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People

Graduate Students | Hispanic Linguistics

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Arróniz-Parra, Santiago / sarroniz

Masters student


Santiago Arróniz-Parra, originally from Seville, Spain, is a first-year M.A. student in Hispanic Linguistics. He received a B.A. in English Studies and an M.A. in Linguistics, Literature, and Culture Studies at the University of Seville. Santiago’s research interests include Pragmatics, Discourse Analysis, Syntax, SLA, and Computational Linguistics. More specifically, his recent research has focused on a corpus-based analysis for the development of a predictive text tool for oncological children, as part of the Proyecto Sinergia at University of Seville in collaboration with the AEetc (an acronym for ‘Spanish Association for the Effects of Oncological Treatment’). Current projects include the study of the acquisition of humor by second language learners in the target language from the point of view of the Relevance Theory.

Baxter, Robert / rpbaxter

Doctoral student


Robert Patrick Baxter is a Ph.D. candidate in Hispanic Linguistics. His research focuses on SLA, syntax, and L2 pragmatics with particular attention to experimental design, politeness, and instruction. His dissertation, entitled “Co-constructing turns as interactional competence: Collaborative turn sequences in L1 and L2 Spanish", explores interactional competence among second language learners of Spanish. It represents a continuation of his experimental approaches to pragmatics and discourse. He has published one article entitled “Interactional competence and politeness: Native and non-native perceptions of collaborative talk in Spanish” (2015, in Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Im/politeness). He was the recipient of a Grant-in-Aid of Doctoral Research Award by the Indiana University Graduate School.

Blaker, Nicholas / nmblaker

Masters student


Nick is a second-year M.A. student in Hispanic Linguistics originally from Cincinnati, Ohio. He received his B.A. in Spanish with a minor in Anthropology from Northern Kentucky University. During his time at NKU, he lived and studied in Segovia and León, Spain. Most recently he served as an Auxiliar de Coversación teaching English in Zaragoza, Spain. His research interests include Pragmatics/Sociolinguistics, (discourse markers, morphosyntacic variation) and Second Language Acquisition with an interest in modality/mood distinction in L2 Spanish learners. Furthermore, he is interested L2 Spanish learners’ contact with sociolinguistic variations in Spain (perfective past/future time-expression). Lastly, he has an interest in the linguistic variations employed in Aragón, Spain due to language contact with Catalan and Aragonese.

Bongiovanni, Silvina / scbongio

Doctoral student


Silvina Bongiovanni completed her licenciatura Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA). Currently she is pursuing a dual Ph.D. in General Linguistics (Department of Linguistics), and Hispanic Linguistics (Department of Spanish and Portuguese). Her main area of research is Phonetics and Phonology with a Laboratory Phonology methodological approach. Her work focuses primarily, though not exclusively, on Buenos Aires Spanish.

Cisneros, Alejandro / arcisner

Doctoral student


Alejandro Cisneros is a Ph.D. student in Hispanic Linguistics. He completed a dual B.A. in Psychology and Spanish; and his M.A. in Hispanic Linguistics at the University of New Mexico. His primary research involves Second Language Acquisition, task-based learning and sociolinguistics.  He is currently interested in how to develop instructor language training to help teachers prepare for classrooms involving students with different backgrounds. His recent conference presentations involved the creation of advanced Spanish classes with Heritage learners.

Clay, Rebecca / rlclay

Doctoral student


Rebecca Clay is a Ph.D. student originally from Richmond, VA. She received a B.A. in Spanish Language and Literature from Virginia Tech (Go Hokies!) and a M.A. in Hispanic Linguistics from Indiana University. Rebecca’s main areas of study are Second Language Acquisition, Syntax, and Sociolinguistics. She is specifically interested in the way language learners acquire certain (morpho) syntactic structures and how written and spoken input play a role in this. Her recent work deals with the acquisition of preposition doubling variation, in addition to the native-speaker variation of future-time expression in promise- and threat-making. Rebecca is an avid supporter of the performing arts and in her free time enjoys playing music with friends and participating in theatre.

Cole, Molly / molcole

Doctoral student


Molly Cole is a Ph.D. student in Hispanic Linguistics. She completed her B.A. in Linguistics and Spanish at Hofstra University in New York, and received a M.A. degree in Hispanic Linguistics from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Her research areas include Sociolinguistics, Language Contact, and Phonology. She is particularly interested in how sociolinguistic variables such as age, linguistic identity, and dialect influence phonological variation in contact situations between Spanish and indigenous languages.

Coulter-Kern, Mackenzie / maccoult

Masters student


Mackenzie Coulter-Kern is a Hispanic Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition M.A. student from North Manchester, Indiana. She received a dual B.A. in Spanish and International Studies from Juniata College in Pennsylvania. After graduating she taught ELL and high school Spanish in Indiana and later kindergarten at a bilingual school in the Dominican Republic. After working in the DR she taught English for a year at the Universidad Autonoma de Aguascalientes in Aguascalientes Mexico on a Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship and became increasingly interested in teaching, research and the intersection between language and identity. In her spare time Mackenzie enjoys dancing, playing soccer, skiing, painting and enjoying life with her new husband.

Daidone, Danielle / ddaidone

Doctoral student


Danielle Daidone is a Ph.D. student in Hispanic Linguistics and Second Language Studies. Her main research area is second language phonology, with a particular focus on lexical representations and spoken word recognition. She also works on individual differences in second language phonological acquisition, as well as first and second language sociolinguistics. In her free time, she enjoys dancing salsa.

Delgado-Díaz, Gibran / gdelgado

Doctoral student


Gibran Delgado-Díaz is a Ph.D. Candidate in the Hispanic Linguistics program. His areas of interest are Sociolinguistics, Laboratory phonology and Second Language Acquisition. His research focuses on Caribbean Spanish, especially Puerto Rican Spanish. His dissertation titled ‘Variation of the Spanish Past Forms’ examines the use of the preterit, imperfect, imperfect progressive, preterit progressive and present perfect in Puerto Rican Spanish. ​

DiBartolomeo, Megan / mdibarto

Doctoral student


Megan DiBartolomeo is a Ph.D. student in the Hispanic Linguistics program. She received a B.A. in Spanish and Adolescence Education from the State University of New York at Geneseo and an M.A. in Hispanic Linguistics from Indiana University. Megan is primarily interested in second language pragmatics (with a focus on the instruction of pragmatics), individual differences in second language acquisition, sociolinguistics, and SLA in study abroad contexts. During the summer she works as an instructor for the Indiana University Honors Program in Foreign Languages.

Elias, Vanessa / mavelias

Doctoral student


Vanessa Elias is a Ph.D. student in the Hispanic Linguistics program. She received her B.A. in Spanish and Political Science from the University of Florida and her M.A. in Spanish Linguistics from Arizona State University. Vanessa’s research interests include pragmatics, sociolinguistics, and heritage language acquisition. She is particularly interested in how the contact situation in the United States has affected Spanish heritage speaker’s pragmatic and syntactic systems. In her free time, Vanessa enjoys traveling, meeting new people, cooking, and spending time with friends and family. 

Escalante Vergara, Ma. Fernanda / mescalan

Doctoral student


Ma. Fernanda Escalante, originally from Barranquilla, Colombia, is a Ph.D. student in Hispanic Linguistics. She received a B.A. in Linguistics and Literature from the Universidad del Atlántico in Colombia and a M.A. in Linguistics from the University of Puerto Rico. Her research areas include syntax, sociolinguistics, and Caribbean variation studies. She is currently researching variation of focalizing “ser” in Caribbean Spanish. Her M.A. thesis, entitled “Parametric Microvariation: The focalizing Ser v. Pseudocleft Sentences in Barranquilla, Colombia,” proposes a micro-parametric pattern, different from the rest of Colombian Spanish and other Spanish varieties.

Escalona-Torres, Juan Manuel / jumescal

Doctoral student


Juan Manuel Escalona-Torres is an Ph.D. student in the Hispanic Linguistics program. He completed his B.A. in Applied Linguistics at Georgia State University and received an M.A. from University of Hawai’i at Manoa in Second Language Studies. He has previously focused on critical language studies with special interest in sociolinguistics and discourse analysis. After completing an M.A. here at IU in Hispanic Linguistics Juan has been focusing on language variation and change with a particular focus on the variation of meaning. Juan has taught English as a Foreign Language in Matsudo City, Japan, and taught Elementary Spanish I & II at the University of Hawai’i. His research interests include language variation and change, syntax, pragmatics, and second language acquisition. Recently he has been exploring the areas of semantics and historical linguistics. 

 

Evans-Sago, Travis / tsago

Doctoral student


Travis Evans-Sago is a Ph.D. student in the Hispanic Linguistics program. He received a B.A. in Spanish and Asian Studies (Mandarin Chinese) from Furman University, a M.A. in Hispanic Linguistics from Indiana University, a M.A. in Spanish (Literature) from Middlebury College, and a TESOL certificate from the University of South Carolina. Travis specializes in sociolinguistics, second language acquisition, pragmatics, and discourse analysis. His research interests include both native speaker and immigrant learner expression of tense, mood, and aspect in conversation and narrative discourse. He is currently examining the speech perception of socially indexed cues, such as those pertaining to sexual orientation, by first and second language speakers of Spanish.

Filimonova, Valentyna / valefili

Doctoral student


Valentyna Filimonova, originally from Ukraine, is a doctoral student seeking a dual Ph.D. degree in General and Hispanic Linguistics at Indiana University. She received a B.A. in Spanish and Linguistics from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro and an M.A. in Spanish and General Linguistics from Indiana University. Valentyna’s research interests include sociolinguistics, pragmatics, morphosyntactic variation, cross-cultural research, and second language acquisition. She loves doing collaborative research and teaching Spanish.

Galarza Galarza, Iraida / igalarza

Doctoral student


Iraida Galarza, originally form Puerto Rico, is a Ph.D. candidate in the Hispanic Linguistics program. She received her B.A. in Foreign Languages, and a M.A. in Linguistics from the University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras. Her areas of interest include Second Language Acquisition, Sociolinguistics, Phonetic and Phonology, and Caribbean Spanish. Her dissertation topic focuses on the acquisition of mood and modal expression by second-language learners of Spanish.

Garrett, Jordan / garretjm

Doctoral student


Jordan Garrett, a third-year Ph.D. student in Hispanic Linguistics at Indiana University, completed his B.A. and M.A. at the University of Iowa. His research interests include Spanish and Portuguese morphosyntax, second language acquisition, and foreign/second language pedagogy. His publications and conference presentations include work on the syntax of object expression, coordination and the syntax-information structure interface, as well as SLA projects in online processing and the acquisition of dialectal variation in study abroad. Many of his projects look to bridge the gap between formal approaches to SLA and syntax with other frameworks to further research on the structure and acquisition of variable language phenomena.

Giacomino, Lindsay / lgiacomi

Masters student


Lindsay Giacomino is an M.A. student in the Hispanic Linguistics program. She received a dual B.A. in Spanish and Linguistics from St. Cloud State University in St. Cloud, Minnesota. She previously focused on L2 acoustic phonetics, specifically with L1 Spanish speakers acquiring English. Prior to beginning the M.A. program at Indiana University, she was a Fulbright English Teaching Assistant and taught English at the Universidad de Boyacá in Tunja, Colombia. Lindsay is particularly interested in phonetics and phonology, second language acquisition, and foreign language pedagogy.

Glide, Margaret / mglide

Doctoral student


Margaret Glide is a first-year Ph.D. student in Hispanic Linguistics. Her research focuses on discourse/pragmatic approaches to syntax and phonology in Spanish, English, and Papiamentu. Specifically, she is interested in syntactic variation in Papiamentu, computer-mediated discourse on social media platforms, and the role of information structure in syntax.

Henderson-Contreras, Carly / crh5

Doctoral student


Carly Rae Henderson-Contreras is a Hispanic Linguistics Ph.D. student from Phoenix, Arizona. She received a B.A. in Spanish and Political Science and an M.A. in Spanish from Arizona State University. Carly’s research interests include instructed second language acquisition, L2 morphosyntax, and foreign language pedagogy. She is specifically interested in the effects of corrective feedback, task-based language teaching methods, learner individual differences and computer-mediated communication on the acquisition of Spanish as a foreign language. During the summers she works with the Indiana University Honors Program in Foreign Languages with High School students studying abroad Spain and México. During her free time, she enjoys traveling, cooking and hiking.

Jarrett, Dylan / dsjarret

Masters student


Dylan Jarrett is a Hispanic Linguistics M.A. student from Anderson, South Carolina. He received a B.A. in Spanish from Furman University. After serving as an undergraduate research assistant and spending several months in Spain, he decided to pursue his M.A. at Indiana University. His interests include syntactic change and variation, cross-cultural pragmatics, and second language acquisition. Before beginning his graduate studies, he spent a year teaching English as a Foreign Language in Madrid, Spain. 

Jung, Daniel / danjung

Doctoral student


Daniel Jung is a 1st year Ph.D. Student in Hispanic Linguistics. He completed a dual B.A. in Spanish and Linguistics at the University of Kansas, and his M.A. in Hispanic Linguistics at Indiana University. His primary research interests include Second Language Acquisition, L2 Pragmatics, and Spanish Syntax, focusing on projects that examine acquisition in a classroom setting. During the 2015-2016 academic year Daniel is participating in the IU Graduate Student Exchange, teaching English for the Universidad de Sevilla.

McKinnon, Sean / samckinn

Doctoral student


Sean McKinnon is a Ph.D. student in the Hispanic Linguistics program. He received a B.S. in Psychology and Spanish from The Ohio State University and a M.A. in Theoretical and Applied Linguistics from Universitat Pompeu Fabra in Barcelona, Spain. Sean’s research interests include language contact (specifically Spanish in contact with Kaqchikel in Guatemala, Catalan in Catalonia, and English in the U.S.), sociophonetics, and pragmatics (focusing on (mock) impoliteness theory). He has published articles in the Journal of Politeness Research, Journal of Language and Sexuality (forthcoming), and Studies in Second Language Acquisition (forthcoming). He was awarded the Department’s Doctoral Student Academic Achievement Award for 2016-2017 and in Spring 2017 he will be participating in the IU Graduate Student Research Exchange Program at the University of Costa Rica.

Melero, Fernando / fmelerog

Doctoral student


Fernando Melero, originally from Spain, is a first-year Ph.D. student in Hispanic Linguistics. He received a B.A. in Translation and Interpretation at the University of Granada and an M.A. in Hispanic Linguistics at the University of New Mexico. Fernando’s research interests include Sociolinguistics, Second Language Acquisition, and Phonetics and Phonology. More specifically, his recent research has focused on an acoustic characterization of Spanish trills, gender assignment to English loanwords by speakers of Spanish in the U.S., and linguistic attitudes towards the use and learning of Spanish among heritage language learners.

Merino, Laura / lmerino

Doctoral student


Laura Merino is a Ph.D. student in the Hispanic Linguistics program at Indiana University. She is interested in varieties of Spanish spoken in México, specifically in Northern Mexico, the U.S.-Mexico border, and the U.S. Southwest. Her research areas include sociolinguistics, SLA, phonology, and pragmatics. 

Michalski, Ian / imichals

Doctoral student


Ian Michalski is a Ph.D. candidate in Hispanic Linguistics. Inspired by his experience studying human migration and working with NGOs in the Caribbean, Ian’s research explores the relationship between the transforming social world and language change, language use and language learning. Situated within the area of contact linguistics and multilingualism, Ian is interested in: Spanish in contact with other languages, pidgins and creoles, syntax, and naturalistic/ un-instructed language acquisition. Current projects include the study of morphosyntax contact features in Yucatan Spanish, migration and language contact in the Caribbean, and the naturalistic acquisition of Spanish by Haitian migrants in the Dominican Republic. In his free time Ian enjoys running, cooking, traveling, and 80s Hair-Metal music.

Milla Muñoz, Ángel / amilla

Doctoral student


Ángel Milla, originally from Seville (Spain), is a Ph.D. Student in the Hispanic Linguistics program. He received his BA in English Language and Literature, and his M.A. in Secondary School Education, Vocational Training and Language Teaching, both from the University of Seville as well as his M.A. in Hispanic Linguistics from Indiana University. His areas of interest include Sociolinguistics with a focus on Peninsular Spanish (namely Andalusian Spanish), Spanish Phonetics and Second Language Acquisition as well as the intersection of these three areas of study. Furthermore, he is interested in Catalan linguistics, more specifically in Catalan Sociolinguistics and Dialectology.

Miranda-Reyes, Odalys / omiranda

Masters student


Odalys Miranda-Reyes is a Hispanic Linguistics M.A. student from Fort Wayne, IN. She received her B.A. in Spanish and her B.A. in Public Relations & Advertising from the University of Southern Indiana. Odalys was a volunteer Spanish Teacher at her local church for 4 months and her interests, as of now, include sociolinguistics, phonology, and second language acquisition. A native Spanish speaker, she loves learning anything and everything about Spanish cultures and the beauty of the Spanish language. 

Mojedano Batel, Andrea / amojedan

Doctoral student


My interests lie primarily in syntax, and how it interacts with meaning and shapes grammar. My research centers on language change, both synchronic and diachronic, as well as language contact, with a focus on the cognitive organization of language. Specific projects that I am currently developing address Spanish in contact with Purépecha, and variation in Spanish object pronouns. I love Bloomington, tacos and dancing.

Pollock, Matthew / mbpolloc

Masters student


Originally from Florida, Matthew is an M.A. student in the Hispanic Linguistics program. He graduated from Auburn University with dual B.A.s in Spanish and English Literature, as well as a minor in Linguistics. During this time, he was exposed to language contact during a semester abroad at the Universidad de Alcalá de Henares. His research interests are sociolinguistics and language acquisition, and he has a specific fascination with code mixing in multilingual settings. Before beginning his graduate studies, he taught English for a year in Hamburg, Germany as a Fulbright English Teaching Assistant. In his spare time, he enjoys visiting unfamiliar cities, hiking down winding mountain paths, and relaxing with a good old paper-based ebook.

Raynor, Eliot / epraynor

Doctoral student


Eliot Raynor is a Ph.D. student in Hispanic Linguistics. He received B.A. degrees in linguistics and Spanish from UNC-Chapel Hill, and an M.A. in Spanish from the University of South Carolina. His main area of research explores pragmatic and sociolinguistic variation along with language contact across three dialect boundaries in northwestern Colombia. He's also looking at the role of novice-native speaker interaction in classroom SLA via a telecollaborative exchange program in partnership with the Universidad de Córdoba in Montería, Colombia. For fun, Eliot watches vintage World Cup soccer matches and dabbles in literary translation.

Sedó, Beatriz / mbsedode

Doctoral student


Beatriz Sedó, originally from Vitoria-Gasteiz (Basque Country), is a Ph.D. Candidate in the Hispanic Linguistics program. She received her B.A. in Translation and Interpreting from the University of Valladolid and her M.A. in Hispanic Linguistics from Indiana University. Her areas of interest include Laboratory Phonology and Sociolinguistics with a focus on Peninsular Spanish, and Second Language Acquisition. Her dissertation topic examines /s/ voicing in the Spanish of the Basque Country. 

Zahler, Sara / szahler

Doctoral student


Sara Zahler is a Ph.D. Candidate in Hispanic Linguistics. Her main interests are Second Language Acquisition, Sociolinguistics and the intersection of the two. Her dissertation will explore the relationship between Individual Differences, such as working memory, and the second language acquisition of variation.

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