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UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE OPTIONS

Sociology Major
Sociology Minor
Work and Business Minor
Major in Afro-American Studies and Sociology
Certificate in Social Research in Health and Medicine
Minor in Social Science and Medicine

See also

IU Bulletin

Sociology Major

Purpose: The major is designed to acquaint students with basic principles, methods, and findings in sociology and to provide students with an opportunity to discover and to understand the social nature of their world.  Provision is made for students who wish to acquire a general background as well as for those who wish to develop particular interests in a subfield of sociology.  The major provides a foundation for careers in many professional fields, such as law, social service administration, and business, as well as for graduate training as professional sociologists in government, business, community agencies, research organizations, or universities.

Sociology majors are required to take:

1) S100 Introduction to Sociology: Introduction to the concepts and methods of sociology with an emphasis on the understanding of contemporary American society.

2) One of the following:

  • S101 Social Problems and Policies: Provides an introduction to sociology through an in-depth study of a major social problem; explores policy implications of the general sociological perspective and of sociological knowledge of a particular problem. Topics have included: childhood as a social problem, sociology of money, medicine in the U.S.
  • S105 Current Social Controversies: Selected controversies, their history, sociological evidence, solutions being debated in the United States and abroad, and the likely outcome of policies. Controversies such as population and the environment, war, childhood, poverty, and education will be examined.
  • S110 Charts, Graphs, and Tables: This course introduces sociology by developing students' skills as consumers and producers of charts, graphs and tables. These data displays are used to illustrate social trends in crime, divorce, and the economy; to assess political programs; and to test social science theories. Students will learn how to find information on the World Wide Web and in government documents, how to read, interpret and evaluate the accuracy of graphical information, and how to present social trends and comparisons in interesting visual formats.
  • S122 Envisioning the City: Students conduct field research in a city in order to understand the relationship between the built environment and social problems such as obesity and residential segregation. Addresses approaches to resolving these problems through community action.
  • S201 Social Problems: Understands current social problems, causes and consequences using a sociological framework
  • S210 The Economy, Organization, and Work: Explores the transformation of capitalism and industrialized societies, the evolution of organizations, government agencies, educational systems, and others, and the changing world of work.
  • S215 Social Change: Introduction to theoretical and empirical studies of social change. Explores issues such as modernization; rationalization; demographic, economic, and religious causes of change; and reform and revolution.
  • S217 Social Inequality: Why are income, wealth and status distributed unequally? Is social inequality good for society? Explores the economic basis of social class, education and culture; social mobility; social inequality in comparative and historical perspective.
  • S220 Culture and Society: Explores changing beliefs about the role of ideas, values, and symbols in society. Considers recent public debates over the content and practices of science, morality, art, and popular culture.
  • S230 Society and the Individual: Introduction to the concepts, perspectives, and theories of social psychology from the level of the individual to collective behavior.

3) Statistics and Social Theory Requirements:

S370, S371, and S340 must be taken by the end of the Junior year. If you do not complete these courses by the end of your junior year, you will need to consult with the Undergraduate Advisor.

  • S370 Research Methods in Sociology: The logic of scientific work in sociology; theory construction; major research designs, including experiments, sample surveys, and ethnographic field studies. Methods of sampling; measurement of variables; and descriptive statistics. Commonly used rates and indices in social research; using software to produce graphical displays and descriptive statistics.
  • S371 Social Statistics: Introduces the logic of statistical inference. Students will learn how to use sample data to reach conclusions about a population of interest by calculating confidence intervals and significance tests. Estimating the effects of multiple independent variables using crosstabulations and/or regression.
  • S340 Social Theory: Sociological theory, with focus on content, form, and historical development. Relationships between theories, data, and sociological explanation. This course is offered as an intensive writing class.

4) Nine credit hours at the 300/400 level (excluding S340, S370, and S371).

5) One 3 credit 400-level capstone seminar. S491, S492, S493, S494, and S495 cannot be used to satisfy the capstone seminar requirement. Capstone courses are intended to integrate ideas and/or methods from earlier courses taken for the major. They are characterized by the following requirements: (1) an empirical paper, service learning paper, or portfolio based on individual or group work; (2) a class presentation based on individual or group work; (3) a focus on discussion rather than lecture; and (4) required readings that include journal articles.

6) A total of 30 credit hours with a grade of C- or better; an overall GPA of 2.0 in Sociology.

7) Students also must complete the degree requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.


Sociology minors are required to take:

Students must complete 15 credit hours of sociology; at least 9 credit hours must be taken on the Bloomington campus. The total of 15 credit hours must be completed with grades of C– or better and an overall GPA of 2.000 in Sociology.

Included in the 15 credit hours of sociology are:

1. One of the following: S100, S105, S110, S122, S201, S210, S215, S217, S220, S230.

2. Three sociology courses (9 credit hours) at the 300– 400 level.

3. An additional sociology course at any level.

Students whose major department requires a minor should consult with their advisor about additional or other requirements. Students who have questions about an appropriate statistics course should consult the advisor.


Work and Business Minor

This minor offers students the opportunity to certify an area of concentration that examines the social context within which business activities take place and the social processes that shape economic organizations. The minor encourages students to explore implications of trends in families, gender roles, race and ethnic relations, and other noneconomic areas of social life for understanding the organization and future prospects of business in America.

For students in the Kelley School of Business, the minor documents completion of an integrated course of study on the impact of social trends on work and occupations.

For students in the College of Arts and Sciences and other schools of the university, the minor certifies that they have combined the study of work and occupations with their major field of concentration.  Students may not earn both a minor in sociology and a minor in sociology of work and business.

Work and Business Minors are required to take:

  1. Either S100, S110, or S101* "Sociology of Money" (only this section of S101 is approved for this minor).
  2. Four courses from the following list (at least three taken on the IUB campus).
    • S210 The Economy, Organizations, and Work*
    • S215 Social Change
    • S217 Social Inequality
    • S302 Organizational Life*
    • S305 Population
    • S308 Global Society
    • S315 Work and Occupation*
    • S316 The Family
    • S335 Ethnic and Race Relations
    • S338 Gender Roles
    • S346 Topics in Cross-Cultural Sociology
    • S410 Topics in Social Organization: Economic Life (only this section of S410 is approved for this minor)*
  3. Students can substitute a 400-level seminar, with an appropriate topic, for one of the four courses, with the approval of the director of undergraduate studies.

The starred courses are particularly useful for Business Majors and are highly recommended.


Interdepartmental Major in Afro-American Studies and Sociology

The interdepartmental major in African American & African Diaspora Studies (AAADS) and Sociology (SOC) B.A. is designed for students who want to pursue two areas of study but do not want to limit their course work in other liberal arts areas by having to take all the classes necessary for completion of the two majors.  The departments of African American and African Diaspora Studies and Sociology are part of the College of Arts and Sciences.

The interdepartmental major in African American and African Diaspora Studies (AAADS) and Sociology (SOC) B.A. provides you with transferrable skills in critical and analytical thinking as you learn about social issues from a cross-cultural perspective. Students will study social forces that that influence human behavior and learn strategies and the critical thinking skills to work with diverse populations.

Students must meet the following course requirements for a minimum total of 40 hours:

  1. Afro-American Studies: At least 18 hours of which at least 12 credit hours must be at the 300 level or above, including:
    • A150 Survey Culture of Black Americans
    • A355 Afro-American History I, or A356 Afro-American History II
    • A379 Early Black American Writing or A380 Contemporary Black American Writing
    • Nine additional hours from our History, Culture and Social Issues Concentration.

      These nine hours must include the Senior Seminar. (Majors are strongly encouraged to take A363 Research on Contemporary Afro-American Problems I, when it is taught.)
  2. Sociology: At least 21 credit hours of which at least 12 credit hours must be at the 300 level or above, including:
    • One course from the following:
      • S100 Introduction to Sociology
      • S210 The Economy, Organizations, and Work
      • S215 Social Change
      • S230 Society and the Individual
    • S217 Social Inequality
    • S335 Race and Ethnic Relations
    • S110 Charts, Graphs, and Tables
    • 3 additional courses in Sociology at the 300-400 level

Certificate in Social Research in Health and Medicine

Purpose: The certificate provides students with an in-depth exposure to social science approaches to health and health behavior.  Students obtain basic training in social science, research methods, and statistics, and foster an interdisciplinary perspective in health that prepares them for the modern world of medicine, nursing, and health policy.

Requirements:

1. Choose 2 basic social science courses, (6 credits) from: SOC-S100, SOC-S101, PSY-P101, ANTH-E260

2. Research and Statistics (6 credits)

  • SOC-S370
  • One statistics course from the following: SOC-S110, SOC-S371, PSY-K300, ECON-E370, ECON-S370, STAT-K310, MATH-K310

3. Advanced Study in Social Science and Health courses (9 credits). (E.g. ANTH-B260, ANTH-B312, ANTH-B340, ANTH-B480, SPH-B310, SPH-H311, PSY-P324, PSY-P303, PSY-P315, SOC-S305, SOC-S324, SOC-S358, SPEA-H322, SPEA-H324, SPEA-H354, SPEA-H411)

4. Capstone Course (3 credits) chosen from SOC-S410 or SOC-S431 (topic must have a health-related focus), SOC-S498, SOC-S499 (Honors Thesis Seminar) or a comparable course with a medical focus in another social science discipline.


Minor in Social Science and Medicine

Purpose: Allows students to study divergent aspects of the delivery and consumption of medical services, paying special attention to relevant social, historical, behavioral, and ethical contexts. The minor, which is organized in five concentrations, will facilitate and certify a greater understanding of the social context of health in our society than could be achieved in a less integrated course of study. This is achieved through a multi-disciplinary approach to health issues that establishes a bridge between the social sciences and health professionals.

Requirements: The minor requires completion of 15 credit hours consisting of a minimum of 9 credits from approved College of Arts and Sciences courses, including:

1. S101 Topics in Social Programs and Policies (+SOC): Approved section: Medicine in America

2. at least 6 additional hours of College courses within the social science and health concentration, of which 3 hours must be at 300-400 level

An additional 6 hours, 3 hours of which must be at the 300-400 level; this may include up to 6 hours in approved courses offered outside the College.

The five concentrations in the Social Science and Medicine minor include:

Health Care and Society: A social science-focused minor which examines social factors defining health status and approaches to care.

Requirements 9 hours of College of Arts and Sciences courses (3 of which must be at the 300-400 level), including (1-3):

1. S101 Social Problems and Policies (SOC). Approved section: Medicine in America and

2. One or more of: S324 Sociology of Mental Health (SOC)

  • S410 Social Roots of Health and Disease (SOC)
  • E445 Medical Anthropology (ANTH)
  • H333 Epidemics in History (HIST)
  • P493 Law and Psychiatry (CJUS)
  • R373 Religion, Ethics and Medicine or R473 Problems in Social Ethics: Medical ethics (RELS)
  • B400 Topics in Bioanthropology (ANTH)

3. One additional course from: B200 Bioanthropology (ANTH)

  • H213 The Black Death (HIST)
  • X205 History of Medicine (HPSC)
  • E104 History of the World Population (COLL TOPICS)
  • E105 Good Genes Bad Genes (COLL TOPICS)
  • M131 Disease and the Human Body (Medical Sciences)

Six additional credits (3 of which must be at the 300-400 level) may include (4-6):

4. One or more of the following:

  • H366 Health Problems in the Community or H311 Human Diseases and Epidemiology (HPER)
  • B233 Health and Wellness in Society (Nursing)

5. One of the following IUPUI sociology courses:

  • R381 Social Factors in Health
  • R382 Social organization of Health Care
  • R321 Women and Health, or

6. Up to 3 credits in experiential learning, with a health or mental health focus:

  • S494 Field Experience in Sociology (SOC)
  • R497 Field Experience in Medical Sociology (IUPUI)
  • H466 Public Health Field Experience (SPEA)
  • P497 Field Experience in Psychology (PSY)
  • C444 Field Experience in Public Health Education (HPER)
  • Y481 Field Experience in Political Science (POLS)

Social Changes in Treatment and Health Care Organization: Social perspectives on the delivery and evaluation of care.

Requirements 9 hours of COLL courses (3 of which must be at the 300-400 level), including (1-3):

1. S101 Social Problems and Policies (SOC). Approved section: Medicine in America, and

2. One or more of: S324 Sociology of Mental Illness (SOC)

  • S410 Health in an Aging Society (SOC)
  • P493 Law and Psychiatry (instructor´s approval) (CJUS)
  • R373 Religion, Ethics, and Medicine or R473 Topics in Social Ethics (RELS) Medical Ethics

3. One of:

  • X205 History of Medicine (HPSC)
  • E104 Mad and the Bad (COLL TOPICS)

Six additional credits (3 of which must be at the 300-400 level); may include (4-5):

4. One or more of:

  • B233 Health and Wellness in Society (Nursing)
  • H320 Health Systems Administration (SPEA)
  • H441 Legal Aspects of Health Care (SPEA)
  • H455 Topics in Health Care Policy: (SPEA) Approved Sections: Health Care Policy and Reform; Managed Care
  • H502 Needs Assessment in Public Health (HPER)
  • C403 Program Planning in Public Health (HPER)

5. One of the following IUPUI sociology courses:

  • R381 Social Factors in Health
  • R327 Death and Dying
  • R382 Social Organization of Health Care

6. Up to 3 credit hours in experiential learning, with a health or mental health focus:

  • R497 Field Experience in Medical Sociology (IUPUI)
  • H466 Public Health Field Experience (SPEA)
  • S494 Field Experience in Sociology (SOC)
  • P497 Field Experience in Psychology (PSY)
  • C444 Field Experience in Public Health Education (HPER)
  • Y481 Field Experience in Political Science (POLS)

Mental Illness and Society: Social and biological factors in mental health.

Requirements: 9 hours of College of Arts and Sciences courses (3 of which must be at the 300-400 level), including (1-3):

1. S101 Social Problems and Policies (SOC). Approved section: Medicine in America, and

2. One or more of:

  • S324 Mental Illness (SOC)
  • P324 Abnormal Psychology or P326 Behavioral Neuroscience (PSY)
  • P425 Behavioral Disorders of Childhood and Adolescence (PSY)
  • P407 Drugs and the Nervous System (PSY)
  • P434 Community Psychology (PSY)
  • P415 Crime and Madness (CJUS) or P493 Seminar: Law and Psychiatry (PSY) (with instructor´s approval)

3. And one additional course:

  • E104 The Mad and the Bad (COLL TOPICS)
  • P201 Biology of Human Behavior (PSY)
  • E105 Neural Basis of Human Behavior (COLL TOPICS)

Six additional credits (3 of which must be at the 300-400 level); may include (4-6):

4. One of:

  • S300 Topics in Family Studies: (Social Work) Approved Sections: Family Violence/Child Abuse; Addictions
  • H318 Drug Use in American Society (HPER)
  • H418 Nature of Addictive Disorders (HPER)

5. One of the following IUPUI sociology courses:

  • R495 Sociology of Mental Illness
  • R410 Alcohol, Drugs, and Society

6. Up to 3 hours of experiential learning, with a focus on health or mental health:

  • R497 Field Experience in Medical Sociology (IUPUI)
  • H466 Public Health Field Experience (SPEA)
  • S494 Field Experience in Sociology (SOC)
  • P497 Field Experience in Psychology (PSY)
  • C444 Field Experience in Public Health Education (HPER)
  • Y481 Field Experience in Political Science (POLS)

Social Factors in Community Health: Epidemiologic approaches to the study of health status and health needs of populations, rather than that of individuals.

Requirements: 9 hours of College of Arts and Sciences courses (3 of which must be at the 300-400 level), including (1-3):

1. S101 Social Problems and Policies (SOC). Approved section: Medicine in America, and

2. One or more of:

  • S410 Social Roots of Health and Disease (SOC)
  • S410 Health in an Aging Society (SOC)
  • H333 Epidemics in History (HIST)
  • B480 Human Growth and Development (ANTH)
  • B400 Topics in Bioanthropology (ANTH)
  • L302 Topics in Human Biology (BIOL)
  • L369 Heredity, Evolution, and Society (BIOL)
  • M440 Medical Microbiology (Medical Sciences)

3. An additional course of

  • B200 Bioanthropology (ANTH)
  • E104 History of World Population (COLL TOPICS)
  • E105 Good Genes Bad Genes (COLL TOPICS)
  • H213 The Black Death (HIST)
  • M131 Disease and the Human Body (Medical Science)

Six additional credits (3 of which must be at the 300-400 level) may include (4-5):

4. One of:

  • H311 Human Disease and Epidemiology (HPER)
  • H494 Research and Evaluative Methods (HPER)
  • H324 Gerontology (HPER)
  • B233 Health and Wellness in Society (Nursing)
  • H310 Health Care in Minority Communities (HPER)
  • H502 Needs Assessment in Public Health (HPER)
  • H494 Research and Evaluative Methods in Health (HPER)

5. One of the following IUPUI sociology courses:

  • R280 Topics in Sociology: Approved section: AIDS and Society
  • R381 Social Factors in Health

6. Up to 3 hours in experiential learning, with a health or mental health focus:

  • H466 Public Health Field Experience (SPEA)
  • S494 Field Experience in Sociology (SOC)
  • P497 Field Experience in Psychology (PSY)
  • C444 Field Experience in Public Health Education (HPER)
  • Y481 Field Experience in Political Science (POLS)
  • R497 Field Experience in Medical Sociology (IUPUI)

Decision Making in Seeking and Providing Care: Preparing patients and providers as partners in clinical and ethical decisions.

Requirements: 9 hours of College of Arts and Sciences courses (3 of which must be at the 300-400 level), including (1-3):

1. S101 Social Problems and Policies (SOC). Approved section: Medicine in America and

2. One or more of:

  • R373 Religion, Ethics, and Medicine (RELS)
  • R473 Problems in Social Ethics: Medical Ethics (RELS)
  • S410 Health Care in an Aging Society (SOC)
  • L369 Heredity, Genetics and Society (BIOL)

3. One of

  • E103 Playing God: Life and Death Issues in Medical Ethics (COLL TOPICS)
  • E105 Good Genes Bad Genes (COLL TOPICS)
  • X205 Introduction to the History of Medicine (COLL TOPICS)
  • M131 Disease and the Human Body (Medical Sciences)

Six additional credits (3 of which must be at the 300-400 level) may include (4-6):

4. One of:

  • S300 Topics in Family Studies (Social Work). Approved Sections: Family Violence/Child Abuse; Addictions
  • H318 Drug Use in American Society (HPER)
  • H324 Gerontology (HPER)
  • B233 Health and Wellness in Society (Nursing)
  • H310 Health Care in Minority Communities (HPER)
  • H220 Death and Dying (HPER)
  • H366 Health Problems in the Community
  • H441 Legal Aspects of Health Care (SPEA)
  • H455 Topics in Health Care Policy: (SPEA Approved sections: Senior Seminar in Public Health Administration (with instructor´s permission)
  • B233 Health and Wellness in Society (Nursing)

5. One of the following IUPUI sociology courses:

  • R327 Death and Dying
  • R381 Social Factors in Health and Illness

6. Up to 3 hours experiential learning in: S494 Field Experience in Sociology

  • P497 Field Experience in Psychology
  • C444 Field Experience in Public Health Education (HPER)
  • Y481 Field Experience in Political Science
  • R497 Field Experience in Medical Sociology (IUPUI)
  • H466 Public Health Field Experience (SPEA)