships are aimed at supporting transregional research, strengthening the understanding of issues and geographies that do not fit neatly into existing divisions of academia or the world, and developing new approaches, practices, and opportunities in international, regional, and area studies. These fellowships help junior scholars (those at the postdoctoral stage, up to five years out of the PhD) complete first books and/or undertake second projects. In addition to funding research, the fellowships will create networks and shared resources that will support fellows well beyond the grant period through intensive workshops and activities that promote transregional perspectives on individual campuses. The Transregional Research Junior Scholar Fellowship and Global Summer Semester Residency will thus provide promising scholars support at critical junctures in their careers, advance transregional research, and establish structures for linking scholars across disciplines in the arts, the humanities, and the social sciences.

      Please see the website for more details.

    • 18th International Conference on German and European Studies
      September 19-20, 2016 | Chicago, Illinois

      The ICGES 2016: 18th International Conference on German and European Studies aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results about all aspects of German and European Studies. It also provides the premier interdisciplinary forum for researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns, practical challenges encountered and the solutions adopted in the field of German and European Studies.

      Please see the website for more details.

    • Funding: Faculty Domestic Conference Travel Grants (REEI/Mellon Endowment)
      Deadline: September 20, 2016

      Applications for funding of faculty travel to conferences in North America will be evaluated and awards made twice a year. Grants will not exceed $400, and faculty are encouraged to combine REEI funds with other IU sources. Only regular Russian & East European Institute affiliated faculty are eligible for support. Please contact REEI for information on becoming a faculty affiliate.

      Please see the REEI Faculty Funding website or email Mark Trotter for more details.

    • Conference: Central Europe and Colonialism: Migrations, Knowledges, Perspectives, Commodities
      September 21-23, 2016 | Wrocław, Poland

      Central Europe has not yet been an object of keener interest in (post)colonial studies. However, not only did large numbers of Central Europeans migrate to the (former) colonial world, but Central Europeans also provided personnel to occupy, administer and police colonial empires,and reflected on colonial experiences at the levels of high and popular culture. Even if largely excluded from colonial politics at an international level, Central Europeans played an important role in generating new discourses based on data gathered in the colonial contact zone. Publications on exotic worlds circulated widely in Central Europe and inspired new conceptions of world history, world literature, and cosmopolitanism, in conjunction with new concepts of human nature (esp. a division of humanity in races) and ecology, with wide ranging consequences for world history.

      Please see the website for more details.

    • Conference: “Vladimir Nabokov and the Fictions of Memory”
      September 22-23, 2016 | University of Social Sciences and Humanities (Warsaw, Poland)

      The University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Warsaw, Poland would like to invite proposals for presentations at an international conference devoted to the problem of memory in the works of Vladimir Nabokov. The conference will take place on 22-23 September 2016 in Warsaw. Almost 40 years after Nabokov’s death his texts continue to function as literary Fabergé eggs in which scholars keep finding hidden surprises and previously overlooked details. As Nabokov wrote in Conclusive Evidence, “the unravelling of a riddle is the purest and most basic act of the human mind.” However, readers and critics are divided on the issue of whether Nabokov is a postmodern riddle-maker enjoying the game itself without enabling the player to reach the ultimate solution, or whether the riddles are solvable by a reader astute enough to follow all the sophisticated patterns and allusions which point to Nabokov’s metaphysical convictions. One of the greatest riddles of Nabokov’s art is memory. From his very first poems and his first novel Mary to the unfinished manuscript of The Original of Laura, Nabokov’s writings abound in characters haunted by their past. This preoccupation is not simply a feature of loss and nostalgia characteristic of emigrant experience in general, but an attempt to examine the mechanisms which control the functions of human consciousness. While Nabokov explores his own remembrances, transferring his experiences to the characters of his fictions, it is never entirely clear how much of what is being recalled is in fact a construct of the imagination. Memory becomes an obsession for many of Nabokov’s heroes, who may often be described as mnemonic deviants, their crimes resulting from a falsified perception of reality which they constantly filter through the lenses of the past. Conversely, there are characters ennobled by their devotion to every fleeting detail of their existence, whether past or present. What is the function of memory in Nabokov’s texts? Is Nabokov really interested in objectively recalling the past or would it be more apt to say that he artfully constructs remembrance in order to deal with trauma, loss and disappointment? To what extent is the past reshaped through literary models and intertextual props? Does the past control us, as in Freud’s theories, detested and summarily dismissed by Nabokov, or is it possible to control the workings of memory and manipulate it in literary discourse?

      The languages of the conference are English and Russian.

      Please see the website for more details.

    • Conference: 11th Slavic Linguistics Society Annual Meeting
      September 23-25, 2016 | University of Toronto (Canada)

      The Slavic Linguistics Society (SLS) is a professional organization devoted to the systematic and scholarly study of the Slavic languages. The organization brings together academics from Europe and North America (and elsewhere) through an annual conference that alternates between North American and European institutions, a mailing list, and other activities. It seeks to promote dialogue across different sub-disciplines of linguistics and theoretical frameworks.

      Membership in the Slavic Linguistics Society is open to anyone, regardless of academic rank or employment. We particularly encourage graduate students to join (there is a reduced student membership fee!), and to become involved with the activities of the organization.

      Please see the SLS website or the conference website for more details.

    • 1st International Conference on “Europe in Discourse: Identity, Diversity, Borders”
      September 23-25, 2016 | Athens, Greece

      The Conference seeks to examine issues in the ongoing construction of European identity, including notions of diversity and (physical and symbolic) borders. It will focus on critical investigations that draw on discourse theory or bottom-up textual analysis to investigate these topics from the following perspectives:

      • historical, to explore the determinants which have been used to support a collective European identity;
      • geopolitical, to understand the importance of space and its role in the European edifice;
      • ideological/discursive, to investigate, synchronically and diachronically, key concepts that have informed EU practices of inclusion and exclusion.

      Methodologically, the Conference will highlight discourse as a major practice that both shapes and reflects European identity.

      The Conference welcomes contributions that investigate the role that key European Union texts have played in forging, maintaining or challenging European identities. The conference will thus highlight identity not as a static concept but as a construct that is continually negotiated and re-written in multiple discourses.

      In addition to attracting contributions from discourse analysts and linguists, the Conference hopes to bring together leading scholars and researchers from a broad range of other fields, including history, European studies, cultural theory, media studies, sociology, political science, economics, and ethnology.

      Please see the website for more details.

    • Conference: "Public Religion, Ambient Faith: Religious Institutions and Socio-Political Change in the Black Sea Region"
      September 29 - October 1, 2016 | Kyiv, Ukraine

      This workshop (29 September – 1 October 2016, Kyiv, Ukraine) is the third in a series of ongoing workshops on the anthropological study of religion in the Black Sea region. It aims to develop dialogue between established scholars and young researchers on the myriad ways in which religious institutions, communities and spiritual practices influence socio-political change in the region using ethnographic methods. The workshop will feature a keynote address by Matthew Engelke, London School of Economics, a working session on qualitative methodologies, along with paper presentations and discussions. We encourage scholars to move beyond narrow nation-state or confessional frames and to consider more incisively how interconnections, encounters and divides shape religious practices and socio-political change more broadly.

      The conference will explore such issues as:

      • modes of secularity and religious (inter)subjectivities
      • debates over secularism, human rights and identity
      • the relevance of concepts such as political Orthodoxy, civil religion, political theology and public religion for the study of religion in this region
      • the relationship between the sensorial, bodily knowledge, and the public sphere
      • ethnographies of doubt, indifference, vernacular religion, and the ‘spiritual but not religious’ phenomenon
      • religion, faith and the making of public space

      The workshop is funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation in cooperation with the research program Contact Zones. All travel and lodging costs of participants will be covered. Papers will be presented in thematic sessions and a publication of select papers is planned.

      Organizing Committee: Olena Bodgan, Kyiv Mohyla Academy; Liudmyla Fylypovych, Ukrainian National Academy of Sciences; Alexander Panchenko, European University at St. Petersburg; Marat Shterin, King’s College London; Catherine Wanner, The Pennsylvania State University.

      You may also view the announcement here.

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OCTOBER 2016

  • Faculty Grants-In Aid of Research
    Deadline: October 1, 2016

    The Russian and East European Institute administers the Mellon Faculty Grants-in-Aid of Research Program funded by the REEI Mellon Endowment. Under this program, all regular Institute faculty are eligible to apply for research grants of up to $700 per year. Priority will be given to the support of innovative proposals that show clear promise of developing into research projects of major significance and ultimately attracting substantial outside funding.

    Priority will also be given to proposals that encourage research collaboration between faculty and graduate students and to well-qualified applicants who have not previously held grants under this program. Recipients of REEI Summer Faculty Research Fellowships are not eligible to receive this award a second time for the same project in a single academic year.
    Among the kinds of activities which might be supported are:

    · Travel and per diem to initiate or complete research for a project.
    · Support of research assistants.
    · Source materials acquisition, photo-copying and computer expenses.
    · Clerical support.

    Application materials needed:

    · The application form, including a budget statement and project description;
    · A current curriculum vitae;
    · Two letters of recommendatation, one of which should come from the departmental chairperson.

    Applications and supporting materials are due to Emily Liverman, eliverma@indiana.edu, on October 1, January 15, and April 1 of every year.

  • REEI International Faculty Travel Grants
    Deadline: October 1, 2016

    REEI has set aside special Mellon Endowment funds (up to $850 per faculty member) to assist a limited number of faculty members in traveling to conferences abroad during each academic year. Applicants should be presenting a paper or otherwise participating in the program as a chair or discussant on a panel or roundtable.

    Applicants are encouraged, but not required, to apply to the Office of International Programs for travel support as well.

    Application materials needed:

    · Application form for Faculty Travel Grant/International
    · Itemized budget of expected expenditures;
    · A copy of the preliminary conference program showing the panel on which the applicant will be participating (or confirmation of faculty member participation from conference organizers);
    · An abstract of the paper;
    · Faculty members not presenting a paper should include a brief statement (one page) addressing the importance of their attendance for participation on a panel of for other purposes;
    · Current c.v.

    Applications are available at REEI.

    Applications and supporting materials are due to Emily Liverman, eliverma@indiana.edu, on October 1, January 15, and April 1 of every year .

  • Funding: REEI/Mellon Grants-in-Aid of Research
    Deadline: October 1, 2016

    Small grants are available to help graduate students who require modest support (up to $700/year) for research-related travel (domestic or international), travel for participation in a structured internship program, or travel for advanced language study in the Russian East European region. Grants may also be used for expenses related to publication of completed research. Students applying under this program may also be eligible for support under Office of International Programs, International Enhancement Grants. Please discuss your plans with the REEI staff before submitting an application.

    Please see the REEI Funding page for more details.

  • Funding: REEI/Mellon Conference Travel Grants
    Deadline: October 1, 2016

    REEI provides grants to help graduate students who specialize in the Russian East European region present their research at major association meetings and conferences. Student travel reimbursement is limited to minimum airfare or mileage (per IU guidelines), one night lodging, and conference registration fee. Students may also be eligible for conference travel support from the College of Arts and Sciences. Please check with your home department graduate advisor to see if you can be nominated. REEI domestic conference travel grants will not exceed $400 and international grants will not exceed $600.

    Please see the REEI Funding page for more details.

  • Funding: REEI/Mellon Faculty Grants-in-Aid of Research
    Deadline: October 1, 2016

    The Russian and East European Institute administers the Mellon Faculty Grants-in-Aid of Research Program funded by the REEI Mellon Endowment. Under this program, all regular Institute faculty are eligible to apply for research grants of up to $700 per year. Priority will be given to the support of innovative proposals that show clear promise of developing into research projects of major significance and ultimately attracting substantial outside funding.

    Please see the REEI Faculty Funding page for more details.

  • Funding: REEI/Mellon Faculty International Conference Travel Grants
    Deadline: October 1, 2016

    REEI has set aside special Mellon Endowment funds (up to $850 per faculty member) to assist a limited number of faculty members in traveling to conferences abroad during each academic year. Applicants should be presenting a paper or otherwise participating in the program as a chair or discussant on a panel or roundtable.

    Please see the REEI Faculty Funding page for more details.

  • Funding: CEUS Travel Award
    Deadline: October 1, 2016

    One of the important legacies Professor Denis Sinor left to CEUS was the tradition of supporting graduate student travel for academic conferences. The Central Eurasian Studies Department makes available to CEUS students who have been confirmed as conference presenters awards, on a competative basis, up to $350 Awards are based on merit, demonstrated need, and availability of funds. Students applying for conference funding should submit to ACES (aces@indiana.edu) the CEUS Travel Award Application and supporting documents no later than October 1 for travel between July-March of the following year and April 1 deadline for travel between January-August of the the same year. If you have not received confirmation from the conference organizers contingency awards may be made although funds cannot be distributed until confirmation is received. Requests for travel stipends will be evaluated by an ACES Committee.

    Please see the CEUS Funding page for more details.

  • Funding: Title VIII Fellowships for Spring and Summer 2017
    Application Deadline: October 1, 2016

    American Councils for International Education is pleased to announce that Title VIII fellowships are available for graduate students, faculty, and independent scholars seeking to conduct policy-relevant research during the spring and summer of 2017 in the following locations: Central Asia, Moldova, Russia, the South Caucasus, Southeast Europe, and Ukraine. Competition is currently open in two Title VIII fellowship categories:

    The American Councils Title VIII Research Scholar Program provides full support for graduate students, faculty, and independent scholars seeking to conduct in-country, independent research for three to eight consecutive months. Typical awards provide roundtrip international airfare from the recipient's home city, a monthly living and housing stipend, a single-entry visa, academic affiliation, medical insurance, archive access, and logistical support in the field.

    The American Councils Title VIII Combined Research and Language Training Program serves graduate students and scholars who, in addition to support for research, require supplemental language instruction. Typical awards provide roundtrip international airfare from the recipient's home city, a monthly living and housing stipend, a single-entry visa, academic affiliation, approximately ten academic hours per week of language instruction, medical insurance, archive access, and logistical support in the field. Open to U.S. graduate students, post-doctoral scholars, and faculty.

    Only U.S. citizens are eligible for these awards.

    About the Title VIII Program
    Funding for these programs is available through American Councils from the U.S. Department of State’s Program for Research and Training on Eastern Europe and the Independent States of the Former Soviet Union (Title VIII). All competitions for funding are open and merit based. All applications will receive consideration without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, national origin, marital status, political affiliation, or disability.

    Applying
    The application deadline for Title VIII fellowships is October 1, 2016. Please note that programs must begin between January 15, 2017 and June 15, 2017; and must be completed by September 15, 2017. Please find application guidelines at: http://researchfellowships.americancouncils.org/

    Contact
    For more information regarding applications, previously funded projects, and eligibility, please visit our website http://researchfellowships.americancouncils.org/ or email us at outbound@americancouncils.org. (You may also view a PDF version of this announcement here.)

  • Conference: VIII International Virtual Forum – “Humanitarian Aspects in Geo-cultural Space”
    October 1-6, 2016 | Online and Onsite at Istanbul University (Turkey)

    The International Coordinating Council (Armenia, Czech Republic, Italy, Russia, Slovak Republic, USA, South Korea, Japan) is continuing its project "Creating Virtual Educational and Scientific Space for a GlobalCommunity" and invites scholars and graduate students to participate in the VIII International Virtual Forum: Istanbul 2016: "Humanitarian Aspects in Geo-Cultural Space" which will be held 1-6 October, 2016 at the University of Istanbul, Turkey. Participation may be virtual with some limited on-site availability.

    Please contact tom.beyer@middlebury.edu or s.minasyanpmesi@gmail.com, or view the full anouncement for complete details.

  • Funding: University Graduate School Grant-in-Aid of Doctoral Research
    Deadline: October 2, 2016

    These awards provide funding for Bloomington graduate students for unusual expenses incurred in connection with doctoral dissertation research, such as travel to special libraries or laboratories, payments to consultants, specialized equipment, and duplication of vital materials needed for writing the dissertation. Expenses that are not supported include typing and duplicating of dissertations, tuition, normal living expenses, routine laboratory supplies, and computers.

    Please see the announcement for more details.

  • Conference: Reframing the Landscape: Historical VIsions of Place
    October 7-8, 2016 | Indiana University Bloomington

    This interdisciplinary conference seeks to understand landscape as constructed and contingent. How have historical subjects imagined their environs? How have guiding visions worked to shape place? How has place, in turn, affected historical narratives?

    Keynote address by Kristin Hoganson, Professor of History, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, on remapping local history for our global age.

    The History Graduate Student Association (HGSA) at Indiana University welcomes submissions from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds and covering a wide range of temporal and geographic settings. The conference follows a turn in historical scholarship toward the study of place. We are open to proposals that analyze how historical subjects have conceived of place as a material site and a conceptual space. We ask how new insights might be uncovered by understanding historical process as competing visions to shape urban, rural, national, imperial, or regional spaces.

    What methodological challenges and opportunities does reframing the landscape present? How, for example, might we recover visions contested, unfulfilled, or powerless?

    Abstracts are due no later than Friday, August 5, 2016. The HGSA Conference Committee will evaluate abstracts and inform participants by August 19, 2016 of their acceptance and panel assignment. Final papers are expected by Friday, September 30, 2016.

    We invite abstracts on the following themes; however, this list is by no means exhaustive:
    - Colonization, imperialism, and territorial or border conflicts
    - Urban and rural planning schemes
    - Regimes of control based on social categories, such as race, gender, class
    - Revolutionary and resistance movements
    - Cultural production as reflections of or resistance to norms, power, or violence
    - Representations of utopian and dystopian societies, including science fiction
    - Construction, use, or denial of sacred space
    - Environmental preservation and degradation
    - Transnational and global histories and issues of scale
    - Memory and memorialization

    Proposals are welcome from a variety of fields and disciplines, including but not limited to:
    - History
    - Anthropology
    - Political Science
    - Sociology
    - Geography
    - Art History & Literature
    - Religion
    - Area Studies
    - Cultural Studies
    - Gender Studies
    - Queer Studies

    Please submit the following information as pdf attachments to hgsaconf@indiana.edu:
    Paper title and abstract (no more than 400 words)
    Curriculum Vitae (2-3 pages)

  • Call for Submissions: University of California Undergraduate Journal of Slavic and East/Central European Studies
    Deadline: October 10, 2016

    Undergraduate students working in any relevant discipline are invited to submit their papers for consideration to the UC Undergraduate Journal of Slavic and East/Central European Studies.  All papers will be subject to peer review.

    While the papers will be due in a few months, right now we need a preliminary headcount. If you are planning to submit your paper, please email Prof. Yelena Furman with your name, preferred email, the title of your paper, and the name and email of your advisor: yfurman@humnet.ucla.edu

    It is expected that you will work with your advisor between now and the submission deadline on revising your paper. Please keep in mind that there is a large difference between a conference presentation and a written article. Your papers should have a well-formulated and well-developed thesis, with plenty of textual evidence to back it up. When citing a non-English language source, please give the quote in English translation in the body and in the original Slavic language in the footnotes. The papers should be a maximum of 25 double-spaced pages and need to include footnotes and a bibliography (the page limit is inclusive of the bibliography/footnotes). For the bibliography, please use the Chicago Manual of Style format (you can find a hard copy of CMS in your library and it’s also available online).

    If you haven’t seen it yet, please take a look at the journal:
    http://web.international.ucla.edu/cwl/slavicjournal/1016

  • Conference: Institute of Russian Literature "Ranks and Muses (Writers in the Civil Service)
    October 10, 2016 | Pushkinskij Dom, St. Petersburg, Russia

    The Institute of Russian Literature (Pushkinskij Dom, St. Petersburg) is glad to invite you to take part in the International Conference “Ranks and muses (writers in the civil service)”, which will be held on 10-12 October 2016. During the work of the Conference it is planned to consider the complex historical, literary and cultural issues related to the combination of creativity and official activity of Russian writers of XVIII-XIX centuries.

    For more information, see the informational letter or the participation request.

  • Application Deadline: Fulbright-Schuman/EU Program
    Deadline: October 13, 2016

    Grants are awarded to U.S. students and young professionals to study or conduct research at universities or institutions in EU Member States on EU policies, EU institutions, and the U.S.-EU agenda. Project proposals should focus on observing comparative perspectives on issues of common concern (either U.S.-EU or with reference to EU policy). Proposals may address topics such as internal and external security, peace-keeping, the EU and NATO, justice and home affairs, finance, trade, human rights, agricultural and environmental policies, energy, asylum, human trafficking, development, and EU enlargement. This list of topics is indicative, not exhaustive. Areas of study must relate to EU competencies and not merely Europe or countries of Europe. Proposals that focus on only one or two European countries and do not demonstrate a “European added value” will not be considered.

    See the Fulbright-Schuman/EU Program website for more details.


  • Funding: Bulgarian Fulbright Student Grant
    Deadline: October 13, 2016, 5:00pm

    Fulbright Bulgaria offers fellowships for U.S. students, MA/PhD candidates, young professionals and artists to conduct research, study or exercise their talents for one academic year. We are looking for motivated candidates who are interested in conducting research projects with an academic, artistic or non-governmental Bulgarian institution, independent library or field research, special projects in the social or life sciences, or a combination of such activities.

    More information can be found on the website.

  • Application deadline: Fulbright Competition
    National Deadline: October 13, 2016, 5:00pm

  • National deadline for the Fulbright Competition.

    The Fulbright U.S. Student Program provides grants for individually designed study/research projects or for English Teaching Assistant Programs.  A candidate will submit a Statement of Grant Purpose defining activities to take place during one academic year in a participating country outside the U.S.

    During their grants, Fulbrighters will meet, work, live with and learn from the people of the host country, sharing daily experiences.  The program facilitates cultural exchange through direct interaction on an individual basis in the classroom, field, home, and in routine tasks, allowing the grantee to gain an appreciation of others’ viewpoints and beliefs, the way they do things, and the way they think. Through engagement in the community, the individual will interact with their hosts on a one-to-one basis in an atmosphere of openness, academic integrity, and intellectual freedom, thereby promoting mutual understanding.

    Competitive applicants to the Fulbright U.S. Student Program will not have recent extensive experience abroad (excluding recent undergraduate study abroad), especially in the country of application.

    Please see the Fulbright website for more details.


  • Deadline for Materials: «Материнство и отцовство сквозь призму Времени и Культур»
    October 13-16, 2016 | Smolensk State University (Russia)

    Напоминаем Вам, что 13-16 октября 2016 состоится IX конференция Российской ассоциации исследователей женской истории (РАИЖИ) в городе Смоленске на базе Смоленского государственного университета.

    Приглашаем Вас в очередной раз принять участие в работе международной конференции, проводимой РАИЖИ при поддержке ИЭА им. Н.Н. Миклухо-Маклая РАН, Смоленского государственного университета

    Смоленского государственного медицинского университета

    «Материнство и отцовство сквозь призму Времени и Культур»

    Мы рады пригласить представителей научного (историков, антропологов, этнологов, социологов, демографов, фольклористов, филологов, философов, педагогов, психологов и др.), профессионального сообщества (преподавателей, врачей, социальных работников), арт-сообщества, активистов общественных организаций к обсуждению вопросов, связанных с трансформацией материнства/отцовства/детства в прошлом и настоящем.

    Ждем Ваши материалы до 15.05.2016.

    Темы секций и круглых столов – в информационном письме.

    Культурная программа планируется на субботу и воскресенье.

    Возможности частичной оплаты проезда или проживания – в стадии обсуждения.

    (You may view a PDF version of this announcement here.)

  • IU Global Village Living-Learning Center Fall 2016 Course Proposals
    Deadline: October 15, 2016, 5:00pm

    Indiana University’s Global Village Living-Learning Center is seeking masters and advanced graduate students to submit proposals for courses to be taught FALL 2016. Proposed courses must consider contemporary global topics or issues using a multidisciplinary approach. Special consideration will be given to proposals for courses with topics that feature the Themester 2016 focus on “Beauty.” All seminars earn students 3 credits toward graduation, carry distribution credit (CASE A&H or CASE S&H), are limited to a maximum of 20 students, and are open to all IU undergraduates. Classes meet in the classrooms of the Global Village in Foster-Martin, which are equipped with a computer, laptop connection, DVD and VHS video, video projector, a standard overhead projector, multiple chalkboards, and wireless access. The Global Village offers full administrative support as well. Instructors receive a stipend of $9,530 fee remission, health insurance, a parking pass, and meal points for dining with students. Applicants must be Masters or advanced graduate students in the College of Arts & Sciences who do not hold another AI, GA, or teaching/staff appointment for the Fall 2016 semester. If you have questions about your eligibility, contact the assistant director. International students must confirm their work eligibility with the Office of International Services before applying for the position. Instructors pursuing degrees in units outside of the College of Arts & Sciences may not be eligible for fee remissions.

    Please see the announcement for more details.

  • Call for Course Proposals: US-RUSSIA RELATIONS IN GLOBAL CONTEXT
    Deadline for abstracts: October 15, 2016
    Conference: March 16-17, 2017 at Kennesaw State University


    Description of Conference: In conjunction with KSU’s Year of Russia Program, the primary focus of this interdisciplinary conference is to examine Russia’s international relations in order to promote increased understanding of today’s complex, interdependent world. Due to the storied history of U.S. - Russia relations over the last century - epitomized by the Cold War era, an often adversarial period resulting in numerous third world proxy wars - there is great need for new perspectives that work to identify areas for collaboration in joint problem-solving efforts. We especially seek the perspectives of scholars and policy-makers who might contribute to an enrichment of symposium participants’ understanding of (1) Russia’s international relations; (2) the complexity of U.S. - Russia relations; and (3) examples of collaborative efforts towards shared problem-solving. We are seeking papers from across disciplines on topics related to:

    The Legacy of the Cold War
    Russia and the U.S. in an Emerging Multipolar World NATO and European  Perspectives on Russia Russia and its Near Abroad EurAsEC, CSTO, SCO, & BRICS: Alternatives to Rejoining the West Russia and the Middle East Global Fight Against Terrorism Arms Control and Weapons Proliferation Issues Ethnicity, Diversity, Identity, Mobility, and Migration Demographic Trends in the Post-Soviet Space Resource Governance including Food, Water and Energy Security Global Warming, Climate Change and Environmental Sustainability The Role of Business and Government Policy in Joint Problem-Solving Collaborative Efforts in Education, Science and Technology Public Health, Pandemics, Humanitarian Response, and Emergency Preparedness Media Arts and Diplomacy

    Guidelines for Submission of Abstracts:  To participate, please submit an abstract of no more than 300 words describing the focus of your proposed paper or panel, the methodology employed, and the general argument. At the top of the abstract, type your name, institutional affiliation, position or title, contact phone number, and e-mail. If you wish to propose a panel, please submit the title and abstract for each paper, along with the names and institutional affiliation of all panelists. Save in one Word or RTF document and attach the document to an email message. Type “Year of Russia Symposium” in the subject line and send it to Ms. Vivian Bonilla, at vbonill1@kennesaw.edu.

    Deadline for Submission of Proposal Abstracts is October 15, 2016.  Select Papers will be eligible for publication in a Special Issue of KSU’s peer reviewed Journal of Global Initiatives focused on Russia. http://dga.kennesaw.edu/content/journals

  • Call for Course Proposals, Collins Living-Learning Center
    Deadline: October 15, 2016

    Teach an IU-accredited course at Collins:

    Is there a course you've always wanted to teach, but never had the opportunity? Have you designed a multidisciplinary course that doesn't quite fit into your department's curriculum? The Collins Living-Learning Center invites faculty members and advanced graduate students with teaching experience to submit course proposals each semester for the following year. Freshmen and sophomores are required to register for one Collins seminar per year. Proposals at the 200 level are sought particularly, but not exclusively.

    Please see the website for more details.
  • Funding: EURO Graduate Student Professional Development Grant
    Deadline: October 15, 2016

    To help graduate students who require support for research travel or travel for participation in a structured academic internship program or formal language training programs. The research, internship or language program must focus on topics related to contemporary European studies or a modern European language. Research funds may be used to conduct preliminary thesis or dissertation feasibility studies or to compile evidence for their Master's thesis or dissertation. EURO research travel grants will normally not exceed $500 and international grants will normally not exceed $1000. However, additional funds may be available for short-term stays dedicated to data collection, interviews, and pre-dissertation fieldwork. While priority is given to students pursuing an MA or doctoral minor in European Studies, all IU graduate students are welcome to apply.

    Please see the EURO Funding website for more details.

  • Funding: EURO Graduate Student Conference Travel Grant
    Deadline: October 15, 2016

    To help graduate students present their research on contemporary European topics at major association meetings and conferences. Student travel reimbursement may be applied to minimum airfare or mileage (per IU guidelines), lodging, and conference registration fee. Conference travel awards will normally not exceed $350 for U.S. conferences and $500 for international conferences. A formal paper is required, and students should submit the paper and letter of acceptance with their application. No retroactive awards will be made. While priority is given to students pursuing an MA or doctoral minor in European Studies, all IU graduate students are welcome to apply.

    Please see the EURO Funding website for more details.

  • Funding: EURO/Mellon Travel Awards for Faculty
    Deadline: October 15, 2016

    Under a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, EURO has funding available to support participation in international and domestic conferences for IU Bloomington faculty presenting papers related to European Studies. Awards will not normally exceed $500 but may range from $100 to $1000. Formal papers are strongly prioritized over participation in roundtable discussions or lecture notes. Faculty who receive funding will be expected to present their research at a EURO–sponsored event following the trip. Faculty members can use the topic from their conference paper or talk about their current and future research. EURO will make room reservations and publicize the talk.

    Please see the EURO Faculty Funding website for more details.

  • Funding (Ukrainian citizens): Fulbright-Kennan Institute Research Scholarships
    October 15, 2016

    Fulbright-Kennan Institute Research Scholarships are available to scholars from Russia and Ukraine to conduct research for six months in the fields of the humanities and social sciences. Preference is given to applicants whose research informs discussion of key public policy issues, enhances development of scholarship in the former Soviet Union, and fosters communication between the world of scholarship and the world of public affairs. Applicants should be able to demonstrate a particular need to be in Washington, D.C. The Wilson Center devotes significant attention to the exploration of broad thematic areas. Primary themes are: 1) governance, including such issues as the key features of the development of democratic institutions, democratic society, civil society, and citizen participation; 2) the U.S. role in the world and issues of partnership and leadership; and 3) key long-term future challenges confronting the U.S. and the world. Research in these areas is particularly encouraged. Fulbright-Kennan Institute Research Scholarships are available to researchers and lecturers from academic and higher educational institutions and research centers who are actively involved in academic and research work. Eligible candidates include scholars and researchers who have at least two years postdoctoral (post-Kandidat) academic and research experience.

    Please see the website for more details.

  • Funding: COAS Graduate Student Travel Award
    Deadline: October 16, 2016 (REEI internal deadline)

    College of Arts and Sciences Graduate Student Travel Awards are intended to assist students traveling to and presenting at major national and international conferences. The College will host two travel award competitions for the 2015-2016 academic school year. One will be held in the fall term and one will be held in the spring term. Each department will set its own internal deadlines for review of its students’ applications.

    Please see the website for more details, or email reei@indiana.edu.

  • Conference: "Crime and Punishment at 150"
    October 20-22, 2016 | University of British Columbia (Vancouver, Canada)
  • The publication of Crime and Punishment in 1866 was a watershed moment in the history of nineteenth-century Russian literature. Dostoevsky’s novel perennially hovers near the top of lists of “Best Books of All Time.” Harold Bloom summed up the work’s enduring mastery and appeal, observing that, “Crime and Punishment remains the best of all murder stories, a century and a third after its publication. We have to read it — though it is harrowing — because, like Shakespeare, it alters our consciousness.” In the twenty first century, media and technology advances have transformed the reading experience and the ways readers relate to texts. Most students in literature classrooms are now digital natives, many reading on e-devices, some even on smart phones. In the age of the “spoiler alert” our reading experience seems to have changed beyond all recognition, yet in some ways the possibilities of new reading communities opened up by social media allow us to replicate the kinds of institutional communities which arose around nineteenth-century Russian periodicals. Rethinking the ways in which we contextualize, teach, and interpret Dostoevsky’s novel will help make it more accessible to a new generation of readers.

    “Crime and Punishment at 150” will celebrate the novel’s sesquicentenary by bringing together teachers, scholars, students, translators, artists, and readers to discuss Dostoevsky in the digital age. The conference will include a keynote by Carol Apollonio, a screening of the new film Crime and Punishment (Apocalypse Films, 2015) with post-film discussion with its director, Andrew O’Keefe, and a video conference with a linked Crime and Punishment panel at the University of Bristol, among other events. Confirmed participants include Brian Armstrong, Elena Baraban, Alexander Burry, Deborah Martinsen, Louise McReynolds, Robin Feuer Miller, Megan Swift, and William Mills Todd, III.

    This event is co-organized by Katherine Bowers and Kate Holland, and supported by the Department of Central, Eastern, and Northern European Studies (UBC), Green College (UBC), and the North American Dostoevsky Society.

    Please see the Call for Proposals for more details.

  • Conference: Central Slavic Conference
    October 21-23, 2016 | St. Louis, Missouri

    The Central Slavic Conference (CSC) is a regional affiliate of the Association for Slavic, Eastern European, and Eurasian Studies (ASEEES), a scholarly society and the leading private organization in the world dedicated to the advancement of knowledge about the former Soviet Union (including Eurasia) and Eastern and Central Europe.

    The CSC is the oldest regional affiliate of ASEEES, founded in 1962. We are a professional organization that promotes inter- and multi-disciplinary scholarship on Slavic and Eastern European-Eurasian topics in a seven-state region including Missouri, Iowa, Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, and Colorado, though the organization's members come from across the United States and around the world. The organization's most important event is an Annual Meeting that, since 2007, has taken place in the fall in St. Louis, Missouri.

    For more details, please visit: this site.

  • Workshop on Regulating and Legitimating Sexualities: the State, Law, Sexual Culture and Change under Neo-Liberalism
    An international Network for Sexual Ethics and Politics Workshop

    October 21-22, 2016 | Miami University, Differdange, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg

    In much of Europe, parts of the North America and Australasia, the last 60 years have been a slow movement towards greater legal and civil equality. Through a mixture of legislation, civil charter challenges, political pressure and protest, lesbian and gay recognition has been accompanied by more permissive sexual values and tolerance and a greater sense of change to counter sexual prejudices and pathologies. This is very much an unfinished process, with questionmarks over the depth or superficiality of change, the extent of legal and civil permissiveness and tolerance, the constitution of 'metrosexuality', 'homonormativity' and other articulations of contemporary sexual politics. The dominant forms of norms and values still correspond to capitalist hetero-patriarchy, modified rather than transformed. More, the nature of this change has progressed through a period when neo-liberal political economy has been dominant, where commodification, consumption and markets have shaped social and cultural change and the politics of recognition has characterised change, if not with accompanying redistribution.

    This workshop seeks to explore and evaluate the role, functions and impact of state and legal change in sexual politics in the context of neo-liberalism. It seeks to make sense of sexual rights, equality, recognition, justice and citizenship as results of change in legal, civil and state regulated permissions, prohibitions and regulations.

    Organizers:
    Tom Claes, University of Ghent, Belgium
    Thierry Leterre, University of Miami, Luxembourg
    Paul Reynolds, Edge Hill University, UK

    For more informaiton, email reynoldp@edgehill.ac.uk or see this website for more information.

  • Overseas Study Programs at Jagiellonian University (Krakow), Warsaw University, Bogazici University (Istanbul), and Free University of Berlin
    Deadline: October 23, 2016

    Indiana University offers exchange opportunities with top universities in selected countries for graduate students on any IU campus. The majority of these programs are intended to support independent research by connecting you with resources and mentors at the partner university. In some cases, you may be able to enroll in courses or gain valuable teaching experience. Because each program differs, you should review them carefully before applying. Graduate students are encouraged to check with their departments and schools about other international opportunities.

    Exchange participants receive funding to cover their expenses. IU's Office of the Vice President for International Affairs (OVPIA) covers the cost of airfare, and participants receive a reasonable living stipend from either OVPIA or the partner institution. For all programs, the partner institution provides housing or helps participants make housing arrangements.

    Applicants may be graduate students from any discipline, department, or campus who are making normal academic progress. Each applicant must submit a proposal for a program that would constitute an integral part of a well-conceived graduate degree program at IU. As part of the application process, interested applicants must prepare a proposal that describes their intended activities. Applicants should indicate how their proposed activities are important to their research and professional development. Research proposals should include an outline of the project and should reasonably identify local resources the candidate would employ. If possible, applicants should identify a faculty member(s) at the partner institution with whom they would like to work during their stay.

    Please see the IU Worldwide Graduate & Faculty Exchange Programs website for more details.

  • Conference: Language and Culture in Post-Maidan Ukraine: Transformations at Work
    October 27, 2016 | First Online Conference of the Nationalities, Culture, and Language Policies Cluster Research Initiative on Democratic REforms in Ukraine project

    This conference aims to bring together researchers in the field of Ukrainian linguistic, social, cultural and literary transformations since the 2014 Maidan Revolution. You are cordially invited to participate in this online polylogue, share your ideas and views on the current issues in Ukraine and potentially influence the decision making of the political leadership of the country.

    RIDRU is supported by the Kule Institute of Advanced Studies, University of Alberta, Canada, and various international partners and explores three dimensions of the ongoing democratic reform of the government of Ukraine: good governance and the rule of law, post-secondary education reform and nationalities, culture and language policies (see details at: http://ridru.artsrn.ualberta.ca/).

    For more details, please visit: this site.

  • Conference: Hungary 1956 – 2016 – Reverberations of a Revolution
    October 27-28, 2016 | University of Alberta (Edmonton, Canada)

    Interdisciplinary conference: Hungary 1956 – 2016 – Reverberations of a Revolution

    60 years ago a student demonstration in pursuit of liberty and democratic reforms in Hungary started a chain of events that turned into a nationwide revolt against the Soviet policies and control embodied in the government of the Hungarian People’s Republic. The uprising that caught the attention and imagination of the world has been widely considered as the first major threat to Soviet control in Central Europe. Although the revolution failed at the time, its reverberations have been felt ever since, particularly in what is now considered the democratic transition in Central Europe, and the lives of diaspora communities around the world.

    This interdisciplinary conference seeks to bring together scholars from any discipline in the social sciences, humanities and fine arts, who are interested in exploring the general theme of Hungary 60 years after the revolution. The organizers welcome academic papers that address social, political, cultural, historical and economic issues in contemporary Hungary, in particular those that investigate how such issues have been shaped or affected by the realities and/or the collective memory of the 1956 revolution.

    Questions to consider are many; some of the suggested topics of inquiry include:

    • education and educational reform(s)
    • women and politics, the role of women in Hungarian society
    • gender and cultural politics
    • NGOs, civil society and democratization
    • minority issues, policies and politics of diversity - national identity, identity and culture, religious identity
    • national identity and the politics of memory and commemoration
    • refugee and diaspora memories
    • citizenship and identity - architecture, space and memory, remembering through space
    • street names and their meaning in national collective memory
    • Art and remembering
    • Hungarian media today, media and society, social media and civic engagement
    • political engagement of youth
    • sports
    • crime and the criminal justice system
    • international relations and Hungary’s place in the world (perceived and actual)
    We encourage presentations from all disciplines and fields of scholarship, including History, Political Science, Literature, Economics, Pedagogy, Art History, Religious Studies, Gender Studies, etc. Selected papers will have the opportunity to be published. We welcome submissions from graduate students and early career scholars.

    Please note that travel and accommodation subsidies are available to participants of this conference. Please notify us of your intention to request a travel subsidy in your submission.

    The conference will take place at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada on October 27-28, 2016. Please note the language of the conference is English.

    You may also view the announcement here.

  • Funding: COAS Graduate Student Travel Award
    Deadline: October 30, 2016 (general deadline)

    College of Arts and Sciences Graduate Student Travel Awards are intended to assist students traveling to and presenting at major national and international conferences. The College will host two travel award competitions for the 2015-2016 academic school year. One will be held in the fall term and one will be held in the spring term. Each department will set its own internal deadlines for review of its students’ applications.

    Please see the website for more details.

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NOVEMBER 2016

  • Conference: American Society for Theater Research, Beyond the State: Performances of Trans-Bodies in Central-Eastern, Russia, and Eurasia
    November 3-6, 2016 | Minneapolis Marriott City Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

    In The Political Lives of Dead Bodies, Katherine Verdery describes how the discovery of mass graves, the reburial of national heroes, and the removal of monuments depicting extraordinary Soviet figures formed a body politics that facilitated the post-1989 process of transition in former Soviet territories and satellite states. According to Verdery, the unique advantage of the body in politics is that it provides “a concreteness that nonetheless transcends time, making past immediately present” (Verdery: 2013). Building on this insight, this working group takes trans- as a point of departure to investigate the body as a performing site that shifts and challenges our understanding of politics in the region prior and post-1989. We invite participants whose work examines bodily practices in excess of state-enforced censorship historically and today, as well as projects that address the proliferation and institutionalization of forms of trans-performance under the demands of global capitalism and human rights.

    Accordingly, we are interested in a wide-range of topics including, but not limited to: bodily practices among refugees, migrants, and minorities; medical and scientific uses of bodies; virtual technologies and prosthetic-bodies such as performing objects and puppets in memory politics; performance protocols of being “human” and influence of discourses such as human rights; forms of cultural diplomacy and cross-cultural exchange; and trans-body performance in the region’s historiography.

    In early September, conveners will circulate three short readings on trans-bodies to build a foundational vocabulary among group members. Drawing on the vocabularies and trajectories of trans- presented in the readings, group members will write a 5-7 page position paper by mid October that situates their research in the field of trans-body studies. In Minneapolis, participants will be asked to bring an object, document, article or ethnographic anecdote specific to their position paper research. For the first half of our meeting, we will split up into small groups where members will (a) discuss their research object and the question that object situates about trans-bodies (b) respond to the group’s position papers and broader theoretical intersections. In the second half, groups will create a “graphic recording” of their discussion and present it to the other three groups and the audience at large. Lastly, we will reserve time at the end of the session to discuss the prospect of an edited anthology on the subject of trans-bodies and performance in Central-Eastern Europe, Eurasia and Russia.

    Working Group Conveners:
    Jacob Juntunen, Southern Illinois University
    Margarita Kompelmakher, University of Minnesota
    Yana Meerzon, University of Ottawa

    Please see their website for complete details.

  • Conference: The 6th International Conference *Grammar and Corpora*
    November 9-11, 2016 | Institut für Deutsche Sprache, Manheim (Germany)

    In recent years, the availability of large annotated and searchable corpora, together with a new interest in the empirical foundation and validation of linguistic theory and description has sparked a surge of novel and interesting work using corpus methods to study the grammar of natural languages. However, a look at relevant current research on the grammar of German, English, or the Romance and Slavic languages reveals a variety of different theoretical approaches and empirical foci which can be traced back to different philological and linguistic traditions. Still, this state of affairs should not be seen as an obstacle but arguably provides an ideal basis for a fruitful exchange of ideas between different research paradigms.

    In addition to deepening our knowledge and understanding of individual languages, corpus-oriented work on grammar has wider implications that concern methodological as well as theoretical aspects. Relevant topics and research questions concern e.g. annotation schemata for (larger) syntactic units and syntactic relations, the increased use of (advanced) statistical methods and models in linguistics, the relation and boundary between grammar and discourse, and more generally the interface between corpus linguistics and linguistic theory.

    Please see their website for complete details.

  • Conference: The 8th International Media Readings in Moscow, "Expanding Media Frontiers in the XXI Century: The Impact of Digitalization upon Media Environment"
    November 17-18, 2016 | Faculty of Journalism, Lomonosov Moscow State University (Russia)

    Today media systems of different countries tend to acquire similar features due to a variety of reasons, including the processes of globalization and the change in national media cultures, encompassing professional values and traditions, level and type of commercialization, government regulations, organizational dynamics, technologies, audiences, etc.

    Although many countries in the world still retain their national specifics determined by their unique social, cultural and political landscapes, we cannot but notice that this specifics is oftentimes replaced by the tendencies of the global character, which have significant influence on media systems of these countries. These tendencies include but are by no means limited to the active use of new digital technologies and social media by journalists; an attempt of media outlets to reach out to a broader audience instead of focusing on particular political or social groupings; the spread of user generated content and the subsequent re-consideration of professional journalists’ mission; a shift to common business models and common media platforms, which is particularly acute for traditional print media creating online versions today, and much more.

    The conference aims to discuss current transformations of media systems across the world, identify factors, which may lead to these transformations, outline possible outcomes of this ‘homogenization’ trend for national cultures and identities, and to discuss best ways to classify media systems in the current context, relying on fundamental works of Siebert, Peterson & Schramm (1956), McQuail (2000), Hallin & Mancini (2004) and other scholars.

    Please see the announcement for complete details.

  • Conference: ASEEES 2016 Annual Convention
    November 17-20, 2016 | Washington, DC

    One of the core activities of the Association is the annual convention. Held in the fall, the convention takes place each year in a different city and is generally hosted by one of the Association's regional affiliates. This international forum makes possible a broad exchange of information and ideas, stimulating further work and sustaining the intellectual vitality of the field.

    2016 Convention Theme: "Global Conversations"

    Please see the Convention's website for more details.

  • Deadline for Proposals: International Society for Language Studies 2017 Conference
    Deadline: November 30, 2016

    The International Society for Language Studies, co-sponsored by the University Hawai‘i - Manoa, will hold a conference from June 15-17, 2017 at the University of Hawai‘i – Manoa in Honolulu. The theme of the conference will be “Intersections of Peace and Language Studies.” The paper proposal submission will open on the ISLS website (http://www.isls.co/conference.php) in April 2016, and conclude on November 30, 2016. Submissions will not be accepted after the November 30th deadline. Notification of proposal acceptance or rejection will be sent by January 15, 2017. All presenters who have not registered for the conference by February 28, 2017 will not be scheduled in the conference program. Selected conference papers will be published by ISLS in the Readings in Language Studies peer-reviewed book series in 2018.

    For step-by-step instructions on the proposal process, go to the following webpage: http://www.isls.co/proposalprep2017.pdf.

  • Call for Papers: Canadian Slavonic Papers/Revue canadienne des slavistes, "Svetlana Alexievich: The Writer and Her Times"
    November 30, 2016

    Canadian Slavonic Papers/Revue canadienne des slavistes invites contributions to a special section to mark the awarding of the 2015 Nobel Prize for Literature to Belarusian writer Svetlana Alexievich. We invite articles from a range of disciplines that explore the author, her oeuvre, and her milieu. Among other topics, explorations of creative non-fiction in the Soviet and post-Soviet space, of the female voice, of oral history, of the intellectual and social history of Soviet and Belarusian writers, or of important themes in Alexievich’s work would be welcome. The issue aims to be multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary.

    Manuscripts may be in English or French. The normal peer-review process will apply. Please consult the journal’s website for our submission and style guidelines: http://www.ualberta.ca/~csp/Submissions.html.

    Authors who submit papers must become members of the Canadian Association of Slavists (CAS).

    Deadlines: Expression of intent to submit: 30 April 2016. Final Paper with abstract: 30 November 2016. Send submissions by e-mail to the Editor, Prof. Heather Coleman: hcoleman@ualberta.ca

    Canadian Slavonic Papers/Revue canadienne des slavistes, founded in 1956, is a quarterly, interdisciplinary journal of the Canadian Association of Slavists, publishing in English and French. It is devoted to problems of Central and Eastern Europe. It is a forum for scholars from a range of disciplines: language and linguistics, literature, history, political science, sociology, economics, anthropology, geography, philosophy, and the arts. hcoleman@ualberta.ca

    You may view also view the full announcement here.

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December 2016

  • Call for papers:

    8th Biennial AWSS Conference: Roots and Legacies of Revolution
    Thursday, April 6, 2017/The Westin Alexandria, Alexandria, VA

    The Association for Women in Slavic Studies (AWSS) solicits paper presentations on the theme of "Roots and Legacies of Revolution: Transformations for Women and Gender" for its 8th Biennial Conference to be held on Thursday, April 6, 2017 at the Westin Alexandria Hotel in Alexandria, VA.  The conference will be held in conjunction with the Annual Meeting of the Southern Conference on Slavic Studies (SCSS), which opens Thursday evening and runs through Saturday.  Participants of the AWSS Conference are encouraged to attend and participate in the SCSS conference as well (a separate CFP will be issued for that conference) and can attend both conferences with the same registration.

    The conference theme recognizes the centennial of the Russian revolutions of 1917, which had a significant impact on the status and lives of women, as well as on the configuration of gender relations and representations throughout our region. We also draw attention to the roots of those revolutionary transformations in Slavic, East European, and Eurasian social, economic, political, literary, and creative practices and events of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Moreover, we are still living with the legacies of 1917, especially the effects on women and the post-Berlin Wall gender order. Thus, while we commemorate the Russian revolutions, we welcome papers across chronological and geographical spans from the tsarist era to the present day, from Berlin to Vladivostok.

    We encourage potential participants to broadly address one or more of the following questions:

    *         How did the nineteenth century conditions of women and the gender order in Russia and other parts of Europe contribute to the transformations of the 1917 revolutions?

    *         How revolutionary was 1917 for women?

    *         How might we see the legacies of a Bolshevik approach to gender throughout the Soviet period, in the USSR, Eastern Europe, and Eurasia?

    *         What has been the impact of the 1917 revolutions on women and gender in Eastern Europe, Eurasia, and the former Soviet states?

    *         What effect have the revolutions of 1989-91 had on women's lives and gender relations?

    The keynote speaker will be Rochelle Ruthchild, currently Research Associate at the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies of Harvard University, Resident Scholar at the Women's Studies Research Center of Brandeis University, and Professor of Graduate Studies, Emerita, The Union Institute and University. In addition to being one of the founding members and a past president of AWSS, as well as its long-term clerk, Professor Ruthchild (PhD 1976, University of Rochester) has a long career of teaching and research in the field of Russian women's history and in Russian Studies in general. In 2010 she published Equality and Revolution: Women's Rights in the Russian Empire, 1905-1917 (University of Pittsburgh Press), which received honorable mentions for both the Zelnick and Heldt Prizes. The title of her talk will be "Bread, Bullets, and Ballots: Russia's Women and Gender in 1917."

    The conference organizers invite proposals from scholars at all stages in their careers and in any discipline of Slavic, East European, or Eurasian Studies (history, literature, linguistics, political science, sociology, anthropology, economics, gender studies, etc.). We especially encourage graduate students to participate in this conference.  Proposals should consist of a 250-word abstract of the paper (including the paper's title) and a brief one-page CV that includes author's affiliation and contact information.  Proposals are due by December 15 to Sharon Kowalsky, Associate Professor of History, Texas A&M University-Commerce (Sharon.Kowalsky@tamuc.edu) or Betsy Jones Hemenway, Director of Women's Studies/Gender Studies, Loyola University Chicago (ehemenway@luc.edu). Participants will be notified of their acceptance approximately four weeks after the proposal deadline.  AWSS has limited funds to help defer the costs of attendance for graduate students (to cover registration fees and hotel accommodations).  Please indicate in your proposal if you are interested in applying for graduate student funding.

    Any questions about the conference or the program should be directed to Sharon Kowalsky (Sharon.Kowalsky@tamuc.edu) or Betsy Jones Hemenway (ehemenway@luc.edu).

    • Conference: Transnational Modern Languages
      December 2-3, 2016 | Italian Cultural Institute (London, UK)

      Transnationalizing Modern Languages is a UK-based initiative, funded by the Arts & Humanities Research Council, that seeks to transform the way modern languages are researched and taught in higher education. The project aims to "develop a new framework for the discipline of Modern Languages as a whole, one which puts the interaction of languages and cultures at its core." Read more about the project here.

      A conference, "Transnational Modern Languages," will be held in London, UK, on 2-3 December 2016. The deadline for submitting abstracts is 30 April 2016. For further details and instructions on how to submit, please see the Call for Papers.

      NOTE that although the conference will take place in the Italian Cultural Institute, it will include researchers and teachers working in all modern languages, including Slavic, East European and Eurasian studies.

    • Conference: "The Knowledge Factor: Refugees in Central and Eastern Europe, 1912-2001"
      December 8-9, 2016 | Herder-Institut (Marburg, Germany)

      In arguments about the current refugee crisis, East European heads of state have repeatedly claimed that their countries have never been perceived as desirable destinations; therefore, they shall never be such. We would like to take the occasion of the 2016 Annual Convention of the Leibniz Graduate School at the Herder Institute for Historical Research on East Central Europe to investigate this claim. “The Knowledge Factor” offers an opportunity to discuss the history of refugees in, not from, Eastern Europe and the role knowledge inherent to or associated with refugees has played in the interaction with host societies. The focus lies on the twentieth century from the Balkan Wars of 1912 until its ultimate end in 2001.

      Please see the announcement for complete details.

    • Conference: 12th European Conference on Formal Description of Slavic Languages (FDSL-12)
      December 8-10, 2016 | Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Germany

      The Slavic Department of Humboldt University, Berlin is pleased to announce the 12th European Conference on Formal Description of Slavic Languages (FDSL-12) to be held on December 8-10, 2016.

      The biannual conference has been hosted in turn by the University of Leipzig and University of Potsdam since 1995, with the University of Göttingen joining in organizing the conference in 2011. This year, for the first time, the Humboldt University will host FDSL. At the same time, the rhythm of the biannual conference changes, so that FDSL will from now on take place in even years.

      Additionally, there will be a special pre-conference workshop on "Formal and experimental semantics and pragmatics" to be announced in a separate CFP.

      Please see the website for more details.

    • Conference: “A Hundred Years of Ostranenie: an International Conference"
      December 15-17, 2016 | University of Erfurt (Germany)

      A century ago, in 1916, a young student named Viktor Shklovsky self-published his precocious essay-cum-manifesto “Art as Device”. In it, he coined a term which became crucial in literary studies, and important in the study of cinema and visual art: ostranenie. Also known as “defamiliarization”, “estrangement”, “enstrangement”, “making strange” and “foregrounding” in English, and – causing confusion with Brecht’s concept – as “Verfremdung” in German, ostranenie is about rendering the usual extraordinary and thus making the reader (or viewer) perceive it anew. Or is it? The way Shklovsky uses the term in “Art as Device” is ambiguous enough; if we also consider his later and lesser-known works as well as the scholarly legacy of ostranenie, we arrive at an array of meanings worthy of a fundamental investigation, thus our suggestion to make this subject the topic of a conference. The subfields may include, but are not restricted to: translating the terminology of ostranenie; ostranenie in world literature; forms and functions of ostranenie; ostranenie, cognition and emotion; ostranenie, Russianness and the East; ostranenie, rhetoric and irony; ostranenie, diversion and entertainment; ostranenie and deconstruction; ostranenie and Romanticism; ostranenie, war, and terror; literary sources of ostranenie discussed by Shklovsky (Sterne, Tolstoy etc.); the media of ostranenie (visual arts, film, music and mediality in general). Keynote speaker will be the noted scholar of Russian Formalism Aage A. Hansen-Löve.

      Please see the announcement for full details.

    • Deadline for Abstracts: 2017 International Conference, "Religion and Russian Revolution"
      December 31, 2016

      This conference (26-28 October 2017, Moscow) will mark the centennial of the Russian Revolution and will explore the complex interactions between revolutionary events and ideas, on the one hand, and religious visions, institutions, and experiences, on the other. The aim of the conference is to reveal the most important and up-to-date trends in the field; present new results coming from recently expanding sources; and articulate new interpretations according to changes in research paradigms, approaches and techniques. Please click here for the full announcement.

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    Rolling

      Funding: SRAS Explorer Awards

      SRAS is celebrating 20 years in study abroad with a new round of scholarships for the 2016-2017 academic year (including summer 2017). One of the very early objectives of SRAS was to get students to study in more unfamiliar locations and to gain broad perspectives through travel. Many of programs have built-in travel components to allow students to do just this. These new awards apply to those programs. Deadlines vary by program. Find out more at http://www.sras.org/explorer.

      Funding: SRAS Home and Abroad Scholarship

      This program combines intensive language study with a generous scholarship and a resume-building internship. Designed for maximum flexibility, this program will help support and nurture student interests in fields as diverse as journalism, economics, history, and art. Apply by May 25, 2016. Program starts from home on June 1. Find out more at http://sras.org/HA.

      SRAS Study Abroad Opportunities

      Students can study abroad in Poland, Russia, Ukraine, Georgia, or Kyrgyzstan in a range of programs covering subjects related to the location (e.g. Conflict Resolution, Security Studies, Central Asian Studies, Art, Politics, etc.). Internships are also available, with particularly wide opportunities in Warsaw and Kyiv. Deadlines and start dates vary by program. Funding opportunities: http://sras.org/Funding.

    • Peer Reviewers Needed for Slovo Issue 28.2

      As part of the editorial process for the forthcoming Spring issue of Slovo – an interdisciplinary academic journal published at the Slavonic Department of UCL – we are looking for peer reviewers for some short (~7000 word) articles. It would involve reading the article and briefly summarising your thoughts on whether it makes a good contribution to CEE scholarship. For the current issue, the themes are:

      • ‘Database Cinema’: A study of late Soviet and Russian childhood and adolescence, relating to emergent nationhood;
      • Russian policy and international law: ‘an examination of the Barents’ Sea Boundary Agreement’ under Medvedev;
      • Russian music: the composer ‘Eduard Artem-ev and the sonics of national identity’;
      • Russian nationalism and the post-Soviet youth: the growth of Nashi;
      • The debate around Nihilism in 1860s Russian literature;
      • Russian national security strategy: regime security and the ‘great power status’;
      • Human insecurity, state capacity, and intrastate conflict in Ukraine;

      In order to peer review these articles, you do not need to have expertise in the specific topic – only a knowledge of the broader areas in which they are based. Becoming involved with this issue would be an excellent way of alerting to future employers of your academic credentials. Please email slovo@ssees.ucl.ac.uk for further information, and indicating which of the fields you would be interested in reviewing.

      Please see the Slovo website for more details.

    • Open Call for Papers and Reviews: Symposia: The Journal of Religion

      The editorial team of Symposia: The Journal of Religion announces that we have moved to an open call for papers. We will accept paper submission on a rolling basis, and will publish issues bi-annually. Please submit your papers when they are ready! Symposia is a peer-reviewed, multidisciplinary journal for the academic study of religion. Its primary focus is on the phenomenon called “religion,” as explored through multiple approaches including those of anthropology, philosophy, sociology, and history. Symposia encourages authors to question and critique the limits and boundaries of disciplinary knowledge, by critiquing categories central to the approaches of each in order to yield new reflections and fresh perspectives on religious phenomena and the study of religion in general. The theme for Volume 8 is “Rites of Passage.” Religions traffic in the business of moving peoples from one stage of life to the next. Whether in terms of coming-of-age ceremonies, or the transition from life to death, religious rituals and their concomitant philosophical reflections are capable of compartmentalizing an entire life into distinct stages. However, certain rituals that inaugurate people into new forms of life are not available to all others, indiscriminately. As for example in the case of shamanic initiations, initiates display some characteristics that, from the perspective of religious leaders, single them out for this activity. Nor are the temporal limits of the ritual initiation always clear, as in some narratival constructions with clear beginnings, middles, and endings. We invite, in addition to the general and open call for papers, papers that address issues surrounding liminality, transition, rites of passage, and initiation. Articles with a maximum of 25 pages will be considered in both French and English. Submissions are made online. Book reviews should be a maximum of 1000 words of any academic publication relevant to the study of religion and released within the last two years in order to be published. We particularly welcome books that deal with issues related to the theme for this issue, “Rites of Passage.” If you are interested in doing a book review, please email Ian Brown at ianphillip.brown@mail.utoronto.ca with the name of the author, book and publisher.

      Please see the Slovo website for more details.

    • American Friends of Russian Folklore Expeditions to Rural Russia
      Summer 2016

      Places are now available on folklore-collecting expeditions to four regions of rural Russia in Bryansk province, Smolensk province, Irkutsk province and the Kamchatka peninsula. The expeditions are led by Dr. Yelena Minyonok of the Gorky Institute of World Literature, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow. The focus will be on documenting traditional songs, music, and seasonal rituals, along with immigrant narratives and narratives of the supernatural. These expeditions provide unusual access to rural Russia and Russian folklore. Established scholars and beginning students are equally welcome. Expedition languages are Russian and English. Participants pay their own way plus a share of the expedition expenses. The expeditions are sponsored by American Friends of Russian Folklore, a 501(c)3 nonprofit registered in the state of California.

      Please see the website for more details.

    • Funding: Jewish Studies Conference Funding for Graduate Students
      Indiana University Robert A. and Sandra S. Borns Jewish Studies Program

      Applications should be submitted to Dr. Carolyn Lipson-Walker, Assistant Director, Borns Jewish Studies Program, Indiana University, Global & International Studies Building, 355 N. Jordan Avenue, Bloomington, IN 47405-1105; clipsonw@indiana.edu; FAX (812) 855-4314.
      You may visit the Jewish Studies Graduate Funding Opportunities website for more details.
      Priority will be given to Jewish Studies doctoral minors.

    • Funding: Jewish Studies Conference Funding for Undergraduate Students
      Indiana University Robert A. and Sandra S. Borns Jewish Studies Program

      For Jewish Studies Major, Certificate, and Hebrew Minor Students up to $500

      No later than one month before the funds are needed and preferably earlier, an applicant must provide: 1) a one page statement describing the conference/program and explaining how it will contribute to the applicant’s Jewish Studies education and/or Jewish Studies career objectives; 2) a reference from a Jewish Studies faculty member (can be sent separately); and 3) a budget, explaining what the funds will be used for. Please submit statement, reference, and budget to the Jewish Studies Program (Global & International Studies Building-4E, 4023, 855-0453) or email to clipsonw@indiana.edu.

      Funds are limited. Applications will be considered on a first-come, first-served basis. You may visit the Jewish Studies Undergraduate Funding Opportunities website for more details.

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    2017 Opportunities

    • Workshop: Private Narratives: Privacy in Literature, Visual and Performing Arts
      January 20-21, 2017 | University of Passau

      "This workshop aims to bring together PhD students, who are interested in the representation of privacy and the study of topics and structures of privacy discourse in different art forms. The focus lies on the reconstruction of the narrative forms dealing with the private and the representations and constructions of privacy in literature, film, theatre, music and art. The multiplicity of privacy semantics will be studied and debated using concrete examples, which will help to determine the connection of the former to the extra-medial reality. This debate will provide insight on the reciprocal relation between the medial presentation of privacy and the cultural and historical privacy practices and discourses.

      For example, privacy can become a significant topos in literary works, where specific characteristics and limitations of private spaces are discussed. Privacy can also refer to the information that one character possesses about another and which he or she uses to empower oneself. In addition, characters’ decisions may be described as private, and it can be studied whether these decisions are represented as autonomous or heteronomous.

      Of great relevance is also the question of the privacy of the author, which is dependent on the historical and political context. One could address here problems of censorship and political restrictions, which influence artistic works. The general connection of privacy to autonomy, freedom, and other fundamental principles of democratic societies serves here as an impulse to discuss the restrictions on artistic production as stimuli for the artists to imagine and thereby “create” their own private sphere, which is otherwise non-existent under current societal conditions.

      Finally, when artistic works reach the audience, the recipients themselves can ‘experience’ and ‘create’ their own privacy, which in turn triggers transformation of one’s perception of reality. This performative effect of privacy can also be extended to the whole society, raising further questions for privacy research.

      Topics of interest include (but are not limited to):
      •       Concepts of privacy: What are the differences between privacy discourse in arts and privacy discourses in other fields?
      •       Evolution of privacy narratives throughout history: What drew attention to privacy in different historic epochs? How did various artistic movements deal with representations and constructions of privacy? And how did these representations and constructions transform throughout time?
      •       Terminology: What are similarities and differences between subjectivity, inner world, and privacy?
      •       Mediatization of privacy: What is the difference between different arts in a sense of technical possibilities, conditions of production, and the ways of reception by the public? How do they differ in their functions of privacy presentation?
      •       Narrativity of privacy: Is there any specific way to “tell privacy” that can arise from the analysis of artistic works?
      •       Cultural relativity of privacy: What are cultural specificities of privacy representations that one can observe in art?

      Organizational information:
      The workshop will take place on January 20-21, 2017, at the University of Passau. We welcome abstract submissions of individual papers (no more than 300 words) until October 9, 2016. Please, include the title of your presentation, as well as a short academic CV (max. 150 words), and send us a PDF document at all the three following E-mail addresses, indicating “Workshop Private Narratives” as the E-mail subject: steffen-burk@uni-passau.de AND tatiana-klepikova@uni-passau.de AND miriam-piegsa@uni-passau.de. Selected speakers will be notified by the end of October, 2016. The presentation should last no more than 30 Minutes, followed by a 30-minute discussion. For any further questions, please, contact Steffen Burk (steffen-burk@uni-passau.de). .

    • Proposal Deadline: Russia's Great War & Revolution, 1914-1922, "“Science, Technology, the Environment, Engineering, and Medicine”
      Deadline: February 1, 2017

      "Russia's Great War and Revolution, 1914-1922" (RGWR) is a decade-long, international, multidisciplinary effort generating new scholarly research focusing on Eurasia's "continuum of crisis" at the dawn of the twentieth century. The project's core participants comprise an international group of more than forty distinguished scholars. Since 2008 RGWR editors have been recruiting and selecting essays from scholars, academics, and exceptional graduate students from around the globe for publication and dissemination in a series of edited volumes being produced by Slavica Publishers.

      To date, the two volumes addressing "Culture" and "The Empire and Nationalism at War” and the first book of the third volume “Home Front” have been published. Three additional “Home Front” books will appear by mid-2106.

      RGWR Project Team members are interested in producing a stand-alone volume on "Science, Technology, the Environment, Engineering, and Medicine" (STEEM) and seek to identify individuals willing to contribute an original essay to the collection. Essays may involve any aspect of the history/culture of STEEM (broadly construed) across Russia and Eurasia between c. 1914-1922.

      Younger scholars, including recent ABDs, are particularly encouraged to participate. Non-native English-speaking colleagues are welcome to submit their essays in their native language. Deadline for the delivery of initial essay drafts is: 1 February 2017. Following the process of peer-review, revision, and editing the final volume is expected to appear by November 2018.

      Please see the RGWR website for more project details. Those interested in participating the project should contact Dr. Scott W. Palmer at: sw-palmer@wiu.edu.

    • 2017 AATSEEL Annual Conference
      February 2-5, 2017 | San Francisco, California

      Beginning in 2017, the AATSEEL conference will no longer meet concurrently with the annual convention of the Modern Language Association and will be held February 2nd through February 5th, 2017 at the Parc 55 hotel in downtown San Francisco, California. In addition to scholarly panels, participants will have the chance to attend advanced seminars, roundtables, workshops and other special events. New for 2017 are the addition of panel streams to the conference program. See the separate call for papers or website (http://www.aatseel.org/program/stream-topics-2017/) for more details.

      The AATSEEL conference is a forum for exchange of ideas in all areas of Slavic and East/Central European languages, literatures, linguistics, cultures, and pedagogy. The Program Committee invites scholars in these and related areas to form panels around specific topics, organize roundtable discussions, propose forums on instructional materials, and/or submit proposals for individual presentations for the 2017 Conference. The conference regularly includes panels in linguistics, pedagogy and second language acquisition, in addition to literature, cinema, and culture.

      Please submit your proposals by April 15, 2016 for early consideration (the final submission deadline is July 1, 2016). For more information, visit the AATSEEL website: http://www.aatseel.org/cfp_main. All proposals must be made through the online submission process - no emailed proposals will be accepted.

    • Fifth International Conference on Language Documentation & Conservation, "Vital Voices: Linking Language & Wellbeing"
      March 2-5, 2017 | University of Hawai'i (Manoa)

      "Wellbeing" is a state of the body and mind that encompasses the presence of positive moods and emotions, life satisfaction, fulfillment and positive functioning, and the absence of negative emotions like anxiety. Public health experts, policymakers and economists are coming to recognize the implications of wellbeing for society as a whole, as well as individuals, thanks to a growing set of results from cross-sectional, longitudinal and experimental studies.

      Increasingly, researchers in several fields have noted a positive correlation between language maintenance and wellbeing in endangered language communities. While the nature of the connection between language and wellbeing remains the subject of much debate, the existence of a connection is not entirely unexpected, given the range of outcomes associated with wellbeing. In addition, languages encode knowledge systems, so language loss represents not only the loss of a communicative system, but also the loss of traditional knowledge systems. Importantly, traditional knowledge systems encode cultural practices related to well-being. Understanding the connections between language and wellbeing will potentially have implications for public health and policy and beyond, but also for language researchers, since traditional knowledge systems are among the most threatened domains of endangered language. Knowledge of esoteric domains such as botanical classification and traditional medicines is forgotten well before basic vocabulary and language structure. Hence, these areas of traditional knowledge are precisely the areas which need to be prioritized by language documenters.

      Exploring the connections between language and wellbeing is potentially transformational for language documentation and conservation, and thus it will be the theme for the 5th ICLDC.

      Please see the website for complete details.

    • US-RUSSIA RELATIONS IN GLOBAL CONTEXT
      Conference: March 16-17, 2017 at Kennesaw State University

      Description of Conference: In conjunction with KSU’s Year of Russia Program, the primary focus of this interdisciplinary conference is to examine Russia’s international relations in order to promote increased understanding of today’s complex, interdependent world. Due to the storied history of U.S. - Russia relations over the last century - epitomized by the Cold War era, an often adversarial period resulting in numerous third world proxy wars - there is great need for new perspectives that work to identify areas for collaboration in joint problem-solving efforts. We especially seek the perspectives of scholars and policy-makers who might contribute to an enrichment of symposium participants’ understanding of (1) Russia’s international relations; (2) the complexity of U.S. - Russia relations; and (3) examples of collaborative efforts towards shared problem-solving. We are seeking papers from across disciplines on topics related to:

      The Legacy of the Cold War
      Russia and the U.S. in an Emerging Multipolar World NATO and European  Perspectives on Russia Russia and its Near Abroad EurAsEC, CSTO, SCO, & BRICS: Alternatives to Rejoining the West Russia and the Middle East Global Fight Against Terrorism Arms Control and Weapons Proliferation Issues Ethnicity, Diversity, Identity, Mobility, and Migration Demographic Trends in the Post-Soviet Space Resource Governance including Food, Water and Energy Security Global Warming, Climate Change and Environmental Sustainability The Role of Business and Government Policy in Joint Problem-Solving Collaborative Efforts in Education, Science and Technology Public Health, Pandemics, Humanitarian Response, and Emergency Preparedness Media Arts and Diplomacy

      Select Papers will be eligible for publication in a Special Issue of KSU’s peer reviewed Journal of Global Initiatives focused on Russia. http://dga.kennesaw.edu/content/journals

    • International Conference on Russian and Soviet History, "The Centenary of the 1917 Russian Revolution(s): its Significance in World History"
      May 15-16, 2017 | Eötvös Loránd University (Budapest, Hungary)

      In May 2017 the Centre for Russian Studies in Budapest is announcing its 11th biennale international academic conference. The aim of the conference is to provide an opportunity for a dialogue between senior and young researchers from different countries and cultures to discuss newly emerging academic questions of and approaches to the 1917 Russian Revolution(s).

      The history of the Russian Revolution(s) has become a topic of memory politics in postsocialist Eastern Europe. Its rejection, the falsification of its history has become integrated in the legitimating ideologies, mainstream political discourse of the emergent new regimes. In this discourse the former “great October Revolution” appears as a “small October coup d’etat” and the red terror has become mainstreamed in the new history writing and teaching. Has the Russian Revolution indeed failed? If yes, then in what sense? The Revolution(s) as a historical process, as a whole has been marginalized and de-constructed, the partial takes precedence over the whole. Revolutionary violence and terror is detached from the original historical context and it is used to demonize the Revolution, Bolshevism and the Soviet power. Totalitarianism as a method and interpretation is celebrating a new Renaissance after it has been effectively de-constructed by the revisionist school in the 1980s. What can critical thinkers do to re-conquer the history and memory of the Revolution?

      The Centre for Russian Studies at the Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, seeks proposals from academic fellows, postdoctoral researchers, PhD candidates.

      Please see the complete announcement for more details. For the application, click here.

    • Call for Papers: Animals in Eastern Europe and Russia
      June 10, 2017

      In recent years there has been an explosion of interest in the various ways that animals have shaped human identities and experiences. Canadian Slavonic Papers/Revue canadienne des slavistes invites contributions to a special issue that focuses on human-animal interactions, broadly conceived, in Eastern Europe, the Baltic states, Russia, the Soviet Union, the former Soviet Union, and the post-Soviet republics. We invite articles from a range of disciplines that explore the place of animals in the history, culture, and socio-political life of the region during any time period.

      Possible subjects include (but are not limited to): animals in war; animal welfare movements; hunting; zoos; pets and pet-keeping; animal celebrities; animal biographies; wildlife and wildlife management; animals and the environment; animals and food production; religion and animals; circus animals; taxidermy; the use of animals in scientific research; animals and disease; animals and animal symbolism in literature and art; animals and the law (including European Union legislation); working animals; and animals under Communism. The issue aims to be multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary.

      Please see the complete announcement for more details.

    • International Society for Language Studies 2017 Conference
      June 15-17, 2017 | University of Hawai'i - Manoa, Honolulu, Hawai'i

      The International Society for Language Studies, co-sponsored by the University Hawai‘i - Manoa, will hold a conference from June 15-17, 2017 at the University of Hawai‘i – Manoa in Honolulu. The theme of the conference will be “Intersections of Peace and Language Studies.” The paper proposal submission will open on the ISLS website (http://www.isls.co/conference.php) in April 2016, and conclude on November 30, 2016. Submissions will not be accepted after the November 30th deadline. Notification of proposal acceptance or rejection will be sent by January 15, 2017. All presenters who have not registered for the conference by February 28, 2017 will not be scheduled in the conference program. Selected conference papers will be published by ISLS in the Readings in Language Studies peer-reviewed book series in 2018.

      About the Theme
      Peace is often defined as freedom from oppression, the end of conflict or even harmony in relationships. Whatever the definition, the word peace means different things to different people. Peace is an important concept that also connects to the focus of ISLS: the intersections and meeting places of language and power, identity, and social justice. It is in this light that we invite proposal submissions that specifically address some aspect of this focus and its intersection with the concept of peace.

      The ISLS conference is a venue for individuals from all disciplines to come together and discuss language from a critical, interdisciplinary lens (language use, language learning, language teaching, critical language studies, to name a few). To that end, we encourage submissions from across fields of study where their work connects language to peace.

    • 2017 International Conference, "Religion and Russian Revolution"
      October 26-28, 2017 | Moscow, Russia

      This conference will mark the centennial of the Russian Revolution and will explore the complex interactions between revolutionary events and ideas, on the one hand, and religious visions, institutions, and experiences, on the other. The aim of the conference is to reveal the most important and up-to-date trends in the field; present new results coming from recently expanding sources; and articulate new interpretations according to changes in research paradigms, approaches and techniques. Please click here for the full announcement.

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