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Undergraduate Studies

Undergraduate Course Descriptions: Fall 2007

Spanish Language
Catalan
Portuguese
Literatures in Spanish
Hispanic Linguistics
Hispanic Culture
Individual Readings
Honors Research

Spanish Language

  HISP-S310 Spanish Grammar and Composition (3 credits)

Prerequisite: S275 or equivalent

This course integrates the four basic language skills into both a review of the major points of Spanish grammar and a structured approach to composition. Course work will combine grammar exercises with the writing of compositions of increasing length and complexity. Credit is given for only one of these courses, S310 or S311.

Note: Above class 17285 open to Hutton Honors Students only. See Honors College for on-line permission.

Note: Above class 17286 will be offered in the Global Village-Learning Center in Foster Quad.


HISP-S312 Introduction to Expository Writing in Spanish (3 credits)

Prerequisite: S310 or S311 or equivalent

This course integrates the four basic language skills into a structural approach to composition in Spanish. Some review of selected points of Spanish grammar will be included. Each student will write a weekly composition, increasing in length as the semester progresses. Emphasis will be on correct usage, vocabulary building, and stylistic control.


 HISP-S315 Spanish in the Business World (3 credits)

Prerequisite: S310 or S311 or equivalent

El objetivo de este curso es promocionar el entendimiento cultural internacional en el mundo de los negocios por medio del estudio del lenguaje comercial y del conocimiento de sus códigos y costumbres. Este objetivo se persigue de dos formas. Por un lado, se aspira a familiarizar al estudiante con el lenguaje comercial escrito y hablado y se trabajará con documentos variados -- cartas comerciales, descripciones de trabajo, anuncios, formularios bancarios y de importación y exportación, etc. --. Además, los estudiantes aprenderán a leer, escribir y traducir documentos comerciales y practicarán conversaciones sobre diversas situaciones de negocios. Por otro lado, se introducirá al estudiante en el conocimiento de las costumbres, protocolo y prácticas culturales propias del mundo comercial hispano. Por medio de casos prácticos se analizarán estereotipos culturales y se cuestionarán comportamientos y conductas éticas del comercio internacional. En definitiva, se buscará sensibilizar al estudiante a conocer, entender, respetar o criticar prácticas culturales del mundo de negocios hispano. Este curso se dictará únicamente en español. El prerrequisito de este curso es S310.


HISP-S317 Spanish Conversation and Diction (3 credits)

Prerequisite: S310 or S311 or equivalent

This class meets five times a week. It includes contrastive study of Spanish and English pronunciation. Intensive controlled conversation correlated with readings, reports, debates, and group discussions. S317 may be repeated once for credit. S317 is NOT open to native speakers of Spanish.

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Catalan

HISP-C400 Catalan Language and Culture I (3 credits) LITERATURE

Requisite: Knowledge of another romance language.

An introduction to Catalan culture beginning with the basics of the Catalan language. A solid knowledge of another Romance language is assumed of all students. From this knowledge the course will be an intensive study of the language, geared primarily at reading knowledge, but not limited to it. The course will also set the bases for a cultural overview of Catalonia and the Catalan linguistic area with special attention to the essential differences with the cultures of nation-states.

Students will work with a textbook and CD, by Dolors Badia, a reader, and hand-out materials.

Beginning with the second week, the class will be primarily conducted in Catalan.

There will be bi-weekly quizes, two exams, a presentation, and a final paper.

Note: This course can fulfill the elective 300/400 level requirement for the Spanish major.


HISP-C494  Individual Readings in Catalan Studies  (1-3 credits)                                                    

Prerequisite:  Consent of the department  

By permission only. Call (812) 855-8612.

This course is by permission only.  This course is used only in emergencies pertaining to graduating seniors who are short credit hours for graduation. This course does not count toward any 400-level course needed for the Spanish or Portuguese majors. This course may be repeated once with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

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Portuguese

HISP-P100 Elementary Portuguese I (4 credits)

Introduction to present-day Portuguese, with an emphasis on communication in a highly interactive classroom. The course is designed to provide knowledge of basic grammar and to develop fundamental communication skills--listening, speaking, reading and writing--with particular emphasis on oral expression. Students will be encouraged to speak only Portuguese in class from day one.


HISP- P135 Intensive Portuguese (4 credits)

For students from secondary school placed into the second semester of first‑year study or those with a strong background in Spanish or another Romance Language. Content of P100 and P150 covered at an accelerated pace. See description of P100. Credit not given for both P135 and P150. This course may count for the Spanish major to fulfill the 300/400-level elective requirement.

  1. HISP-P 135 #23497 9:05A-9:55A MTWR BH 240 STAFF

Note: This class meets jointly with P491.


HISP-P200 Second-Year Portuguese I (3 credits)

Prerequisite: P150 or equivalent.

Continuation of P100-P150, with in-depth review of grammar, continued emphasis on communicative exercises, and more intensive study of selected readings.


HISP-P290 Topics in Luso-Brazilian Culture (3 credits)

2 nd Eight Weeks Course, 10/22/2007 – 12/14/2007

Topic: Dictatorship to Democracy: Spain and Portugal in the 20th Century

Taught in English, this course will explore the consequences of political, cultural, and socio-economic isolation of Spain and Portugal from the 1930s to their entry into the European Community in 1986. Topics to be discussed include the rise and consolidation of the authoritarian regimes of Salazar (1928-1974) and Franco (1936-1975), the impact of the dictatorships on cultural production, and the emphasis on an agrarian as opposed to industrial state under the regimes. The course will draw on multiple disciplines, including political science, economics, history, journalism, cultural studies, and film, to examine the representation of the Iberian Peninsula’s isolation through 20th-century literary manifestations, especially poetry, the short story, and the novel. Special emphasis will be given to the Spanish and Portuguese dictatorial regimes confronting the spread of post-war democracy, opposition and democratization of the 1970s, as well as formal European integration in the mid-1980s.

NOTES:

1) This course is offered jointly with GLLC-G210 #27425 and HISP-S 290, #28038.
2) This course does not count toward the Portuguese minor or major since it is taught in English.
3) The course does count for Culture Studies and the Arts and Humanities requirement.


HISP-P311 Advance Grammar and Composition in Portuguese (3 credits)

Prerequisite: P200-P250 or equivalent

An advanced course on Portuguese composition and grammar, designed to refine students’ knowledge of several language skills. Emphasis on writing, with special attention to syntax and vocabulary development and usage. Students will write compositions, increasing in length and complexity as the semester progresses.

Note: This course is offered jointly with HISP-P 492.


HISP-P491 Elementary Portuguese for Graduate Students (3 credits)

An accelerated introduction to the structure of the Portuguese language, covering in one semester content matter usually reviewed in two semesters.

Note: Above section meets jointly with HISP-P 135.


HISP-P492 Reading Portuguese for Graduate Students (3 credits)

Prerequisite: P491 or equivalent.

A continuation of P491.

Note: Above section meets jointly with HISP-P 311.


HISP-P 494 Readings in Luso-Brazilian Literature (1-3 credits)

Prerequisite: Consent of the department.

This course may be repeated for a maximum of up to 6 credit hours as long as each registration covers a different topic.


HISP-P495 Luso-Brazilian Colloquium ( 1-3 credits)

Topic: Several Selves, Numerous Nations: Twentieth-Century Portuguese Literature

This course introduces students to essential writers and literary periods of twentieth-century Portuguese literature. We focus on the tendency in Portuguese literature to react to the crisis of self and modernity with the representation of many different selves rather than with the fragmentation of the individual. Beginning with Fernando Pessoa’s project of creating different poets or heteronyms, the course continues with readings from a literary tradition, in which these themes evolve. With vanguard literary experimentation emerges a need to question the sense of identity in conjunction with an exploration of Portugal’s multicultural history. In this search, self and national identities are multiple and multiplied and hence constantly defining and redefining themselves. The course then examines the modernist heritage and the transition to later post-modern fiction by António Lobo Antunes, Lídia Jorge, and José Saramago, attempting to connect the modernist project with postmodern and postcolonial debates about identity as multicultural and diverse. We will read closely a variety of different genres, including poetry, short story, novella, novel, and essay, and supplement our primary readings with relevant theoretical reflections on the representation of self in literature and culture.

Note: Above class meets jointly with HISP-P 498 and HISP-P 567.


HISP-P498 Portuguese Honors Seminar (3 credits)

This course is for majors who are doing Honors in Portuguese. This HISP-P 498, class number 17161, meets with HISP-P 495, Luso-Brazilian Colloquium.

Note: Above section meets jointly with HISP-P 495 and HISP-P 567.

Contact Karla Allgood at (812) 855-8612 or kallgood@indiana.edu for permission.

See course description for P495, Luso-Brazilian Colloquium below:
HISP-P495 Luso-Brazilian Colloquium (3 credits)

Topic: Several Selves, Numerous Nations: Twentieth-Century Portuguese Literature

This course introduces students to essential writers and literary periods of twentieth-century Portuguese literature. We focus on the tendency in Portuguese literature to react to the crisis of self and modernity with the representation of many different selves rather than with the fragmentation of the individual. Beginning with Fernando Pessoa’s project of creating different poets or heteronyms, the course continues with readings from a literary tradition, in which these themes evolve. With vanguard literary experimentation emerges a need to question the sense of identity in conjunction with an exploration of Portugal’s multicultural history. In this search, self and national identities are multiple and multiplied and hence constantly defining and redefining themselves. The course then examines the modernist heritage and the transition to later post-modern fiction by António Lobo Antunes, Lídia Jorge, and José Saramago, attempting to connect the modernist project with postmodern and postcolonial debates about identity as multicultural and diverse. We will read closely a variety of different genres, including poetry, short story, novella, novel, and essay, and supplement our primary readings with relevant theoretical reflections on the representation of self in literature and culture.


 HISP-P499 Honors Research in Portuguese (3 credits)

Approval of the Director of Portuguese Studies and the Chair of the Honors Committee.

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Literatures in Spanish

HISP-S331 The Hispanic World I (3 credits)

Prerequisite: S310 or S311 or equivalent

redit given for only two of the following: S331, S332, S333

Una visión panorámica de la cultura literaria, histórica y política de América Latina desde el Modernismo hasta nuestros días. Pondremos especialmente énfasis en las características, los límites y la evolución de diferentes géneros, y su confrontación con la realidad socio-política. La asistencia y discusión en clase afectarán la calificación final. Los alumnos harán tres composiciones y un examen parcial. Habrá examen final.

Bibliografía

Jorge Boccanera : La pasión de los poetas ; Sabina Berman: Entre Villa y una mujer desnuda; Gustavo Sainz: Gazapo; Eduardo Galeano:Las venas abiertas de América Latina; Gustavo Sainz: Juegos prohibidos.


 HISP-S331 The Hispanic World I (3 credits)

Prerequisite: S310 or S311 or equivalent

  Credit given for only two of the following: S331, S332, S333

El curso es una introducción al estudio de la literatura contemporánea con textos hispanoamericanos del siglo XX. Las lecturas comprenden varios géneros literarios ― cuentos y relatos breves, novela corta, poesía y teatro ― de autores reconocidos como Isabel Allende, Gabriel García Márquez, Carlos Fuentes, Julio Cortázar y Jorge Luis Borges, entre otros. También se verán dos películas. El objetivo del curso es la lectura, comprensión y análisis literario de los textos poniendo especial énfasis en el contexto histórico, social y cultural.

La asistencia y participación activa en clase, con las lecturas asignadas hechas, es esencial para el buen funcionamiento del curso. El curso se impartirá en español y todos los trabajos y exámenes deberán hacerse en esta lengua. Habrá dos exámenes y tres ensayos analíticos.


 HISP-S331 The Hispanic World I (3 credits)

Prerequisite: S310 or S311 or equivalent

  Credit given for only two of the following: S331, S332, S333

This course will explore the relationship between art, politics, and the representation of national and gendered identity within the context of an introduction to twentieth-century Spanish American literary works. The course is divided into five sections, each of which studies the mechanics of a different literary genre: the novel, short story, drama, essay, and poetry.

Authors read include: Jorge Luis Borges, Julio Cortázar, Rubén Darío, Rosario Ferré, Gabriel García Márquez, Antonio Skármeta, and others.

Goals of this course include: working knowledge of the major literary genres; development of skills for analyzing literary texts; and improvement of the student¹s speaking, writing, listening, and reading abilities.

Course requirements include daily reading assignments and participation, a midterm and final exam, three short papers, homework, and quizzes.

Note: Above section meets with HISP-S 331 Honors class, #22879.


  HISP-S331 The Hispanic World I (3 credits)

Prerequisite: S310 or S311 or equivalent By Permission Only.

Credit given for only two of the following: S331, S332, S333

This course will explore the relationship between art, politics, and the representation of national and gendered identity within the context of an introduction to twentieth-century Spanish American literary works. The course is divided into five sections, each of which studies the mechanics of a different literary genre: the novel, short story, drama, essay, and poetry.

Authors read include: Jorge Luis Borges, Julio Cortázar, Rubén Darío, Rosario Ferré, Gabriel García Márquez, Antonio Skármeta, and others.

Goals of this course include: working knowledge of the major literary genres; development of skills for analyzing literary texts; and improvement of the student¹s speaking, writing, listening, and reading abilities.

Course requirements include daily reading assignments and participation, a midterm and final exam, three short papers, homework, and quizzes.

Note: Above section open to Hutton Honors students only. Obtain on-line permission for above section from Hutton Honors College. Above section meets with another class of HISP S331, class #22646.


HISP-S331: The Hispanic World I (3 credits)

Prerequisite: S310 or S311 or equivalent

Credit given for only two of the following: S331, S332, S333 

Study of Hispanic literature and culture through the analysis and discussion of representative literary works from Spanish America. This course includes an introduction to narrative, poetry, and theater. Taught in Spanish.


 HISP-S331: The Hispanic World I (3 credits)

Prerequisite: S310 or S311 or equivalent

  Credit given for only two of the following: S331, S332, S333

Study of Hispanic literature and culture through the analysis and discussion of representative literary works from Spanish America. This course includes an introduction to narrative, poetry, and theater. Taught in Spanish.


 HISP-S331: The Hispanic World I (3 credits)

Prerequisite: S310 or S311 or equivalent

Credit given for only two of the following: S331, S332, S333 

This course is both an introduction to the literature of Spanish America and an introduction to ways of reading literary texts. As we read examples of the essay, short story, poetry, drama, and the novel, we will develop skills for analyzing each of these different literary genres. We will use these readings to examine the role of writing in the construction of identities, both collective and personal, and we will look at the way that Latin American writers have defined literature’s relationship to politics and culture.

Readings for the course will include one short novel, Gabriel García Marquéz’s Crónica de una muerte anunciada. We will watch at least one film, and will consider the relationship of the cinematic medium to literature. Other readings will be drawn from the work of Horacio Quiroga, Jorge Luis Borges, Juan Rulfo, Julio Cortázar, Rosario Ferré, Rubén Dario, Gertrudis Gómez de Avellaneda, José Martí, Vicente Huidobro, Pablo Neruda, Nicolás Guillén, and Nancy Morejón, among others.

The final grade will be determined on the basis of participation in class discussion, written assignments, three short papers, a mid-term and a final exam.


 HISP-S331 The Hispanic World I (3 credits)

Prerequisites: S310 or S311 or equivalent

Credit given for only two of the following: S331, S332, S333

Study of Hispanic literature and culture through the analysis and discussion of representative literary works from Spanish America. This course includes an introduction to narrative, poetry, and theater. Taught in Spanish.


 HISP-S331 The Hispanic World I (3 credits)

Prerequisite: S310 or S311 or equivalent

Credit given for only two of the following: S331, S332, S333

Study of Hispanic literature and culture through the analysis and discussion of representative literary works from Spanish America. This course includes an introduction to narrative, poetry, and theater. Taught in Spanish.


HISP-S 331 The Hispanic World I (3 credits)

Prerequisite: S310 or equivalent  

Credit given for only two of the following: S331, S332, S333

 This course will provide you with a thorough introduction to the concepts of literary analysis and the poetics of different genres, while at the same time familiarizing you with Latin American literature and culture. We will read an excellent selection of nineteenth- and twentieth-century Spanish-American texts in different genres, including poetry, short stories, essays, a short novel, and a drama. This class is an excellent preparation for upper-level literature courses; we focus on reading texts closely, asking critical and informed questions of them, and considering their cultural, political, and historical contexts. The final grade will be based on class preparation (reading, homework, attendance, quizzes), two short papers (each focusing on a different genre), and a midterm and final exam.

Required Texts


HISP-S 332 The Hispanic World II (3 credits)

Prerequisite: S331 or equivalent  

Credit given for only two of the following: S331, S332, S333  

This section will explore the relationship between men, women, and Spanish society, as seen in representative works from across the centuries. The readings include short stories, a short novel ( San Manuel Bueno, mártir), short plays, a three-act drama ( La casa de Bernarda Alba), and poetry selections. The course grade will be based on class participation, numerous brief writing assignments, 2 hourly exams and a final examination.  


HISP-S332 The Hispanic World II (3 credits)
SUBTITLE:
“What’s love got to do with it?”: Eros in Spanish Literature and Film.

Prerequisite: S331 or equivalent.

Credit given for only two of the following: S331, S332, S333

Building on the knowledge already acquired in S331, this course will further explore the creative mechanics of different types of literary texts (fiction, poetry, theater) and film in Spanish. The object of the course is to provide you with the necessary tools and vocabulary for textual analysis, foster critical thinking and creative engagement with texts, and help you improve your analytical and argumentative writing skills in Spanish. The ultimate goal is to help you become a better, more active, and more sophisticated reader while enhancing your enjoyment of literature and film. Love (in its widest sense: friendship, affection, fondness, passion, desire, sex, etc.) is arguably the most recurring literary topic of all times and we will use it as a general thematic framework for the course. Although usually presented as a universal emotion, love, like literature and film, is also conditioned by cultural, social, and historical factors. As we do our readings, we will pay attention to the cultural construction of eroticism in Spanish literature and film: from an individual emotion to a feeling of solidarity with humankind and a tool for change. As we study a variety of texts, we may reflect upon them as vehicles for expression and representation of love (does writing about love affect the form of what we write? is poetry better suited for love than theater? how is love represented in such different mediums as poetry and film?), and as sites for both contesting and reproducing dominant ideas on nation, religion, race, gender, sexuality, etc. (what role does literature have in perpetuating the image of woman as sexual/love object? is it possible to write about love outside the male and/or heterosexual literary tradition?). Although the topic of love will be a common thread and organizing principle of the materials, it should not be understood as a limit to our interpretations and discussions in class.Class attendance and participation are essential to the success of the course. Assignments may include one in-class presentation, short papers, a midterm and a final exam. The course will be conducted entirely in Spanish.


HISP-S407 Survey of Spanish Literature 1 (3 credits)

Prerequisite: S331 and S332 or equivalent

A panorama of Spanish literature from the Middle Ages through the seventeenth century. The readings will include the Poema de Mio Cid, La Celestina, novellas by Miguel de Cervantes and María de Zayas, plays by Lope de Vega and Calderón, and a selection of poetry by various poets.   Grades will be based on two exams, two papers, and class participation.   The course will be conducted in Spanish.

 


HISP-S470 Women & Hispanic Literature (3 credits)

Prerequisite: S331 and S332 or equivalent

This course examines the role of women in Hispanic letters, as authors, critics and protagonists of literary works. We will look at how women have sought to define themselves in the Hispanic world at various moments in history, either with or against (or both with and against) the prevailing norms of society. Special consideration will be paid to questions about voice and writing, body, desire, sexuality, madness, and debates between essentialism and constructivism. Does what Helene Cixous calls “feminine writing” [l’écriture feminine] exist in the Spanish and Spanish American literary traditions? If so, what does it look like and what are its aims? Works include poetry, short stories and novels, testimonial writing and a film. Possible authors include Sor Juana de la Cruz, Manuela Gorriti, María Luisa Bombal, Delmira Agustini, Alejandra Pizarnik, Nelly Campobello, Elena Poniatowska, Cristina García (Dreaming in Cuban), Carmen Gaite (El cuarto de atrás), Griselda Gambaro, Cristina Peri Rossi, Tomás Eloy Martínez (Santa Evita), and Néstor Perlongher. Secondary readings will include essays on gender, sexuality, and hysteria by Judith Butler, Helen Cixous, Sigmund Freud, Elaine Showalter, Luce Irigaray, Julia Kristeva and Josefina Ludmer. Evaluation based on class participation, short response papers and a final research project.


HISP-S473 Hispanic Literature & Literary Theory (3 credits)

Prerequisite: S331 and S332 or equivalent.

This course will focus on the study of Hispanic literature through concepts of literary theory. By focusing on these concepts, however, we will not seek to turn the reading of literary works into a mere technical activity, but to expand our interpretive imaginations and thereby deepen the experience of reading. Among the theoretical-literary topics which will concern us will include magic, history, the sublime and the unconscious, and the relation of these topics to problems of narrative, figural language and image in the specificities of the Hispanic literary context. Our readings will include a wide range of works by Hispanic American and Spanish poets and narrators from the early modern period to the present, including Cervantes, Góngora, Sor Juana, Galdós, José María Heredia, Gertrudis Gómez de Avellaneda, Rubén Darío, César Vallejo, Xavier Villaurrutia, Adelaida García Morales, Juan Marsé and Daína Chaviano. Along with these writers, we will consider theories of literature in selections from the writings of Plato, Aristotle, Nietzsche, Saussure, Benjamin, Derrida, Barthes, de Man and Kristeva, among others.

Note: Above section meets jointly with HISP-S 498 Honors, #17310.


HISP-S495 Hispanic Colloquium (3 credits)

Prerequisite: S331 and S332 or equivalent.

 Topic: Faulkner and Spanish American Writers

This course examines Spanish American authors’ readings and rewritings of William Faulkner. In addition to Faulkner, we will read works by Rosario Ferré, Carlos Fuentes, Gabriel García Márquez, Juan Carlos Onetti, Juan Rulfo, and Mario Vargas Llosa. We will focus in particular on the authors’ reworkings and appropriations of Absalom, Absalom! and “A Rose for Emily.” We will examine representations of the family and how these are affected by the U.S. South’s racial, sexual, and gender discourses. We will also study the transformations in the representation of time, and the repudiation of notions of linearity, causality, and chronological order as part of efforts at rewriting regional— U.S. Southern and Spanish American—history. We ask just what it was about Faulkner and his depiction of the U.S. South that appealed to Spanish American authors who were just then beginning to achieve international fame. Course will be taught in Spanish.


 HISP-S498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)

Prerequisite: S331 and S332 or equivalent

This course is for majors who are doing Honors in Spanish. This HISP-S 498, #17310 meets with HISP-S 473 Hispanic Literature & Literary Theory. If you are leaning toward Literature for your background on your honors thesis, you may want to consider taking this HISP-S 498 course.

Contact Karla Allgood in BH 844 for permission or e-mail kallgood@indiana.edu.

Descriptions for HISP-S 473 follows:
HISP-S473 Hispanic Literature & Literary Theory (3 credits)

Prerequisite: S331 and S332 or equivalent.

This course will focus on the study of Hispanic literature through concepts of literary theory. By focusing on these concepts, however, we will not seek to turn the reading of literary works into a mere technical activity, but to expand our interpretive imaginations and thereby deepen the experience of reading. Among the theoretical-literary topics which will concern us will include magic, history, the sublime and the unconscious, and the relation of these topics to problems of narrative, figural language and image in the specificities of the Hispanic literary context. Our readings will include a wide range of works by Hispanic American and Spanish poets and narrators from the early modern period to the present, including Cervantes, Góngora, Sor Juana, Galdós, José María Heredia, Gertrudis Gómez de Avellaneda, Rubén Darío, César Vallejo, Xavier Villaurrutia, Adelaida García Morales, Juan Marsé and Daína Chaviano. Along with these writers, we will consider theories of literature in selections from the writings of Plato, Aristotle, Nietzsche, Saussure, Benjamin, Derrida, Barthes, de Man and Kristeva, among others.


HISP-S498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)

Prerequisite: S331 and S332 or equivalent

This course is for majors who are doing Honors in Spanish. This HISP-S 498, #17310 meets with HISP-S 473 Hispanic Literature & Literary Theory. If you are leaning toward Literature for your background on your honors thesis, you may want to consider taking this HISP-S 498 course.

Contact Karla Allgood in BH 844 for permission or e-mail kallgood@indiana.edu.

Descriptions for HISP-S 473 follows:
HISP-S473Hispanic Literature & Literary Theory (3 credits)

Prerequisite: S331 and S332 or equivalent.

This course will focus on the study of Hispanic literature through concepts of literary theory. By focusing on these concepts, however, we will not seek to turn the reading of literary works into a mere technical activity, but to expand our interpretive imaginations and thereby deepen the experience of reading. Among the theoretical-literary topics which will concern us will include magic, history, the sublime and the unconscious, and the relation of these topics to problems of narrative, figural language and image in the specificities of the Hispanic literary context. Our readings will include a wide range of works by Hispanic American and Spanish poets and narrators from the early modern period to the present, including Cervantes, Góngora, Sor Juana, Galdós, José María Heredia, Gertrudis Gómez de Avellaneda, Rubén Darío, César Vallejo, Xavier Villaurrutia, Adelaida García Morales, Juan Marsé and Daína Chaviano. Along with these writers, we will consider theories of literature in selections from the writings of Plato, Aristotle, Nietzsche, Saussure, Benjamin, Derrida, Barthes, de Man and Kristeva, among others.

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Hispanic Linguistics

HISP-S326 Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics (3 credits)  

Prerequisite: S310 or equivalent. 

Introduces the basic concepts of Hispanic linguistics and establishes the background for the future application of linguistic principles. The course surveys linguistic properties in Spanish, including phonology, morphology, and syntax. Additional introductory material on historical linguistics, second language acquisition, semantics, and sociolinguistics will be included. This course carries N & M credit.


HISP-S326 Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics (3 credits)  

Prerequisites: S310 or equivalent.  

Introduces the basic concepts of Hispanic linguistics and establishes the background for the future application of linguistic principles. The course surveys linguistic properties in Spanish, including phonology, morphology, and syntax. Additional introductory material on historical linguistics, second language acquisition, semantics, and sociolinguistics will be included. This course carries N & M credit.


 HISP-S326 Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics (3 credits)

Prerequisites: S310 or equivalent.

 Course description:

This course is an introduction to basic concepts and methodology used in Spanish Linguistics. The main goal of the course is to provide students with the opportunity to learn the tools of linguistic analysis and to apply them to the study of Spanish. Attention is given to different levels of analysis in linguistics including phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics as well as language variation. Class time is divided between lecture, problem-solving exercises, and discussion. Evaluation is based on quizzes, exams, class participation, and homework. This course carries N & M credit.

Goals:

After successful completion of this course, the student will:

Note to majors who started at IU prior to Fall 2003: HISP-S 326 can fulfill the 400-level linguistics requirement.


HISP-S326 Introduction to Hispanic Linguistics (3 credits)

Prerequisites: S310 or equivalent.

Introduces the basic concepts of Hispanic linguistics and establishes the background for the future application of linguistic principles. The course surveys linguistic properties in Spanish, including phonology, morphology, and syntax. Additional introductory material on historical linguistics, second language acquisition, semantics, and sociolinguistics will be included. This course carries N & M credit.

Note to majors who started at IU prior to Fall 2003: HISP-S 326 can fulfill the 400-level linguistics requirement.


HISP-S425 Spanish Phonetics (3 credits)

Prerequisite: S310 or equivalent for those students who matriculated prior to Summer 2003.

S326 for those students who matriculated Summer 2003 or after.

This course studies the sound system of Spanish.  Topics include the articulatory system, the characteristics and description of Spanish sounds, the patterns of Spanish sounds, the historical development of modern Spanish from Latin and the variation of the Spanish sound system.  Attention will also be given to differences between Spanish and English sounds.  While not a primary goal of the course, a deeper understanding of how the Spanish sound system works should help students obtain a more native-like pronunciation.  Course evaluation is based on homework assignments, a class project and presentation, and two exams.

Note: Above section meets jointly with HISP-S 498 honors, #17311.


HISP-S428 Applied Spanish Linguistics (3 credits)

Prerequisite: S310 or equivalent for those students who matriculated prior to Summer 2003.

S326 for those students who matriculated Summer 2003 or after.

The objective of this course is to provide the student with a general overview of the field of Applied Linguistics and its application to Spanish. In order to do so, theoretical concepts in various branches of linguistics including phonology, morphology, syntax, and pragmatics will be reviewed. In addition, we will consider the practical application of this knowledge to second language acquisition from the learner’s perspective, specifically in relation to the acquisition of Spanish by native speakers of English. The course will focus on allowing students to developing a more thorough understanding of the structure of Spanish in order to enhance their pedagogical effectiveness in the second language classroom. In order to achieve this objective, we will review various aspects of the grammar with specific attention to the acquisition of grammatical points that are traditionally problematic for students of Spanish, including: object pronouns, the aspectual distinction (perfect vs. imperfect), the mood distinction (subjunctive vs. indicative), and ser vs. estar, among other topics. In the final component of the course, pragmatics, issues related to focus on form and focus on function will be presented. Students will study cross-cultural differences in various speech acts and will be equipped with tools for enabling their future students to achieve sociocultural competence in the second language classroom.


HISP-S498 Readings for Honors (3 credits)

Prerequisite: Prerequisite: S310 or equivalent for those students who matriculated prior to Summer 2003.

S326 for those students who matriculated Summer 2003 or after.

This course is for majors who are doing Honors in Spanish. This HISP-S 498, #17311 meets with HISP-S 425 Spanish Phonetics. If you are leaning toward Linguistics for your background on your honors thesis, you may want to consider taking this HISP-S 498 course.

Contact Karla Allgood in BH 844 for permission or e-mail kallgood@indiana.edu.

Descriptions for HISP-S 425 follows:  
HISP-S425 Spanish Phonetics (3 credits)

Prerequisite: S310 or equivalent for those students who matriculated prior to Summer 2003.

S326 for those students who matriculated Summer 2003 or after.

This course studies the sound system of Spanish.  Topics include the articulatory system, the characteristics and description of Spanish sounds, the patterns of Spanish sounds, the historical development of modern Spanish from Latin and the variation of the Spanish sound system.  Attention will also be given to differences between Spanish and English sounds.  While not a primary goal of the course, a deeper understanding of how the Spanish sound system works should help students obtain a more native-like pronunciation.  Course evaluation is based on homework assignments, a class project and presentation, and two exams.

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Hispanic Culture

HISP-S275 Introduction to Hispanic Culture (3 credits)

Prerequisite: S250 or equivalent.

This course serves as a bridge between the S200 and S300 levels and is designed to increase proficiency in Spanish in the four skills areas (listening, reading, writing, and speaking) through reading, writing, and discussion of Hispanic culture. S275 also serves to review and expand upon Spanish grammar elements studied at the 100 through 200 levels. The format of the course includes a discussion of readings and assigned topics, focused writing, and the writing of compositions. Evaluation is based on quizzes, tests, compositions, homework, participation, and oral presentations. This course is required for minors and majors unless the student tested into the 300 level. Course conducted in Spanish. See Schedule of Classes for class numbers, times, days, and rooms.

NOTE: Students who test out or place above S275 will need to replace its 3 credits with an extra course at the S300 or S400 level.


HISP-S290 Topics in Hispanic Culture ( 3 credits)

2nd Eight Weeks Course, 10/22/2007 – 12/14/2007

Topic: Dictatorship to Democracy: Spain and Portugal in the 20th Century

Taught in English, this course will explore the consequences of political, cultural, and socio-economic isolation of Spain and Portugal from the 1930s to their entry into the European Community in 1986. Topics to be discussed include the rise and consolidation of the authoritarian regimes of Salazar (1928-1974) and Franco (1936-1975), the impact of the dictatorships on cultural production, and the emphasis on an agrarian as opposed to industrial state under the regimes. The course will draw on multiple disciplines, including political science, economics, history, journalism, cultural studies, and film, to examine the representation of the Iberian Peninsula’s isolation through 20th-century literary manifestations, especially poetry, the short story, and the novel. Special emphasis will be given to the Spanish and Portuguese dictatorial regimes confronting the spread of post-war democracy, opposition and democratization of the 1970s, as well as formal European integration in the mid-1980s.

NOTES:

1) This course is offered jointly with GLLC-G210 #27425 and HISP-P 290, #28041.
2) This course does not count toward the Spanish minor or major since it is taught in English.
3) The course does count for Culture Studies and the Arts and Humanities requirement.


HISP-S411 SPAIN: The Cultural Context (3 credits) CULTURE

Prerequisite: S275 or equivalent for those students who matriculated prior to Fall 2001.

S331 or equivalent for those students who matriculated Fall 2001 or after.

This course presents a cultural history of Spain, from the early times to the present, with an emphasis on contemporary society. The purpose is to study the culture of the past for a better understanding of the present Spanish society. This panoramic view will concentrate on the study of political, economic, and historical aspects. In addition, we will examine diverse cultural artifacts (art, architecture, literature, music, journalism and contemporary films) to explore the heterogeneity of Spain. It will be conducted entirely in Spanish. Grades will be based in active participation, assignments, oral presentations, several exams, and a final paper.

Note: This course carries culture studies credit.


HISP-S412 Spanish America: The Cultural Context (3 credits) CULTURE

Prerequisite: S275 or equivalent for those students who matriculated prior to Fall 2001.

S331 or equivalent for those students who matriculated Fall 2001 or after.

Topic: “Representation and Violence in Spanish America”

In this course we will examine various forms of cultural production (written, visual and uses of physical space) in the context of institutionalized violence in Spanish America during the 20 th and early 21 st centuries. We will ask how these cultural forms seek to remember, convey and/or intervene in structures of political repression, economic domination and psychological abjection. Course material will be selected from three geographic and historical contexts: the Mexican revolution of 1910-1920, the Southern Cone military dictatorships of the 1970’s and 80’s, and the contemporary drug wars in the Andes and along the Mexican-US border. Cultural texts will include films, photographic displays, paintings, plans for a “museum of memory,” short stories, and short or medium-length novels. We will pay especially close attention to the specificities of cultural form, asking how it is that film, painting, music, fiction and architectural design respond in their own ways to experiences of violence. Evaluation based on class participation, short writing assignments, presentations, and a final research project.

Note: This course carries culture studies credit.


HISP-S413 Hispanic Culture in the U.S. (3 credits) CULTURE

Prerequisite: S275 or equivalent for those students who matriculated prior to Fall 2001.

S331 or equivalent for those students who matriculated Fall 2001 or after.

This class will explore the impact of Hispanic culture on the United States, as well as the interplay of  the English and Spanish-speaking phenomena already existing in American society.

The course will emphasize a close reading of the essay as a means of approaching Hispanic culture, particularly as it permeates the culture of the U.S.

Family, religion, the Hispanic sense of community, cultural identity, Latino humor, and other cultural aspects of tSpanish-speaking society in the U.S.  will be profiled.  Readings taken from such writers as Octavio Paz, Tino Villanueva, Richard Rodríguez, Gloria Anzaldúa and others will be highlighted.

There will be one midterm paper and a more extensive final paper.  The class will do written exercises and oral presentations, all in Spanish.  Though some of the readings will be in English, the class will be conducted in Spanish.

Note: This course carries culture studies credit

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Individual Readings

HISP-S494 Individual Readings in Hispanic Studies (1-3 credits)

Prerequisite: Consent of the department. Permission required, call (812) 855-8612.

This course is by authorization only. This course is used only in emergencies pertaining to graduating seniors who are short credit hours for graduation. This course may be repeated once with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours. It may not be used as one of the course requirements for the major or minor.


Honors Research

HISP-S499 Honors Research in Spanish ( 1-3 credits)

Prerequisite: Approval of the honors advisor. BY PERMISSION ONLY. Call (812) 855-8612

Majors doing honors in Spanish would register for this class after they have completed S498 and while they are writing their honors thesis. Contact Karla Allgood via email at kallgood@indiana.edu or see in person in BH 844 for permission arrangements.

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