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Roundtable and Reception
Friday, December 7th, 4:30-6:30
College Arts and Humanities Institute (CAHI)
1211 East Atwater Avenue (Corner of Ballantine and Atwater)

Mark your calendars for the last 2012 event of Renaissance Studies. The program will begin at 4:30 with a roundtable followed by a reception.

The roundtable will explore issues of general interest to scholars of Renaissance and early modern studies, with short presentations by four doctoral students. ROBERT (MOSES) FRITZ (Hispanic Literatures) will look at the scenes of hunting in the late fifteenth-century novel “Amadís de Gaula,” and argue that they reflect a discourse of leisure prevalent in late medieval and early modern Spain which encouraged hunting as an appropriate pastime for nobles and kings. JOHN WALTERS (English) will focus on how, in his “Defence of Poesy” (1595), Philip Sidney challenges prevailing anti-poetic sentiment by showing that poetry can teach what virtuous action in the political world looks like, especially to those who wish to reform the government of their societies. CHRYSTINE KEENER (History of Art) will look at the iconographic composition of Jacopo Pontormo’s “Visitation” (1528) and show how it contains a system of coded visual metaphors of a type of spirituality inspired by the late fifteenth-century Dominican friar Girolamo Savonarola. Finally, DANA BARRON (Musicology) will use the work of Johannes Lupi (c. 1410-1467) as a case study to discuss the way in which English mass music was perceived and used on the Continent in the fifteenth century.

We will also welcome new faculty and graduate students, advertise the Renaissance Studies minor and certificate, announce the speakers for the new year-long lecture series titled “Individuals, Groups, and the Constitution of Renaissance Societies,” as well as other events. This will be a chance for faculty and graduate students alike to meet colleagues working in other disciplines.

I hope to see you there.

Massimo Scalabrini
Director of Renaissance Studies