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Upcoming Events

weekly calendar academic opportunities

Past Events

  • Mark Kramer (Harvard), "Hungary and Its East-Central European Neighbors: The View from Moscow, 1945-2015"

    Thursday, April 28, 6:00pm. Dogwood Room, Indiana Memorial Union. Until the late 1980s, Soviet leaders after World War II regarded Hungary and other East-Central European countries as an extension of their own country’s frontiers. Threats to the security of an East European Communist regime, whether external or internal, were seen as threats to Soviet security as well. Talk will discuss whether under President Putin Russia is returning to the same paradigm? Hosted by the Department of Central Eurasian Studies.
  • Czech Play: "Murder on the Bohemian Express"

    Thursday, April 28, 2016, 7:00pm. Fine Arts Building 015. The North American Cimrman Society presents "Murder on the Bohemian Express," a Czech play with English supertitles. Free admission.
  • Marina Antić (IUB), "Against National Mythopoesis: Ivo Andrić and His Readers"

    Friday, April 29, 2016, 3:00pm. Global & International Studies Building 1118. It is difficult to overstate Ivo Andrić’s stature: his stories, novels, and even his doctoral dissertation are cited by historians, journalists, even the US military as the infallible “guide” to the Balkans. Andrić’s novel The Bridge on the Drina is a lightning rod for such interpretations, offering imagological sketches of Bosnia often (mis)used in assessing Balkan nationalism and the wars of the 1990s. Read through this prism, Andrić has become both a point of departure for analyzing (post)Yugoslav culture as well as its greatest obstacle. This talk will unpack the problematic history surrounding Ivo Andrić’s oeuvre, presenting a case for reading his foundational novel, The Bridge on the Drina, not as national mythopoesis, but rather as engagement of Bosnia’s incomplete modernization, or as an aesthetic response to the conditions of modernity on the periphery of Europe. The analysis will focus on narrative strategies in two key scenes in the early parts of the novel: the devşirme and the impalement scene. These readings will illustrate Andrić’s confrontation with the epic mode on the one hand, and read against the rest of the novel, his registration of combined and uneven development of peripheral modernity on the other.
  • International Arthouse Series presents 11 Minutes (11 Minut) (2015)

    Friday, April 29, 2016, 6:30pm and Saturday, April 30, 2016, 7:00pm. IU Cinema. Directed By: Jerzy Skolimowski, Not Rated Drama (Thriller), 81 Minutes. A cross-section of contemporary urbanites’ lives and loves intertwine, including a jealous husband out of control, his sexy actress wife, a sleazy Hollywood director, a reckless drug messenger, a disoriented young woman, an ex-con hot-dog vendor, a troubled student on a mysterious mission, a high-rise window cleaner on an illicit break, an elderly sketch artist, a hectic paramedics team, and a group of hungry nuns. All of them live in an unsure world where anything could happen at any time. An unexpected chain of events can seal many fates in a mere 11 minutes. In Polish and English with English subtitles. (2K DCP Presentation)
  • Observance of Holocaust Remembrance Day

    Saturday, April 30, 2016, starting at 1:00pm. CANDLES Holocaust Museum and Education Center (1532 South Third Street, Terre Haute, IN). Holocaust Remembrance Day (Yom HaShoah) is a day of commemoration for the victims of the Holocaust. This year, Holocaust Remembrance Day is observed on Wednesday, May 4th. However, CANDLES will be observing Holocaust Remembrance Day on Saturday, April 30th, 2016.
    • Eva Kor presentation at 1:00pm ($5/person)
    • Candlelighting Ceremony at 3:00pm
    • An afternoon with Sam Harris: One of the youngest Holocaust survivors, Sam Harris was born in Deblin, Poland in 1935. He was just four years old when his town was bombed. Having lost his parents and most of his family, Sam hid for two-and-a-half years in Deblin and Czestochowa concentration camps. An upbeat, optimistic, and inspirational personality, Sam is a successful businessman and was the instrumental force behind the construction of the Illinois Holocaust Museum and Educational Center, of which he is president emeritus.
    Admission for the ceremony and Sam Harris presentation are free and open to the public. Donations are welcomed. (You can also view a PDF of this announcement here.)
  • Supercharge Your Dissertation

    Monday, May 2, 2016, 8:30am-4:00pm. Hazelbaker Hall (Wells Library) E159. This one-day workshop will help you start the summer right! Graduate students, librarians, faculty and campus experts will share their insights on organizing your research, developing a sustainable writing schedule, exploring digital components of dissertation research, writing with a future book project in mind, staying sane while dissertating, and much more.
  • Dr. O. Oyunjargal (National Univ. Mongolia), "Mongol Social Structure in the Manchu Period: sum, qamjilga, and slaves"

    Wednesday, May 4, 2016, 5:00pm. Bridgewaters Lounge, Neal-Marshall Black Culture Center. Under the Manchu-Qing Empire, new administrative structures known as banners and sum were imposed onto the Mongols. The basis of the administrative units consisted of banner members known as sum commoners who fulfilled the official duties (alba) of the Manchu state, the personal subjects of the nobility known as qamjilga (personal serfs), and the shav’ (disciple) of the Qutagt (reincarnate lama). In other words, in accordance with Manchu-Qing imperial law the Mongol princes’ own male subjects aged four to sixty as well as the personal subjects of the nobility became qamjilga, the remainder of the population was divided up to fulfill imperial duties for the Manchu emperor as sum commoners. In the registers of estimated manpower which each banner drew up every three years, sum commoners and qamjilga were distinguished, indeed written down separately by name. Furthermore, at that time in Mongolian traditional society the class of domestic slaves was becoming smaller, and almost disappeared by the beginning of the twentieth century. The main reason domestic slavery disappeared was that the slaves became sum commoners, qamjilga, or shav’. (Please click here for complete details.)
  • Global & International Studies Building (GISB) Classroom Orientation Workshop

    Thursday, May 12, 2016, 9:00am. Global & International Studies Building 1118. Instructors who are currently teaching in or are about to teach in a GISB classroom are invited to attend a GISB Classroom Orientation Workshop. In this GISB classroom orientation, participants will receive a brief tour of the room’s affordances and experience several of them through hands-on activities intended to provide a students’ perspective on their use. Participants will explore the white board walls, configurable furniture, and technology-rich environment that instructors can leverage for interactive lectures, a wide variety of student learning activities and assessments, and student collaboration and sharing. In the last hour, we will provide stations for instructors to visit for more in-depth exploration and questions. The event will occur on May 12, 9:00-11:00am in Global and International Studies Building room 1118. Please register here: https://uits.iu.edu/mosaic/events
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